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Which Films Did You See Last Week? Week 16, 2021

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Perception de Ambiguity
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Re: Which Films Did You See Last Week? Week 16, 2021

#1

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

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Illuminate (2020, James Cardoza) 6

ཐར་ལོ་ / Tharlo (2015, པད་མ་ཚེ་བརྟན།/Pema Tseden) 4

Constans / The Constant Factor (1980, Krzysztof Zanussi) 5

My Dog Tulip (2009, Paul & Sandra Fierlinger) 6+

Baxter, Vera Baxter (1977, Marguerite Duras) 7

Cash on Demand (1961, Quentin Lawrence) 7-

さらば箱舟 / Farewell to the Ark (1984, 寺山修司/Shuji Terayama) 6-

یک اتفاق ساده / A Simple Event / Yek Etefagh sadeh (1973, سهراب شهید ثالث/Sohrab Shahid Saless) 6

Geschichtsunterricht (1972, Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub; written by Bertolt Brecht) 7-

Crainquebille (2005 restoration) (1922, Jacques Feyder) 5-

And Then There Were None (1945, René Clair) 4+

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First Man (2017, Fred Fougea & Jérôme Guiot) 8

Coherence (2013, James Ward Byrkit) (2nd viewing) 7


shorts

Window (2021, David O'Reilly) 7

Já-Fólkið / Yes-People (2020, Gísli Darri Halldórsson) 6

Monangambeee / Monangambé (1968, Sarah Maldoror) 2

দুই / Two / Parable Two (1965, সত্যজিৎ রায়/Satyajit Ray) 5+

Martin pleure (2017, Jonathan Vinel) 6


music videos

Till Lindemann: Любимый город "LUBIMIY GOROD” (Beloved Town)


series

Star Trek - S03E05 - "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" (1968) 6


no, I said I enjoy a good yarn, not a good yawn

West Indies (1979, Med Hondo) [37 min]
Il Cristo proibito / The Forbidden Christ (1951, Curzio Malaparte) [20 min]
They Might Be Giants (1971, Anthony Harvey) [10 min]


notable online media

top:
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My Neurons, My Self
Mind Over Masters: The Question of Free Will
French Is Easy pt. 2
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Carl Jung: How The Media // Internet Reinforces Shadow Projection | Psychology & Philosophy
Short Life - Charles Manson Meets Happy Wheels - Let's Game It Out (quick look)
I Built a Theme Park With a 99.9% Death Rate - Parkitect
I Built a Theme Park of Perpetual Torment in Planet Coaster
I Used VR to Terrorize Gods and NPCS - Oculus Rift S and Asgard's Wrath
Game Proves Ghosts Are Real, Hiding in Bathrooms - The Spook Inspectors Gameplay - Let's Game It Out
I Built a Theme Park That Ends Reality in Planet Coaster
I Lost $1,007,905 Selling Shirts for Serial Killers - King of Retail - Let's Game It Out
My drunk friend sent this to me at 4:04am.
Guinea pigs Jumping over the Lava
Stop Wasting Your Time On Nonsense - Mooji
[various half-watched "Let's Game It Out" vidz]
Awakening the Mind: A Celebration of the Life and Work of Oliver Sacks [partly]
rest:
Chimpanzees: Dumber Than All Humans - Horrifying Planet - Ep. 2
I Became an Amazing Author While Being Held in Captivity - Drafting Tales - Let's Game It Out
I Left My Perfect House to Go Fall to My Death Over and Over - Sophica Gameplay - Let's Game It Out
LINDEMANN - Blut (Live in Moscow)
Physics in the Dark: Searching for the Universe’s Missing Matter [partly]
Loose Ends: String Theory and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory [partly]
[YT channel "Alasdair Beckett-King"]
[YT channel "Grand Illusions"]
First Man & Geschichtsunterricht
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the rest
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We do not have to understand new things, but by dint of patience, effort and method to come to understand with our whole self the truths which are evident.Image
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Bing147
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#2

Post by Bing147 »

Managed 18 this week, not my best week again but a bit better than the week before. The films were a bit of a mixed bag as well sadly though I saw some very good ones.

Waking Life (2001): C+ Interesting film certainly but not one of my favorites from Linklater. Philisophically interesting and visually outstanding but it never really comes together for me with some parts dragging a great deal.

Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron (2002): D

Tales From Earthsea (2006): C- One of the worst Ghibli films but not a bad film by any means. Its beautiful, maybe not on the level of the best Ghibli films but beautiful. The story and characters though just aren't particularly interesting. I've meant to read the Earthsea books for years and this doesn't make me want to (though I won't let it stop me considering I've heard this is a poor adaptation).

Kung Fu Panda 3 (2016): C+

Metropolis (2001): B-

The Prince of Egypt (1998): C Its really well animated and the voice cast is pretty outstanding. This is just such an overdone story though and I've seen better adaptations of what frankly isn't that interesting a story in the first place. It doesn't help that with the exception of When You Believe the music is forgettable at best.

The Spongebob Movie: Sponge Out of Water (2015): C

Barefoot Gen (1983): A- Stunning stuff. I love the way they spend a significant amount of time with this family at the start before things get going. It allows the horror when the moment you know is coming hits to feel all the more horrifying. The kids are a bit annoying but not in a way that makes it work any less.

Weathering With You (2019): B+ I saw Your Name a few years ago and fell absolutely in love with it. This isn't quite as good but that's not a fair comparison as that's one of the best anime films I've ever seen. This is still really good with interesting characters and it goes in some unexpected directions. Visually stunning as well. Highly recommended.

The Four Feathers (1939): D- Just so bland. None of the characters are interesting, its so stereotypical in so many ways. There are parts that heavily feature outdated attitudes as well but those don't even need to factor into this rating, its super dull. There are some very pretty sequences, that's the best I can say for it.

For Sama (2019): A- Super powerful, super personal documentary. Capturing their own experience staying in Aleppo with their very young child is powerful and it makes a great companion piece with the also excellent Last Men in Aleppo from a couple years earlier which documents the experience of some of the white hats as they work to save those who are injured. I would highly recommend both.

Man's Favorite Sport? (1964): B- This is a charming film, but the story is a bit absurd and the character motivations really don't work. The actors make it come together though and there are some truly hilarious sequences.

Cowboy Bebop: The Movie (2001): B Not as good as the series its based on, but still really excellent stuff. Visually interesting, solid story, it spends a bit too much time on some new characters who aren't as interesting as the main ones but its just nice to see a story with this crew that I haven't seen years ago. Makes me want to rewatch the original series.

Heroes For Sale (1933): C+ I liked this alright but I didn't love it. It tells a story that tries to focus on issues like capitalism vs socialism but seems lost in dealing with the topics. A shame as seeing them from the perspective of the time would have been quite interesting and I suppose it still is, even if only to show that people were perhaps as confused about them then as they are now. The parts that work are the more personal parts, which slip a bit into cheese at times particularly near the end but still mostly work thanks to a strong cast.

Evangelion: 1.0 You Are (Not) Alone (2007): B I don't know if this is more for those who have seen the series or haven't. There's still an excellent subject, characters, and story here, but it all feels a bit rushed by trying to condense so much down into such a brief time. Some might prefer the more streamlined version, which is still good, but I prefer the original. Still, it looks great, sounds great, and is still a version of an interesting story.

Pi (1998): B-

Ladies in Retirement (1941): B+ Really well done creepy victorian story. An interesting way to take the story too. It could have been a mystery pretty easily except we're let in on everything that's happening the entire way so we get to see it from the insiders view as the characters try to figure things out. It might have been a bit better if we were left in the dark about a few things, but still excellent. Excellent cast.

