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Which Films Did You See Last Week? Week 17, 2021

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kongs_speech
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Which Films Did You See Last Week? Week 17, 2021

#1

Post by kongs_speech »

Hi everyone and welcome to the first proper installment of the "Which Films Did You See Last Week?" thread as hosted by your promising young princess trapped in the body of an ogre. Last week, we had a bit of a kerfuffle and I just threw something together at the last minute. I promised to do better, so here we are.

"Please share with us which films you saw last week. It would be great if you could include some comments on each film. It would be awesome if you could also take some time to comment on everyone else's viewings. Please also note that this is intended as a movie discussion thread, not a large image posting thread. Having too many large images makes this thread difficult to navigate through. If you wish to include more than five images in a reply, please use spoiler tags - [ spoiler ][/ spoiler ] - to hide extra images." - sol

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kongs_films

An American Werewolf in London (1981, John Landis)

An American Werewolf in London blends horror and comedy so effectively that I can't fathom anyone hating it. Every component of the film is crafted with thought and precision, starting with the opening needle drop -- "Blue Moon" by Bobby Vinton. All through the movie, the soundtrack consists of songs with the word "moon" in the title, playfully mocking David's predicament. The makeup work by Rick Baker, which won the first-ever competitive Oscar in the category, is arguably some of the greatest ever. Werewolves and the undead are presented in imaginatively gruesome detail that could never be rivaled by today's finest computer effects. Films seldom get more entertaining, and I'm happy to have very belatedly joined its massive following. 4.5/5

River’s Edge (1986, Tim Hunter)

River's Edge is not necessarily a good film. That's quite alright. In refusing to color inside the lines, it aims instead for greatness, and in that ambition, it largely succeeds. It depicts adolescence, and life in general, in the bleakest manner possible, yet it lacks any hints of a sensationalist take on morality. It is a disturbing film about disturbed people, none of whom will be okay after the credits roll. River's Edge has a soundtrack consisting of various heavy bands. It does not, however, feature the punk song with the title that best summarizes its central outlook: "No Future." 4/5

Twenty Years Later (1984, Eduardo Coutinho)

Eduardo Coutinho's documentary Twenty Years Later is very well-made and tells a deeply human story that is infuriating in the sense of how a man was assassinated for trying to help the poor, which led to his family being completely fractured by his death. It's all presented in a highly cinematic manner and remains an important statement regarding fascism and political evil. 4/5

Accident (1967, Joseph Losey)

Told primarily through flashbacks, Joseph Losey's Accident is a gripping drama surrounding an Oxford professor whose midlife crisis transforms into something worse when a fatal car wreck occurs. Though it blurs its timeline to create a disorienting effect, its bleakness towards romance and sexuality is crystal clear. 4/5

The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946, Tay Garnett)

Now that I have finally seen the first Hollywood version of The Postman Always Rings Twice, I am confident in saying that it is considerably better than Bob Rafelson's remake. Tay Garnett's film is, of course, less salacious, yet it needs no explicit material in order to be thoroughly grimy. The movie refreshingly avoids the moralizing prevalent in the Hays Code era -- at least until laying it on very thick in a cheesy finale that feels tacked on by request of censors. The plot twists are intelligently deployed and the leads have excellent chemistry. Lana Turner is perfectly cast as a bombshell capable of convincing anyone to do anything. She and John Garfield keep their characters human despite the horrible acts they commit. Remove the last scene and the film would be top-shelf noir. As it stands, it remains excellent entertainment. 4/5

Pirates (1986, Roman Polanski)

Pirates is messy, sure, but it's also a blast. Far more engaging than the disaster it has been considered since its release, the film stars Walter Matthau as charismatically sleazy pirate Captain Red, with Chris Campion as his comparatively decent French sidekick Jean-Baptiste. Aside from a couple of cheap effects, the film has a beautiful sense of atmosphere, with the ship designs and Oscar-nominated costume work being especially praiseworthy. Between the high production values and the infectious (possibly in more ways than one) joy of Matthau hamming it up with his peg leg, I had a very fun time. Is it the worst Polanski? Not a chance, because Bitter Moon exists. It's also an obvious influence on Pirates of the Caribbean. 3.5/5

The Ninth Configuration (1980, William Peter Blatty)

Blatty didn't need an experienced director in order to make a better film than The Exorcist -- he did it himself with his directorial debut, The Ninth Configuration. The religious themes and exploration of trauma cut deeper than those of his more famous script, perhaps more effectively explored in a psychodrama than supernatural horror. At times wickedly funny, it shifts towards extremely bleak dramatic territory as it progresses, capturing a tone that is entirely its own. It is a much visually richer film than The Exorcist, filled with symbolism and unforgettable imagery. In a highly surreal way, it wrestles with forgiveness, sacrifice and the forever-dueling natures of good and evil. Though the plot twist may not seem groundbreaking now, that is only because it has been emulated. 4.5/5

The Bad and the Beautiful (1952, Vincente Minnelli)

The cynicism that The Bad and the Beautiful harbors towards Hollywood is shocking coming from someone who, at the time, was among its elite class. In a clever story structure, Minnelli utilizes flashbacks to tell the story of a harsh, opportunistic Hollywood producer via three industry professionals whose experiences with him have been both a blessing and a curse. Through his relationships with these very different people, we get a full picture of his amoral character. The ensemble is strong, with Kirk Douglas and Lana Turner particularly mining the most from a perceptive script. It is peculiar, however, that Gloria Grahame took home the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her role as the screenwriter's wife, having less than 10 minutes of screentime and doing nothing all that noteworthy. While done in the style of a melodrama, the film offers an unusually frank portrait of Hollywood toxicity, 65 years prior to the #MeToo movement. 4/5

Peppermint Candy (1999, Lee Chang-dong)

In reverse chronological order, Peppermint Candy depicts key episodes from the life of a man who has just committed suicide, a series of personal and career traumas that come more clearly into focus as the timeline travels further backwards. This review is intentionally vague because the story is best experienced going in cold. Lee Chang-dong's film is an emotionally eviscerating deep-dive into the reasons people are pushed to take their own lives. While far from an easy viewing, it carries immense power and should not be missed. 4.5/5

Godzilla vs. Kong (2021, Adam Wingard)

Maddeningly, Godzilla vs. Kong has doubled down on my primary gripe with the 2014 Godzilla, which is that the film is primarily about dull human characters and does not feature enough badass monster action. Even the fights that do occur in this sorry sequel are little more than tedious CGI wankery. This thing is horribly bloated and has no idea what it ought to be. The concept is so simple that it seems Adam Wingard and Co. have overthought it. Just have a giant monkey punch a giant lizard for about 90 minutes and call it a day. How do you manage to fuck that up? Honestly, what happened to Wingard's career after The Guest? (By the way, as a Kong, I feel obligated to inform you that I would beat 'Zilla's bitch ass, anytime anywhere.) 1.5/5

Flirting with Disaster (1996, David O. Russell)

One of the most effective screwball comedies made post-1940s, David O. Russell's Flirting with Disaster is irreverently chaotic and dripping with wit. As wacky as it is, the film also has a huge heart, never allowing itself to become mean-spirited. It is unfortunate that Russell gravitated more towards Oscar bait later in his career, because this '90s gem that put him on the map is a near-perfect farce of continually escalating mayhem. 4.5/5

Nenette and Boni (1996, Claire Denis)

