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¶ Which first time viewings last month made you one with the cosmic hum? - August 2020

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Perception de Ambiguity
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¶ Which first time viewings last month made you one with the cosmic hum? - August 2020

#1

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » September 1st, 2020, 4:49 am

Ѧ!א‎ε:

♈︎. Le Horla / Ορλά 1966 jean-daniel pollet
♉︎. Valley of the Gods 2019 lech majewski
♊︎. With History in a Room Filled with People with Funny Names 4 2018 korakrit arunanondchai
♋︎. The Flow of Zen 1969 alan watts
♌︎. Méditerranée 1963 jean-daniel pollet
♍︎. Dieu sait quoi / God Only Knows 1994 jean-daniel pollet
♎︎. Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion: Bonus Selections 2002 tom piozet
♏︎. La fórmula secreta 1965 rubén gámez
♐︎. Magical Egypt 2001 chance gardner & john anthony west
♑︎. Bassae 1964 jean-daniel pollet
♒︎. Tesla 2020 michael almereyda
♓︎. Vincent: The Life and Death of Vincent Van Gogh 1987 paul cox

Honorable Mentions

Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion 2002 tom piozet ● Lycan Colony 2006 rob roy (with rifftrax) ● Noisedive 2015 johan nordberg ● Z = |Z:Z•Z-1 mod 2|-1: The Old Victrola 2019 andrew norman wilson ● #horror 2015 tara subkoff ● Dream Journal 2016-2019 2019 jon rafman ● this WORLD is UNREAL like a SNAKE in a ROPE 2011 robert millis ● Nightflyers 1987 robert collector ● more than everything (3D) 2018 rainer kohlberger ● Pourvu qu'on ait l'ivresse... / As Long As You Get Drunk 1958 jean-daniel pollet ● John Frusciante Plays and Sings 2001 vincent gallo ● Traum A Dream 2002 dirk de bruyn ● Jupiter may be closer than you think 2016 dalibor barić ● Eclipse 1984 antônio moreno ● Signal 8 2019 simon liu ● Alien Dreamtime (featuring spoken word by Terence McKenna) 2003 ken adams ● The Astronomer’s Dream (director's cut) 2010 julie murray ● Le Maître du temps 1971 jean-daniel pollet

special shoutouts / Online Media

The Joe Rogan Experience [#606 - Randall Carlson 2015, #1151 - Sean Carroll 2018, #1121 - Michael Pollan 2018, #1527 - David Blaine 2020, #1528 - Nikki Glaser 2020, #1525 - Tim Dillon 2020, #1397 - S.C. Gwynne 2019, #1515 - David Choe 2018, #1016 - Whitney Cummings 2017, #1516 - Post Malone 2020, #1343 - Penn Jillette 2019]

The Heart of Screenland 2020 justin kelly ● MΑILMAN [by Outlaw Moscow] ● YT channel "PINGTR1P" ● David Blaine vids ● [60 fps] The Flying Train, Germany, 1902 ● Guy annoys girlfriend with puns at Ikea ● Curb your entire being of Joe Rogan.

Honorable Mentions - most fruitful rewatches

絞死刑 / Death by Hanging 1968 大島渚/nagisa oshima. 5>6 ● Zoo zéro 1979 alain fleischer. 7>8 ● Before Sunrise 1995 richard linklater. 9 ● Before Midnight 2013 richard linklater. 9 ● Before Sunset 2004 richard linklater. 9 ● Sommarlek / Summer Interlude 1951 the bergman. 8 ● Vampire Journals 1997 ted nicolaou. 10 ● JFK 1991 oliver stone.

♆☸⼐℟ې‽
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#2

Post by prodigalgodson » September 1st, 2020, 6:47 am

Damn August flew by! That's a tall order in the thread title, I'd say only the first three really live up to that standard.

1. Colossal Youth (Costa, 2006)
2. In Vanda's Room (Costa, 2000)
3. Film Socialisme (Godard, 2010)
4. Ossos (Costa, 1997)
5. Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky (Leszczylowski, 1988)
6. Becoming Animal (Mettler, 2018)
7. Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler (Lang, 1922)
8. The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (Lang, 1933)
9. Lola (Demy, 1961)
10. Still Life (Jia, 2006)

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#3

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » September 1st, 2020, 7:28 am

So many great films this month!

