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Onderhond
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#41

Post by Onderhond »

Completely unfamiliar with this one. Only have 1 film rated and that one only had a 1-minut short by Rivette that I don't remember at all.

01. 1.0* - Lumière and Company (anthology)
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#42

Post by outdoorcats »

beavis wrote: April 15th, 2021, 10:27 am I'd like to keep this topic active for a while (as I haven't been doning director rankings for ages now ;))
So I take the liberty to throw in another now it has become quiet and nobody stepped in yet

Another one I've almost have seen the complete director filmography of: Jacques Rivette https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0729626/

1 - Out 1, noli me tangere (1971) - 9
2 - Haut bas fragile (1995) - 8,5
3 - La belle noiseuse (1991) - 8
4 - L'amour par terre (1984) - 8
5 - Paris nous appartient (1960) - 8
6 - Lumière et compagnie (1995) - 7,5
7 - L'amour fou (1969) - 7,5
8 - La bande des quatre (1989) - 7,5
9 - Jeanne la Pucelle I - Les batailles (1994) - 7,5
10 - Jeanne la Pucelle II - Les prisons (1994) - 7,5
11 - La religieuse (1966) - 7,5
12 - Merry-Go-Round (1981) - 7,5
13 - Noroît (1976) - 7
14 - Le pont du Nord (1981) - 7
15 - Histoire de Marie et Julien (2003) - 7
16 - Secret Défense (1998) - 7
17 - Va savoir (2001) - 7
18 - Hurlevent (1985) - 7
19 - Ne touchez pas la hache (2007) - 7
20 - Duelle (une quarantaine) (1976) - 6
21 - Céline et Julie vont en bateau - Phantom Ladies Over Paris (1974) - 6

That last one I've seen ages ago and I disliked it a bit on the day, while on paper it should be one of my favorites... I wouldn't mind rewatching it someday...
Good one! Though here is where I suddenly guiltily remember all the Rivette I haven't seen yet, despite the fact he's made so many of my favorites.

Chronologically:

Paris Belongs to Us (1960) 10
Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974) 10
Merry-Go-Round (1980) 8
Le pont du nord (1981) 9
Paris s'en va [sh.] (1981) 9
Joan the Maid, Part I: The Battles (1994) 9
Joan the Maid, Part II: The Prisons (1994) 9
Va savoir (1999) 5
The Duchess of Langeais [aka Don't Touch the Axe] (2007) 7.5

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#43

Post by insomnius »

Rivette

Superb
1. Out 1, noli me tangere (1971) 10
2. Duelle (une quarantaine) (1976) 10
3. Le pont du Nord (1981)
4. Noroît (1976)
5. Merry-Go-Round (1981)
6. Céline et Julie vont en bateau (1974)

Great
7. Paris s'en va (1981)
8. Out 1: Spectre (1972)
9. La religieuse (1966)
10. Histoire de Marie et Julien (2003)

Good
11. La Belle noiseuse (1991)
12. Divertimento (1992)
13. Jeanne la Pucelle II - Les prisons (1994)
14. Jeanne la Pucelle I - Les batailles (1994)
15. Paris nous appartient (1961) needs a rewatch
16. Hurlevent (1985)
17. Secret défense (1998)
18. Le coup du berger (1956)

Didn't resonate with
19. Ne touchez pas la hache (2007)
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#44

Post by clemmetarey »

1. La religieuse (1966) 7/10 (Favorite)
2. La Belle Noiseuse (1991) 7/10
3. Histoire de Marie et Julien (2003) 7/10
4. Paris nous appartient (1961) 6/10
5. Le pont du Nord (1981) 6/10
6. Céline et Julie vont en bateau: Phantom Ladies Over Paris (1974) 5/10
7. La bande des quatre (1989) 5/10
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#45

Post by beavis »

Onderhond wrote: April 15th, 2021, 10:41 am Completely unfamiliar with this one. Only have 1 film rated and that one only had a 1-minut short by Rivette that I don't remember at all.

