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The Science Lounge

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xianjiro
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The Science Lounge

#1

Post by xianjiro » May 23rd, 2018, 2:48 am

A place to talk about things scientific and the state of science in today's world.
Know what this is?Show
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#2

Post by 3eyes » May 23rd, 2018, 1:28 pm

Aw, let's guess first.

Flour tortilla with mustard, mole sauce, artichoke prickles, pirouetting ant, and Cambrian hyolith.
Spoiler: click to toggleShow
well at least the hyolith was on the right track. We've come a long way since I wrote my heretical high school term paper on the (gasp!) evolution of the bird back in 19-aught-52.
Last edited by 3eyes on May 23rd, 2018, 5:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#3

Post by Knaldskalle » June 3rd, 2018, 7:42 pm

In case you missed it, there's an important poll/discussion about the future of our forum hosting right here:

viewtopic.php?t=3764&1/

Please read and vote, we want to know what you think!
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#4

Post by Nopros » June 3rd, 2018, 7:45 pm

Stop spamming, Knald.

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#5

Post by maxwelldeux » June 3rd, 2018, 7:58 pm

Nopros on Jun 3 2018, 01:45:41 PM wrote:Stop spamming, Knald.
I mean, it does answer the question of "how is your post count that high?" tehe :cowboy:

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#6

Post by 3eyes » June 3rd, 2018, 8:35 pm

we're supposed to make a scientific analysis of the poll results with forensics, algorithms and things.
algorithm:Show
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#7

Post by xianjiro » June 4th, 2018, 1:32 am

Knaldskalle on Jun 3 2018, 01:42:05 PM wrote:In case you missed it, there's an important poll/discussion about the future of our forum hosting right here:

viewtopic.php?t=3764&1/

Please read and vote, we want to know what you think!
:folded: thanks for using the Science Lounge to pimp your unscientific poll :tongue:

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#8

Post by Carmel1379 » June 10th, 2018, 6:48 pm

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#9

Post by hurluberlu » June 10th, 2018, 7:13 pm

1927, so many names that made history... who would we put on the picture today ?

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#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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#10

Post by Carmel1379 » June 10th, 2018, 7:20 pm

hurluberlu on Jun 10 2018, 01:13:59 PM wrote:who would we put on the picture today ?
No white men, that's for sure...

...except maybe James Cameron.

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#11

Post by xianjiro » November 16th, 2018, 5:03 pm

Rare microbes lead scientists to discover new branch on the tree of life
Based on the genetic analysis they've done so far, the Dalhousie team has determined that hemimastigotes are unique and different enough from other organisms to form their own "supra-kingdom" — a grouping so big that animals and fungi, which have their own kingdoms, are considered similar enough to be part of the same supra-kingdom.

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#12

Post by maxwelldeux » November 16th, 2018, 6:05 pm

xianjiro wrote:
November 16th, 2018, 5:03 pm
Rare microbes lead scientists to discover new branch on the tree of life
Based on the genetic analysis they've done so far, the Dalhousie team has determined that hemimastigotes are unique and different enough from other organisms to form their own "supra-kingdom" — a grouping so big that animals and fungi, which have their own kingdoms, are considered similar enough to be part of the same supra-kingdom.
That is the coolest thing I've read in a long time.

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#13

Post by 3eyes » November 16th, 2018, 9:00 pm

Yes, very interesting. Micropaleontology was in its infancy when I studied geology. (I realize this isn't paleontology yet, but still)
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#14

Post by xianjiro » November 17th, 2018, 12:34 am

you're welcome! I thought it was pretty cool/interesting as well. It's not often we get this kind of breakthrough anymore and a great reminder that as much of this planet as we've explored, there are still things we haven't found/don't understand.

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#15

Post by Lakigigar » November 17th, 2018, 7:14 pm

They also found a new huge crater... that crashed on our Earth 3 million years ago to 12.000 years ago, and had a diameter of 19km, and is one of the 20 largest asteroid craters found on Earth, under the Greenland Ice Cap... and the largest one of the last 30 million years. It's so huge and an important discovery that it might completely rewritten human history (esp. before 8000BC). Now it's important to exactly date this asteroid, but i think it's indeed likely to be one that crashed 12.000 to 13000 years ago, causing the Younger Dryas, a small extinction wave, maybe some Biblic flood stories (a possibility) and the Clovis Culture and all humans in North-America might have gone extinct, together with some other North-American megafauna, and it might have drastically reduced the population of mammoths as well (at the end of the Ice Age).

