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ICMF-FF5: Programmer's Thread

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zzzorf
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#161

Post by zzzorf »

I am enjoying this process and have watched a few good movies I wouldn't have seen and would like to nominate but if I keep rushing nominations out I will take up my 30 pretty quickly and may miss something good to nominate later. All the same though I want to thank you all for letting me be part of this as I am getting to see movies I wouldn't normally search for and am enjoying them.

I'm not just watching potential nominations though and the other day I watched Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains. For a debut feature that was a well constructed film. I will admit to losing the thread of the story a couple times but it was easily corrected. The cinematography was great, I especially enjoyed the scene of the swim, walk around the water, just beautiful. I have given it a 1 in the spreadsheet but there is a chance it will move up to a 2 once I see how other nominations fall into place.
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#162

Post by xianjiro »

How firm is the 30 limit on nominations?

Also, the problem with waiting: if everyone does that then we'll have too much to try and see as we near the deadline. I'd be happier to work through nominations as early as possible. Once I get through my current stack, I could see updating and restarting my search process once a month, watch what I can find, and repeat.
Last edited by xianjiro on January 30th, 2021, 3:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#163

Post by St. Gloede »

I only have 12 films on my original 50+ Watchlist left - might add a new batch of films tomorrow though it is getting hard with the final films. May try to leave a few open positions, say 3 - 4 even after I'm done with my Watchlist (have 11 left now) as a just in case.

Started working more actively on the nominees as well, will add some thoughts tomorrow.
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#164

Post by xianjiro »

Watched Captain Morten and the Spider Queen (2018) tonight. Personally, I enjoyed the stop motion animation, and even though VFX were mixed in, and until I read the credits I wasn't certain if the whole thing was so well done in CG that it just looked like stop motion though what fun would there have been in that? I just think it's a lot of fun looking at all the stuff that made to bring the story to life.

However, beyond being an interesting reminiscence of animation gone by, I don't think the story is strong or compelling enough to interest an adult audience who isn't keenly interested in animation in the first place. While I think the IMDb ratings are overly harsh, it's likely that audience is keen for yet more Pixar-type animation (or anime of the Japanese variety). Just not clear how many festival goers look to the festival to find movies to play for or watch with younger viewers, but I'd certainly tell parents to check it out. It really strikes me as a made-for-TV animation aimed squarely at the under 10 set. Lots of nifty imagination though the Irish accents might be a challenge for younger audiences from elsewhere.

I'll rate it 2 in our spreadsheet. My guess is we'll have stronger films for the slate and I don't see this really fitting any other slate besides animation. I searched last year's thread on "Morgan" but didn't pull anything up and see only one programmer watched/rated it last time: can this be viewed as not having much interest then?

If IMDb's country classification scheme can be trusted, this is really an Estonian film co-produced with the Irish. Not sure what difference that makes, but it might account for some of the jingoistic racial stereotypes that pop up. That's just another tiny throwback. But The Secret of Kells this is not nor is it of the quality we might hope for from the Irish animation houses.
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#165

Post by beavis »

xianjiro wrote: January 30th, 2021, 8:37 am I'll rate it 2 in our spreadsheet. My guess is we'll have stronger films for the slate and I don't see this really fitting any other slate besides animation. I searched last year's thread on "Morgan" but didn't pull anything up and see only one programmer watched/rated it last time: can this be viewed as not having much interest then?
It's not nominated, that might explain it a bit. Would you like to nominate it?
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#166

Post by xianjiro »

beavis wrote: January 30th, 2021, 9:30 am
xianjiro wrote: January 30th, 2021, 8:37 am I'll rate it 2 in our spreadsheet. My guess is we'll have stronger films for the slate and I don't see this really fitting any other slate besides animation. I searched last year's thread on "Morgan" but didn't pull anything up and see only one programmer watched/rated it last time: can this be viewed as not having much interest then?
It's not nominated, that might explain it a bit. Would you like to nominate it?
not at this stage, but having those "hold overs" as possibilities would make sense should we get to where we need to look for something to plug in a slot. The implication of this post viewtopic.php?f=1&t=5265#p681568 and the way the spreadsheet it set up aren't really clear to newcomers. I don't have the energy to pick things out of my spreadsheet now that I've got it set up. I'll still watch and rate the couple of things that will cross my path - clearly it was easier to get stuff that was nominated last year than about half the stuff currently nominated, but hopefully that will improve as time goes by.
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#167