01. 1.0* - Lumière and Company (anthology)
I don't think it is something for you, although he is the "weirdest" of the Cahiers guys, a bit like Ruiz, although he goes more for theatre where Ruiz goes more for literature... both have a pulpy sense of adventure and humor too, but not in a way that would today be considered "cool" ;)
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#46

Post by Onderhond »

beavis wrote: April 15th, 2021, 12:17 pm I don't think it is something for you, although he is the "weirdest" of the Cahiers guys, a bit like Ruiz, although he goes more for theatre where Ruiz goes more for literature... both have a pulpy sense of adventure and humor too, but not in a way that would today be considered "cool" ;)
I know Rivette by name but apart from La Belle Noiseuse, none of the titles ring a bell, so I guess he's quite niche.

Looking on ICM it's the film from his oeuvre with the most official checks, though mostly coming from the 1000-entry lists. I'm still quite a bit removed from 12-list films though, I'm sure I'll get there eventually. Probably not anytime soon, so no worries :P
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#47

Post by OldAle1 »

RIvette....Rivette...hmmm...who...what...weird...I think I know the name...but? Ah, got it. The guy who has 11 films on my favorite films list. Could have more actually. Yeah.

As I did with Hou...* means seen in the cinema, + means seen multiple times

TOP 100 ALL TIME:
1. Out 1 *
2. L'amour fou *+
3. Céline et Julie vont en bateau *+

TOP TIER
4. Noroît *+
5. Duelle *+
6. Paris nous appartient *+
7. La religieuse *+
8. L'amour par terre
9. Haut bas fragile *
10. Le pont du nord

SPECIAL TIER
11. Out 1: Spectre

EXCELLENT
12. La belle noiseuse *+
13. La bande des quatre
14. Merry-Go-Round
15. Secret défense *
16. Ne touchez pas la hache
17. Historie de Marie et Julien *
18. Va savoir
19. Paris s'en va (short)

VERY GOOD
20-21. Jeanne la Pucelle *
22. Hurlevent
23. 36 vues du Pic Saint Loup
24. Le coup du berger (short)

OK
25. Divertimento *

Still waiting for those early, re-discovered shorts; would have thought they'd have screened, been made available by now.

Fairly confident in my feelings on the first 10; #11 I only saw in the horrible VHS dupe that was circulating for years - I have the BD now of course but just haven't gotten around to it or to a re-watch of #1. Many of the films from 15 on down I particularly need to see again.

Oh and I have seen Lumière et compagnie, when it was new, but don't really remember any of it apart from Lynch's piece which I've seen a few times (and which was easily the most interesting one).
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#48

Post by brokenface »

Broadly:

8/9+
Celine & Julie
Duelle
Haus Bas Fragile
Le Pont du Nord

7+
La belle noiseuse
Secret Defense
Histoire de Marie et Julien
Paris nous appartient
La religieuse / The Nun
Noroit
Out 1: Spectre

6+
L'amour fou
Divertimento
Jeanne la Pucelle I+II
Merry-Go-Round
Va savoir
L'amour par terre / Love on the Ground
La bande des quatre / Gang of Four

And the diplomatic 'Did not resonate' category:
Hurlevent / Wuthering Heights
Ne touchez pas la hache / The Duchess of Langeais
36 vues du Pic Saint Loup / Around a Small Mountain
Out 1, noli me tangere

[yes I'm a heathen who much prefers the shorter Spectre, though one day I do need to rewatch the full thing on BR as originally saw as subpar download]
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#49

Post by Torgo »

5/10
Céline et Julie


~ fin ~
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#50

Post by pitchorneirda »

2nd favourite director after Béla Tarr

1. Secret Défense 10/10 (Top 10)
2. Histoire de Marie et Julien 10/10 (Top 20)
3. La Belle Noiseuse 8/10 (Top 100)
4. Va Savoir 7/10
5. Ne touchez pas la hache 7/10
6. La Bande des Quatre 7/10
7. Le Pont du Nord 7/10
8. Céline et Julie vont en bateau 7/10
9. Merry-Go-Round 6/10
10. Hurlevent 6/10
11. 36 vues du pic Saint-Loup 5/10
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#51