Claire Denis' Nenette and Boni is a tense, unsentimental exploration of the reunion between estranged teenage siblings. On the surface, the film is one of gritty, kitchen-sink reality, yet this is juxtaposed with a brightly colored, somewhat fanciful visual style captured by masterful cinematographer Agnes Godard. It relishes in the uncomfortable, whether it be in the form of awkward interactions, aberrant sexuality or desperate acts such as the decision protagonist Boni makes in the film's climax. The narrative is rather sparse, highlighting instead this unsettled tone as well as moments of surprising grace, such as the "God Only Knows" sequence with Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi. The acting is suitably naturalistic, save for Vincent Gallo, whose bit part feels entirely out of place. The film's dreamlike nature provides it with a certain vibrance even as its characters are at their most hopeless. 4/5

A Hidden Life (2019, Terrence Malick)

With each film, reclusive auteur Terrence Malick continues to prove himself to be one of the finest filmmakers who has ever lived. A Hidden Life is a sublime wonder that reveals itself patiently over a three-hour period. At its core, it celebrates pacifism and the commitment to refusing to partake in evil, even at the expense of martyring one's self. Malick's trademark ethereal cinematography and whispery narration are applied to the most traditional narrative he has told since The Thin Red Line. I don't know if there is any frame in any of his films that wouldn't look right at home on the wall of a museum. The film achieves a great contextual poignancy while coming at a time when Nazis have reemerged as a powerful force. 5/5

The Missing Picture (2013, Rithy Panh)

For his profoundly personal documentary The Missing Picture, Rithy Panh had the brilliant idea to use clay figures as a means of reenacting the unspeakable crimes committed in 1970s Cambodia by the Khmer Rouge. Panh was a child during this time, and he vividly recalls the atrocities that he and millions of other Cambodians suffered. The clay figures are not a gimmick, they are necessary to compensate for the fact that the only surviving footage from the Khmer Rouge's reign of terror is its propaganda. For Panh, sharing his painful memories with the world is an act of catharsis. For the viewer, it is an engrossing crash course in a miserable period of human history. 4/5

Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012, Benh Zeitlin)

When I first saw Beasts of the Southern Wild in 2013, I was young, dumb and incapable of properly appreciating it. Having fallen in love with the ethereal beauty of Benh Zeitlin's follow-up film, Wendy, I gave his debut another chance and found myself blown away. Every frame of Ben Richardson's cinematography is intoxicating in its vivid zeal for life. Utterly dreamlike and fantastical, the film utilizes a very loose narrative surrounding rambunctious six-year-old Hushpuppy (Quevenzhane Wallis) and her life in "the Bathtub," a poor, rural community in Louisiana. The script by Zeitlin and Lucy Alibar populates the Bathtub with such colorful dialogue and memorable characters, none more so than the protagonist herself, who is impossible not to love. The film is emotionally affecting at the highest level, with performances that are as magical as the world of Hushpuppy's daydreams. A work of immense visual poetry, it celebrates childhood innocence, the power of imagination and the resiliency of impoverished people of color in the south. Its ending is an astonishing one that leaves the viewer in a state of inspired awe. 5/5 (rewatch)

Summertime (2020, Carlos Lopez Estrada)

For his follow-up to Blindspotting, Carlos Lopez Estrada created a wildly original film based around the work of 27 spoken word performers, each of whom wrote their own poems. The style of Summertime is unlike anything I have seen and deftly tackles some of the heaviest issues plaguing issues our society while never losing its exuberance. The diverse cast are uniformly wonderful presences, providing an authenticity that can't be faked. This summer-themed treat, a light-hearted Do the Right Thing, is as delicious as a Bomb Pop on the hottest day of the year. 4/5

Little Girl (2020, Sebastian Lifshitz)

However beautiful a portrait of queer childhood as Little Girl is, it also left me feeling infuriated and depressed at the loss of the female youthfulness I never got to experience. The documentary's subject, an intelligent, kind-hearted French eight-year-old named Sasha, is oppressed by intolerant people in her society, as are all trans individuals anywhere, but at least she has the full support of her family and friends, which is enough to allow her to be who she truly is. Trans people are exactly like everyone else. It is not our fault that our bodies don't match our souls, and yet we are targets of hatred and violence for merely existing. Little Girl is one of the most vital nonfiction films I've seen, though I admit my own bias on the subject. 4.5/5

Y Tu Mama También (2001, Alfonso Cuaron)

In Alfonso Cuaron's Y Tu Mama Tambien, what begins as a breezy homoerotic comedy of adolescent horniness, starring Diego Luna and Gael Garcia Bernal, develops into a transcendent, life-affirming experience. Their sex-filled road trip with a female friend takes place against the backdrop of a changing Mexico at the dawn of the millennium. While most narration in films is intrusive, the frequent voiceover here is an essential component that evokes the feeling of an incredible novel. The epilogue is achingly beautiful, reducing me to tears. What Cuaron made isn't just a masterpiece, it's a work of art with the power to change lives. 5/5

No Ordinary Man (2020, Aisling Chin-Yee & Chase Joynt)

The career of jazz musician Billy Tipton is an unfairly obscure one, having been reduced to a historical footnote of the tabloid freakshow that occurred after his passing. Billy was a trans man who managed to live his entire life without even his wife and adopted son knowing his secret until he died. He did this with no malice whatsoever, but out of love and necessary self-preservation. Tipton lived in a time that was even worse for trans folks than today. The wonderful documentary No Ordinary Man portrays him as the forgotten queer hero he is. I normally dislike "talking head" documentaries, but the interviews from other trans men provide such insight and should evoke compassion even among cis people. 4/5

A Dog Barking at the Moon (2019, Lisa Zi Xiang)

A familial drama centered around the struggle of repressed homosexuality in Chinese society, Lisa Zi Xiang's A Dog Barking at the Moon also effectively explores the cult mentality and what draws previously "normal" people into it. Through the perspective of their adult daughter, we witness the story of a gay man and his bitter wife who refuses to divorce him, believing that he can become straight if she prays hard enough to the leader of a pseudo-Buddhist cult. It is a thoughtful and educational glimpse into the oppression of queer life in another culture, with a surprising ending that adds another layer of depth. 4/5

Ema (2019, Pablo Larrain)

A darkly hypnotic character piece about a beautiful but seriously fucked up young dancer, Pablo Larrain’s Ema is impossible to look away from even when it makes one cringe. The cinematography is sensational, with some of the best use of lighting I have seen in recent years. As the titular Ema, Mariana Di Girolamo is out of this world. No matter how despicable Ema is on paper, the actress makes it easy to become invested in her. Gael Garcia Bernal is great as her infertile husband, who deeply resents her after they abandon their adopted son. A graphic, intense work of art as gorgeous as it is unpleasant, Ema is a stunner. 4.5/5 (rewatch)

Mortal Kombat (2021, Simon McQuoid)

By far my most pleasant movie surprise of 2021, the new Mortal Kombat is a wildly entertaining experience that successfully captures the tone of the recent games' campaign modes. In stark contrast to the bloodless MKs of the '90s, it is preposterously gory, which is such a crucial component of the source material. There is not a single famous actor in the cast, with the actors instead being chosen for their ability to look and act like the characters. The storyline is standard stuff, yet delivered in a very satisfying manner that is never quite predictable. An attempt is clearly being made to build a major film franchise, so this movie functions primarily as an origin story rather than showcasing the epic tournament we will hopefully receive in the sequel. The lack of a tournament is disappointing, sure, but it's hard not to be satisfied with what is presented. Appropriately balancing faithfulness to the games with the cinematic skill that video game adaptations so often disregard, Mortal Kombat might not quite be a "flawless victory," but it is an unbelievably fun one. 4/5
Misc.