Post by filmbantha »

I've been working through my 2018/2019 watchlist this past week and it's been fun having a focus even though I haven't discovered any new potential nominees just yet. One of the films I watched has been nominated by Kingink - Rocks. It's a competent and affecting coming of age drama though it didn't strike me as anything particularly special. I gave it a 6/10 and I'm happy to support it with a 1.

I was considering nominating The Wild Goose Lake and I note that both Beavis and Gloede have seen it so would like to hear if this is a film they would support should I nominate it?

I've added two new nominations to the spreadsheet, both of which are currently available on Shudder UK, and may well be available on Shudder in other Countries.

The first is a documentary; Leap of Faith: William Friedkin on The Exorcist. It's a fascinating insight into Friedkin's work on The Exorcist which comprises of interview footage filmed over four days and was surely a huge undertaking for the editor to whittle down all of the footage into a coherent and naturally flowing film, complete with clips from The Exorcist. I am unsure if this will appeal to viewers who are not fans of The Exorcist, however, seeing as we are all huge film fans, I'm confident this fascinating essay film that explores the creative process behind one of the most renowned horror films still has a lot to offer for the festival's audience.

The second is Anything For Jackson, a sinister Canadian horror film about a bereaved Satanist couple who kidnap a pregnant lady to carry out their evil designs. This is one of the creepiest horrors I encountered last year and has bags of originality even if the central conceit is nothing new. It left such an impression on me that I was keen to seek out more work from the Director, only to then be baffled when all of his previous films were made for TV Christmas films?! It seems to be a complete anomaly in his filmography, I just hope it is not a one-off as he seems to have returned to churning out numerous Christmas films once again. I feel like this is a very strong candidate for the Dawn section and I will look forward to hearing if it resonates as well with anyone else who decides to seek it out.

I also had a question in relation to the 10,000 IMDB vote limit. If a film surpasses that number before the festival begins does that mean that it would no longer be eligible for the festival?
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#168

Post by Fergenaprido »

filmbantha wrote: January 30th, 2021, 3:51 pm I also had a question in relation to the 10,000 IMDB vote limit. If a film surpasses that number before the festival begins does that mean that it would no longer be eligible for the festival?
Yes (with rare exceptions). The past two years we've updated the imdb votes around June, so if something crosses the threshold between July and November, then it might still stay in the festival if we feel that it deserves a spot and is still considered to be underseen and in need of showcasing. I think that usually only happens to films within the first year of release... after that, the numbers on imdb climb more slowly.
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#169

Post by zzzorf »

OK well I think I will go with Xianjiro's point on the problem with waiting and add some more nominations now to help fill out some categories.

White Fang (2018) This French animated Netflix film is beautifully animated and while I've learnt it isn't fully faithful to its source novel (is really any movie fully faithful) it still gives a great tale.

Sibel (2018) A Turkish film which sees the title character being a mute 25-year old female who communicates through a special whistling language of the region and her struggle to become more accepted by the community around her.

The Woman Who Keeps a Murderer (2019) A multiple personality horror by Japanese horror director Hideo Nakata (Ringu). I have put a ? in LGBT as it plays a part in the movie but I don't think it is a real fit for what we are going for.

Carmen & Lola (2018) The tagline for this Spanish movie sums up this movie pretty well "The love story of two gypsy girls"

Primal: Tales of Savagery (2019) I may be pushing boundaries a little here as this is a compilation of the first 4 episodes of a TV show but it is presented as a movie here and that is how I watched it. While it isn't my strongest nomination on my behalf I think it has a good chance on picking up some support for the animation section.