Post by Onderhond »

Torgo wrote: April 15th, 2021, 1:33 pm 5/10
Céline et Julie
We've seen an equal amount of films from Rivette, yet you've seen 193 times more of his work than I did :D
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#52

Post by klaus78 »

1. La Belle Noiseuse (1991) 8/10
2. Céline et Julie vont en bateau (1974) 8/10
3. Paris nous appartient (1961) 8/10
4. Duelle (1976) 8/10
5. La religieuse (1966) 8/10
6. Out 1, noli me tangere (1971) 7/10
7. Le pont du Nord (1981) 7/10
8. L'amour fou (1969) 7/10
9. Noroît (1976) 6/10
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#53

Post by St. Gloede »

Rivette is easily one of the weakest major New Wave directors as far as I'm concerned, and his enthusiasm for extremely long run-times is not a fantastic selling point. That said, Out 1, did really impress and my favourite of his is also over the 4-hour mark.

1. La belle noiseuse (1991) 9.0
2. Céline et Julie vont en bateau - Phantom Ladies Over Paris (1974) 8.5
3. Le pont du Nord (1981) 8
4. La religieuse / The Nun (1966)
5. Out 1, noli me tangere (1971)
6. 36 vues du Pic Saint Loup / Around a Small Mountain (2009)
7. Duelle (une quarantaine) (1976) 7
8. Noroît (1976)
9. Paris nous appartient / Paris Belongs to Us (1961)
10. L'amour par terre / Love on the Ground (1984) 6
11. L'amour fou (1969)
12. Histoire de Marie et Julien (2003) 5
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#54

Post by Lammetje »

Hou Hsiao-Hsien

1. Dong dong de jiàqi (A Summer at Grandpa's): 4/10

Jacques Rivette

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#55

Post by RolandKirkSunglasses »

St. Gloede wrote: April 15th, 2021, 2:27 pm Rivette is easily one of the weakest major New Wave directors as far as I'm concerned, and his enthusiasm for extremely long run-times is not a fantastic selling point. That said, Out 1, did really impress and my favourite of his is also over the 4-hour mark.
Are you saying you don't find him....Riveting? :D

One of my favourite directors off the strength of Celine and Out, haven't seen some of his films for a while and need to rewatch a couple:


Love:

Celine & Julie Go Boating
Out 1 (needs a rewatch)

Really like:

Gang of Four
Duchess of Langeais

OK:

The Nun
Paris Belongs to Us (needs a rewatch)
La Belle Noiseuse
L'Amour Fou
Jeanne la Pucelle
Story of Marie and Julien

Don't like:

Love on the Ground
Up Down Fragile
Around a Small Mountain
Wuthering Heights
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#56

Post by zuma »

01 - La belle noiseuse (1991) - 10

02 - Ne touchez pas la hache (2007) - 7

03 - Le pont du Nord (1981) - 6

04 - Paris nous appartient (1960) - 6

05 - Céline et Julie vont en bateau (1974) - 5.5

06 - L'amour fou (1969) - 5

07 - Out 1: Spectre (1972) - 4

08 - Out 1, noli me tangere (1971) - 3
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#57

Post by Ivan0716 »

1. Céline and Julie Go Boating 1974 ★★★★★
2. La Belle Noiseuse 1991 ★★★★½
3. Duelle 1976 ★★★★
4. The Story of Marie and Julien 2003 ★★★★
5. The Nun 1966 ★★★★
6. Secret Defense 1998 ★★★½
7. Paris Belongs to Us 1961 ★★★½
8. Le Pont du Nord 1981 ★★★½
9. Noroît 1976 ★★★½
10. Out 1 1971 ★★★
11. The Duchess of Langeais 2007 ★★★
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#58

Post by hurluberlu »