Last Men in Aleppo (2017): B+
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#3

Post by Torgo »

Thanks for taking over today, Onder.
Onderhond wrote: April 25th, 2021, 3:50 pm 01. 5.0* - Hotel Poseidon by Stefan Lernous (2021)
A modern-day Eraserhead.
Alright, you got me curious enough. ;) This hasn't even 5 votes on IMDb so far. How did you become aware of it? Will this get a wide release or be lost in obscurity?

Almost no feature films here this week because cool kids keep pressuring me to watch anime series. Actually wanted to get 2 or 3 more titles cleared from the Academy nominations but I wasn't nearly in the mood for that. Huge-eyed manga figures it is then.

Gifted (6,5/10)
The Father (8/10)
Fist of The North Star (6,5/10)
Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust (7,5/10)
Ghost In The Shell 2: Innocence (7,5/10)
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#4

Post by prodigalgodson »

Haha, stealing kong's thunder eh? This should be interesting.

I only had time for one movie, and it turns out I should've used the time otherwise:

Splendor in the Grass (Elia Kazan, 1961)

Dour, maudlin, overwrought -- these words seem made to describe a certain vein of art, because there's nothing in the corporeal world that evinces them as much as films like these. Boundless privilege meets hopeless naivety, playing out as the most broad, bloodless variation of exactly what you’d expect. At times it feels on the cusp of saying something worthwhile or conveying something true, only to relapse into inanity at the first opportunity. Wood’s the only one involved with an ounce of talent (well, and Boris Kaufman — what a shame Dziga Vertov’s brother had to be involved in such mediocrity, though he does nothing to elevate it either). Inge's flaccid screenplay leans into the most insufferable tendencies of midcentury playwrighting, and hack snitch Kazan drags it down even further with his stilted, palpable lack of style -- at least a Ray or a Sirk would've known to approach this telegraphed crapola with a winking irony. But despite being bored and annoyed throughout, I can't deny that the final scene where the old flames reunite struck a genuine emotional chord, at least until the requisite closing re-obviation -- I'm too much of a sucker for mono no aware stories. There's also a quick shot of three bums staring at a rich man's post-Black Tuesday suicide that works pretty well, and that's about it.
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#5

Post by peeptoad »

in order watched-
County Lines (2019) 8
Park Row (1952) 7
Rizi/ Days (2020) 7
Synchronic (2019) 6+/7
Promising Young Woman (2020) 8
First Cow (2020) 7 technically "next week" since I just finished it...

Promising Young Woman was best, although the ending lacked some of the punch I was hoping for. I was less gratified by the closing scene than I could have been.
County Lines was interesting; the lead actor did a very good job in his role and it was nice and gritty. The fact that it's based on an unfortunate reality drove the experience home more.
Rizi not my favorite from Tsai Ming-liang, but I have a bunch of his yet to see. Still decent and had some beautiful shots...
Park Row was good for what it was. I like Fuller, so anything he's done I tend to like to an extent.
Synchronic is my least favorite from Benson/Moorhead, but not bad. I thought the writing, or some aspect of it, could have been a lot tighter.Also didn't care for one or two of the casting choices.
First Cow was good, but I figured out the entire trajectory of the film in the first 10-15 minutes. My mom used to make peach clafouti when I was a kid; it was one of her "go to" easy desserts. Peaches probably make it more of a flaugnarde I guess.
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#6

Post by kongs_speech »

Hi everyone, Kong here. As Sol had given me permission to take over this weekly thread from him, that's what I'm doing. Welcome to the official new "Which Films Did You See Last Week?" zone. Apologies for not throwing together a better intro or some capsule reviews, but I'm running a bit late for this inaugural edition and I wanted to go ahead and get it published. Next week will be different. B)

FEATURES

The Devil All the Time (2020, Antonio Campos) - 4/5
I’m Thinking of Ending Things (2020, Charlie Kaufman) - 3.5/5
Rent-A-Pal (2020, Jon Stevenson) - 3/5
Shirley (2020, Josephine Decker) - 3.5/5
This is Paris (2020, Alexandra Dean) - 4/5

Rifkin’s Festival (2020, Woody Allen) - 4.5/5
The Wolf of Snow Hollow (2020, Jim Cummings) - 4/5
Supernova (2020, Harry Macqueen) - 4/5
Monster Hunter (2020, Paul W.S. Anderson) - 2/5
Little Fish (2020, Chad Hartigan) - 3.5/5

Disclosure (2020, Sam Feder) - 4/5
The Meetings of Anna (1978, Chantal Akerman) - 5/5
True Mothers (2020, Naomi Kawase) - 3/5
The Nest (2020, Sean Durkin) - 3.5/5
Love Affair(s) [2020, Emmanuel Mouret] - 3.5/5

Red Post on Escher Street (2020, Sion Sono) - 4/5
The United States vs. Billie Holiday (2021, Lee Daniels) - 1/5
Better Days (2019, Derek Tsang) - 2/5
The Great Pretender (2018, Nathan Silver) - 1.5/5
Dark Days (2000, Marc Singer) - 4/5

An Oversimplification of Her Beauty (2012, Terence Nance) - 2.5/5
Blonde Venus (1932, Josef von Sternberg) - 4.5/5
The Scarlet Empress (1934, Josef von Sternberg) - 5/5
Pickpocket (1959, Robert Bresson) - 4.5/5
Puberty Blues (1981, Bruce Beresford) - 3.5/5

Towards Mathilde (2005, Claire Denis) - 3/5
Lessons of Darkness (1992, Werner Herzog) - 4.5/5

SHORTS

The Sweet Number - An Experience of Consumption (1969, Valie Export) - 2.5/5
Drawn and Quartered (1987, Lynne Sachs) - 3.5/5
47/91: A Celebration (1991, Kurt Kren) - 2/5
Mojster Plecnik (1953, Mirko Grobler) - 2.5/5
Saute ma ville (1968, Chantal Akerman) - 5/5

La chambre (1972, Chantal Akerman) - 4/5
The Ducksters (1950, Chuck Jones) - 4/5
Tulips Shall Grow (1942, George Pal) - 3.5/5
Zipping Along (1953, Chuck Jones) - 3.5/5
Daffy Duck in Hollywood (1938, Tex Avery) - 2.5/5

Father and Daughter (2000, Michael Dudok de Wit) - 3.5/5
Help! Help! (1912, Mack Sennett) - 2/5
I… Dreaming (1988, Stan Brakhage) - 4/5
Jeux des reflets et de la vitesse (1925, Henri Chomette) - 4/5
Beyond (2002, Yasushi Muraki) - 2.5/5

Daphnia (1928, Jean Painleve) - 4/5
Lambchops (1929, Murray Roth) - 3.5/5
Lamentation (1943, Simon Moselsio) - 2.5/5
Parada Militar (1911)
Nymphlight (1957, Joseph Cornell & Rudy Burckhardt) - 4/5

Permutations (1968, John Whitney, Sr.) - 3.5/5
Proclamation of Montenegro for the Kingdom (1910) - 2/5
Prussian Culture (1908, Mojzesz Towbin) - 3/5
Mindscape (1976, Jacques Drouin) - 4/5
Marian Anderson: The Lincoln Memorial Concert (1939) - 3.5/5