I'm still debating over some other nominations (including watching some more), especially a couple of animated movies that I enjoy but I think will be more family orientated than we are looking for in terms of the festival. Also my iCM list with the nominations listed has been updated with all the new nominations.
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#170

Post by St. Gloede »

Caught up on 4 more of nominees:

Aniara:

This was the sleeper surprise for me!

Aniara manages the incredible feat of boost demystifying and lyricising space - coating the journey to Mars with commercialism, work, repetition, rituals and pretences - before attacking hour senses with on-off slow, existential terror in a way I don't think we have ever seen space before. We may indeed recognize elements, from doomed voyages (High Life), interiors resembling cruise ships (Passengers) or simply people living as of earth while slowly losing the plot (Ikarie XB) - and indeed, space has been used to capture existentialism for a long time - just see Solyaris - but, frankly, Aniara brings something uniquely Scandinavian to space. A kind of muted existentialism of manners, mundanity and order, coated in darkly comedic observations and details - it is cold - but not in the way you may be used to.

The way it looks at time, and creates a narrative of the journey - showing us clear changes in culture and general life, just from how certain characters act or dress - is remarkably clever and astute. It also demonstrates just how few effects actually need to be used to create a believable journey through space. The interiors look like a large cruise ship, with clubs, arcades, escalators - it is earth - but it is not. Visions so similar to our reality get added meaning - and the artificiality, replication and need for ways to escape are felt throughout. Low-key, low-budget, but in so many ways larger than life. 8/10 (3).


Djamilia:

Djamila is a visually daring documentary that grabs a hold of one of Kyrgistan's most beloved stories - that of Djamila - a young woman, married against her will, who leaves with her lover - and links it to the life, status and expectations placed upon Kyrgistani women all the way up to today. It degrades its visuals, almost as if to seem like it is from a time far gone: but no, it is 2018 - life has just stood still.

Woman after woman looks into the camera, while telling us their story - and/or how they think about Djamila. Some are named, some are not. We slowly see and learn that little has truly changed. Some even say they were/are less free - while hope for the future still remains. I would say its weakness lays in too much repetition in its stylistic attempts at a disconnect between what we see and hear (women looking into the camera while narrating) as well as a few slightly longer/thinner detours - but it is quite the good film. 6.5/10. (I gave it 1, but could go to 2)


Rejected:

I have mixed feelings about Rejected. On one hand it is a remarkably complex and nuanced look at a culture of misogyny and tradition - and on the other it feels fairly thin, with the budget showing, and not all of its ideas panning out. There is a mixture of interesting visuals ideas, times it simply looks cheap - but: it always carries a punch - literally as well. It is remarkable seeing a mother take extreme beatings in front of her child for daring to come back to her family (the child was had out of wedlock) and interesting still to see the perpetrator be made to be a fairly responsible family man essentially taking care of everyone around him. It does well with creating mixed emotions, evoking sympathy/empathy employing emotive cultural critique.

At the same time, learning the reason why our lead returns is extremely disappointing, and her reasoning is slim - similarly it is extremely forceful and frankly "simple" in its plotting - complete with easy tie-ups that feels about as natural as a b-noir. Overall though, the good beats out the bad with quite a solid margin - and it is extremely hard to look away. 6/10 (1).


Away:

I really liked the core concept of a no-dialogue journey through a mystical land - and it had some serene scenes and a few great visual ideas. However, personally I need to draw a distinction here between minimalism and under-animation. It can really be felt in almost every scene of the film - and it hurts a little. You have these scenes, often close to beauty, but they are just slightly off. The limitations are clear from the beginning, with poor movement as he runs from the monster. This complaint could also be levelled against parts of my nominee The Bears' Famous Invasion of Sicily, there it was only in certain moment - but here it just feels like an entirely unfinished product. 5/10 (0)
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#171

Post by St. Gloede »

I will also add two more nominees of my own:

-

A Metamorfose dos Pássaros / The Metamorphosis of Birds (2020, Catarina Vasconcelos)

Image

The Metamorphis of Birds weaves memories, stories, letters and images into a visually poetic family saga so colourful and alive it is impossible not to become entirely mesmerized. It is truly incredible how it creates such a powerful, dreamlike and hypnotizing fabric that carves out an almost unvisited area in cinema - a true borderland between documentary filmmaking and personal expression. 