Playing Away (1987, Horace Ove)

Playing Away, which appears to have gone largely unnoticed over the years, isn't funny or especially insightful. Its tone is light and pleasant enough, but it doesn't go much of anywhere and I can't wrap my head around whatever the rules of cricket might be. 2.5/5

The Night of Counting the Years (1969, Shadi Abdel Salam)

Considered one of the masterpieces of Egyptian cinema, Shadi Abdel Salam's The Night of Counting the Years is a slowly-paced, impressively shot film based on the true story of a 19th century clan of ancient tomb robbers. I didn't have much of a reaction to it beyond appreciating the quality of the filmmaking, so I would like to give it another viewing someday. 3.5/5

Victoria (2015, Sebastian Schipper)

As praiseworthy as Victoria is for being shot entirely in one-take, it ought to be easy to overlook flaws. However, there's no getting around the fact that the 138 minute film is longer than it needed to be, as if Schipper was indulging in his stunt as much as possible. The fact that the film avoids any obvious goofs is ridiculously impressive, though the excessive length and occasional dull moments prompt me to wonder if it might have been more fully realized as a traditionally shot feature. There is still much to like, starting with the perfectly natural performance of lead actress Laia Costa. There is also a great heist sequence, which is the most exciting part of the film. Judged as a narrative drama, the film is generally successful. Trim some of the tedious bits and it would likely be a spectacular flick, albeit one without a technical gimmick. 3.5/5

The Mattei Affair (1972, Francesco Rosi)

An unusual hybrid of narrative and documentary, The Mattei Affair owes a bit of its non-linear structure to Citizen Kane. The documentary portion is more compelling than the primary storyline with Mattei, which takes a while to get going. Tying for the Palme d'Or in 1972, Rosi's film is a damning study of corruption and politically motivated murder. 3.5/5

Limbo (2020, Ben Sharrock)

Limbo, a film about refugees waiting on an isolated Scottish island in hopes of being granted asylum, has an odd, slightly comic tone that generally works. Though it is likable enough, I find myself unable to muster any particular enthusiasm for it. 3/5

Lying and Stealing (2019, Matt Aselton)

Lying and Stealing is a woefully bland heist film with no saving graces aside from the always reliable Isaiah Whitlock Jr. Anchored by handsome charisma void Theo James, it is a plodding waste of time. It's as conventional as possible, and frankly, it's fucking boring. 1.5/5

Ma Belle, My Beauty (2021, Marion Hill)

There haven't been many films about polyamorous folks, so Marion Hill's Ma Belle, My Beauty seems like a good place to start. It is an intelligent, sophisticated film for adults; a graceful, breezy watch that moves at its own pace and treats its characters' sexuality without any stigma. All three actresses play their roles well. 3.5/5
Shorts

The Barber Shop (1933, Arthur Ripley) - 2/5
A Love Story (2021, Blake Ridder) - 2/5
And Then (2021, Jenn Ravenna Tran) - 4/5
I Bit the Lemon (2021, Scarlett McCartney-Hill) - 2/5
The Eloquent Peasant (1970, Shadi Abdel Salam) - 4/5

Nice and Friendly (1922, Charlie Chaplin) - 2/5
The Immigrant (1917, Charlie Chaplin) - 4.5/5
Post-Haste (1934, Humphrey Jennings) - 3/5
Precious Images (1986, Chuck Workman) - 4.5/5
Tender (2019, Felicia Pride) - 4/5

Permanence A (2020, Victoria Daylor & Nicole Patrick) - 3/5
A Night in the Show (1915, Charlie Chaplin) - 3/5
Pay Day (1922, Charlie Chaplin) - 4/5
The Odyssey (2021, Emmanuelle Mattana) - 4/5
Leap (2021, Juan Baio & Eino Antonio) - 2/5

Feeling Good (2021, Danisa Munguia) - 3.5/5
Batman: Dying is Easy (2021, Aaron Schoenke & Sean Schoenke) - 4/5
Last edited by kongs_speech on May 2nd, 2021, 3:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Quartoxuma wrote: A deeply human, life-affirming disgusting check whore.
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Perception de Ambiguity
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#2

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

«When you're asleep you're pretty much awake, but you don't know it.»
- Little Girl Poet ("The Mind After Midnight: Where Do You Go When You Go to Sleep?")

«You can tell when an animal is awake by just looking at the way the brain responds. There are these oscillations, rhythms that kick in. There are certain rhythms that correspond to being attentive, to moving in the world, other rhythms that correspond to being inattentive. Well, during REM the rhythms are the rhythms that you would get if you were attending, if you were moving through the world. During REM, as far as the brain is concerned, it's awake, it just doesn't happen to be moving. And it's in the REM state where now you see it's...you know, the animals are dreaming about things as though they were actually happening.»
- Matthew Wilson ("The Mind After Midnight: Where Do You Go When You Go to Sleep?")

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ゴ ン ド ラ / G o n d o l a ( 1 9 8 7 , C h i s h o _ I t o h ) 7

CERN (2013, Nikolaus Geyrhalter) 6

Voyagers (2021, Neil Burger) 6-

Hat Wolff von Amerongen Konkursdelikte begangen? (2004, Gerhard Benedikt Friedl) 6

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Ne croyez surtout pas que je hurle / Just Don't Think I'll Scream (2019, Frank Beauvais) 6

По закону / By the Law / Po zakonu (1926, Лев Кулешов/Lev Kuleshov) 3

La Grande Vadrouille (1966, Gérard Oury) 5

Thriller (1979, Sally Potter) 6

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黑社會 / Election (2005, Johnnie To) (2nd viewing) 7+

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Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992, David Lynch) (8th viewing) 10

Image (international cut) (2003, QT) (9th viewing) 10

Pulp Fiction (1994, QT) (11th viewing) 10/10
Heard about this one bloke, he walks into a bank with a portable phone. He gives the phone to a teller. The bloke on the other end says, "We got this guy's little girl. If you don't give him all your money, we're gonna kill her."
Sounds like a certain film by Quentin Lawrence I watched last week.


shorts

Silvercup (1998, Jim Jennings) 6+

Egypt, Kingdom of the Nile (1934) 5+

Trois thèmes / Three Moods (1980, Alexander Alexeieff & Claire Parker) 6-

The Bite (2019, Pedro Neves Marques) 5


music videos

Kontra K: Asphalt & Tennissocken (2021)


other

The Politics of Perception - 7-min segment (1973, Kirk Tougas)

The Joe Rogan Experience - #1643 - Jonathan Zimmerman (2021) 7


series

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Made for Love - S01E01 - "You're User One" (2021) 5

Made for Love - S01E02 - "Another" (2021) 3

Eastern Wisdom and Modern Life (1960-69) - Ep10 - "Nonsense" 7

Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey - E5 - "Hiding in the Light" (2014) 6+