Mutable Fire (1984, Bradley Eros) - 3.5/5
The Golf Specialist (1930, Monte Brice) - 1.5/5
Neighbours (1952, Norman McLaren) - 4.5/5
Sodoma (1970, Kurt Kren & Otto Muehl) - 0/5
Spot the Microdot (1969, Malcolm le Grice) - 3/5

The Lonely Villa (1909, D.W. Griffith) - 2.5/5
The Olympic Games as They Were Practiced in Ancient Greece (1924, Jean de Rovera) - 3.5/5
Bluebeard (1901, Georges Melies) - 4/5
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#7

Post by Torgo »

Well, that escalated quickly. :blink:

I too recall that you wanted to take over (that's why I wrote "today" in my post). I just assumed he saw that nothing happened by 16:00 CET and decided to take action.
Don't know if that's worth fighting over.
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#8

Post by kongs_speech »

Torgo wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:13 pm Well, that escalated quickly. :blink:

I too recall that you wanted to take over (that's why I wrote "today" in my post). I just assumed he saw that nothing happened by 16:00 CET and decided to take action.
Don't know if that's worth fighting over.
No one informed me of a set time. I intended to get it published much earlier, but I've had an interesting morning and just logged onto my computer.
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#9

Post by AdamH »

1) Is Onderhond happy for kongs to host the weekly threads? If yes then there's no issue anyway
2) If Onderhond isn't happy, then is there a solution that will work for both of you?
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#10

Post by Knaldskalle »

Ech. I'm trying to move posts from one thread to the other (since we have 2 competing threads), but the system insists on ordering posts by timestamp. So the "OP" is further down the thread than replies that came early from the other thread. I'll see if I can't make it into less of a mess, but I'm not sure the system lets me do that. You have my apologies for that.


While I'm here, can I please ask everyone (and I mean everyone) to not immediately assume the worst about everyone else? If you guys can't get along, stay away from each other. I don't want to have to start handing out warnings and bans and whatnot. I would much prefer if we could work things out without getting shrill. This is supposed to be a place where people come for the fun of it, not to get into strife. Let's keep it that way, shall we?
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#11

Post by 72aicm »

I love how the moderators now made a third creator of the weekly thread! :lol:
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#12

Post by Knaldskalle »

72aicm wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:42 pm I love how the moderators now made a third creator of the weekly thread! :lol:
Sigh... :$
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#13

Post by Onderhond »

AdamH wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:37 pm 1) Is Onderhond happy for kongs to host the weekly threads? If yes then there's no issue anyway
I honestly just started the thread because I was waiting and remembered sol wasn't hosting anymore. I have no interest in claiming ownership of the thread/project, if someone else really wants to claim it, I'm 100% fine with it.
Knaldskalle wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:41 pm Ech. I'm trying to move posts from one thread to the other (since we have 2 competing threads), but the system insists on ordering posts by timestamp. So the "OP" is further down the thread than replies that came early from the other thread. I'll see if I can't make it into less of a mess, but I'm not sure the system lets me do that. You have my apologies for that.
You can just delete my thread, I still have to original post here :)
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#14

Post by kongs_speech »

I've set a note on my phone to get the thread published every week by 11am CST. Earlier than that, probably, but that's like the absolute deadline I'll allow myself. Does it work for everyone? I really want to do a good job with this.
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#15

Post by Knaldskalle »

Onderhond wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:47 pm
AdamH wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:37 pm 1) Is Onderhond happy for kongs to host the weekly threads? If yes then there's no issue anyway
I honestly just started the thread because I was waiting and remembered sol wasn't hosting anymore. I have no interest in claiming ownership of the thread/project, if someone else really wants to claim it, I'm 100% fine with it.
Knaldskalle wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:41 pm Ech. I'm trying to move posts from one thread to the other (since we have 2 competing threads), but the system insists on ordering posts by timestamp. So the "OP" is further down the thread than replies that came early from the other thread. I'll see if I can't make it into less of a mess, but I'm not sure the system lets me do that. You have my apologies for that.
You can just delete my thread, I still have to original post here :)
Thanks! If I can get you to repost it here I'll delete the other thread once I see it here.
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#16

Post by peeptoad »

kongs_speech wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:50 pm I've set a note on my phone to get the thread published every week by 11am CST. Earlier than that, probably, but that's like the absolute deadline I'll allow myself. Does it work for everyone? I really want to do a good job with this.
This is fine with me, thanks kong. I probably won't have the time or possibly inclination to post every single week anyway. That's true regardless who is the host.
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#17

Post by Onderhond »

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01. 5.0 - Hotel Poseidon by Stefan Lernous (2021)
A modern-day Eraserhead. A film that defies description and simply has to be experienced to be believed. The symbolism is thick, the coherence can be fickle and the brain may protest in disgust, but the creativity, absurdity and humor that bursts from every single scene and character is simply breathtaking. Not the easiest recommend, but if you think you can handle weird, you owe it to yourself to give Hotel Poseidon a try. Mesmerizing cinema.

02. 3.5* - Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes by Junta Yamaguchi (2020)
A very cute and original take on the whole time travel business. Films like these have been quite common lately and rut is certainly setting in, but Yamaguchi found a way to give this premise a fresh and interesting spin. And that's even without counting the single shot setup of the film. After closing up his bar, the owner goes home to rest. When he gets there, he sees himself in the bar, talking to him. Apparently there's a 2-minute time warp between the two spots. When his friends come over, things get a bit trickier as they try to find way to look further ahead into the future. The film offers a nice blend of comedy and sci-fi. It's never too serious, at the same time the plot is pretty intricate and there are some very neat twists along the way. Performances are decent and the single shot approach is creative. Its low budget roots are a little too apparent at times, but otherwise a short, fun and entertaining little gem. Well recommended.

03. 3.5* - Shadows by Glenn Chan (2020)
A fine psychological thriller with some pretty gruesome imagery. Not really the kind of film you'd expect to see coming out of Hong Kong. Maybe that's one of the perks of an industry in shambles, maybe it's because director Glenn Chan is actually from Singapore, but the result is pretty cool regardless. The plot revolves around Ching, a psychiatrist with the peculiar skill to dive into people's unconsciousness. When she is called to evaluate a lauded social worker who just killed his entire family and tried to commit suicide afterwards, she starts suspecting a fellow psychiatrist of messing with this patient's minds. The police investigation is a little plain, but solid performances by Stephy Tang and Philip Keung are a big plus, some gruesome kills pull the film straight into horror territory and the neat score and cinematography give it some extra shine. It may lack the excellence of a true masterpiece, but it's prime filler for genre fans.

04. 3.5* - Hunter Hunter by Shawn Linden (2020)
Hunter Hunter is a somewhat tricky thriller. Starts off well enough, then gets lost in its own twist, only to resurface with a big bang during the finale. I'm still not entirely sure whether it was worth the hassle, that said Shawn Linden shows he has the talent to deliver a mean little thriller/horror crossover. Joseph and his family live in the woods, far away from the civilized world. With winter closing in they need food and hides, but the arrival of a wolf disturbs their efforts to prepare for the coming season. Joseph wants to get rid of the animal as quickly as possible, yet soon finds himself battling a fierce enemy. The performances are solid and the setting is pretty atmospheric. The tension drops a little in the middle and the change of direction feels unnecessary, on the other hand the sprawling finale convinced me it might have been the right choice after all. A fine mix of thriller and horror elements, well recommended for genre fans.