It is not so much that it tests the limits of documentation and fiction/recreation - as it rarely attempts the latter. Stories are told or read from diaries, letters or the real people - even the director herself - and yet, what we are shown is first and foremost representation of what we are told - and as it creates a web of remembrances, echos, secrets, longing and connections - including a self-assessment it leaves us with more than the feeling of any kind of traditional essay. A unique, visually incredible slice of cinema unlike almost anything I have seen.


The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open (2019, Elle-Maija Tailfeathers, Kathleen Hepburn)

Image

Stark, intimate and emotionally uneasy - The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open is a raw and believable take on the aftermath of domestic violence. What sets it apart from all other films tackling the subject, is that it genuinely places you in the immediate aftermath - and never lets you go - it plays out the entire set of emotions, thoughts and discussions - however muted, or unhealthy they may be - in one singular take.

We are given a short introduction, letting us get a slight sense of two women's lives - until one of them is standing there - bloody - in the rain - with no shoes on her feet - as her partner screams - far away - barely visible at the other side of a trafficked road - and this is where our two leads meet each other for the first time.

Inspired by a real event in co-director and co-lead Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers' life - the entire set of events feel real - almost too real - from beginning to one. We are on the street as they rush away, we are in the room as Áila tries to tell Rosie to call the police - and we get to experience incredible character dynamics. Áila, supportive, suggestive, cautious, unsure - Rosie, hurt, rude, crude - lashing out - giving abuse. You can feel the unease, not just of the violence, but the conversations, mistrust and choices made. It is excellent in that it manages to get you to relate and empathize with both leads - that seemingly come from such different worlds - and live such different lives. 

What is further impressive is the effect of the single take. While single takes generally aim to either impress with extravaganza, often done for the exercise in itself - The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open never calls attention to itself. It uses singular take to place you right there with our characters, allowing the experience to feel reel and that we are there with them. 

Side note: It is worth mentioning that The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open is an indigenous narrative - both our leads are indigenous women - their background is discussed and explored - and the funding comes, in part from indigenous foundations and organizations.
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#172

Post by Fergenaprido »

Oooh, The Body... got a lot of buzz when it was released. I'll try to catch that one if I can find it.
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#173

Post by St. Gloede »

It's on Netflix.
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#174

Post by Fergenaprido »

Not for me. I checked there, Kanopy, and Mubi. I'm sure it will get some sort of release in the next six months or so.
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#175

Post by xianjiro »

zzzorf wrote: January 30th, 2021, 10:16 pm I'm still debating over some other nominations (including watching some more), especially a couple of animated movies that I enjoy but I think will be more family orientated than we are looking for in terms of the festival. Also my iCM list with the nominations listed has been updated with all the new nominations.
And this goes for everyone: if you want a second opinion on something before nominating, feel free to PM me an iCM or IMDb link and I'll see if I can get it. I'm happy to give it a watch and give you another opinion.

Would that help any?
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#176

Post by beavis »

filmbantha wrote: January 30th, 2021, 3:51 pm I was considering nominating The Wild Goose Lake and I note that both Beavis and Gloede have seen it so would like to hear if this is a film they would support should I nominate it?
The movie has its fans, and it was a step up for me from the director's previous one, but it will only get the slightest support from me, as it looks nice but is still rather forgettable...
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#177

Post by beavis »

Since it is not even the end of February yet (the time when this thread started previously) I wasn't too bothered about how fast the nominations are coming. My watch-list is already overcrowded! And I had hoped starting with my strongest nominations in a smaller batch would give those I would like the most to get support the most attention. If people need help finding any of my nominees they just need to ask in PM for it.
Last edited by beavis on January 31st, 2021, 8:39 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#178

Post by beavis »

I added some ratings to the spreadsheet, sadly have to agree on Away turning out to be a bit of a disappointment, and I really liked A Metamorfose dos Pássaros, Also check out the short "Metáfora ou a Tristeza Virada do Avesso", as it is in the same style and talks about some of the same people.
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#179

Post by St. Gloede »

Unlike Beavis I'm actually very fond of Diao and I love Black Coal, Thin Ice - which I discovered solely due to ICMFF(F)1. Last year I watch his two first features, Uniform and Night Train - and the bleak, quiet mimimalism won me over again and again. That said, Wild Goose Lake disappointed me quite a bit.