Star Trek - S01E18 - "Arena" (1967, Joseph Pevney) 3+

Batman - S01E10 -"A Death Worse Than Fate" (1966, Norman Foster) (probable rewatch) 4


no, I said I enjoy a good yarn, not a good yawn

Antena / Antenna (2004, Kazuyoshi Kumakiri) [30+ min]
Sambizanga (1972, Sarah Maldoror) [21 min]
The Whisperers (1967, Bryan Forbes) [20 min]
Gantz: O (2016, Yasushi Kawamura & Keiichi Saitô) [18 min]
Fata Morgana (2013, Peter Schreiner) [14 min]
Mirt Sost Shi Amit / Harvest: 3,000 Years (1975, Haile Gerima) [11 min]
La Otra / Mordprozeß Montes de Oca / The Other One (1946, Roberto Gavaldón) [9 min]


notable online media

top:
The Mind After Midnight: Where Do You Go When You Go to Sleep?
Changa (DMT) Breakthrough experiment v3 [EPILEPSY WARNING] [2 viewings]
Mind Melds and Brain Beams: The Dawn of Brain-to-Brain Communication
WHY YOU Are TRAPPED In Plato's MANIPULATION Cave | Philosophy // Psychology
The Ultimate Guide to Black Holes
Every Villager in Eastshade Is Just the Worst - Eastshade gameplay - Let's Game It Out
Bro Travels Back in Time, Goes Punch Crazy - The Warhorn (Early Access Gameplay) - Let's Game It Out
Yanpai Simulator - I HAVE BEEN NOTICED - Let's Game It Out (Full Walkthrough)
David Lynch reads an original poem [2 viewings]
I Made Millions by Managing a Team of Cheaters - Esports Life Tycoon
Why Games Shouldn't Let Me Draw Stuff - Pikuniku (First Look Gameplay) - Let's Game It Out
Owl Simulator - WTF THIS ISN'T ABOUT OWLS - Let's Game It Out
Cube Mainframe Becoming Flesh
rest:
The Next Quantum Leap: Here, There, and Everywhere [partly]
Tour of the EMS 08 - Gamma Waves
Fun With Shorts: The Doctor Part1
30 Seconds to Jail - HIDE THE DRUGS NOW - Let's Game It Out
I Stole a German Submarine and Defected to America - UBOAT - Let's Game It Out
I'm a Maniac Cop That Ignores Laws and Terrifies Citizens - Police Simulator Patrol Duty 18
Everyone Dies When I'm a 911 Operator in the Wrong Country - 112 Operator
just scream
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gondola
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mirage
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«There are these interesting connections between memory (areas of the brain involved in memory) and imagination. Our ability to remember the past is linked to our ability to imagine the future. So you could think of dreams in a way...they are a process of imagining a world and perhaps anticipating a world which we are going to have to interact with.»
- Matthew Wilson ("The Mind After Midnight: Where Do You Go When You Go to Sleep?")
Last edited by Perception de Ambiguity on May 2nd, 2021, 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
We do not have to understand new things, but by dint of patience, effort and method to come to understand with our whole self the truths which are evident.Image
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#3

Post by peeptoad »

Hi kong-
I didn't see anything really tremendous last week. My best view was rewatching Christiane F. . Still 10/10.

First Cow (2020) 7
Swallow (2020) 7
The Current War (2017) 4
Adolescentes (2019) 7
Zappa (2020) 6+
The Taking (2014) 3

of yours, these are all favs of mine-
An American Werewolf in London
River’s Edge
The Ninth Configuration
Y Tu Mama También
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#4

Post by Torgo »

So much text there, Kong! :o
kongs_speech wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 2:18 pm Godzilla vs. Kong (2021, Adam Wingard)

Maddeningly, Godzilla vs. Kong has doubled down on my primary gripe with the 2014 Godzilla, which is that the film is primarily about dull human characters and does not feature enough badass monster action. Even the fights that do occur in this sorry sequel are little more than tedious CGI wankery. This thing is horribly bloated and has no idea what it ought to be. The concept is so simple that it seems Adam Wingard and Co. have overthought it. Just have a giant monkey punch a giant lizard for about 90 minutes and call it a day. How do you manage to fuck that up? Honestly, what happened to Wingard's career after The Guest? (By the way, as a Kong, I feel obligated to inform you that I would beat 'Zilla's bitch ass, anytime anywhere.) 1.5/5
Lol'd.
I agree with your sentiment, especially with the puny humans part, which I noted in my own comment. Did like it overall more than you, but been yuuugely disappointed with all that hype machine and after the fun that Skull Island was.

Disagree with Mortal Kombat though .. not enough face smashing.
A whole 4 feature films this week, being still occupied with Cowboy Bebop, a few anime short films and .. slacking.


Mortal Kombat [2021] (5,5/10)
Nobody (6,5/10)
Neo Tokyo (6,5/10)
The Mitchells vs. The Machines (7/10)
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#5

Post by Carmel1379 »

Hello kongs_speech!! Personally I'm delighted to be able to write this. :)

Although I need to SHAMEFULLY admit I have skimmed some of the writing in this thread while replying to everyone.

Your viewings:

An American Werewolf in London - I have not seen this film.
River’s Edge - I have seen this film illegally. sol likes the music in the composers' poll I have conducted, and jvv played in this movie. "No Future." is like being said with a Sexy Croissant British accent which would probably be read as sound on youtube. 6/10
The Postman Always Rings Twice - DVD. 5/10
Peppermint Candy - "In reverse chronological order, Peppermint Candy depicts key episodes from the life of a man who has just" - Thank you for writing this. 7/10
Godzilla vs. Kong - Yes! FINALLY! Quoting from my "OLD Film Log" textedit file:
Spoiler
AUGUST ENDS
INLAND EMPIRE (2006, David Lynch) (4th viewing) (theatrically) ∞/10
Coeur Fidèle (1923, Jean Epstein) 7
Seeing New York by Yacht (1903, F.S. Armitage & co.) (short)
The Ghost Train (1901, F.S. Armitage) (short)
The Simpsons - Moaning Lisa (rewatch), The Telltale Head (rewatch), I Love Lisa, One Fish, Two Fish, Blowfish, Blue Fish; Duffless, Lisa’s First Word, And Maggie Makes Three, Lisa the Beauty Queen, Lisa’s Rival, Lisa’s Date with Density, Lisa the Simpson (rewatch), Lisa’s Substitute (rewatch) [Yeah, I know, many Lisa-centric episodes.], Radioactive Man
Godzilla vs. King Kong (1962, Ishirō Honda) 2
Godzilla (2014, Gareth Edwards) 6
Godzilla (1998, Roland Emmerich) 2
ゴジラ / Gojira (1954, Ishirō Honda) 6
Twin Peaks: The Return Part 16 (2017, David Lynch) 8
Sátántangó (1994, Béla Tarr) 8
I have seen Ken Watanabe say "Gojira" last month and I give it a 5/10. I have also seen the Adam Wingard motion picture on a projector with three men last month and liked it. 5/10

Y Tu Mama También - 5/10

Mortal Kombat (2021) - I hope you've seen it with the correct music.

Perception de Ambiguity:

All animals can scream.

Only Lovers Left Alive - Deleted and Extended Scenes (2013, Jim Jarmusch)
Twin Peaks: The Return Part 7 (2017, David Lynch) 6
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016, David Yates) 4
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992, David Lynch) (2nd viewing) 9
Graspop Metal Meeting
Beetlejuice (1988, Tim Burton) 7

peeptoad

I've seen Christiane F. for the first (and so far only) time in July 2019 and (u)



Why the fuck is Klaus Baudelaire not wearing glasses?

(in the screenshot below)

Image




I'm so curious who the next funkybingo poster is going to be. Maybe Onderhond?
arritame no yume nikki & I suppose I’ll have to add the force of gravity to my list of enemies

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#6

Post by Carmel1379 »

Torgo wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 2:43 pmNeo Tokyo (6,5/10)
8/10

Cheers.
Last edited by Carmel1379 on May 2nd, 2021, 3:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
arritame no yume nikki & I suppose I’ll have to add the force of gravity to my list of enemies

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#7

Post by peeptoad »

Carmel1379 wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 3:03 pm
peeptoad

I've seen Christiane F. for the first (and so far only) time in July 2019 and (u)
Sorry you didn't like it. It's not for everyone. I wouldn't recommend watching it again since... (u)
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#8

Post by Torgo »

Er maybe Carmel did like Christiane F. but found it so cruel and heartbreaking? :o
It's a shocking work (the book, that is) that every German of that generation and many of the following know. Impactful on a national level.