If that theory is correct, i'm almost certain that the last 15.000 years are the deadliest 15.000 years since the K-Pg event (the event that killed the Dinosaurs). It's not like asteroid impacts like these are uncommon or cause mass-extinctions, but it's the combination of several factors that will make this event classify as a mass-extinction event: human activity, human overhunting, a period of rapid climate change (because: the earth usually has glacial and interglacial episodes, but in cold ages, those difference between the climate can vary a lot on a short time interval (because of positive feedback mechanisms like ice albedo).

Younger Dryas impact hypothesis

-> this was a controversial theory, but they might have nailed it.

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#16

Post by Knaldskalle » November 17th, 2018, 7:26 pm

Lakigigar wrote:
November 17th, 2018, 7:14 pm
They also found a new huge crater... that crashed on our Earth 3 million years ago to 12.000 years ago, and had a diameter of 19km, and is one of the 20 largest asteroid craters found on Earth, under the Greenland Ice Cap... and the largest one of the last 30 million years. It's so huge and an important discovery that it might completely rewritten human history (esp. before 8000BC). Now it's important to exactly date this asteroid, but i think it's indeed likely to be one that crashed 12.000 to 13000 years ago, causing the Younger Dryas, a small extinction wave, maybe some Biblic flood stories (a possibility) and the Clovis Culture and all humans in North-America might have gone extinct, together with some other North-American megafauna, and it might have drastically reduced the population of mammoths as well (at the end of the Ice Age).

If that theory is correct, i'm almost certain that the last 15.000 years are the deadliest 15.000 years since the K-Pg event (the event that killed the Dinosaurs). It's not like asteroid impacts like these are uncommon or cause mass-extinctions, but it's the combination of several factors that will make this event classify as a mass-extinction event: human activity, human overhunting, a period of rapid climate change (because: the earth usually has glacial and interglacial episodes, but in cold ages, those difference between the climate can vary a lot on a short time interval (because of positive feedback mechanisms like ice albedo).

Younger Dryas impact hypothesis

-> this was a controversial theory, but they might have nailed it.
I actually heard about this a year and a half ago. A friend of mine knows one of the people who discovered the crater.
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#17

Post by Knaldskalle » November 17th, 2018, 7:39 pm

xianjiro wrote:
November 17th, 2018, 12:34 am
you're welcome! I thought it was pretty cool/interesting as well. It's not often we get this kind of breakthrough anymore and a great reminder that as much of this planet as we've explored, there are still things we haven't found/don't understand.
I have no doubt that we'll establish new "kingdoms" as we continue to explore the planet. In the old days it was "plant or animal". Then came fungi and bacteria (prokaryotes) and then came the archaea (aka. archaebacteria, a separate grouping of prokaryotes). It's not unreasonable to assume that descendants of early life are still around and that our understanding of the "tree of life" is fairly limited. I wouldn't be surprised if it turns out to be a many-branched "bush of life" of which we currently only know 6 branches.
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#18

Post by PirateJenny » February 26th, 2019, 10:19 am

https://demonstrations.wolfram.com/TheHairyBallTheorem/

Hairy Ball theorem - "you can't comb a hairy ball flat without creating a cowlick" - Splat!

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#19

Post by 3eyes » February 26th, 2019, 4:13 pm

PirateJenny wrote:
February 26th, 2019, 10:19 am
https://demonstrations.wolfram.com/TheHairyBallTheorem/

Hairy Ball theorem - "you can't comb a hairy ball flat without creating a cowlick" - Splat!
Clearly baldness has its advantages.
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#20

Post by PirateJenny » February 26th, 2019, 5:09 pm

3eyes wrote:
February 26th, 2019, 4:13 pm
PirateJenny wrote:
February 26th, 2019, 10:19 am
https://demonstrations.wolfram.com/TheHairyBallTheorem/

Hairy Ball theorem - "you can't comb a hairy ball flat without creating a cowlick" - Splat!
Clearly baldness has its advantages.
To answer as a Fermi Question (scientific estimate). How long before the last one falls out? :lol:

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#21

Post by Carmel1379 » February 27th, 2019, 9:40 pm

PirateJenny wrote:
February 26th, 2019, 10:19 am
https://demonstrations.wolfram.com/TheHairyBallTheorem/

Hairy Ball theorem - "you can't comb a hairy ball flat without creating a cowlick" - Splat!
Image



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#22

Post by PirateJenny » March 17th, 2019, 12:07 pm

Scientists have reversed time using a quantum computer.