1. La Belle Noiseuse (1991) 9
2. Céline et Julie vont en bateau: Phantom Ladies Over Paris (1974) 8
3. Va Savoir (2001)
4. Noroît (1976) 7
5. Jeanne la Pucelle I & II (1994)
6. Paris nous appartient (1961)
7. Duelle (1976)
8. Le Pont du Nord (1981) 6
9. L'amour fou (1969)
10. Ne touchez pas la hache (2007) 5
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#59

Post by tommy_leazaq »

1. Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974) - 64/100
2. La Belle noiseuse (1991) - 60/100
3. Twilight (A Quarantine) (1976) - 58/100

Nothing had hit the Favorite zone (70+) yet but I can see the potential so will explore him soon again.
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#60

Post by beavis »

17 responses in half a day already!
love it

My overall feel on all the lists so far is that it just confirms Rivette is hard to get into and even his most widely seen / respected movies can end up at the bottom of a list, but then when he hits home, he really hits home. I don't think it is fair to compare all the famous Nouvelle Vague directors and then call one weaker than the other, but it might be fair to label Rivette "interesting". The most interesting? maybe not, but the "team" wouldn't be the same without him! ;)
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#61

Post by Torgo »

I had a similar takeaway, in that some people have 2-3 highly adored titles at their Rivette top and then so many only "really good" or "good" films. Could mean he's not a very consistent director or not playing it too safe (= freethinking) ..
Since St. Gloede warned us that he's actually one of the weakest directors from the Nouvelle Vague, I guess I will not find out the truth any soon. :P
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#62

Post by St. Gloede »

I'm not sure what is unfair by pointing out that I am personally less impressed/in-love with his overall filmography than I am with most of the other major names he is associated with. Just my opinion/experience. ;)

I do think Rivette has a relatively consistent style, and while not so apparent here there are people who will hail him as one of the all-time greats and with good reason. He certainly created a unique, recognizable style, and if it hits home, epic scale films like these become overpowering experience with near infinite amount of pleasure to give - and rediscover on rewatches.

I have a theory of why this seems to be a fairly consistent reaction in this thread to simply find a large portion of his work good, and it is the flipside of the above. You have to really impress to keep someone's attention for 3, 4, 5+ hours. You need to deliver greatness/brilliance every step of the way, and never outlast your welcome. In general, at least I will this way - if a film is thoroughly well made, with plenty of great ideas, but outlast it's welcome and become tiresome it will get a good, but not great final reaction.
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#63

Post by beavis »

Of course everything everybody says is just a personal opinion, no worries, and I think I agree with all you are saying in that last post.
The wording "weak" just implies an objective measure of incompetence to me, and if that conclusion was derived just from having more favorites from the likes of Godard or Varda, than that feels unfair for what we seem to agree is just a challenging director, doing entirely what he wants with no regards for how to sell it. I think that is a strength for somebody making art!
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#64

Post by St. Gloede »

Torgo wrote: April 15th, 2021, 8:31 pm Since St. Gloede warned us that he's actually one of the weakest directors from the Nouvelle Vague, I guess I will not find out the truth any soon. :P
*Of the 9 big names, all of which are generally heralded as all-time greats. All should be explored properly.

Just to be clear, I'm not comparing him to Kast, Doinel-Valcroze, Colpi, Astruc, Moullet, etc.

If I were to rank the big names (overall) I'd say:

JLG
Varda
-
Resnais
Rohmer
-
Truffaut
Chabrol
Marker
-
Rivette
-
Demy

*Of the small names, Rozier is thoroughly impressive with his tiny filmography - and Rivette may just be the one he is closest to - granted, only to the extent Moullet is comparable to Godard.
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#65

Post by beavis »

I couldn't do such a ranking I think but I'd say Resnais had made some of my biggest favorites, Godard is the director I have seen the most of and learned the most of (not just of the wave, but the entire world and all time) and Rohmer is the first one I'd say I love (his work ;))
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#66