Carmel1379 wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 3:07 pm
Torgo wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 2:43 pmNeo Tokyo (6,5/10)
8/10

Cheers
Mh I dunno, didn't like the style of Rintaro's opening (and closing) at all, although I am into surrealist shit .. also looked disappointingly unjapanese to me. The middle Running Man segment had quite the adrenaline and interesting look, though a bit thin on the narrative and again not very good aged 80s Anime; then there's the bit by the Akira guy with 500 times the dialogue of the rest and then it's already over. Mixed bag and at 50 minutes even a bit too short for an omnibus. It's alright, but you can do so much better in that field I think :)

Carmel1379 wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 3:03 pm I'm so curious who the next funkybingo poster is going to be. Maybe Onderhond?
Placing my bet on Bing
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#9

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01. 4.0* - Audition [Ôdishon] by Takashi Miike
Even knowing how everything pans out, fully aware of how Miike structured his film for maximum impact, this one still managed to impress a second time around. With Audition, Miike proves he can channel his crazy and deliver a meticulously paced film, building up to an amazing, extremely memorable finale. And when Eihi Shiina finally breaks out into gleeful bursts of kiri kiri, it's simply impossible to deny the quality put on display here.

02. 3.5* - Homunculus by Takashi Shimizu (2021)
Takashi Shimizu's latest film is quite a bit different from his usual output. Best known for directing trademark Japanese horror films, Shimizu has been branching out in recent years. Homunculus is a clear step away from the horror genre, though where he ended up exactly isn't as easy to explain. Homunculus is a mystery with strong supernatural elements. Go Ayano plays Nokoshi, a strange man who is dead wealthy, but lives in his car and goes through life as a homeless person. One day he is approached by a medical student who wants to drill a hole in his skull. Nokoshi isn't interested, but the boy persuades him and before he knows it, he can see personifications of people's traumas. Shimizu has a little trouble establishing the tone of Homunculus, and he spends a little too much time on the drama at the end. Other than that, this was pretty great. Pretty rad effects, an original plot, unpredictable until the very end and a great central performance. Don't go in expecting a typical Shimizu film, just sit down and enjoy what Shimizu throws at you.

03. 3.5* - Asia Strikes Back [Ajia no Gyakushu] by Gakuryu Ishii (1983)
One of Gakuryu Ishii's early cyberpunk shorts. It's not really a typical narrative, instead Ishii shot the footage to use it as backing video for the concerts of one of his punk bands. That makes the short a little disjointed, on the other hand Japanese cyberpunk isn't really known for coherent narratives, so who cares. There's an underlying plot about psychic soldiers who fight wars from an underground bunker. They start a revolt and manage to make their way to the surface. Bits and pieces that work well within the setting of the film, but in the end it's all pretty garbled and messy, with Ishii paying more attention to mood and atmosphere. Ishii's punk aesthetic is already well-developed here. The soundtrack is raw and loud, the setting is grungy and dirty and the camera work explosive and intense. If Japanese cyberpunk is your thing then Asia Strikes Back delivers in spades, if not then there's probably nothing here for you. Not quite up there with Ishii's best, but a lovely treat for cyberpunk fans either way.

04. 3.5* - The Sword Stained with Royal Blood [Xin Bi Xue Jian] by Hoi-Ching Cheung (1993)
Every time I watch one of these films (early 90s Hong Kong martial arts with strong fantasy/comedy elements) I feel it might be the last one. And every time I find a new one I'm elated that there are more to discover. The Sword Stained with Royal Blood may not be one of the absolute highlights of the genre, it's perfect fan material. I wasn't too impressed with Cheh Chang's Shaw Bros adaptation, this version resolves most of that film's issues. The story is pretty basic, then again you're probably not watching this for the intricate plot. Heroes and bad guys fight it out, with some mistaken identities and volatile relations thrown into the mix to keep things interesting. The action is great, the comedy is fun (RIP Man-Tat Ng though) and the fantasy elements add the necessary flair. What draws me to these films is the insane pacing, giving you absolutely no room to breathe, and this one definitely delivers. Fun from start to finish, perfect genre filler, well recommended if you haven't seen it already.

05. 3.5* - How to Build a Girl by Coky Giedroyc (2019)
Didn't like Booksmart much so I nearly passed on watching this film. It's a good thing I didn't in the end, as How to Build a Girl is way wittier, classier and more imaginative than Feldstein's USA escapades. I was pretty surprised (and impressed) by the range she puts on display here. Feldstein plays Johanna, a young girl with a knack for writing, growing up in Wolverhampton. Her life changes when she applies for a job as a music reviewer. She's a natural, but it's a tough world out there and as she pushes for success, she has to make some difficult decisions along the way. Feldstein is a delight, the dialogues are clever, Giedroyc switches between comedy and drama with deceptive ease and the presentation is pleasant. There's really nothing specifically wrong with this film, except that this has been done many times before and How to Build a Girl stick a little too closely to its biopic roots.

06. 3.0* - 68 Kill by Trent Haaga (2017)
A brave attempt to make an edgy dark comedy, even though the film isn't quite as zany as it tries to be. Haaga struggles with the structure of the film and tries to hold back for too long, possibly because the finale isn't quite as over-the-top as it should've been. That said, there's quite a bit to like here. Chip is a well-meaning guy who keeps falling for the wrong women. Liza, his somewhat deranged girlfriend, has him on a short leash and convinces Chip they need to rob one of Liza's clients to finally get ahead in life. Chip reluctantly agrees, but finds himself way in over his head when Liza kills the couple in cold blood. The presentation is pretty decent, the actors are well in on the joke and the introduction/finale deliver. The problem is the middle part, where Haaga fails to build up to a crescendo. The entire segment with Violet probably should've been cut (though through no fault of Boe, who plays her part well). Still, decent, fun and entertaining filler, just not as mad as it pretends to be.

07. 3.0* - The Closet [Keulrojet] by Kwang-bin Kim (2020)
A South-Korean horror film called The Closet. That's really all you need to know. Whatever clichés are popping up in your head right now, you can be sure this film has them. The Closet is the definition of by-the-numbers, luckily the execution is on point, which makes that this film is at least pretty watchable. A dad and his daughter move into a new house (yup). There's a creepy closet (hah), footsteps are heard on the second floor while nobody is there (heh) and sure enough, eerie drawings of ghosts pop up not much later (woo-hoo). That the film moves from horror to tragedy later on should come as no surprise. The performances are decent, the cinematography is polished and the build-up is solid. The second half get a bit too dramatic for my taste and the lack of originality (read: none whatsoever) is a bit grating at times, but if you're looking for decent horror filler this film has you covered. Just don't expect to see anything you haven't seen before.