1. Picture of Light (Peter Mettler, 1994)
2. A Place In the World (Artur Aristakisyan, 2001)
3. Illuminated Texts (R. Bruce Elder, 1982)
4. Strange Days (Kathryn Bigelow, 1995)
5. Hard To Be a God (Aleksey German, 2013)
6. Daïnah la Métisse (Jean Grémillon, 1932)
7. Three Crowns of the Sailor (Raúl Ruiz, 1983)*
8. Days (Tsai Ming-Liang, 2020)
9. Le Horla (Jean-Daniel Pollet, 1966)
10. Systemsprenger (Nora Fingscheidt, 2019)
11. Golden Eighties (Chantal Akerman, 1986)
12. The Tango of the Widower and Its Distorting Mirror (Raúl Ruiz & Valeria Sarmiento, 2020/1965)*
13. Mr. Thank You (Hirsoshi Shimizu, 1936)
14. The Cloud-Capped Star (Ritwik Ghatak, 1960)
15. L'amour existe (Maurice Pialat, 1960)

HM's: Variety (Bette Gordon, 1983), Eclipse (Antonio Moreno, 1984), Tchoupitoulas (Ross Brothers, 2012), Tartuffe (F.W. Murnau, 1925), The Apple (Samira Makhmalbaf, 1998), Bait (Mark Jenkins, 2019)*

* = theatrical

Yours:
Le Horla - see above. Love the yellow rocking boat, but the best thing about it is how it thematizes how humans in the age of radio (and Television) now consciously can make a ghost of themselves, and because of that can end up feeling genuinely haunted (by yourself?). You can actually be present many places at once. Though there's a lot more to this. One of the most dense 40 minute films I've seen.
With History in a Room Filled with People with Funny Names 4 - very interested in this. Any new and experimental Thai cinema is welcome in my world.
Méditerranée - 6+
Dieu sait quoi - seeing it this month. I've loved all the screen shots I've seen from it.
Bassae - of course interested
Tesla - also very interested. Any thoughts on it?
Eclipse - 8- also watched it this month. Beautiful restoration. Interesting film.
not everything is fish, but fish are teeming everywhere

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#4

Post by pitchorneirda » September 1st, 2020, 10:09 am

7/10 or higher this month (8/10 or higher in bold), by chronological order of watching:

1. Mimosas (2016, Oliver Lake)
2. Visaaranai (2015, Vetrimaaran)
3. Au nom du Christ (1993, Roger Gnoan M'Bala)
4. Un homme qui crie (2010, Mahamat-Saleh Haroun)
5. Struktura kryzstalu (1969, Krzysztof Zanussi) personal all-time top 50
6. Die Sehnsucht der Veronika Voss (1982, Rainer Werner Fassbinder)
7. Aruitemo aruitemo (2008, Hirokazu Koreeda)
8. Asha Jaoar Majhe (2014, Aditya Vikram Sengupta)
9. Ting che (2008, Mong-Hong Chung)
10. Wendy and Lucy (2008, Kelly Reichardt)
11. Jerichow (2008, Christian Petzold)
12. Duze zwierze (2000, Jerzy Stuhr)



Honorable mentions (6+) : Manoel dans l'île des merveilles (1984, Raoul Ruiz); La forteresse (2008, Fernand Melgar); Revanche (2008, Götz Spielmann); Agantuk (1991, Satyajit Ray)

By the way, I've already watched Pollet's Le Horla many years ago and I also liked it, you non-French guys are probably not very familiar with Guy de Maupassant but you should try to read some of his works, especially Boule de Suif.