Post by St. Gloede »

beavis wrote: April 15th, 2021, 9:11 pm Of course everything everybody says is just a personal opinion, no worries, and I think I agree with all you are saying in that last post.
The wording "weak" just implies an objective measure of incompetence to me, and if that conclusion was derived just from having more favorites from the likes of Godard or Varda, than that feels unfair for what we seem to agree is just a challenging director, doing entirely what he wants with no regards for how to sell it. I think that is a strength for somebody making art!
I never said "weak", I said "weaker". ;)

We are talking about some of the greatest directors of all time, so I don't think "weaker" implies any degree of incompetency. It merely implies that I find him less great than most of the other big names (that's not just down to number of favourites mind you - but it has been too long since I saw the majority of these films).
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#67

Post by Carmel1379 »

I made a screenshot of a cat to represent 'Céline et Julie Vont En Bateau' which is also 'Daisies' by Vera from 1966
arritame no yume nikki & I suppose I’ll have to add the force of gravity to my list of enemies
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#68

Post by St. Gloede »

beavis wrote: April 15th, 2021, 9:25 pm I couldn't do such a ranking I think but I'd say Resnais had made some of my biggest favorites, Godard is the director I have seen the most of and learned the most of (not just of the wave, but the entire world and all time) and Rohmer is the first one I'd say I love (his work ;))
That's interesting, I would not have expected you to love Rohmer more than Resnais and Godard, but if I recall correctly you are not sold on the latter films of the latter two, correct? I can see why - and I'm with you on Resnais. The ranking would have been very different if I set the cutoff to the early 80s.
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#69

Post by Fergenaprido »

I've only seen La religieuse (1966). Gave it a 7.2/10. It was a film for French class in uni that I couldn't see but managed to catch it years later. It's actually the reason that my professor invited me to a Kvery Gspecial place to grab the movie from, a few years before I joined icm. It's something I feel I should have liked more than I did. Perhaps it will improve upon a rewatch.

Looking at the rest of his filmography, nothing really interests me, and the very long runtimes don't appeal to me either.
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#70

Post by OldAle1 »

Since Gloede did his little ranking, I'll do one too. I no longer rank directors 1 through xxx, but have them in groups - and even that is frustrating and feels wrong sometimes. Rivette WAS #1 before I went to the group rank thing, and remains "first among equals" in the New Wave,/Left Bank and French cinema generally for me. So something like this for this group -

1a - Rivette
1b - Godard
1c - Varda

2 - Resnais

3a - Demy
3b - Marker
3c - Rohmer

4 a - Chabrol
4b - Duras
4c - Truffaut

Does Duras belong with this crowd? I don't know. But I'm putting her there anyway, though she might deserve to be at a rank one higher. There's also Rouch and Pollet - haven't seen enough from either yet, and neither is primarily a feature director, so they're a little outside the "normal" grouping anyway. There's also Phillippe Garrell, a bit younger - but he started making films in 68 so why not? Also haven't seen that much from him, nor from Eustache, Rozier, Moullet, or some other even more esoteric figures. Jackie Raynal's Deux fois, also from 1968 (what a year for French cinema, despite the unrest - or maybe because of it), would put her in contention as a major figure except she never really followed it up. And now we're really at the fringes.

Why Rivette? Because I like his use of duration, his evocation of conspiracies and Deep Meanings even when they are obviously not there, his sense of playfulness, his melding of theater, film, the real world - his use of direct sound should be noted, a big part in his overall cinematic design, the way he uses actors, the "world" he creates, particularly in the films made from L'amour fou through, I dunno, Le pont du Nord or so. There is a particular kind of magic in all of those films - and several of his others - that touches me in a deep place, maybe the place where believers feel God or something like it.
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#71

Post by Fergenaprido »

I haven't seen much from the French New Wave crowd, so I can't really rank them. All I know is I like Varda, but I've primarily seen her later documentaries, which is what introduced me to her. I think The Gleaners and I was my first Varda.

Directors roughly ranked below, based only on feature-length films. Ranked within each director, bold films are ones I think are considered part of the New Wave.

