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Best movie theatre and worst movie theatre experience

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Lakigigar
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Best movie theatre and worst movie theatre experience

#1

Post by Lakigigar »

The movies i've watched in theatres. I rarely go.

National Treasure II: Book of Secrets (2007)
Nanny McPhee (ugh)
Intouchables (with school)
Victoria: third best
Inside Out
Umimachy Diary: worst (not because of movie)
Son of Saul
Black
Ixcanul
Sangailes vasara
Everest: second best
The Neon Demon: best
Nerve
20th Century Women: because of my Elle Fanning crush after The Neon Demon lol.

I think this is it LOL. After that social anxiety became to high... Wished i went to some others like Home, Mustang, American Honey, Mandy and a few others.

It doesn't even make sense... It's so random. I've seen

I know some of you have seen 1000 movies in theatres, but that will never happen in my life.
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#2

Post by mjf314 »

Best:
A Brighter Summer Day (it's one of my favorite movies, but this was my first time seeing it in good quality)

Worst:
One Child Nation (the fire alarm went off, so I didn't get to finish the movie; at least I got a refund, but it wasted a few hours of my time)

There are probably other bad experiences that I'm forgetting, but that's the first one that came to mind.
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burneyfan
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#3

Post by burneyfan »

Definitely the worst (I know I told this story on this forum several years ago): it was in Barcelona in 1993, and the film was Mùi du du xanh (The Scent of Green Papaya). I chose to sit far back on the right aisle, because the film threatened to be fairly full, and I don't like being crowded. All of the seats filled up except one -- by the time the film started, the seat to my left was empty, which was great. About 20-25 minutes into the film, a very, VERY fat man came in and took the seat to my left. The seats were not small, but he was so big that he took up all of his seat and spilled a lot into mine (and probably into the person's on his left, but I never saw).

A couple of minutes after he sat down, he took out a paper bag of what must have been individually-wrapped hard candies. He would very noisily twist open the wrappers for what seemed like ages, and then he would suck and munch on the candies VERY loudly -- someone might have even thought he was trying to be funny. Every so often, he must have eaten a particular flavor that he didn't like, because on those occasions, he would turn his head to the right, lean forward slightly, and spit/SHOOT the candy out of his mouth like a cannon, so that it would ricochet off the wall across my aisle, and then I would hear the candy rolllllllllllllling downhill toward the screen on the hard floor. Maybe 30-45 minutes later, he finished his bag of candies and immediately fell asleep in his seat, sprawling even further into mine and snoring. He woke up again when the film finished and the lights came on, and then he finally moved enough that I could squeeze out of my seat. The movie was actually good, but the experience...well, it was definitely very memorable, even almost 30 years later.
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AdamH
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#4

Post by AdamH »

burneyfan wrote: February 7th, 2021, 1:24 am Definitely the worst (I know I told this story on this forum several years ago): it was in Barcelona in 1993, and the film was Mùi du du xanh (The Scent of Green Papaya). I chose to sit far back on the right aisle, because the film threatened to be fairly full, and I don't like being crowded. All of the seats filled up except one -- by the time the film started, the seat to my left was empty, which was great. About 20-25 minutes into the film, a very, VERY fat man came in and took the seat to my left. The seats were not small, but he was so big that he took up all of his seat and spilled a lot into mine (and probably into the person's on his left, but I never saw).

A couple of minutes after he sat down, he took out a paper bag of what must have been individually-wrapped hard candies. He would very noisily twist open the wrappers for what seemed like ages, and then he would suck and munch on the candies VERY loudly -- someone might have even thought he was trying to be funny. Every so often, he must have eaten a particular flavor that he didn't like, because on those occasions, he would turn his head to the right, lean forward slightly, and spit/SHOOT the candy out of his mouth like a cannon, so that it would ricochet off the wall across my aisle, and then I would hear the candy rolllllllllllllling downhill toward the screen on the hard floor. Maybe 30-45 minutes later, he finished his bag of candies and immediately fell asleep in his seat, sprawling even further into mine and snoring. He woke up again when the film finished and the lights came on, and then he finally moved enough that I could squeeze out of my seat. The movie was actually good, but the experience...well, it was definitely very memorable, even almost 30 years later.
Great story :lol:
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#5

Post by blocho »

I once wrote a humorously inclined essay about the perils of going to the art house and repertory movie theaters of New York. Here's an excerpt which recounts an episode I experienced at Lincoln Center:

Though the bilious bunch at MoMA has no competitors when it comes to consistent complaining, those grumps never reached the high of indignation that I have seen at Lincoln Center’s Walter Reade Theater. And one particular incident there showed me that an easily irritated audience sometimes yields benefits. The art house crowd’s irascible ways, in other words, are a double-edge sword that can be turned against pesky interlopers as easily as it can attack a fellow filmgoer.

I attended an evening screening of Carl Foreman’s The Victors, a little known, 176-minute World War II epic. Gavin Smith, the slightly pompous editor of Film Comment and a programmer at Walter Reade, got up on stage to introduce the movie. He spoke for about five minutes about his own impressions of the film and then announced that he had been communicating with Foreman’s son and had a lengthy e-mail from him that he would read.