08. 3.0* - The Adventures of Kosuke Kindaichi [Kindaichi Kosuke no Boken] by Nobuhiko Ôbayashi (1979)
Kosuke Kindaichi is one of the most famous detectives in Japan, made popular by the films of Kon Ichikawa (but originating from a long line of novels). Madcap director Nobuhiko Ôbayashi also had a swing at it and delivers what could've been a fun live action Lupin film, only with a different set of characters. The plot is pretty negligible and little more than an excuse for some insanity along the way. Kindaichi is summoned to recapture the missing head of statue. What starts off as a very simple assignment, quickly escalates into a mad search for the head. Again, the comparisons with Lupin are never far off. I'm not familiar with the original series so it's difficult to compare, but the elements that stick out bear the clear signature of Ôbayashi. The tone is extremely light, even bordering on outright comedy, there are some truly wacky moments and the hand of Ôbayashi is always present. Probably more fun for people already familiar with the series, but still worth a watch even if you've never heard of Kindaichi before.

09. 2.5* - A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night by Ana Lily Amirpour (2014)
An incredibly messy feature. I have to give it to Amirpour, she certainly created something unique. It's as if she feared she'd never make a film again and put every genre she ever wanted to work in, in a single film. There's really no baseline here, except that everything is shot in stark black and white. The story revolves around a vampire girl and a young boy who is forced to deal with his father's drug addiction. They both roam the streets of the fictitious Bad City, where they inevitably bump into each other. A strange romance ensues, which only becomes more complicated as the film progresses. From crime to western, from horror to comedy, from romance to drama, the film rolls from one genre into the next. The cinematography is pretty nice, the camera work and editing aren't on the same level though and the soundtrack is a big letdown for a film like this. Performances are good and it's certainly quite different from anything I've ever seen, but in the end it left me rather cold. An interesting failure.

10. 2.5* - Another Heaven [Anaza Hevun] by Jôji Iida (2000)
While the premise of Another Heaven sounds interesting enough (a police thriller with supernatural overtones), the film itself comes off a little uninspired. Iida spends too much time on a setup that doesn't deliver anything original, while skipping through the supernatural elements without too much conviction. Detective Manabu finds a man with his brains removed in a little apartment. It's the start of a tricky cat and mouse game with a killer that seems to have superhuman capabilities. Manabu isn't discouraged though and what the help of his partner and a girl who has fallen in love with him, he slowly closes in on the killer. The film takes too long to get going, the cinematography is a little basic and Eguchi makes a pretty boring lead. Luckily Miwako Ichikawa adds some spice to the film and the ending turns it up a notch, but it's not enough to turn a 130-minute police thriller into a riveting film.

11. 2.0* - Queen of Triads 2 by Jing Wong, Kwok-Man Keung (2021)
Not sure if I'm surprised to see Jing Wong resurface in the recent boom of Chinese genre cinema. He may be getting a little order, but it's a work ethic that suits his perfectly. Filling shelves with popular genre cinema is Wong's shtick and since he'll probably be making films until he's actually physically uncapable, it's a match made in heaven. The story is a simple one. A man solicits at a restaurant known for giving unjustly imprisoned people a second chance. Things go well until an old enemy resurfaces. The people at the restaurant decide to help him out, but the secret deals between the police and the Triads make it hard to get a proper revenge. Though Wong should be able to make this type of film with his eyes closed, he can't fall back on seasoned actors and cinematographers to elevate his film, which is a bit of a problem. Queen of Triads 2 pales in comparison to most of his other work, there are a few decent action scenes (and of course some gambling action), but it's hardly a film worth pursuing. Filler for the needy.

12. 2.0* - On-Gaku: Our Sound [Ongaku] by Kenji Iwaisawa (2019)
Disappointing. Japan has a pretty sketchy track record when it comes to films about bands and pop/rock music, On-Gaku seems all to content to continue that trend. Apart from the differentiating art style and the dry comedy, it's really just a rather bland and by-the-numbers film with a horrible soundtrack. A group of high school delinquents is so bored, they decide to form a band. While rivaling gangs are trying to settle scores with them, the three boys get some instruments and without any formal training try to find a sound of their own. When they score a gig at a local festival, it becomes a race to perform. The crude and simplistic art style is what jumps out right away. It isn't very pretty to look at and the animation itself is quite poor, but there are some nice style variations throughout the film. The soundtrack is crummy, the comedy not at all that funny and the plot is of the cookie cutter variety. Many people seem to like this film, not sure what the deal with that is really. It's all very "been there, done that".

13. 2.0* - 10 Things I Hate About You by Gil Junger (1999)
A pretty basic high school romcom with some above average performances that make it stand out, if only just a little. I'll readily admit that I don't care at all about these US high school flicks, they have practically no chance of winning me over, so the fact that I found this bearable might mean it's actually pretty decent. In order to get to Bianca, the girl of his dreams, Cameron needs to find a date for Bianca's asocial sister, as her dad won't let her go out before that. Cameron's eye lands on Patrick, the school criminal who has no interest in any of his classmates whatsoever. I hope you can guess how it goes from there. It's the banter between Ledger and Stiles that makes this film rather fun. The plot is bland, the music is terrible and the high school setting has been done to death, but at least there a somewhat sarcastic undertone that gives it a novel twist. Not a great film, but considering the type of film this is, it could've been a lot worse.

14. 2.0* - Closet Monster by Stephen Dunn (2015)
A rather brave attempt to spruce up a basic coming out drama, but writer/director Stephen Dunn doesn't quite get his film where it needs to be. For too long Closet Monster is just a simple drama like there have been so many before, it's only nearing the finale that the film gets something mysterious and uncomfortable. Oscar is a young boy scarred by the divorce of his parents. The separation of his mom and the fickle mental state of his father make his childhood harder than it should've been. Oscar is also coming to terms with the fact that he is gay, though signals from his surroundings denote that as a bad thing. The performances are decent but barely sufficient for this type of drama, the minor fantastical elements don't leave much of an impression, the soundtrack is borderline acceptable and the drama feels way too familiar. The moody ending redeems the film somewhat, but I expected more from this one.

15. 2.0* - A Midsummer Night's Dream [Sen Noci Svatojánské] by Jirí Trnka (1959)
Old puppet animation based on Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Adapting Shakespeare isn't the most original of ideas, but I will admit that it fits the style, especially with all the fantasy elements presents. Still, I would've preferred to see an original story rather than the umpteenth version of this story. Unless you've never seen or read A Midsummer Night's Dream before, there are few surprises here. In classic Shakespeare fashion, tragic romances are littered throughout, as people are paired with the wrong partner and are pining for unattainable love. The plot isn't really the main draw here though. Some of the puppet designs are nice and the more fantastical sets are cute, but the pacing is slow, the voice-over sounds somewhat indifferent and the animation is very basic, at least by modern standards. There are some stand-out moments here, but they are few and far between and most of the film was a bit too simplistic to keep me engaged throughout.

16. 1.5* - Sex Crimes [Seihanzai] by Koji Wakamatsu (1967)
One of the weaker Wakamatsu films I've seen in a while. Not that it is so different from his other work, but somehow it lacks the urgency and the vigor that made his other films jump out. Without it, there's little more than a mix of unsexy erotica and endless monologues, few of them very interesting. Though I'm not 100% certain, I think Sex Crimes is part of a series of films Wakamatsu made about deranged individuals that ended up becoming sex criminals. Either that or it's just a very recurring theme in his films. You pretty much get the same setup here, though with a slightly dull lead. The performances didn't really appeal to me, the camera work felt a bit obligatory and there were some serious pacing issues. Maybe I'm getting a bit too used to these 60s Wakamatsu films, or maybe this is just a lesser film in his oeuvre. Time will tell I guess, as I still have a good 60 more to go. For now, I would say this is for completists only.