05. 3.5* - Forbidden Martial Arts: The Nine Mysterious Candle Dragons by Dai Yilin (2020)
A fine mix of fantasy and martial arts. The more I see of these recent Chinese genre films, the more I feel lost in the endless maze of releases. They all feel like they're part of bigger franchises (and I guess many are based on fantasy novels), but for an outsider like me there's just no way to tie everything together without guidance. Luckily, most of them are pretty basic fantasy tales. Take a dragon that threatens the neighborhood, a haunted general who protects the people from the dragon and an inn where most of the action takes place, and you have all the ingredients for a solid action film with strong fantasy elements. The cinematography is beautiful, sets and costumes are lush and the action choreography is pretty impressive. The dragon lair is a bit of a bummer though, relying quite heavily on subpar CG to create a high fantasy setting. Performances are pretty decent and the short runtime is a definite plus. All in all this is great genre fare, the kind I can keep watching. It's a good thing then the market is being flooded with these films.

06. 3.5* - Duel for Gold [Huo Bing] by Yuen Chor (1971)
One of Yuen Chor's finer martial arts films. A film that feels at least 10 years ahead of its time, as it would've worked quite well as a bridge between the typical Shaw Bros productions and the early martial arts work of Jackie Chan. That's quite something for a project made during the early years of the Shaw Bros boom. The plot is basic, but what did you expect with a title like Duel for Gold. A safe house houses a big stash of gold, which attracts a few interested parties. They all want to get their hands on the gold, but the house is guarded by a pretty capable martial artist. They'll have to work together to get by him, but splitting up the loot afterwards may prove to be just as treacherous. The fight choreography is pretty imaginative for its time, performances are solid, there's a lot of backstabbing and changing dynamics that keeps the plot interesting, and he sets have that typical Shaw Bros charm. Solid genre fun with some standout moments that make this a worthy Shaw Bros classic. Oh, and one of the best Shaw Bros endings ever.

07. 3.0* - Misty by Kenki Saegusa (1996)
A retelling of the infamous Rashomon story. The concept has been done to death by now, the difference here is that Misty remains quite close to its source, rather than simply nicking the idea and making a more contemporary version of it. There are some obvious pros and cons tied to that setup though. Knowing up front this was a take on Rashomon meant the story became quite predictable. It might've been more fun going in blank, sadly that part was already spoiled for me. Even then, the middle part of the plot would've remained pretty by the numbers once the cat was out of the bag. Luckily, Saegusa put a lot of effort into the cinematography and setting, which kept things interesting even when the plot was merely chugging along. Performances are solid too and the soundtrack is an asset. I liked this quite a bit better than Kurosawa's version, then again that's probably my general lack of interest in classic cinema talking.

08. 3.0* - Love and Monsters by Michael Matthews (2020)
Big budget adventure that plays like a PG version of Zombieland. On the one hand, it's nice to see more creative monster designs and less predictable world building, on the other hand the film's a bit tame and could've used some extra spice, especially during the rather kitschy finale. After being holed up for 7 years, Joel decides it times to man up and face the monsters as he travels towards the colony where his former girlfriend escaped to. The world is overrun by giant monsters (mutated insects), which makes his trip quite dangerous, especially since he's a pretty clumsy guy. The comedy isn't quite sharp enough, the horror elements are very light and the ending is a bit too Power Rangers, but the effects and designs are pretty cool, performances are decent, the world is quite intriguing and the adventure elements are solid. Love and Monsters is light but amusing entertainment, just don't expect it to be very badass.

09. 3.0* - Crest of Betrayal [Chûshingura Gaiden: Yotsuya Kaidan] by Kinji Fukasaku (1994)
Though Kinji Fukasaku is best known for making Battle Royale and a series of 70s/80s Yakuza films, he's actually pretty competent at directing samurai films with a darker edge. Sadly, he didn't produce too many in his career, so Crest of Betrayal is a film that needs to be treasured and cherished. The plot focuses on Tamiya Iyemon, one of the 47 ronin who wandered the land when their master died. He falls in love with Oiwa, a prostitute who earns an extra buck working in local bathhouses. It's all pretty basic samurai stuff, though the second half of the film does have a darker/more fantastical edge to it. The first half is a little dull. A bit too much time is spent on the setup, but once all the pawns are in place and the darker and weirder second half kicks off, it's clear that Fukasaku really feels at home in this genre. Some stark, colorful imagery, decent performances and a solid ending make this another noteworthy Fukasaku flick.

10. 3.0* - Digging Up the Marrow by Adam Green (2014)
A fun and quirky project by Adam Green. Found footage meets mockumentary, with Green and his team playing themselves. Add some horror legends, a madman who may or may not be telling the truth and some freakish monsters and you have all the ingredients for a fun horror flick. Green decides to shoot a documentary on William Dekker, a fan who wrote him about an underground world inhabited by freaks and monsters. Dekker says he knows the entrance to this realm and is willing to let Green tag along, but when not everything about Dekker checks out, things take a turn for the worse. Green playing himself really was a smart move, casting Ray Wise opposite of him is also a stroke of genius. Green pokes some fun at himself and the found footage hype, but stays a little too true to the genre, which results in a somewhat tedious middle part. It picks up near the end again though, so fans of Green and/or horror films needn't worry. A neat twist on a formulaic film.

11. 2.5* - The Night Sitter by Abiel Bruhn, John Rocco (2018)
Some horror films try just a little too hard, The Night Sitter is one of them. No doubt the directors are big horror fans and love their late 70s/80s classics, but film is more than just references and while there are some decent bits and pieces here, overall it lacks the detail and polish of a true horror marvel. Amber gets more than she bargained for when she is invited to sit on Ted Hooper's kid. The boy has crazy nightmares and Hooper has a mad taste for the occult. Meanwhile, Amber's plan is to rob Ted dry, but a mysterious book made of actual witches is bound to mess up her plans (and her evening). The use of bold colors can't hide the relatively poor camera work, performances are mediocre and the balance between horror and comedy is slightly off. There are definitely some good ideas here, but the project comes off a little cheap and the directors seem unable to transcends that on skill alone. Not a terrible film, but for horror enthusiasts only.

12. 2.5* - Missing Link by Chris Butler (2019)
Laika's latest project shows promise, but as their stop-motion work has become more intricate, the charm in their films has slowly diminished. It's still a big step up from your average animal-led US CG animation, even so it's a shame to see Laika's more or less chasing the same audience. Missing Link follows Lionel Frost, a brave adventurer who wants to be recognized by his peers. He travels to the US, hoping to find Sasquatch in order to prove his worth, but he's taken by surprise when he discovers that Sasquatch himself has been leaving clues behind, wanting to be found. While the stop-motion animation is technically proficient (and probably the very best in the business), the art style is a little dull and unadventurous. Sasquatch is also slightly annoying, which is a bummer since he's the film's titular character. There are still some decent laughs, but overall it just isn't quite funny, beautiful or surprising enough to stand out.

13. 2.5* - Not a Game by Jose Gomez (2020)
A pretty basic gamer doc that seems squarely aimed at parents who have no idea what to make of their kids' digital hobby. If you're a bit familiar with the gaming world or the world of esports, this documentary will tell you nothing new, if on the other hand you have parents who are clueless about what you're doing all day behind the computer, it's a decent enough intro for them. There's a bit too much focus on the positives (of course) and even though the doc does touch on some negative aspects of gaming, they're easily put aside as extremes or just part of life. A bit more nuance and scientific fact checking wouldn't have hurt, even though the message itself isn't necessarily wrong. Instead, we see quite a few sob stories about how gaming made the life of the sick and unfortunate better, how people growing up in small towns became big esports stars and other from rags to to riches stories. As an introductory doc it isn't terrible, but it's hardly the comprehensive overview of the gaming world it tries to be.

