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What movies did you watch in school?

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What movies did you watch in school?

#1

Post by blocho »

List the movies you remember seeing in school.
- Not for a film class.
- Not as part of some after-school activity or field trip. It has to be movies you saw in class.
- Only complete movies, not just clips from a movie.
- Not as a teacher because I know there are a lot of teachers here.
- Only movies, not historical footage or tv episodes or news broadcasts

Here's my list:

The Gods Must Be Crazy (1980)
I think I was probably about nine years old. We watched it in class, though I don't remember what the rationale for it was. I remember enjoying it, but I have a feeling that it might not hold up to adult eyes.

La Belle et la Bete (1946)
Au Revoir les Enfants (1987)
La Gloire de Mon Pere (1990)
L'Argent de Poche (1976)

I saw all of these in middle school French class, from the sixth to the eighth grades. I didn't much like French, and I switched to a different language in high school, but I have to say my teacher had great taste.

West Side Story (1961)
For a music class in eighth grade.

Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972)
I saw this in ninth grade world history class. It was truly a revelatory experience. I immediately saw another four Herzog movies at home. Years later, when I was a teacher, I tried to show part of the movie to my ninth grade world history class. They couldn't have cared less.

La Ultima Cena (1976)
Guantanamera (1995)

For a class in college on modern Latin American history. Great class and great movies.

Shane (1953)
For a class in college on westward expansion in American history. It was a rewatch for me at the time, but what a great movie (and the topic of a recent episode of the unofficial icm forum podcast).

Know Your Enemy - Japan (1945)
For an American history class in grad school. We had a professor who was even more mentally checked out of teaching than the average tenured professor. For the second half of 3-hour classes, we would just watch video clips, including all of this propaganda doc.
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#2

Post by mightysparks »

Hard to remember.. totally blanking at the moment but I remember in highschool watching Monty Python and the Holy Grail, which i was happy about because I already loved it. It was one of those ‘hey let’s not have class and watch a film’ days.

Others in highschool:
The Princess Bride - can’t remember why
Strictly Ballroom - the class had to write a film review on it
Monsoon Wedding - doing some essay on some culture thing
Bend it Like Beckham - for the same essay

I hated most of what we were forced to watch in school so no surprise I gave 3/4 a 1/10..
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#3

Post by peeptoad »

The only two I can think of were Platoon for my 20th century history class in high school, and The Omega Man in middle school in my literature class and I can't recall why since I Am Legend was never part of a class assignment.
I'm pretty sure I saw Soylent Green for a class in middle school, but not positive. Raiders of the Lost Ark too, but that was an assembly, not a class.
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#4

Post by Armoreska »

None! We did watch Chaplin once for some reason but I can't say I could check anything from that.
It's amazing that people remember this stuff.
he or A. or Armo or any

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#5

Post by TraverseTown »

The only memorable ones that jump out to me in high school (2006-2010) were:

Dark City (English class)
V For Vendetta (English class)
Dante's Peak (Chemistry class)

Oh and we watched Mean Girls in middle school health class when it was still relatively new.

I think I only remember these because they were R-rated lol
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#6

Post by albajos »

Flåklypa Grand Prix (1975) VIDEO
Ages 7-12: The reward movie. If we celebrated something that was the go to movie. Otherwise they rewarded us with Peter and the Wolf on LP.

Cry Freedom (1987) CINEMA
Ages 10-12: The more typical school movie. Apartheid, Biko and South Africa. First movie that handled this content.

Triumph of the Spirit (1989) VIDEO
Ages 13-15: Jewish boxer during Holocaust. First movie shot at Auschwitz.

Døden på Oslo S (1990) CINEMA
Ages 13-15: Norwegian youth crime drama (like the Hardy Boys) about drugs and prostitution. Maybe we saw the sequel as well.

Christiane F. - Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo (1981) VIDEO
Ages 13-15: In german class. We also read the book.

Kristin Lavransdatter (1996) CINEMA
Ages 16-19: Nobel prize winning book (from 1920) directed by Liv Ullmann. Just the first book, but still 3 hours long. Terrible reviews from some critics, and we never got our LoTR trilogy.