17. 1.5* - Hidden Figures by Theodore Melfi (2016)
Crappy Hollywood schmaltz. How ironic is it that a movie that tries to honor the accomplishments of Johnson, deems those accomplishments so benign that it has to smother them with a scripted fight against social injustices. And what was the deal with Johnson's moment supreme being little more than a piggyback on a white man's solution? Hidden Figures tells the story of three black women who played an important part in getting the first American man in orbit around the Earth. Rather than focus on their careers at NASA though, the film is more about their fight against prejudice, misogyny and racism. Elements that Hollywood added because who wants to see a film about smart, black women, right? Regardless of all the above, the film is just terribly kitsch. The performances are bland, the soundtrack is atrocious, the script is laughable, emotions are fake and overly sentimental. I think even Spielberg would describe this film as "a bit much". In between all the standard Hollywood nonsense there is an interesting story hidden, but it's buried under a load of hot garbage.

18. 1.0* - 9 to 5 by Colin Higgins (1980)
Didn't really have high hopes for this one, especially not with Dolly Parton being part of the main cast, but in some circles it's considered a classic USA comedy. I guess at one time this must've been the definition of funny, luckily those times are long gone. All that remains now is an endless succession of predictable and poorly executed jokes. Three working women are tired of their bigot boss. On a little get together they dream up ways to humiliate and retaliate against him, but when one of their dreams becomes reality (their boss gets poisoned) they panic. Afraid someone will find out about their plans, they kidnap the body. The main cast isn't very funny, the jokes are lame and lazy, the soundtrack is absolutely drab, the cinematography purely functional. Apart from the dream sequences, which at least stand out, there's nothing here really. Just a dire piece of mainstream comedy that didn't stand the test of time.

19. 1.0* - Turner & Hooch by Roger Spottiswoode (1989)
80s buddy cop film. Only someone thought it would make sense if Tom Hanks was a cop and his buddy cop was a dog. It's really as lame as it sounds and time hasn't done this film any favors. It's really just generic shelf filler that goes through the motions simply because Hanks is a bankable actor. The plot isn't much to look at. Turner takes on one last job before he is transferred to the big city. He has to try and catch a killer, but his best lead turns out to be Hooch. A dog. Turner isn't a big fan of the animal, but believe it or not, after some awkwardly scripted scenes they become best friends and as a team they're ready to go and catch the bad guy. I'm not a big Hanks fan, so there's that. I'm also not a big fan of 80s buddy cop movies, nor of movie dogs. The bland attempts to mix in romance and even some drama fail horribly, the action is dim, the crime elements are lazy and the ending is so sappy it's almost embarrassing to watch. Not a great film.
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#10

Post by peeptoad »

Torgo wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 3:10 pm Er maybe Carmel did like Christiane F. but found it so cruel and heartbreaking? :o
It's a shocking work (the book, that is) that every German of that generation and many of the following know. Impactful on a national level.
good point.
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#11

Post by pitchorneirda »

Nice job kongs! Happy to see your write-ups instead of simply your ratings.

I'm not really confident enough to do the same yet here but I always read the thread.

From your list, I've seen three movies, two being favourites of mine!
What really caught me in Peppermint Candy was how it's built to be a metaphor of South Korean 20th c. sociopolitical history but the story is tremendously powerful on its own, that's for sure
I didn't know that Benh Zeitlin had directed a new movie since Beasts of the Southern Wild so thank you for this info!
Also seen Y tu mama también 10 years ago when I was in Spain during a student exchange program, I didn't care for it but I was probably drunk and don't remember much, I might give it another try.
"Art is like a fire, it is born from the very thing it burns" - Jean-Luc Godard
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#12

Post by viktor-vaudevillain »

The Shooting (Monte Hellman, 1966) - 7

Room Without a View (Roser Corella, 2021) - 6 CPH:DOX 2021

Мой друг Иван Лапшин / My Friend Ivan Lapshin (Alexey German, 1985) - 9

害虫 / Harmful Insect (Akihiko Shiota, 2001) - 7

White Cube (Renzo Martens, 2020) - 5- CPH:DOX 2021

阿賀の記憶 / Memories of Agano (Makato Sato, 2005) - 8+
I found solace in this deeply humane, yet melancholy exploration of lives at the margins of society after just having seen Renzo Martens' colonialist madness.

All Light, Everywhere (Theo Anthony, 2021) - 7+ CPH:DOX 2021
Everyone interested in the interplay of (film-)technology, the bodies affected by technology, violence, history of hegemony and structures of suppression should watch this. It is still "Farocki light", but Anthony still makes for one of the more intelligent documentarians/essay-filmmakers living. Anthony strives too much for perfection and “subtleness" here, and yet still pandering for an audience raised on American narrative media. This does not make the whole thing come together as it doesn't fit with the object-oriented and singular farockian vision most of the film tries to follow.

The Last Shelter (Ousmane Samassekou, 2021) - 6 CPH:DOX 2021


shorts:

Shape Shifting (Elka Marhöfer & Mikhail Lylov, 2015) - 8++

Listen to the Beat of our Images (Maxime & Audrey Jean-Baptiste, 2021) - 8 CPH:DOX 2021

Low Tide (Eva Kolcze, 2019) - 7

***

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Last edited by viktor-vaudevillain on May 3rd, 2021, 6:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#13

Post by RolandKirkSunglasses »

Slow week for me going through the UK version of "Whose Line is it Anyway", will be back to movies next week.

Clash by Night (1952): Fritz Lang drama written by Clifford Odets and starring Barbara Stanwyck? Quite an interesting little drama, Odets would do better work on "Sweet Smell of Success".

Fail-Safe (1964): The other nuclear war film of that year has aged pretty badly, taking itself far too seriously with a ludicrous ending. Among the worst films by Sidney Lumet, watch "Dr. Strangelove" instead.

Seconds (1966): An old man is given a new face by an evil corporation and a second chance at life. An interesting premise undone by thin characters and very slow pacing. Watch "Face of Another" instead made the same year.

Beast From 20,000 Fathoms (1953): Early Ray Harryhausen effort is a pretty cheap B-movie only worth watching for the lizard and seeing the inspiration for Godzilla.

The Patsy (1928): Marion Davies wants to finaigle her sister's boyfriend in this slight silent comedy with much charm, Marion gets to impersonate Pola Negri and Lillian Gish.

Storm Over Asia (1928): Soviet silent movies aren't my cup of tea, this one moves excruciatingly slow, last 5 minutes are alright but it's really not worth watching.

Judex (1916): I love "Les Vampires" and was slightly disappointed by Georges Franju's remake of "Judex". This one is more firmly plotted than "Les Vampires" with less gadgets and a smaller cast, the plot becomes a bit smushy in places but for a 5 hour serial it's paced surprisingly well. Quite decent.

Dragons Forever (1988): Jackie Chan is a womanising lawyer involved in a polluted water case, the plot isn't that important because what we really wanna see is Yuen Biao's acrobatics and Sammo Hung fighting too. The fight scenes between the 3 Dragons are pretty good, the romantic plots are OK and there's some good comedy, but really the best thing about the movie is Jackie's fight with Benny Urquidez, not quite as good as their legendary battle in "Wheels on Meals". Overall an enjoyable kung fu flick.

Krysar (1986): Two years in the making, Jiri Barta tackles the Pied Piper of Hamelin with a dark twist in this stop-motion film. Borrowing from German Expressionism and medieval woodcuts, the film has a unique visual style and clocks in at 50 minutes, another impressive Czech animation.
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#14

Post by Torgo »

RolandKirkSunglasses wrote: May 3rd, 2021, 12:00 am Fail-Safe (1964): The other nuclear war film of that year has aged pretty badly, taking itself far too seriously with a ludicrous ending. Among the worst films by Sidney Lumet, watch "Dr. Strangelove" instead.
Hm, it's not my job to defend this film, but I will: 8.0 with 20k votes on IMDb, 93% on Rotten Tomatoes, one of ICM's most-favorited films and that at 271 favs vs. 7 dislikes; you sound much harsher than the general opinion on this. Unfortunately, I can only remember that I found it to be a strong picture, but not a single thing about the content or why I thought so ...