While the cinematography is among the best of 2019, the action seemed unintentionally comical and the plot awkward. It took a strange middle path between the kind of silly-pretty minimalist action - which would have worked wonderfully - and the kind of dark, restrained and bleak crime drama he is used to - and it didn't jive for me. The beauty made the silliness seem so far more out of place - as if it was shouting it from a megaphone. Take the scene where someone is stabbed with an umbrella, it opens on the other side and catches his blood. Stunning, well done, insane moment - that just does not work (for me).

I gave it 6, so would add in a 1 rather than a 0.
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#180

Post by St. Gloede »

beavis wrote: January 31st, 2021, 8:30 am Since it is not even the end of February yet (the time when this thread started previously)
Great point, and part of the pitch in starting earlier was that we would be motivated to go through our Watchlist and find more potential nominees - so I don't mind this at all - especially when the sheet already looks like it is on par with last year's.

If anyone have more nominees they are certain of, do add them though. I'm working on finding and watching the ones that interest me (though I still have so many more months to do that).
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#181

Post by kingink »

beavis wrote: January 31st, 2021, 8:25 am
filmbantha wrote: January 30th, 2021, 3:51 pm I was considering nominating The Wild Goose Lake and I note that both Beavis and Gloede have seen it so would like to hear if this is a film they would support should I nominate it?
The movie has its fans, and it was a step up for me from the director's previous one, but it will only get the slightest support from me, as it looks nice but is still rather forgettable...
I have seen the Wild Goose Lake as well and I have to agree that it is quite forgetable. The main reason is the script that is very basic for these kind of films. I feel like |I have seen the same script various times before. So I don't think it will get much support from the three of us that have watched it.
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#182

Post by kingink »

So that's it for Away I guess. For me the animation worked because the story itself is simple or minimal. It all just worked together for me.
I am struggling to find some more animation to nominate ( that are not anime).
Lately I watched the following films but they will not get a nomination from me. I am posting them in case someone have seen them or plans to.

La casa lobo https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8173728/ I gave it a 5 as it got lost in space after a while. No coherence at all and not enough strong visuals to keep my interest.

Josep https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10534996/ If you thought Away had lazy animation, don't watch this one! Most of it are just talking images. Very little animation. Too bad since the theme could be interesting, but it failed for me in the story and the animation.

L'extraordinaire voyage de Maronahttps://www.imdb.com/title/tt6785292/ A sweet little film about the life of a little doggy. Nice animation but in all the film was too family oriented and not strong enough.

Kill It and Leave This Town https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8387918/ Now this is the one I had high hopes for. It won the Special jury Award at the Annecy International Animated Film Festival and sounds interesting mainly because of the Lynchian feeling you get while watching it, but ultimately it suffers from the same problem as some of Lynch's short animations. Just so full of itself that it lost any meaning or purpose. Too bad. I gave it a 5, but in case someone watches it and likes it I could support it since it's an arthouse film. And art house films are divisive, so the fact that I couldn't connect with it doesn't mean anything really. It is interesting visually. If anyone happens to watch it tell me and we will discuss if we should add it.
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#183

Post by Fergenaprido »

Away recently became available so I was going to give it a go. I'm interested in Marona, maybe I'll look for it. Casa Lobo will not be my cup of tea, though I may still give it a whirl since it's short and I already have it.
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#184

Post by beavis »

Casa Lobo has already been featured in the festival
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#185

Post by St. Gloede »

kingink wrote: January 31st, 2021, 6:45 pm So that's it for Away I guess. For me the animation worked because the story itself is simple or minimal. It all just worked together for me.
Not at all, as long as you get supporters there won't be an issue. You reacted positively, there's a good chance others will too.
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#186

Post by zzzorf »

Here are the two animated movies I was looking at that I deem may be to family-orientated if anyone wanted to check them out. I am happy to nominate them if they gain support but only if they get that support for I'm not overly certain they are what we are after.