“Take a vote,” a woman sitting in the audience and glancing over a newspaper said loudly.

“Excuse me,” Smith responded.

She didn’t even look up from the Metro Section. Democracy has rarely been so laconically initiated: “Take a vote to see if we want to hear it.”

That got the hoi polloi going.

“It’s a three-hour movie, for God’s sake.”

“Just read it later.”

“We didn’t pay to listen to you talk.”

A few voices spoke up in favor of a recitation, but Smith looked like he’d just swallowed an oyster that had gone bad. Desperately holding onto his swiftly disappearing status as grand arbiter, he called for a voice vote. The audience wasn’t so dumb to agree to a system ripe for electoral manipulation; Everyone raised their hands as well. But the votes were evenly split, and the result was chaos.

“Some of us have trains to catch.”

“Post it on the internet.”

“Let him speak.”

Smith, challenged with mutiny, drew up all the authority a nebbish art house theater programmer can muster.

“Surely,” he said, “we can give the son of Carl Foreman the respect to listen to what he wrote.”

This line of reasoning proved wildly unpopular. Nobody knew who the hell Carl Foreman was and most cared even less about his son. But Smith proved resolute. The democratic process had failed to achieve consensus, so with a touch of masterly discipline he made an executive decision. He read roughly five sentences and then scurried to the back of the auditorium like a penguin lurching away from a predatory petrel.

Where Godard and the New Wave failed, a bunch of ornery New Yorkers succeeded. Finally, a real revolution of the cinema.
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#6

Post by blocho »

I've also been in a theater when someone had a heart attack. That really sucked. Obviously, those incidents will always be the worst.
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#7

Post by mjf314 »

Speaking of sons of directors, that reminds me of a story.

I was trying to get a ticket for Endless Poetry. A few of the showtimes had a Q&A with the director, Alejandro Jodorowsky, but they were sold out. Then I noticed one Q&A that wasn't sold out yet, so I quickly got a ticket.

Unfortunately, I didn't bother to read the details. The Q&As with Alejandro were in fact sold out. What I went to was a Q&A with Adan Jodorowsky, Alejandro's son, who played the main character in the film.

It wasn't a bad Q&A, but I was disappointed that I didn't get to see Alejandro.
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#8

Post by 3eyes »

Two stories, both of which I've probably told before:

When I was in 8th grade (1948) the principal in her wisdom decided that the whole Junior High should go to see Henry V. Most of the kids viewed it as getting out of school - they talked, threw popcorn at each other and down from the balcony, etc - completely drowned out the movie.

The circumstances under which I saw Psycho: I went with a neighbor who I didn't know very well. She had her cat in the car. She left toward the end of the movie and didn't come back. I was worried, but when I came out she was in the parking lot trying to coax the cat out from under the car. By now it was after midnight and the undertakers whose business backed on the parking lot were waiting for us to leave so they could bring in a body.

As to best, I guess it was when my favorite aunt took me to see a double bill of Bambi and a Joe E. Brown comedy on Dec 31, 1943 and we sat in the front row, which my parents would never allow me to do.
Last edited by 3eyes on February 7th, 2021, 8:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
:run: STILL the Gaffer!
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tazz_85
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#9

Post by tazz_85 »

Like Laki, i also haven't seen much movies in theathres, and i'm also Belgian. But for no particular reason actually, i didn't have much interest in movies until i started watching (a lot) of movies in 2012. I caught up much since then.
It was only in 2018 when i started going back to theatres, but still only a few blockbusters per year.

These are the ones i have seen, i think, can't remember if there were others:
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (1995)
Independance Day (1996)
The Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring (2001)
The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002)
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
Dunkirk (2017)
Avengers: Infinity War (2018)
Deadpool 2 (2018)
Captain Marvel (2019)
Avengers: Endgame (2019)
Spider-Man: Far from Home (2019)
Joker (2019)
Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker (2019)

Didn't have worse experience though watching these,
the best was the LOTR marathon in 2003, on the day that ROTK came out in movie theatres. What a crazy day. It began with the fellowship in the afternoon, then the two towers in the evening, then ROTK began at exactly midnight
Other nice experience was Independance day in 1996. I was 11 and went together with my parents and grandparents. It was ages since my grandparents went to the theatres (they were in their 60's back then). The movie was awesome, my grandmother was freaked out by those aliens and my dad fell asleep :p
Third best were Deadpool 2 and Avengers Endgame. Awesome reactions by the crowd :)
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prodigalgodson
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#10

Post by prodigalgodson »

blocho wrote: February 7th, 2021, 4:50 am I once wrote a humorously inclined essay about the perils of going to the art house and repertory movie theaters of New York. Here's an excerpt which recounts an episode I experienced at Lincoln Center:
Haha, nice, enjoyed that.
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#11

Post by kongs_speech »

My best theatrical experience was undoubtedly seeing 2001 in IMAX in 2018 in a nearly empty theatre.

I had a panic attack in 2014 and walked out of Neighbors. I think that may be the only time I ever "walked out," though I genuinely wish I hadn't finished Identity Thief, which is a Nazi rally disguised as a broad, R-rated studio comedy.
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