Varda - 7 films & 7 shorts
8.0 Faces Places (2017)
8.0 The Gleaners and I (2000)
7.8 Happiness (1965)
7.8 Jacquot de Nantes (1991)
7.6 The Beaches of Agnès (2008)
7.4 Pointe-Courte (1955)
7.0 Lions Love (1969)

Truffaut - 4 films & 1 short
8.0 The Last Metro (1980)
7.6 The 400 Blows (1959)
7.0 Confidentially Yours (1983)
7.0 The Woman Next Door (1981)

Chabrol - 2 films & 0 shorts
7.8 This Man Must Die (1969)
7.4 The Good Time Girls (1960)

Resnais - 4 films & 3 shorts
7.4 Mélo (1986)
7.4 My American Uncle (1980)
6.0 Last Year at Marienbad (1961)
4.4 Life Is a Bed of Roses (1983)

Rohmer - 1 film & 1 short
7.6 Suzanne's Career (1963)

Rivette - 1 film & 0 shorts
7.2 The Nun (1966)

Demy - 1 film & 1 short
7.0 The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964)

Godard - 3 films & 3 shorts
7.2 Breathless (1960)
6.4 The Little Soldier (1963)
1.8 The Image Book (2018)

Marker - 0 films & 4 shorts

I'm definitely going to explore more of Varda's work, and I'm also interested in continuing with Truffaut and Chabrol. Resnais's been hit and miss with me, and Rohmer is underseen, but I'll watch more from both as well. Demy and Rivette I won't seek out, but I won't avoid them either. Godard and Marker don't really impress me but I may give select films a chance. I haven't seen anything from Duras or the other minor directors Gloede mentioned, except two of Luc Moullet's shorts from the 80s that I quite liked.
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beavis
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#72

Post by beavis »

are we all forgetting Malle, or have I somehow missed how he isn't part of the new wave? :)

and as for Duras, she is obviously part of the Left Bank crowd (if only for writing the Resnais feature debut), but for me she is in a class of her own and I am such a huge fanboy, I rank her high above any of the nouvelle vague directors!!

also a shout out for Demy, sad to see he is always such an overlooked voice, especially since his wife has been reevaluated to such a large extend.
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#73

Post by beavis »

St. Gloede wrote: April 15th, 2021, 10:01 pm
beavis wrote: April 15th, 2021, 9:25 pm I couldn't do such a ranking I think but I'd say Resnais had made some of my biggest favorites, Godard is the director I have seen the most of and learned the most of (not just of the wave, but the entire world and all time) and Rohmer is the first one I'd say I love (his work ;))
That's interesting, I would not have expected you to love Rohmer more than Resnais and Godard, but if I recall correctly you are not sold on the latter films of the latter two, correct? I can see why - and I'm with you on Resnais. The ranking would have been very different if I set the cutoff to the early 80s.
Godard has his difficult sides... it makes him complex and interesting but also hard to fully love. Maybe we can talk some more on him when we are eventually doing his ranking, as he seems to be also very "controversial" (lot of haters and passionate lovers) on this forum, looking at previous discussions of his work. Rohmer has built just the perfect body of work, even the weaker films are wonderfully Rohmer-esque, and his characters resonate the strongest with me... I have very strong identification with especially Le Rayon Vert and Conte de Printemps.
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#74

Post by OldAle1 »

beavis wrote: April 16th, 2021, 5:34 am are we all forgetting Malle, or have I somehow missed how he isn't part of the new wave? :)

and as for Duras, she is obviously part of the Left Bank crowd (if only for writing the Resnais feature debut), but for me she is in a class of her own and I am such a huge fanboy, I rank her high above any of the nouvelle vague directors!!

also a shout out for Demy, sad to see he is always such an overlooked voice, especially since his wife has been reevaluated to such a large extend.
Duras is, for me overall the most difficult of all these filmmakers - Godard being the only one in the same category, and only part of the time. But a re-watch (3rd viewing actually) of India Song last year along with a few other films, and then seeing another one this spring has certainly moved her higher in my pantheon even if my ranking doesn't show it yet. She is, though, not a director I look forward to in the same way as many of the others, in that I cannot just say "I think I'll watch a Duras film now". Everything has to be right, I have to be in the right mood and VERY awake.