Red Shoes and the Seven Dwarfs (2019) - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4429160/ A Korean film with a different take on the Snow White Fairy Tale.

100% Wolf (2020) - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8774798/ An Australian Werewolf film where the teenage heir to the throne instead turns into a poodle.


As to kingink's Anime problem. If I'm correct all the Anime's nominated so far were by me and I am by no means an expert. I am more than happy to watch any you nominate and will allow us to better choose what to represent that genre of animation.
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#187

Post by zzzorf »

St. Gloede wrote: January 31st, 2021, 9:15 pm
kingink wrote: January 31st, 2021, 6:45 pm So that's it for Away I guess. For me the animation worked because the story itself is simple or minimal. It all just worked together for me.
Not at all, as long as you get supporters there won't be an issue. You reacted positively, there's a good chance others will too.
I have it lined up to watch soon so there is always a chance it could work for me, who knows, I did nominate a non-spoken language animation myself in Primal: Tales of Savagery.
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#188

Post by beavis »

for animation I think we'll end up with enough options, no worries, there is one available and unmentioned so far (I haven't checked out yet):
https://www.icheckmovies.com/movies/the ... sorceress/
also from Korea
China will have some hidden gems too I'm sure, and France always has stuff coming out...
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#189

Post by filmbantha »

kingink wrote: January 31st, 2021, 6:28 pm
beavis wrote: January 31st, 2021, 8:25 am
filmbantha wrote: January 30th, 2021, 3:51 pm I was considering nominating The Wild Goose Lake and I note that both Beavis and Gloede have seen it so would like to hear if this is a film they would support should I nominate it?
The movie has its fans, and it was a step up for me from the director's previous one, but it will only get the slightest support from me, as it looks nice but is still rather forgettable...
I have seen the Wild Goose Lake as well and I have to agree that it is quite forgetable. The main reason is the script that is very basic for these kind of films. I feel like |I have seen the same script various times before. So I don't think it will get much support from the three of us that have watched it.
Thanks for your feedback, I agree that the story is quite derivative but I was really taken by the way it was presented; the striking mood and ambience of the film made it easy for me to overlook its shortcomings in other areas. I will probably pass upon nominating it now though as I have many other potential selections to choose from.
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#190

Post by kingink »

zzzorf wrote: January 31st, 2021, 9:22 pm
As to kingink's Anime problem. If I'm correct all the Anime's nominated so far were by me and I am by no means an expert. I am more than happy to watch any you nominate and will allow us to better choose what to represent that genre of animation.
The thing is that I want Promare to be included so I am thinking of featuring some more diversity in animation for the slate and not just other anime.
"I want to eat your pangreas" was an anime I was considering but Promare seems more suitable.
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#191

Post by kingink »

beavis wrote: January 31st, 2021, 8:46 pm Casa Lobo has already been featured in the festival
Oh yeah! I watched it and then noticed it has been already featured before. I forgot about it when posting
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#192

Post by filmbantha »

I caught up with a couple of nominations yesterday. The first was Residue which was already on my watchlist for potential nominations. Sadly, the film was not to my taste. I'm not usually a huge fan of films with experimental/art-house tendencies so perhaps I'm just the wrong audience for this as the director definitely shows promise and there were some interesting ideas but the delivery of them left me cold. Some of the flashback scenes and the amalgamation of dreams/memories felt similar to aspects of Martin Eden so I think this might be up Gloede's street. I'm giving it a 1 as I feel it could be appreciated by many members of the forum even if it failed to make an impression on me.