14. 1.5* - Species II by Peter Medak (1998)
Cheap sequel to a cheap film. I never really understood the appeal of the first Species film, this second one is clearly a quick cash-in, exploiting the success of the first one. In many ways it's even worse than the original, except maybe where it matters the most: the horror bits are actually quite juicy. When a team of astronauts returns from Mars, they bring back some concealed guests. They treat their hosts nicely, but the women they hook up with aren't so lucky. An investigator figures out what's happening and tries to locate the astronauts before the alien threat takes over our world. Performances are absolute crap, the film looks dirt cheap (especially the sci-fi elements) and the police investigation is dull at best. The horror effects look pretty cool though and there are quite a few exploding bodies and tentacles to keep things interesting. It's not enough to redeem this film, but it does make it bearable.

15. 1.0* - Fire and Ice by Ralph Bakshi, Tom Tataranowicz (1983)
I guess I should be happy with Bakshi making animated films that are aimed at non-kiddie audiences, but their excessive 80s kitsch, godawful art styles and bland characters/writing don't really get me all that excited. Fire and Ice was my third Bakshi and once again a pretty big disappointment. The plot is as basic as you can get, with an age-old good guys (fire) vs bad guys (ice) face-off in a rather boring and unimaginative fantasy setting. It felt like a lazy cut-and-paste job from generic fantasy canon. The intro failed to grab my attention and the film never truly recovered from that. While the animation itself is pretty fluid, the art style is such an eyesore that I didn't care for any of it. The dub is atrocious, characters are dumb and off-putting and the story is a complete snooze. I felt like I was watching bad 80s TV again, only with better animation. Not for me.

16. 1.0* - It's a Gift by Norman Z. McLeod (1934)
W.C. Fields used to be a pretty hip comedian, nowadays, few people even recall his name. Where actors like Chaplin, the Marx Brothers and Keaton are still remembered for their comedy, W.C. Fields is material for the hardened classic cinema fan. After watching It's A Gift, it's not hard to see why. There isn't much in the way of a plot here, the film plays like a series of extended sketches. Fields plays Harold Bissonette, a grumpy old man who is tired of his family and decides to chase his dream: own an orange plantation. All of that is just an excuse for running through a series of gags. The comedy hasn't aged very well though. Predictable jokes, many of which outstay their welcome, poor timing, not much variation. And since there isn't anything else, it's a pretty tough film to like. At least the runtime is relatively short, I would've given it an even lower score if they'd stretched it to 90 minutes.

17. 1.0* - The Lady Vanishes by Alfred Hitchcock (1938)
One of Hitchcock's final pre-Hollywood projects. I can usually stomach them just a little better compared to his USA films, but The Lady Vanishes didn't do it for me at all. It's extremely one-note, setting up a rather simple mystery, then dragging it out for an entire film in typical Hitchcock fashion. When the Trans Europ Express stops because of bad weather, Iris gets to talking with misses Froy in a small hotel alongside the tracks. Once the train is back on its way, Iris notices Mrs Froy is absent from the train. She sounds alarm, but people pay little attention to her claims that and old lady is missing. A missing old woman and endless conversations that ponder the mystery of her disappearance. The train isn't a very exciting setting either, not in the least because Hitchcock loves working with cheap projections. There are some twists in the final part, but even that was a given 5 minutes in. I found this incredibly dull, par for the course for my journey through Hitchcock's oeuvre I'm afraid.

18. 1.0* - Way Out West by James W. Horne (1937)
Long form Laurel & Hardy. Like most early comedies, it relies entirely on its main protagonists. If you think L&H are funny you'll probably like this film, if you can't stand their antics, there's really nothing for you here. The film is as generic as they come, it's just the comic duo doing their thing. The plot is an excuse for some comedy, nothing more. Laurel & Hardy are on their way to notify a girl whose father passed away. Along with the sad news, they also have a deed to a gold man to hand over. Of course, they let the cat out of the bag before they meet the girl, which triggers the interest of a bunch of scammers. I don't like Laurel & Hardy and I don't like their comedy. The jokes are absolutely dire and predictable and there's really nothing else. The same facial expressions, the same dynamic, the same gags, over and over again. Oh, and some musical bits, that added absolutely nothing at all. At least the film was short.

19. 0.5* - Law of the Border [Hudutlarin Kanunu] by Lütfi Akad (1966)
Once considered lost, but restored based on a single remaining print. Stuff of legends that tends to transcend the actual quality of the film, which is definitely the case here. Law of the Border is poorly put together, sluggish and static. It even made me wonder if this was really worth saving. The film plays like a Turkish western, which should give you a pretty good idea of what to expect plot wise. A very simple story about a poor man trying to smuggle a flock of sheep across the border. Border patrol isn't too happy with his plans and a cat and mouse game begins. The camera work is excruciatingly static, conversations and performances are wooden, the soundtrack is unfitting and the editing appears haphazard. There's a bit more action near the end of the film, but even that feels fake and crummy. Pretty dull and amateurish, the 70-minute runtime felt at least twice as long.
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#18

Post by kongs_speech »

peeptoad wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:56 pm
kongs_speech wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:50 pm I've set a note on my phone to get the thread published every week by 11am CST. Earlier than that, probably, but that's like the absolute deadline I'll allow myself. Does it work for everyone? I really want to do a good job with this.
This is fine with me, thanks kong. I probably won't have the time or possibly inclination to post every single week anyway. That's true regardless who is the host.
:cheers: 🐁
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#19

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Torgo wrote: April 25th, 2021, 6:10 pm Alright, you got me curious enough. ;) This hasn't even 5 votes on IMDb so far. How did you become aware of it? Will this get a wide release or be lost in obscurity?
I was going through the BIFFF roster and the poster immediately jumped out. As for availability, hopefully the director will keep his word and I'll have an interview ready in the coming weeks. It's one of the questions I asked, since I really wanted to know myself :D
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#20

Post by RolandKirkSunglasses »

@PdA

Really enjoyed Crainquebille, "Then There Were None" was ok.

@bing

Did not enjoy "Waking Life" at all, felt like it was written by a 1st year philosophy student.



As for me, a productively bad week with some highlights:

Plan 9 from Outer Space (1957): Very low-budget, poorly made but hard to hate.

Midnight Run (1988): Forgettable buddy movie saddled with an awful score by Danny Elfman. De Niro and Grodin share some chemistry but a lot of the jokes fall flat.

Naked Gun 2.5: Smell of Fear (1991): Zucker humour is usually hit-and-miss, most of this falls in the latter category.

Gloria (1980): Gena Rowlands is her usual great self but the child actor is horrible beyond words, the ultra-cringe ending makes this the worst Cassavetes I've seen.

Midaregumo (1967): The last film by Mikio Naruse is another tale of forbidden love, this time without Hideko Takamine. Yumiko (Yoko Tsukasa) loses her husband in a car accident just before they're about to leave for America. The guilty man (Yuzo Kayama) is wracked with guilt and slowly falls for Yumiko. The melodramatic story and colour photography reminds me of Douglas Sirk, not a bad film but not a great one either.

L'Inhumaine (1924): My first Marcel l'Herbier based on the stories of Joris-Karl Huysmans, what it lacks in narrative it makes up for in style and the grand sets designed by Fernand Leger. Very good, will have to check out "l'Argent".

Shen Nu (1934): Enjoyable silent melodrama from China about a single mother trying to do right for her little boy.