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#5

Post by OldAle1 » September 1st, 2020, 3:08 pm

Not that great a month for new views by my standards, but that was to be expected as I a big lull in interest over much of the period. Anyway -

GREAT
1. Le testament d'Orphée ou ne me demandez pas pourquoi / Testament of Orpheus (Jean Cocteau, 1960)
EXCELLENT
2. Yôtô monogatari: hana no Yoshiwara hyakunin-giri / Killing in Yoshiwara / Hero of the Red Light District (Tomu Uchida, 1960)
3. Akibiyori / Late Autumn (Yasujirô Ozu, 1960)
4. Onna ga kaidan wo agaru toki / When a Woman Ascends the Stairs (Mikio Naruse, 1960)
5. La vérité / The Truth (Henri-Georges Clouzot, 1960)
6. Zazie dans le métro (Louis Malle, 1960)
VERY GOOD
7. Elmer Gantry (Richard Brooks, 1960)
8. Macario (Roberto Gavaldón, 1960)
9. Les bonnes femmes / The Good Time Girls (Claude Chabrol, 1960)
10. Classe tous risques / Consider All Risks (Claude Sautet, 1960)
11. Marg dar baran / Death in the Rain (Samuel Khachikian, 1975)
12. Neotpravlennoe pismo / Letter Never Sent (Mikhail Kalatozov, 1960)
13. Das Millionenspiel / The Millions Game (Tom Toelle, 1970)

VERY VALUABLE RE-WATCHES:

1. Alice in die Städten / Alice in the Cities (Wim Wenders, 1974)
2. Der Himmel über Berlin / Wings of Desire (Wim Wenders, 1988)
3. Im Lauf der Zeit / Kings of the Road (Wim Wenders, 1975)

DIRECTOR OF THE MONTH

Wim Wenders, duh

SURPRISE OF THE MONTH

Super Mario Bros - no masterpiece, heck I don't know if it's even good, but surprisingly enough just the kind of schlock I wanted at the moment, with the throw-everything-you-can-in-the-pot-and-hope-it's-edible style that increasingly warms my bones, particularly in it's era (1990s nostalgia, starting to peak?)

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#6

Post by Onderhond » September 1st, 2020, 3:18 pm

Image

01. 4.0* - Guns Akimbo by Jason Lei Howden
Hilarious, zany and pleasantly over-the-top. Guns Akimbo isn't the most original of films and often wears its influences on its sleeves, but there aren't many action films like this, so it's really hard to fault the film for it when the execution is so precise and on point. Weaving and Radcliffe are awesome, the cinematography is insane and the pacing/runtime is perfect. A true adrenaline rush.


Image

02. 4.0* - High & Low: The Worst by Shigeaki Kubo
The latest in Shigeaki Kubo's High & Low series. Availability is a real problem here, with several installments lacking international distribution, but people familiar with the Japanese high school brawler won't have too much trouble finding their way. Big gangs of colorful characters, lots of posing, some crazy fights and a little drama to glue everything together. I have a soft spot for this niche and Kubo (who is on his fifth film now) has proven to have mastered the genre.


Image

03. 4.0* - Killing God [Matar a Dios] by Caye Casas & Albert Pintó
What a lovely surprise. A dark comedy about a disjointed family who receive a surprise visit from a strange little man who claims he is God. Quirky from the beginning until the very end, wonderful performances, charming cinematography and an original take on an amusing subject. It's as if Álex de la Iglesia and Jean-Pierre Jeunet had a baby.

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#7

Post by Traveller » September 1st, 2020, 3:39 pm

Other than the World Cup movies, all watches were, due to this month’s challenge, from the 70s. No new favorites (9/10 or better); below are the films I enjoyed and rated 8/10.

The Stepford Wives (1975)
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)
Camera Buff (1979)
The Hellstrom Chronicle (1971)
Heart of Glass (1976)
Vedreba (1967)
Rembetiko (1983)
Daughters of Darkness (1971)
ICM
September Challenge: Image
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#8

Post by peeptoad » September 1st, 2020, 3:43 pm

top 7-

Das Beil von Wandsbek (1951) The Axe of Wandsbek
Das Gold der Liebe (1983) The Gold of Love
Panna a Netvor (1978) Beauty and the Beast
Tomka dhe shokët e tij (1977) Tomka and His Friends
Den-en ni shisu (1974) Pastoral: To Die in the Country
Die verlorene Ehre der Katharina Blum (1975) The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum
Deváté srdce (1979) The Ninth Heart