The second film was White Fang, the perfect film to end the weekend on. A pleasant, breezy animation with a lot of heart that doesn't demand too much from the viewer. I'm not sure if this would be a great fit for the festival, it is a delightful film but I don't think it showcases a particularly exciting or impressive form of animation. This is another 1 from me, I enjoyed it a lot more than Residue but I hope that we may be able to find some more captivating animated features over the coming months.
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#193

Post by zzzorf »

kingink wrote: February 1st, 2021, 11:01 am
zzzorf wrote: January 31st, 2021, 9:22 pm
As to kingink's Anime problem. If I'm correct all the Anime's nominated so far were by me and I am by no means an expert. I am more than happy to watch any you nominate and will allow us to better choose what to represent that genre of animation.
The thing is that I want Promare to be included so I am thinking of featuring some more diversity in animation for the slate and not just other anime.
"I want to eat your pangreas" was an anime I was considering but Promare seems more suitable.
I Want to Eat Your Pancreas is one I am really looking forward to seeing, just haven't got around to it yet.
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#194

Post by kingink »

zzzorf wrote: February 1st, 2021, 11:08 am
kingink wrote: February 1st, 2021, 11:01 am
zzzorf wrote: January 31st, 2021, 9:22 pm
As to kingink's Anime problem. If I'm correct all the Anime's nominated so far were by me and I am by no means an expert. I am more than happy to watch any you nominate and will allow us to better choose what to represent that genre of animation.
The thing is that I want Promare to be included so I am thinking of featuring some more diversity in animation for the slate and not just other anime.
"I want to eat your pangreas" was an anime I was considering but Promare seems more suitable.
I Want to Eat Your Pancreas is one I am really looking forward to seeing, just haven't got around to it yet.
OK then. Watch it and lets decide together if it needs to be nominated!
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#195

Post by filmbantha »

I thought I would do a little recap of the month to highlight my progress as I've enjoyed working on this project:

Potential Nominations watched in Jan: 14
Best Potential Nominations watched: Babyteeth, Get Duked! & The Pool
Nominations watched in Jan: 7
Best nomination watched: Jonaki (2)
Total festival nominations watched: 24

Spotlight on a nomination that has yet to be watched by another programmer - Rent-A-Pal- I feel like this could fit well in either the before dawn or the indie section and I hope that others who seek it out will agree! Here are my thoughts to encourage others to check it out :thumbsup:

The psychological impact of being a full time carer for a loved one is the stepping stone for a powerful and traumatic thriller in Rent-A-Pal. A lonely bachelor, David, is fighting off depression and loneliness whilst struggling to take care of his housebound mother and he tries to find love through a video dating service. He stumbles upon a strange VHS that offers companionship but this tape slowly takes over David's life as the line between reality and his imagination begin to blur.

Rent-A-Pal is an imaginative and utterly captivating slow burn thriller that takes time to build up a sympathetic characterisation of David with a remarkable performance from Brian Landis in the lead role. There is humour throughout to alleviate the feeling of despair and hopelessness that invades David's life and this allows the audience to warm to David and empathise with his plight. A menacing turn from Will Wheaton as Andy, the host of the VHS tape which becomes such a huge part of David's life, is the perfect counterpoint to David's introverted nature and their interplay feels so natural that it is easy to forget Andy is just a video recording. There is a lot to unpack in Rent-A-Pal; its social commentary is smart and affecting and the elements of horror towards the end of the picture really hit hard. This is an incredibly original and striking picture and should be essential viewing for anyone who relishes dark and disturbing dramas.
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#196

Post by St. Gloede »

filmbantha wrote: February 1st, 2021, 11:06 am I caught up with a couple of nominations yesterday. The first was Residue which was already on my watchlist for potential nominations. Sadly, the film was not to my taste. I'm not usually a huge fan of films with experimental/art-house tendencies so perhaps I'm just the wrong audience for this as the director definitely shows promise and there were some interesting ideas but the delivery of them left me cold. Some of the flashback scenes and the amalgamation of dreams/memories felt similar to aspects of Martin Eden so I think this might be up Gloede's street. I'm giving it a 1 as I feel it could be appreciated by many members of the forum even if it failed to make an impression on me.
Thanks for the recommendation - somehow this one slipped completely under my radar (probably because I couldn't find a place to watch it. Would be great if you could point me in its direction as it sounds right up my alley.
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#197