Mad Max: Fury Road (2015): Went into this with rockbottom expectations, couldn't even rise above that.

Stranger than Paradise (1984): An important independent movie, starts off pretty awful but picks up slightly. Jim Jarmusch has done much better.

The Bad and the Beautiful (1952): Dated Hollywood movie about the awfulness of Hollywood even though the ending wants to have its cake and eat it too. The lengthy flashback scenes become a bore, Kirk Douglas is alright but the melodrama becomes too much, can't compare with "Sunset Boulevard".

The Devil-Doll (1936): Erich von Stroheim as joint-screenwriter, Lionel Barrymore in drag and Todd Browning directing, a bizarre combination in a weird yet unsatisfying horror flick. Some nice special effects with the murderous dolls but could've been a whole lot more sinister.

Shakespeare in Love (1998): Contrived, dull Oscar-bait relying on lame jokes, pretty costumes and lots of Weinstein-approved sex scenes for awards. Lifeless direction and an overbearing score combined with a clichéd storyline and dodgy acting make this a chore to sit through.

Lonesome (1928): Experimental silent flick with some awkwardly inserted sound scenes. Overall it's worth a look but the whole time watching it I thought "2nd-rate Sunrise".

Criss Cross (1949): Burt Lancaster in another noir flick trying to recreate "The Killers". A couple good scenes and nice photography brought down by a poorly-paced story. OK, could've been better.

Opening Night (1977): Gena Rowlands gives it her all in this superficial story of a woman on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Rambles on in places, one of Cassavetes' better films.

The Room (2003): Easily one of the worst films I've ever seen, also one of the most unintentionally hilarious.

Terra em Transe (1967): Glauber Rocha's brand of politically raw, experimental filmmaking isn't to all tastes, this one works in places and bores in others.

How Green was my Valley (1941): Maudlin and idealistic view of Wales at the turn of the century, beautifully photographed but rather long-winded.
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#21

Post by Torgo »

RolandKirkSunglasses wrote: April 26th, 2021, 12:25 am Plan 9 from Outer Space (1957): Very low-budget, poorly made but hard to hate.
The Room (2003): Easily one of the worst films I've ever seen, also one of the most unintentionally hilarious.
:woot: Two of the greatest here. You make me smile by only naming them, hehe.
But how to rate films like this? I immediately gave The Room an 1/10 as the most inapt film of the 00s, but it brought so much joy into my life. Phew, tough.
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#22

Post by kongs_speech »

Torgo wrote: April 26th, 2021, 3:11 am
RolandKirkSunglasses wrote: April 26th, 2021, 12:25 am Plan 9 from Outer Space (1957): Very low-budget, poorly made but hard to hate.
The Room (2003): Easily one of the worst films I've ever seen, also one of the most unintentionally hilarious.
:woot: Two of the greatest here. You make me smile by only naming them, hehe.
But how to rate films like this? I immediately gave The Room an 1/10 as the most inapt film of the 00s, but it brought so much joy into my life. Phew, tough.
I think I give The Room a 4/5. Whether it's a bad film or not is irrelevant. It's better than most good ones.
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#23

Post by viktor-vaudevillain »

Love & Friendship (Whit Stillman, 2016) - 6+

Douro, Faina Fluvial / Working on the Douro River (Manoel de Oliveira, 1931) - 8

Im Schatten / In the Shadows (Thomas Arslan, 2010) - 8

Le navire Night / The Night Ship (Marguerite Duras, 1979) - 9

Brigadoon (Vincente Minnelli, 1954) - 9

A Man and a Camera (Druido Hendrikx, 2021) - 7 CPH:DOX 2021

Birds of America (Jacques Lœuille, 2021) - 7+ CPH:DOX 2021

Didn't finish:
Fantastic Mr. Fox (Wes Anderson, 2009)
What I watched last week:
In the Mood for Love (WKW, 2000) - 10 rewatch

Celles qui s’en font (Germaine Dulac, 1928) - (u)

The Sky on Location (Babette Mangolte, 1983) - 10

Das Glück meiner Schwester / My Sister's Good Fortune (Angela Schanelec, 1995) - 8

Secret Defense (Jacques Rivette, 1998) - 9

Until the End of the World (Wim Wenders, 1991) - 8 the loooong cut
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#24

Post by Torgo »

viktor-vaudevillain wrote: April 26th, 2021, 8:18 am Birds of America (Jacques Lœuille, 2021) - 7+ CPH:DOX 2021
Oh. Look at this bird, this majestic bird. Do you like birds?
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#25

Post by viktor-vaudevillain »

Torgo wrote: April 26th, 2021, 2:13 pm
viktor-vaudevillain wrote: April 26th, 2021, 8:18 am Birds of America (Jacques Lœuille, 2021) - 7+ CPH:DOX 2021
Oh. Look at this bird, this majestic bird. Do you like birds?
Well, they're beautiful creatures, and interesting as they are so alien from how human beings' are constructed. I'm not a "bird nerd" myself, but I have a few friends who are.
Birds of America is just as much about birds and the extinction of specific kinds of American birds as it is about ecological crisis, the annexation of the Native American population and man's relationship with nature through cartography, art and science - but also how these in someway have isolated man even more from nature. In the film there's some beautiful silent moving images of the Ivory-billed woodpecker, which is nearly extinct today, coupled with sound recordings of it from around the same time (1920's). The recordings were haunting in the way only early nature footage can be. Also a lot of the beautiful drawings by ornithologist Audubon (the film's main subject) is shown in the film, I find those extremely fascinating.
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#26

Post by shugs »

1. Vampires (John Carpenter, 1998) - 8/10
2. End of Days (Peter Hyams, 1999) - 6/10
3. Day of the Woman (Meir Zarchi, 1978) - 8/10
4. Opera (Dario Argento, 1987) - 9/10
5. It Chapter Two (Andy Muschietti, 2019) - 6/10
6. The Limey (Steven Soderbergh, 1999) - 6/10
7. L'aile ou la cuisse [The Wing or The Thigh?] (Claude Zidi, 1976) - 6/10

Vampires was surprisingly enjoyable given all the bad things I've read about it. Nothing cooler than vampires coming out of the desert sand.
End of Days is a movie in which Arnold drinks a shake made from eggs, beer and old pizza and fights Satan.
Day of the Woman had no reason to be this good. I watched it to improve my cinephile cred, but it was actually well shot and Camille Keaton gave a tremendous performance. And I was expecting it to be disturbing, but it still got under my skin.
Opera was bonkers and probably my favourite Argento after Suspiria. Might even surpass it on a rewatch, I don't know.
It Chapter Two wasn't that great. The adult actors don't work well together, and it's tonally all over the place.
The Limey had some nifty editing, but it didn't grab me. Was cool to see scenes from an old movie in which Terence Stamp acted as flashbacks.
The Wing or The Thigh? is a Louis de Funes movie, so you can tell already if you're going to like it or not. :D I used to watch his movies on TV as a kid, so I'll always have a soft spot for him, but I thought this was one of his weaker efforts.
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#27

Post by kongs_speech »

shugs wrote: April 26th, 2021, 5:56 pm 1. Vampires (John Carpenter, 1998) - 8/10
2. End of Days (Peter Hyams, 1999) - 6/10
3. Day of the Woman (Meir Zarchi, 1978) - 8/10
4. Opera (Dario Argento, 1987) - 9/10
5. It Chapter Two (Andy Muschietti, 2019) - 6/10
6. The Limey (Steven Soderbergh, 1999) - 6/10
7. L'aile ou la cuisse [The Wing or The Thigh?] (Claude Zidi, 1976) - 6/10