There is probably more but my notes is on another PC.
Last edited by albajos on October 1st, 2020, 9:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#7

Post by GruesomeTwosome »

A lot of the movies that we watched in school were film adaptations of novels or plays that we had just read. Though I can’t remember a ton of those right now; here are some random films that I do remember seeing in class:

Romeo & Juliet (1968)
Of Mice and Men (the 1992 one with Gary Sinise/John Malkovich)
Gladiator (2000) - somewhat controversial I guess since this is R-rated, and I think it was 8th grade when our Latin teacher played it. I already had seen it when it came out in the theater, heh.
Le ballon rouge / The Red Balloon (1956) - for high school French class.
La haine (1995) - college French class.

I'll update this when I remember some more...
Last edited by GruesomeTwosome on October 1st, 2020, 8:50 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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#8

Post by blocho »

peeptoad wrote: October 1st, 2020, 6:37 pm The only two I can think of were Platoon for my 20th century history class in high school, and The Omega Man in middle school in my literature class and I can't recall why since I Am Legend was never part of a class assignment.
I'm pretty sure I saw Soylent Green for a class in middle school, but not positive. Raiders of the Lost Ark too, but that was an assembly, not a class.
Platoon was being shown in an American history class in high school that I wasn't enrolled in, and I tried to sneak in to watch along but got caught and kicked out. I saw a clip from Soylent Green in a college history class, which motivated me to see the rest of the movie. I think it was the final scene in the movie which featured Edward G. Robinson.
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#9

Post by tirefeet »

Kramer vs Kramer during I think the 7th grade.
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#10

Post by pitchorneirda »

The only two I can remember are

American History X: in "cours de morale" (known as zedenleer in Dutch), I think that exists only in Belgium, it's a sort of non-confessional ethics class

Cyrano de Bergerac (the 1990 version with Gérard Depardieu) : for French class

PS: I also remember going to the movie theather within the school framework to watch:

- An Inconvenient Truth
- Perfume: The Story of a Murderer

but I can't remember for which class
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#11

Post by 3eyes »

Not sure if shorts are included? Classes weren't long enuf to see full-length movies.

The man without a country (1937, 21m)
The Story of Menstruation (1946, 10m) - (boys were excused)
[We saw the 1935 David Copperfield in 9th grade but it must have been abridged]

The whole jr high school was let out of class to see the 1945 Henry V in the theater - kids talked, threw popcorn, etc - impossible to hear a word

in 10th grade we saw a movie in all-school assembly about teenage drunk driving (narrated by a girl whose face had been smashed up - during the frame she had her back to us - at the end approached the mirror and smashed it. In English class afterwards the teacher asked us if we thought it would have been more effective if we had seen the girl's face - interesting discussion.

When I was in grad school studying Russian we saw Aleksandr Nevsky and Revizor - not sure if they count.
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#12

Post by Kublai Khan »

Oh, good question. This is working out my memory as I did take some film appreciation classes.

I remember watching Au Revoir Les Enfants (1987), Jean de Florette (1986) and Manon des Sources (1986)..

Pretty sure Outsiders (1983) was middle school english class (we were reading the book).

The Candidate (1972) was for a civics class at one point.
All Quiet on the Western Front (1979) for.. literature, I think.

I can't remember any more at this point.
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#13

Post by blocho »

pitchorneirda wrote: October 1st, 2020, 9:19 pm American History X: in "cours de morale" (known as zedenleer in Dutch), I think that exists only in Belgium, it's a sort of non-confessional ethics class
Ah yes -- I remember I also saw this in high school for an elective on African-American history.
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#14

Post by blueboybob »

Last of the Mohicans comes to mind

Also the star wars triology when the released the "remastered" VHS
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#15

Post by burneyfan »

Here are the ones I remember, specifically for classes (pre-college):

High School:
The Star Wars Trilogy (back then, it was a trilogy)
The Emerald Forest

For a humanities class

Mujeres al borde de un ataque de "nervios"
For a Spanish class

La règle du jeu
Diva
Jean de Florette
Manon des Sources

For a French class

The Last Temptation of Christ
For a religion class

Middle School:
Grease
Sweeney Todd
(the 1982 filmed stage production with George Hearn and Angela Lansbury)
Singin' in the Rain
West Side Story

for 8th grade music

To Kill a Mockingbird
for 8th grade English

That's all I remember, though I bet there were a few more.
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#16

Post by 3eyes »

I guess all you guys watched stuff on DVD or VHS or something - mine were all 16mm, except for the one in the theater.
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#17

Post by mightysparks »

That reminds me of another one: we had an excursion to see the first Harry Potter movie at the cinema. Also I think I may have watched Rabbit-Proof Fence at school, but I'm not sure if I did or why.