Post by filmbantha »

St. Gloede wrote: February 1st, 2021, 4:03 pm
filmbantha wrote: February 1st, 2021, 11:06 am I caught up with a couple of nominations yesterday. The first was Residue which was already on my watchlist for potential nominations. Sadly, the film was not to my taste. I'm not usually a huge fan of films with experimental/art-house tendencies so perhaps I'm just the wrong audience for this as the director definitely shows promise and there were some interesting ideas but the delivery of them left me cold. Some of the flashback scenes and the amalgamation of dreams/memories felt similar to aspects of Martin Eden so I think this might be up Gloede's street. I'm giving it a 1 as I feel it could be appreciated by many members of the forum even if it failed to make an impression on me.
Thanks for the recommendation - somehow this one slipped completely under my radar (probably because I couldn't find a place to watch it. Would be great if you could point me in its direction as it sounds right up my alley.
It is on both netflix and Amazon Prime in the UK which is how I watched it, hopefully it will be available in your region as well. I saw that you checked Jesus shows you the way to the highway and I'm looking forward to reading your thoughts on it!
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#198

Post by St. Gloede »

3 more nominees seen:

-

Zhuang si le yi zhi yang AKA Jinpa (2018, Pema Tseden)

Image

At first glance, Jinpa is all about the "look". It is deliciously lit, with the frames emitting pure heat. There is limited dialogue, limited action - and a spiked haired protagonist who essentially never removes his sunglasses. The type of cool, no-nonsense look that would have fit in perfectly in a Takashi Miike film 20 years ago - but no, this is not that kind of a film. Jinpa is actually a slow, brooding, lyrical and - as it becomes clearer and clearer, philosophical film about choices, connections and thoughts - as paths emerge into one. 8/10 (3)


Jonaki (2018, Aditya Vikram Sengupta)

Image

Jonaki very much captures the feeling of a wasteland, a unique world crumbling on top of itself, disappearing - my mind drifts to Sukorov, and his more experimental work. The visuals are beautiful, but also a little vacant. 

I will say though, that there is a resonating conflict, revealed at the end, that does make what we have seen come together more than you'd originally think. At face value this is a world where people turn into trees, and fruit covers corridors. The poetic exit does centre the film a little more, and offers a key.

At the same time, while I was swept up in its beauty, I don't think it held itself together as well as it should - mixing contemplation/poetry - with the odd, minimalist almost reverse-Tetsuo vibe. I simply did not find this seemingly central theme or its execution that satisfying - though it is at all times an enjoyable film, and, with its conclusion comes together quite well. 7/10 (2)



Jesus Shows You the Way to the Highway (2019, Miguel Llansó)

Image

Filmbantha sold this as a "genre film", and I think that is selling it short. Jesus Shows You the Way to the Highway is clearly a future cult movie phenomenon - as bizarre and off-beat as it is playful and fun - complete with video game/simulation tie-ins giving the impression of a retro-Matrix/World on a Wire - but with the camp value turned up to 1000 - with silly crumbled avatars, brought acting and plotting - and a lot of charisma.

Daniel Tadesse carries the film wonderfully, teaming up with Llansó once again after Crubs (he really needs to be in more films) and showcases wonderful charisma and a presence we rarely see. Camp of this kind is usually not my cup of tea, but the silliness and camp value genuinely work really well - and you laugh/smile along, even if some elements may just be a little too silly. The tone and atmosphere is just that good. A film that just makes you happy, complete with a great ending. 7/10 (2)
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#199

Post by St. Gloede »

Btw, Beavis. Have you seen anything else by Pema Tseden? I realized I actually have Tharlo, not seen, and never knew it was the same director. I noticed he actually has another eligible film as well. Balloon from 2019. Seen it? Looks quite interesting.
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#200

Post by beavis »

I've got Tharlo on dvd but not seen it yet. Balloon neither. But i did see Old Dog, which is interesting but not as good as Jinpa.
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