Vampires was surprisingly enjoyable given all the bad things I've read about it. Nothing cooler than vampires coming out of the desert sand.
End of Days is a movie in which Arnold drinks a shake made from eggs, beer and old pizza and fights Satan.
Day of the Woman had no reason to be this good. I watched it to improve my cinephile cred, but it was actually well shot and Camille Keaton gave a tremendous performance. And I was expecting it to be disturbing, but it still got under my skin.
Opera was bonkers and probably my favourite Argento after Suspiria. Might even surpass it on a rewatch, I don't know.
It Chapter Two wasn't that great. The adult actors don't work well together, and it's tonally all over the place.
The Limey had some nifty editing, but it didn't grab me. Was cool to see scenes from an old movie in which Terence Stamp acted as flashbacks.
The Wing or The Thigh? is a Louis de Funes movie, so you can tell already if you're going to like it or not. :D I used to watch his movies on TV as a kid, so I'll always have a soft spot for him, but I thought this was one of his weaker efforts.
The Limey is actually a really fantastic film, in my opinion. One of the best revenge flicks I've seen. Opera Is a lot of fun, very inventive and playful Argento. Day of the Woman (or as I call it, I Spit on Your Grave) is brilliant. I agree with you, it's a much better film than it ever needed to be. Despite the all the abuse and torture Keaton endures, I actually find it very empowering in regards to her gruesome revenge. I have a magnet on my fridge that came with the deluxe Blu-Ray set. :D
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#28

Post by kongs_speech »

Torgo wrote: April 26th, 2021, 2:13 pm
viktor-vaudevillain wrote: April 26th, 2021, 8:18 am Birds of America (Jacques Lœuille, 2021) - 7+ CPH:DOX 2021
Oh. Look at this bird, this majestic bird. Do you like birds?
Everybody knows that the bird is the word!
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#29

Post by shugs »

kongs_speech wrote: April 26th, 2021, 7:14 pm The Limey is actually a really fantastic film, in my opinion. One of the best revenge flicks I've seen. Opera Is a lot of fun, very inventive and playful Argento. Day of the Woman (or as I call it, I Spit on Your Grave) is brilliant. I agree with you, it's a much better film than it ever needed to be. Despite the all the abuse and torture Keaton endures, I actually find it very empowering in regards to her gruesome revenge. I have a magnet on my fridge that came with the deluxe Blu-Ray set. :D
You need to post a pic of the magnet. :D
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#30

Post by viktor-vaudevillain »

Perception de Ambiguity wrote: April 25th, 2021, 4:22 pm Baxter, Vera Baxter (1977, Marguerite Duras) 7

یک اتفاق ساده / A Simple Event / Yek Etefagh sadeh (1973, سهراب شهید ثالث/Sohrab Shahid Saless) 6

Geschichtsunterricht (1972, Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub; written by Bertolt Brecht) 7-

First Man (2017, Fred Fougea & Jérôme Guiot) 8

Monangambeee / Monangambé (1968, Sarah Maldoror) 2
Baxter is exceptional. 9 or higher from me.

Looking forward to A Simple Event. Still Life is a favorite of mine. Also looking forward to his German films, which look very different from his Iranian output.

Geschichtsunterricht - 8 - as dry as it gets. Not my favorite Straub-Huillet, but still very strong stuff. I like the more cartographic approach to film they display in this and how (as more than often) past, present and future collapses into one another through the palimpsestic intersection of picture, sound and text material.

First Man - you sure know how to find your 'dawn of homo sapiens' films. One of the smaller niches in cinema.

Monangambé - 7
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#31

Post by viktor-vaudevillain »

kongs_speech wrote: April 25th, 2021, 8:12 pm
Blonde Venus (1932, Josef von Sternberg) - 4.5/5
The Scarlet Empress (1934, Josef von Sternberg) - 5/5
Pickpocket (1959, Robert Bresson) - 4.5/5
3 of my favorite films watched in a row there (l) Cinema never got more baroque than the Sternberg/Dietrich films, and narrative cinema never got more minimalist than with Bresson. Vital in their completely different ways.
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Perception de Ambiguity
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#32

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

viktor-vaudevillain wrote: April 28th, 2021, 1:13 pm Baxter is exceptional. 9 or higher from me.

Looking forward to A Simple Event. Still Life is a favorite of mine. Also looking forward to his German films, which look very different from his Iranian output.

Geschichtsunterricht - 8 - as dry as it gets. Not my favorite Straub-Huillet, but still very strong stuff. I like the more cartographic approach to film they display in this and how (as more than often) past, present and future collapses into one another through the palimpsestic intersection of picture, sound and text material.

First Man - you sure know how to find your 'dawn of homo sapiens' films. One of the smaller niches in cinema.

Monangambé - 7
Baxter - Definitely another successful mood piece. When it comes to creating an atmosphere that pulls me in Duras sure seems to know how to deliver, especially considering that it's getting more and more rare for me for a film to pull me into its world with something other than its words - I watch too much, live too little. The text/scenario here wasn't of particular interest to me, though, and in retrospect I was more compelled by 'Agatha et les lectures illimitées' some weeks ago, but for which I was in a sub-optimal frame of mind while viewing. I'm looking forward to 'Le navire Night' next.

Is there any Straub-Huillet that comes to mind that screams "Perception de Ambiguity" to you?

First Man - Do I? What other films are you thinking of? Off the top of my head (quality stuff) that comes to mind is 'Quest for Fire' and possibly 'Iceman' (watched it ages ago) and to some extent "2001" and 'Altered States'. I've watched a whole bunch of documentaries on apes in the past few years, which typically can be watched as "living history" studies of our ancestry to some degree. I'm definitely interested in finding more on the subject, but when it comes to prehistoric man it seems easier to find ones that are more concerned with proving the ancient astronauts theory. :turned:

Urs:
Haven't seen any of yours from this week, except for the unfinished one. Is 'Birds of America' something for me? Is it a documentary?

In the Mood for Love - 7 - Have you seen the Johanna Vaude distillation? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXjqbZDAoIg
Celles qui s’en font - yeah
Secret Defense - "Happened" to see this at a film festival in 2010. - 7
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viktor-vaudevillain
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#33

Post by viktor-vaudevillain »

Perception de Ambiguity wrote: April 28th, 2021, 9:10 pm
viktor-vaudevillain wrote: April 28th, 2021, 1:13 pm Baxter is exceptional. 9 or higher from me.

Looking forward to A Simple Event. Still Life is a favorite of mine. Also looking forward to his German films, which look very different from his Iranian output.

Geschichtsunterricht - 8 - as dry as it gets. Not my favorite Straub-Huillet, but still very strong stuff. I like the more cartographic approach to film they display in this and how (as more than often) past, present and future collapses into one another through the palimpsestic intersection of picture, sound and text material.

First Man - you sure know how to find your 'dawn of homo sapiens' films. One of the smaller niches in cinema.

Monangambé - 7
Baxter - Definitely another successful mood piece. When it comes to creating an atmosphere that pulls me in Duras sure seems to know how to deliver, especially considering that it's getting more and more rare for me for a film to pull me into its world with something other than its words - I watch too much, live too little. The text/scenario here wasn't of particular interest to me, though, and in retrospect I was more compelled by 'Agatha et les lectures illimitées' some weeks ago, but for which I was in a sub-optimal frame of mind while viewing. I'm looking forward to 'Le navire Night' next.