Another I remember is Indian in the Cupboard during primary school, probably just something random to fill the time

Had to check my spreadsheet for these, more in highschool:
- October Sky
- The Castle
- The Gods Must be Crazy II
- Bopha!
- Europa Europa

Don't remember why for any of them. If there are any others I didn't write them my diary or remember them...
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#18

Post by Kublai Khan »

Oh yeah, we watched To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) for sure.
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#19

Post by GruesomeTwosome »

Yes, I’m also pretty sure To Kill a Mockingbird is one that we watched in school after reading the book. 6th or 7th grade.

Another film I now remember watching in school, in 8th grade English class I think, was the Jimmy Stewart film Harvey (1950). Though I can’t for the life of me remember WHY we watched that...
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#20

Post by brokenface »

Remember Jean de Florette in French class (possibly Manon too), and a TV version of The Mayor of Casterbridge when studying that.
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#21

Post by Wonderful Rainbow »

I can only remember watching Un Chien Andalou in history of culture and all of the class being surprised by the eye scene.
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#22

Post by Harco »

In high school, probably more but this is what I remember:

Lola Rennt - German class
Être et Avoir - French class
De Fûke - Frisian class
Das Leben der Anderen - at the cinema, probably for some kind of cultural class
Polleke - at the cinema, no idea why
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#23

Post by yllow »

Yes To Kill a Mockingbird me too
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#24

Post by peeptoad »

3eyes wrote: October 1st, 2020, 9:45 pm in 10th grade we saw a movie in all-school assembly about teenage drunk driving (narrated by a girl whose face had been smashed up - during the frame she had her back to us - at the end approached the mirror and smashed it. In English class afterwards the teacher asked us if we thought it would have been more effective if we had seen the girl's face - interesting discussion.
When I was in first grade my class took a field trip to the local police department, since they had just completed a new building and police training facility in the small town I grew up in. All of us (I was 6 at the time) took turns getting locked into the holding cells by the officers present, we got to watch one of the German Shepherds train at the outdoor training facility (that was by far the best part of the trip), and finally we were shown one of these drunk driving films meant to scare the life out of kids: it was one of the more horrifying films I recall watching at that young age... accident victims splattered graphically on the highway, blood everywhere, disfigured people who survived accidents... I even vividly remember the music that played over the closing credits (some kind of hip, jazz-rock type of instrumental).
Man, that was an effective film to show a 6yo. :blink:
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#25

Post by 3eyes »

peeptoad wrote: October 2nd, 2020, 1:53 pm
3eyes wrote: October 1st, 2020, 9:45 pm in 10th grade we saw a movie in all-school assembly about teenage drunk driving (narrated by a girl whose face had been smashed up - during the frame she had her back to us - at the end approached the mirror and smashed it. In English class afterwards the teacher asked us if we thought it would have been more effective if we had seen the girl's face - interesting discussion.
When I was in first grade my class took a field trip to the local police department, since they had just completed a new building and police training facility in the small town I grew up in. All of us (I was 6 at the time) took turns getting locked into the holding cells by the officers present, we got to watch one of the German Shepherds train at the outdoor training facility (that was by far the best part of the trip), and finally we were shown one of these drunk driving films meant to scare the life out of kids: it was one of the more horrifying films I recall watching at that young age... accident victims splattered graphically on the highway, blood everywhere, disfigured people who survived accidents... I even vividly remember the music that played over the closing credits (some kind of hip, jazz-rock type of instrumental).
Man, that was an effective film to show a 6yo. :blink:
Thanks for sharing that!
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#26

Post by max-scl »

Only remember having seen The Wall and Clockwork Orange in 8th grade or so for a Philosophy class.
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#27

Post by burneyfan »

Oh, yeah -- Un chien andalou also for French class!
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#28

Post by GruesomeTwosome »

max-scl wrote: October 2nd, 2020, 3:35 pm Only remember having seen The Wall and Clockwork Orange in 8th grade or so for a Philosophy class.
Dang, 8th grade is a lot different in Chile, heh.
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#29

Post by albajos »

Most is allowed if you discuss it afterwards. Then ratings don't apply.

All movies in Norway are allowed to be seen by those 3 years younger if they are accompanied by an adult. Well, except for the highest rating, but we seldom use that anymore.
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#30

Post by Torgo »

Great idea for a post :thumbsup:

It's funny because I just yesterday had to think of one film we watched in geography class and which is probably the least known one of the lot:
The March (1990), which some call prophetic or so. Furthermore

Went to school from 1993 to 2007, might be an interesting info.