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-styl ... 20516.html

I've always thought time is going to be multidirectional at a quantum level, though if you tried it on a human we'd probably explode. :circle:

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#23

Post by Carmel1379 » March 17th, 2019, 10:04 pm

PirateJenny wrote:
March 17th, 2019, 12:07 pm
Scientists have reversed time using a quantum computer.

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-styl ... 20516.html

I've always thought time is going to be multidirectional at a quantum level, though if you tried it on a human we'd probably explode. :circle:
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/6131 ... -computer/

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#24

Post by PirateJenny » March 18th, 2019, 1:32 pm

Ah damn, :lol: It's still interesting. It's thought that in black holes time is still very unpredictable.

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#25

Post by 3eyes » March 22nd, 2019, 8:42 pm

After my husband had been a subscriber to Science (AAAS Journal) for 50 years they gave him a free lifetime subscription. He doesn't read it but I do, sort of (the non-technical parts).

This week it was hypothesized that hunter-gatherers had no overbite and so couldn't pronounce v & f'; with the rise of farming, people ate softer food and developed an overbite, and v & f entered their languages.

cience.sciencemag.org/content/363/6432/eaav3218

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/arc ... cs/584950/
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#27

Post by Carmel1379 » March 23rd, 2019, 2:11 am

PirateJenny wrote:
March 18th, 2019, 1:32 pm
Ah damn, :lol: It's still interesting. It's thought that in black holes time is still very unpredictable.
The problem is semantic/signifier overdoing, and it's not just media sensationalisation and misconstruing, but the physicists themselves who often struggle with interpreting and phrasing experimental results, leading to many inflated ideas. Correct phrasing is a major part of writing papers and if experimental outcomes are phrased in a lurid fashion, the actual signified result is most likely lost in translation, ill-described, dramatically exaggerated, or just plainly misapprehended. And obviously journalists aren't physicists, so they can't proof-read anything even if they wanted to.

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#28

Post by PirateJenny » March 23rd, 2019, 5:47 pm

Carmel1379 wrote:
March 23rd, 2019, 2:11 am
PirateJenny wrote:
March 18th, 2019, 1:32 pm
Ah damn, :lol: It's still interesting. It's thought that in black holes time is still very unpredictable.
The problem is semantic/signifier overdoing, and it's not just media sensationalisation and misconstruing, but the physicists themselves who often struggle with interpreting and phrasing experimental results, leading to many inflated ideas. Correct phrasing is a major part of writing papers and if experimental outcomes are phrased in a lurid fashion, the actual signified result is most likely lost in translation, ill-described, dramatically exaggerated, or just plainly misapprehended. And obviously journalists aren't physicists, so they can't proof-read anything even if they wanted to.
Yeah you're right. That makes sense. Most of the science doesn't really make much sense to me at a deeper lever so it's easier to get misled. From what I've read the quantum level is where it's all kicking off though?

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#29

Post by Carmel1379 » April 10th, 2019, 1:44 pm

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#30

Post by joachimt » April 10th, 2019, 2:08 pm

Is that the first photo of a black hole?
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#31

Post by Carmel1379 » April 10th, 2019, 2:16 pm

joachimt wrote:
April 10th, 2019, 2:08 pm
Is that the first photo of a black hole?
Right. Apparently it has about 6,5 billion times the mass of the Sun and is located 55 million light-years from Earth.

https://eventhorizontelescope.org/

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#32

Post by xianjiro » July 14th, 2020, 8:08 pm

- cool NEOWISE vid from ISS (the comet doesn't appear until about the 3 minute mark and it emerges from behind the planet)

this should be an official check! lol

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#33

Post by Armoreska » July 14th, 2020, 8:16 pm

Nice graphics. But there was a comment on youtube that said the earth was flat.
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viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1434
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#34

Post by xianjiro » July 14th, 2020, 8:19 pm

I should have also shared this link earlier - it gives some interesting background as the comet isn't the only celestial phenomena in the vid

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