Is there any Straub-Huillet that comes to mind that screams "Perception de Ambiguity" to you?

First Man - Do I? What other films are you thinking of? Off the top of my head (quality stuff) that comes to mind is 'Quest for Fire' and possibly 'Iceman' (watched it ages ago) and to some extent "2001" and 'Altered States'. I've watched a whole bunch of documentaries on apes in the past few years, which typically can be watched as "living history" studies of our ancestry to some degree. I'm definitely interested in finding more on the subject, but when it comes to prehistoric man it seems easier to find ones that are more concerned with proving the ancient astronauts theory. :turned:

Urs:
Haven't seen any of yours from this week, except for the unfinished one. Is 'Birds of America' something for me? Is it a documentary?

In the Mood for Love - 7 - Have you seen the Johanna Vaude distillation? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXjqbZDAoIg
Celles qui s’en font - yeah
Secret Defense - "Happened" to see this at a film festival in 2010. - 7
I can definitely recognize the "it's getting more and more rare for me for a film to pull me into its world" feeling. But it comes in nadirs and highs for me. In periods of life you're simply more 'open' towards the world and thus you more easily get pulled into a film's world. But for me actually in these periods I usually don't watch as many films, as I'm 'out there' in 'the world'. But sure, Duras' work also always pulls me in. Very much mood pieces.

Too Early/Too Late is probably the one of their films I'd recommend you the most. But given you liked Geschichtsunterricht to some degree I'd also recommend you From the Clouds to the Resistance which is in the same vein. I wouldn't say their later works and Straub's solowork is something up your alley.

I just remember you watching 'Quest for Fire' some years ago, where you said something along the lines: "I don't know if I'd recommend this film, except if you're interested in man's “pre-history and how it could be portrayed in cinema", implying that this niche in cinema was of interested to you.

Birds of America is a "Farockian" documentary. it should be of your interest.

I'll watch the Johanna Vaude thing! thanks.
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#34

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

viktor-vaudevillain wrote: April 29th, 2021, 12:38 pm
Perception de Ambiguity wrote: April 28th, 2021, 9:10 pm
viktor-vaudevillain wrote: April 28th, 2021, 1:13 pm Baxter is exceptional. 9 or higher from me.

Looking forward to A Simple Event. Still Life is a favorite of mine. Also looking forward to his German films, which look very different from his Iranian output.

Geschichtsunterricht - 8 - as dry as it gets. Not my favorite Straub-Huillet, but still very strong stuff. I like the more cartographic approach to film they display in this and how (as more than often) past, present and future collapses into one another through the palimpsestic intersection of picture, sound and text material.

First Man - you sure know how to find your 'dawn of homo sapiens' films. One of the smaller niches in cinema.

Monangambé - 7
Baxter - Definitely another successful mood piece. When it comes to creating an atmosphere that pulls me in Duras sure seems to know how to deliver, especially considering that it's getting more and more rare for me for a film to pull me into its world with something other than its words - I watch too much, live too little. The text/scenario here wasn't of particular interest to me, though, and in retrospect I was more compelled by 'Agatha et les lectures illimitées' some weeks ago, but for which I was in a sub-optimal frame of mind while viewing. I'm looking forward to 'Le navire Night' next.

Is there any Straub-Huillet that comes to mind that screams "Perception de Ambiguity" to you?

First Man - Do I? What other films are you thinking of? Off the top of my head (quality stuff) that comes to mind is 'Quest for Fire' and possibly 'Iceman' (watched it ages ago) and to some extent "2001" and 'Altered States'. I've watched a whole bunch of documentaries on apes in the past few years, which typically can be watched as "living history" studies of our ancestry to some degree. I'm definitely interested in finding more on the subject, but when it comes to prehistoric man it seems easier to find ones that are more concerned with proving the ancient astronauts theory. :turned:

Urs:
Haven't seen any of yours from this week, except for the unfinished one. Is 'Birds of America' something for me? Is it a documentary?

In the Mood for Love - 7 - Have you seen the Johanna Vaude distillation? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXjqbZDAoIg
Celles qui s’en font - yeah
Secret Defense - "Happened" to see this at a film festival in 2010. - 7
I can definitely recognize the "it's getting more and more rare for me for a film to pull me into its world" feeling. But it comes in nadirs and highs for me. In periods of life you're simply more 'open' towards the world and thus you more easily get pulled into a film's world. But for me actually in these periods I usually don't watch as many films, as I'm 'out there' in 'the world'. But sure, Duras' work also always pulls me in. Very much mood pieces.

Too Early/Too Late is probably the one of their films I'd recommend you the most. But given you liked Geschichtsunterricht to some degree I'd also recommend you From the Clouds to the Resistance which is in the same vein. I wouldn't say their later works and Straub's solowork is something up your alley.

I just remember you watching 'Quest for Fire' some years ago, where you said something along the lines: "I don't know if I'd recommend this film, except if you're interested in man's “pre-history and how it could be portrayed in cinema", implying that this niche in cinema was of interested to you.

Birds of America is a "Farockian" documentary. it should be of your interest.

I'll watch the Johanna Vaude thing! thanks.
Right, this is my experience as well, that like most things it comes in waves and that during times of "living" watching films can be of little interest...just that it has been quite a while that I last have been in the situation of "living".
As for your "open towards the world" explanation, incidentally in yesterday's chapter (the day before your post) of my book of "useless thoughts I haven't asked for but which have become rare enough for me to feel compelled to make note of" I had an insight on openness. That to be open means for the brain to be quick at adapting to changing circumstances.
Right now the ability to get pulled into a film I'd more explain by saying that some fuel is required to stir the flames of the art, since ultimately it's what you bring to the work that either makes it a fruitful experience or not. Art can be very stimulating, of course, but if you are not stimulated by life then very little impetus will come from your side and the potentially rich fertilizer will fall on barren soil. Living a little makes art personal, you actively relate to it. Which perhaps is just to say that imagination is required, with a dulled mind neither your memory tends to be too sharp nor your thinking about the future too active, which all feeds into this. A quote that I have stored for next week's thread speaks of a link between memory and imagination/creativity. "Our ability to remember the past is linked to our ability to imagine the future." Relating to a world that isn't yours is very much a creative act. But maybe that's missing the point and the ability to be simply pulled into a film has more to do with openness, I mean children are defined by their openness and the way a child experiences a film is akin to looking out of a window, they are right there. And what also comes to mind now that I heard recently on the subject of openness is that to be open doesn't mean to know nothing. So this relates to the memory thing, memory begets imagination.

Those two Straub-Huillets look of interest, will keep them in mind, thanks.

Birds of America - watchlisted
We do not have to understand new things, but by dint of patience, effort and method to come to understand with our whole self the truths which are evident.Image
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#35

Post by Torgo »

Onderhond wrote: April 25th, 2021, 9:00 pm
Torgo wrote: April 25th, 2021, 6:10 pm Alright, you got me curious enough. ;) This hasn't even 5 votes on IMDb so far. How did you become aware of it? Will this get a wide release or be lost in obscurity?
I was going through the BIFFF roster and the poster immediately jumped out. As for availability, hopefully the director will keep his word and I'll have an interview ready in the coming weeks. It's one of the questions I asked, since I really wanted to know myself :D
It's at 5 votes already with a displayed rating! From there we just watch it grow.
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#36

Post by Onderhond »

Torgo wrote: May 2nd, 2021, 10:14 pm It's at 5 votes already with a displayed rating! From there we just watch it grow.
For modern cinema, there's Letterboxd. Ten times the votes already :P
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