Krysar is obviously impressive.
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#15

Post by RolandKirkSunglasses »

Torgo wrote: May 3rd, 2021, 12:14 am Hm, it's not my job to defend this film, but I will: 8.0 with 20k votes on IMDb, 93% on Rotten Tomatoes, one of ICM's most-favorited films and that at 271 favs vs. 7 dislikes; you sound much harsher than the general opinion on this. Unfortunately, I can only remember that I found it to be a strong picture, but not a single thing about the content or why I thought so ...

Krysar is obviously impressive.
The heavy-handed dialogue and the constant explanations of every single procedure, characters talking about how horrible nuclear weapons are becomes tiresome and too obvious. I know the thought of nuclear annihilation earns a couple extra brownie points considering it was made around the Cuban Missile Crisis but the treatment in "Fail-Safe" takes itself far too seriously, when you realise that's not how the fail-safe protocol works the movie becomes ridiculous, even more after
Spoiler
The President orders the nuclear bombing of New York.
I'm not the biggest Dr. Strangelove fan but it's far superior to "Fail-Safe".
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#16

Post by shugs »

Not the greatest of weeks.

1. Palm Springs (Max Barbakow, 2020) - 8/10
The saving grace of this week, Palm Springs was a lot of fun. Glad to see Cristin Milioti getting bigger roles, she's a great actress.

2. Nomadland (Chloé Zhao, 2020) - 4/10
There's something supremely gross about an old man opening up about his son's suicide while some rich Hollywood prick pretends to be poor because she was bored at home.

3. Snake Eyes (Brian De Palma, 1998) - 6/10
Fun, but it kind of falters after the opening. Recommended for Cage and De Palma fans.

4. Wolfen (Michael Wadleigh, 1981) - 3/10
Boring. More wolves, less pretentious dialogue, please.

5. Get Hard (Etan Cohen, 2015) - 6/10
I don't have my access to my Plex server right now, so I'm watching what I can on Netflix. :D It's your standard Will Ferrell / Kevin Hart vehicle, but it had a lot of moments where I laughed out loud.

6. Land of the Dead (George A. Romero, 2005) - 5/10
Capitalism is bad, m'kay? zombie edition.
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shugs
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#17

Post by shugs »

What I've seen from y'all.

@kong
An American Werewolf in London - 7/10
Y tu mamá también - 8/10
The Postman Always Rings Twice - 6/10
Beasts of the Southern Wild - 7/10
The Bad and the Beautiful - 8/10
Godzilla vs. Kong - 6/10


Need to revisit the first three. Beast of the Southern Wild I don't remember much of, just that I felt it was underwhelming. Good performance from the girl.
The Bad and the Beautiful is the kind of classic Hollywood melodrama I love. <3
Godzilla vs Kong was stupid fun, but they still can't create interesting human characters.

@PdA
Pulp Fiction - 10/10 - nothing to add :D
La Grande Vadrouille - next on my de Funes watchlist

@peeptoad
First Cow - 7/10
Needed more cow. Had the same problem I have with most Reichardt films, the pacing was kinda off.

@Torgo
Neo Tokyo - 7/10
Enjoyed all three segments (the racing one being the best), just wished there was more flesh on their bones.

@Onderhond
Audition - 7/10
10 Things I Hate About You - 5/10
Watched these a loooong time ago, Audition is in a dire need of a rewatch.

@Roland
Fail-Safe - 10/10
I think it's one of Lumet's best. Loved the dry procedural style and it kept me on the edge of my seat until the end.
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Onderhond
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#18

Post by Onderhond »

shugs wrote: May 3rd, 2021, 2:09 pm @Onderhond
Watched these a loooong time ago, Audition is in a dire need of a rewatch.
Yeah, it was the same for me. I had relatively low expectations for my Audition rewatch (which is why I kept postponing it), but it really turned out fine.

From yours I liked Palm Springs (3.5* - fun, but I'm a bit bored of time loop films, this one didn't do anything interesting with it either).
Snake Eyes (2.5), Get Hard (2.5) and Land of the Dead (2.5) were decent filler fodder, but nothing too memorable.

We got Nomadland on Disney+ over the weekend, so I'll get to that in the coming weeks. Expectations are quite low though. Isn't helped by the fact that films on Disney+ tend to remain there, which takes away an incentive to watch it fast.
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Torgo
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#19

Post by Torgo »

peeptoad wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 5:01 pm
Torgo wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 3:10 pm Er maybe Carmel did like Christiane F. but found it so cruel and heartbreaking? :o
It's a shocking work (the book, that is) that every German of that generation and many of the following know. Impactful on a national level.
good point.
This post from the Coming of Age results should clear things up .. :thumbsup:

Lonewolf2003 wrote: May 3rd, 2021, 12:32 pm
#11 Christiane F. - Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo [We Children from Bahnhof Zoo] (1981, Uli Edel) 587.22 points
2679 checks, official lists: 1 :imdb:
Carmel1379 (#26)
Gordon_Gekko (#8)
jvv (unranked)
Lakigigar (#24)
Lonewolf2003 (unranked)
Mifune (#3)
peeptoad (#1)
Perception de Ambiguity (unranked>27)
Bing147
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#20

Post by Bing147 »

Better week than the last few, watched a lot of good stuff. Quick ratings this week I'm afraid, have a lot going on.

8 Women (2002) A-
Amateur (1994) B-
Act of Violence (1948) B+
Safe in Hell (1931) B
And Then There Were None (1945) C+
Chinese Roulette (1976) B
Evangelion 2.0 You Can (Not) Advance (2009) B+
Mind Game (2004) B+
Dead Leaves (2004) C-
Ernest and Celestine (2012) B+
Abominable (2019) D
Death By Hanging (1968) B
The Deep End (2001) B-
The Night of Counting the Years (1969) B
Wolf Children (2012) A-
The Silent Partner (1978) B
Joint Security Area: JSA (2000) B
Boy & The World (2013) B-
The Insult (2017) B
Tokyo Godfathers (2003) B+
The Secret of Nimh (1982) C+
The Face of Another (1966) A-
Another Day of Life (2018) C
Targets (1968) B-
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peeptoad
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#21

Post by peeptoad »

Torgo wrote: May 3rd, 2021, 4:24 pm
peeptoad wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 5:01 pm
Torgo wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 3:10 pm Er maybe Carmel did like Christiane F. but found it so cruel and heartbreaking? :o
It's a shocking work (the book, that is) that every German of that generation and many of the following know. Impactful on a national level.
good point.
This post from the Coming of Age results should clear things up .. :thumbsup:

Lonewolf2003 wrote: May 3rd, 2021, 12:32 pm
#11 Christiane F. - Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo [We Children from Bahnhof Zoo] (1981, Uli Edel) 587.22 points
2679 checks, official lists: 1 :imdb:
Carmel1379 (#26)
Gordon_Gekko (#8)
jvv (unranked)
Lakigigar (#24)
Lonewolf2003 (unranked)
Mifune (#3)
peeptoad (#1)
Perception de Ambiguity (unranked>27)
Ah, yes... I must open my eyes a bit wider, I seeee...
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