English class:
- To Kill a Mockingbird
- Red Dust (2004) in a segment dealing with South Africa

History:
- Passages of Der ewige Jude (1940) (you can imagine we will deal with this chapter of German history quite extensively)
- The Pianist too afaik
- Jakob the Liar (1999) vs. Jakob the Liar (1974, GDR version)
- Jeanne d'Arc (1928) vs. Jeanne d'Arc (1999)
- Life of Brian :woot: :lol:
- Forrest Gump (we analyzed this one for a few lessons, I'm afraid I can never watch it again, although it's a really good film :pinch: And it was rather a politics class )

Philosophy / ethics:
- Das Experiment (2001)
- Die fetten Jahre sind vorbei (2004)

Biology:
- Microcosmos (1996) (that's a cool one!)


And a few more... The Matrix, I think, at some point. Probably a war movie, too. But which one? Hm. And I'm sure I forgot an animation movie.
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#31

Post by Nathan Treadway »

The ones I can think of right off the top of my head?

Schindler's List
Star Chamber
Charly (Flowers for Algernon)
The Outsiders
A Civil Action
To Kill a Mockingbird
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#32

Post by matthewscott8 »

For French Class (l) :

The Return of Martin Guerre (1982 - Daniel Vigne) (l)
Diabolique (1955 - Henri-Georges Clouzot) (l)
The Wages of Fear (1953 - Henri-Georges Clouzot) (l)

For English Class:

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf (1966 - Mike Nichols)

For Latin Class:

Ben Hur (1959 - William Wyler) - several times
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#33

Post by matthewscott8 »

blocho wrote: October 1st, 2020, 6:25 pmAguirre, the Wrath of God (1972)
I saw this in ninth grade world history class. It was truly a revelatory experience. I immediately saw another four Herzog movies at home. Years later, when I was a teacher, I tried to show part of the movie to my ninth grade world history class. They couldn't have cared less.
If I had a gateway drug into cinema this was it. Saw it in a bookshop when I was at university and got it because the title was so strange. Before that I had loved moves but after watching this I knew I was a film nut for life. Nowadays a lot of kids think anything that is over a year old is passé. They are benighted!

As an aside I used to laugh at the film studies guys at uni, they were complaining about having to watch movies in the evening. I was watching movies in the evening to come down from the days of learning new programming languages, lab practicals, lectures and tutorials, usually 9-6 with essays to write as well :lol: .
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#34

Post by Fergenaprido »

Great topic.

One of my earliest film memories is from Junior Kindergarten (age 4). We were playing with toy dinosaurs and I stabbed Adam Stephens with a Triceratops and cut him above his eye. Why? I have no idea. Might have been an accident, might have been on purpose. I don't remember that part. As punishment, though, I had to sit at my desk for the rest of the day with my head down, while the rest of the class got to watch Pete's Dragon (the original, obviously). I kept turning my head to try and see parts of it, but I probably had seen the film before, and I definitely saw it later as a kid (it was one of those films my younger sister became obsessed with and watched incessantly). And I have a very concrete memory of going home that day, walking around to the backyard to where my mom was sitting on the back deck, opening up my lunchbox and having to explain to here why I didn't eat my banana (I wasn't allowed my afternoon snack either).

I remember seeing Dot and the Kangaroo in a classroom setting, but I don't know how old I was, or if it was for educational purposes or just for fun. It stuck with me, though.

I'm sure I saw a lot of kids films throughout the years as teachers would show us movies to keep up occupied or reward us. Or those terribly hilarious educational videos that were at least 20-30 years old. I don't recall any other specific ones, though.

In grade 7 we watched Jesus Christ Superstar, probably for religion class (I went to a Catholic public school).
In grade 8 we watched When the Wind Blows, but I don't remember why. We must have been studying nuclear war or something. I still haven't rewatched it, though I keep meaning to.
In grade 10 we watched Bonheur d'ocassion [The Tin Flute] for French class, since we were reading the book (it's a Canadian classic). I've been trying to find a copy with English subtitles so I can rewatch it.
In grade 10 our religion teacher showed us a number of films, as the theme for that year was symbols. We saw Rudy, Can't Buy Me Love and The Land Before Time (we all kind of laughed when he said he was going to show us this kids movie, but then he blew our minds when he asked us to look at it through the lens of racism). I don't remember which other films we saw.
In grade 10 English class we read 12 Angry Men and To Kill a Mockingbird. I think we saw the first one in class, and the second one was playing on television over the Christmas holidays when we were visiting my grandparents down in Florida, and I remember asking my parents if I could stay up late so that I could watch it.
Something is off with my record keeping, because I know I watched Au revoir les enfants for French class, but the date I have marked down doesn't make sense. So either grade 10 or grade 11.
In grade 12 we had a musical theatre class because extra-curricular activities were cancelled (political turmoil in the late 90s thanks to the provincial conservative government - really affected my high school years through strikes, lockouts, and lack of any extra curriculars for almost two years), and we were doing Bye Bye Birdie, so we watched the movie.