Good point about her connection to Resnais - and Jackie Reynal was the editor on some of Rohmer's early films, and there are many other correspondences between this group, or these groups, that do make it seem like a more unified movement sometimes than it probably was. Malle and Tavernier and some other directors from the era do seem to stand outside but I'm sure there are connections between all of them on some level, if sometimes quite minimal connections. Not sure why I've yet to read a book on the New Wave - not sure what's out there in English, I think I'm going to have to look now.

As to Demy - I think his problem for a lot of people on this forum, and probably most cineastes these days, is that he mostly made musicals or romantic films, neither of which is particularly popular now among the still mostly-male, mostly-cynical film buff world. Chabrol also stuck mostly to one genre/style/mood, but it's noir/crime, so he probably gets more respect in some quarters, though his massive output probably works against him. Of course the older crowd of critics and filmmakers sees things differently, with Demy much more highly regarded on TSP than Chabrol (or Rivette for that matter).
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#75

Post by St. Gloede »

There are massive numbers of fun little links,

For instance, Godard acted in early shorts by Rivette, Rohmer and Varda, while Truffaut's first film was shot in Doinel-Valcroze's appartment.

Continuing that train, it was actually Godard who hooked Demy up with his Breathless producer - Georges de Beauregard - who in turn would not just produce Demy's debut, Lola - but also Varda's Cleo From 5 to 7 and Rozier's debut Adieu Philippine - before working with several of the new wavers, from Rivette's La religieuse and L'amour fou, Rohmer's La collectionneuse, 3 for Chabrol and several Godards.

Raoul Coutard, who shot 14 out of Godards 15 solo films from Breathless to Weekend, was actually also the cinematographer on 5 Truffaut films and 3 Demy films - including Lola - meaning he almost shot Breathless and Lola back to back. He also shot a Kast (Portuguese Vacation), and Rouch's Chronicles of a Summer (if we include Rouch).

*It is worth noting that Beauregard produced and Coutard shot all the early Pierre Schoendoerffer films - perhaps we should start including him.

Flipping more firmly to the left bank Henri Colpi edited both Hiroshima mon amour and Last Year at Marienbad (as well as an early Varda short) before directing The Long Absence (1961) and who wrote The Long Absence? Oh, Duras of course. For his next film - who did he cast as the lead actress? Françoise Brion - who of course was Doinel-Valcroze's wife - and frequent actress.

And the number of actors moving between them, etc. is quite high - though there were plenty of overlaps between people outside of the movement as well.

-

Duras is a director who has grown on me a lot. My rewatch of India Song is undoubtedly one of the most rewarding rewatches of the year - and I should rewatch other early films of hers which I did not love. I would place her somewhere not that far outside my top 100 directors, and with a few successful rewatches she could climb in. I did not quite consider headspace, but that could certainly be part of it.

As for the link to the new wave it is a bit tricky. She directed her first film in '67 so a little late - but if Eustache can get included, she certainly should - and her early ties with the Left Bank would make her the most natural addition. I also feel it is odd that Robbe-Grillet is not counted as left bank. He wrote Last Year at Marienbad, which very much feels like an ARG film as well as a Resnais. In fact, his next few films all seemed to play with ideas from Marienbad - from L'immortelle's plays with interpretation - and matching the visual aesthetics, to The Man Who Lies playing with the idea of second-guessing what is and is not lies to both Trans-Europ-Express and especially Eden and After playing with both perspective of reality and narrative/linear play.