The summer between Grade 12 and 13 I did the Summer Language Bursary Program where people go to a different part of the country to learn either French or English (and get a university credit for it!). I did mine in the small town of Trois-Pistoles on the Gaspé Peninsula, and each week they showed us a French film (without subtitles, if I recall correctly). It was a 5-week program, but I can only recall 3 of the films that we saw at the moment: Histoires d'hiver [Winter Stories], My Life in Pink, and The Eighth Day. I've since rewatched the two Belgian films with subtitles, but the Canadian one still eludes me.

In grade 13 English class, we must have done independent book reports, because I read and then watched A Clockwork Orange, and I showed a part of the movie in class as part of my presentation. It was a part with nudity, so I had to hold a piece of paper in front of part of the screen to hide the boobies (Catholic school, remember). That was also the year we read Hamlet (we did one Shakespearean play each year), so a friend and I watched the 1990 (Gibson) and 1996 (Branagh) versions of the play. The 2000 (Hawke) version came out that year, but I didn't get to see it until a few years later.

In university, the only films I remember were from French classes. La religieuse was one, which I just discussed in the FOTW thread the other week. The professor played it in class, but I'm pretty sure I missed it. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg was another, but I forget which class - it's not based on a book, so it must have been a "French Culture" class or something. It's the only film I watched for school that I remember not really liking at first, but I enjoyed it more when I rewatched it a decade later. Les ordres was for Contemporary Quebec class I think, but I saw it without subtitles the first time, so I didn't fully grasp everything.

I'm sure there are plenty others, but my record-keeping wasn't as diligent during my school years :D
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#35

Post by Ivan0716 »

Of Mice and Men
Psycho
Great Expectations
Romeo and Juliet (1968)
Romeo and Juliet (1996)
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Lammetje
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#36

Post by Lammetje »

max-scl wrote: October 2nd, 2020, 3:35 pm Only remember having seen The Wall and Clockwork Orange in 8th grade or so for a Philosophy class.
Wow, I also watched A Clockwork Orange in school during philosophy class (in the Netherlands)!
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#37

Post by blocho »

Fergenaprido wrote: October 12th, 2020, 5:00 am As punishment, though, I had to sit at my desk for the rest of the day with my head down, while the rest of the class got to watch Pete's Dragon (the original, obviously). ...I wasn't allowed my afternoon snack either).
I have some issues with your school.
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#38

Post by mightysparks »

Lammetje wrote: October 12th, 2020, 11:18 pm
max-scl wrote: October 2nd, 2020, 3:35 pm Only remember having seen The Wall and Clockwork Orange in 8th grade or so for a Philosophy class.
Wow, I also watched A Clockwork Orange in school during philosophy class (in the Netherlands)!
I remember asking the school librarian if they had a copy of the book and she was like 'gasp no that's too graphic for a highschool' :/
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Fergenaprido
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#39

Post by Fergenaprido »

blocho wrote: October 13th, 2020, 4:19 am
Fergenaprido wrote: October 12th, 2020, 5:00 am As punishment, though, I had to sit at my desk for the rest of the day with my head down, while the rest of the class got to watch Pete's Dragon (the original, obviously). ...I wasn't allowed my afternoon snack either).
I have some issues with your school.
Back then kindergarten was only half-days, so "rest of the day" might have only been an hour or so, since school itself was only 3.5 hours in total each day for me. And I'd be surprised if we watched the entire film in one sitting, it was probably shown over a few days (if they even bothered to show us the whole thing).

But as a little kid, the punishment probably felt like a week :D
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#40

Post by weirdboy »

It has been a long time so I have only faint memories of watching movies in school, with the exception of the emotionally scarring "don't drive drunk" video.
I remember watching Field of Dreams for a literature class, and also I recall seeing West Side Story as a companion to reading Romeo and Juliet.
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