Oh, and who did he cast as L and N in L'immortelle - Françoise Brion and Jacques Doniol-Valcroze.
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#76

Post by beavis »

Robbe-Grillet and Duras are two big names in the Nouveau Roman movement and their Left Bank links stems mostly from this, I don't think they actively wanted to be part of Nouvelle Vague with their movies, but links between all of them are of course unavoidable. The Zanzibar group is also linked but seperate in my mind.
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#77

Post by Y U M E »

JACQUES RIVETTE

★★★★ | 8.4
01. Jeanne la Pucelle – 1re Partie: Les Batailles (1993)

★★★¾ | 8.0
02. Jeanne la Pucelle – 2ème Partie: Les Prisons (1993)
03. Out 1 (1970)

★★★½ | 7.6
04. La Religieuse (1965)
05. Histoire de Marie et Julien (2003)

★★★¼ | 7.2
06. Céline et Julie Vont en Bateau (1974)
07. La Bande des Quatre (1988)
08. Secret Défense (1997)
09. Paris Nous Appartient (1960)
10. L’Amour par Terre (1984)

★★★ | 6.8
11. Le Pont du Nord (1981)
12. Va Savoir (2001)
13. La Belle Noiseuse (1991)

★★¾ | 6.4
14. Noroît (une vengeance) (1976)

★★½ | 6.0
15. Duelle (une quarantaine) (1976)
16. Merry-Go-Round (1980)

★★¼ | 5.5
17. Ne Touchez Pas la Hache (2007)

N/R
Une Aventure de Ninon (1995) segment from «Lumière et Compagnie»

«Hurlevent» is scheduled for next Wednesday, by courtesy of beavis, whose dvd I borrowed last month :circle:
Last edited by Y U M E on April 18th, 2021, 3:23 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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#78

Post by outdoorcats »

Alright, I'll be the first besides beavis to name a director:

Alfred Hitchcock

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A long career, yet I still haven't seen so many of his films...but from what I've seen, he might have one of the highest average ratings for me (perhaps the highest for directors I've seen 10+ films from).

The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934) 8.5
The 39 Steps (1936) 9
Sabotage (1936) 8
The Lady Vanishes (1938) 9
Rebecca (1940) 8
Foreign Correspondent (1940) 8
Suspicion (1941) 8
Saboteur (1942) 9
Notorious (1946) 8
Rope (1948) 9
Strangers on a Train (1951) 8.5
Rear Window (1954) 10
To Catch a Thief (1955) 6
Vertigo (1958) 10
North by Northwest (1959) 10
Psycho (1960) 10
The Birds (1963) 8.5

Most under-rated: Saboteur. It's so much fun and contains some of his best set-pieces, but I don't often see it listed by critics as one of his best.

I believe I've also seen Shadow of a Doubt a long time ago, but I'm not sure and I don't have a rating for it, so may as well add it to the "to see" list.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
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#79

Post by pitchorneirda »

1. Rear Window 8
2. Rope 7
3. Psycho 6
4. Shadow of a Doubt 6

Below 6, rating unsure

5. The Trouble with Harry
6. The Man Who Knew Too Much
7. North by Northwest
8. Vertigo
9. Frenzy
10. Notorious

Not pure dislikes but not any good

11. Family Plot
12. Marnie
13. The Birds
14. Torn Curtain
15. Saboteur
Last edited by pitchorneirda on April 18th, 2021, 3:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#80

Post by Teproc »

One of my five favorite directors, and the one I've seen most features from - though there's still many I have to see still.

1. Vertigo - 10/10
2. Rear Window - 10/10
3. Psycho - 9/10
4. Strangers on a Train - 9/10
5. Frenzy - 8/10
6. Rebecca - 8/10
7. Rope - 8/10
8. North by Northwest - 8/10
9. The Lady Vanishes - 8/10
10. To Catch a Thief - 7/10
11. Dial M for Murder - 7/10
12. Spellbound - 7/10
13. Jamaica Inn - 7/10
14. Notorious - 7/10
15. The 39 Steps - 6/10
16. Under Capricorn - 6/10
17. Shadow of a Doubt - 6/10
18. Topaz - 6/10
19. Family Plot - 6/10
20. Marnie - 5/10
21. Suspicion - 5/10
22 - Saboteur - 5/10
23 - The Birds - 4/10
Last edited by Teproc on April 18th, 2021, 3:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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