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#9

Post by GruesomeTwosome » September 1st, 2020, 4:13 pm

A top 8 for August:

1. Wuthering Heights (2011, Andrea Arnold)
2. La coquille et le clergyman / The Seashell and the Clergyman (1928, Germaine Dulac)
3. Streetwise (1984, Martin Bell)
4. Eden (2014, Mia Hansen-Løve)
5. Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984, Michael Radford)
6. Menilmontant (1926, Dimitri Kirsanoff)
7. Vanishing Point (1971, Richard C. Sarafian)
8. Tower (2016, Keith Maitland)


Most fruitful re-watches: Match Point (2005, Woody Allen); Little Women (2019, Greta Gerwig)
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#10

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » September 1st, 2020, 7:21 pm

viktor-vaudevillain wrote:
September 1st, 2020, 7:28 am
So many great films this month!

1. Picture of Light (Peter Mettler, 1994)
2. A Place In the World (Artur Aristakisyan, 2001)
3. Illuminated Texts (R. Bruce Elder, 1982)
4. Strange Days (Kathryn Bigelow, 1995)
5. Hard To Be a God (Aleksey German, 2013)
6. Daïnah la Métisse (Jean Grémillon, 1932)
7. Three Crowns of the Sailor (Raúl Ruiz, 1983)*
8. Days (Tsai Ming-Liang, 2020)
9. Le Horla (Jean-Daniel Pollet, 1966)
10. Systemsprenger (Nora Fingscheidt, 2019)
11. Golden Eighties (Chantal Akerman, 1986)
12. The Tango of the Widower and Its Distorting Mirror (Raúl Ruiz & Valeria Sarmiento, 2020/1965)*
13. Mr. Thank You (Hirsoshi Shimizu, 1936)
14. The Cloud-Capped Star (Ritwik Ghatak, 1960)
15. L'amour existe (Maurice Pialat, 1960)

HM's: Variety (Bette Gordon, 1983), Eclipse (Antonio Moreno, 1984), Tchoupitoulas (Ross Brothers, 2012), Tartuffe (F.W. Murnau, 1925), The Apple (Samira Makhmalbaf, 1998), Bait (Mark Jenkins, 2019)*

* = theatrical

Yours:
Le Horla - see above. Love the yellow rocking boat, but the best thing about it is how it thematizes how humans in the age of radio (and Television) now consciously can make a ghost of themselves, and because of that can end up feeling genuinely haunted (by yourself?). You can actually be present many places at once. Though there's a lot more to this. One of the most dense 40 minute films I've seen.
With History in a Room Filled with People with Funny Names 4 - very interested in this. Any new and experimental Thai cinema is welcome in my world.
Méditerranée - 6+
Dieu sait quoi - seeing it this month. I've loved all the screen shots I've seen from it.
Bassae - of course interested
Tesla - also very interested. Any thoughts on it?
Eclipse - 8- also watched it this month. Beautiful restoration. Interesting film.
A Place In the World - I became interested in this one when I saw it among your viewings, it wasn't on my radar before. Will watch soon, probably. A film I'll dig, you think?
'Tchoupitoulas' I put on my watchlist, too.

Got some juicy thoughts on 'Systemsprenger'?

Le Horla - Interesting take, and yeah, the yellow boat stuck out for me as well as a resonant image. I watched this on a day of soul searching where the past came back to me in intense ways, and I came to contemplate a lot on how the mind works and develops. I was in dialogue with my past selves, something that I saw reflected in this film and being in the thick of it this temporary madness was further nurtured by the experience of watching it. What I saw in the film was that trying to explain some mysterious phenomenon a man consequently follows the golden thread of his thoughts and keeps holding on to them, common sense be damned, creating a new reality in its wake. I felt in some ways as going mad along with the character in the film, as I followed his train of thought and bought into his reality.
There is certainly something to it that possessing technology that enables to record words, voices, images, ready to be played back at any given later point in time, gives a different kind of presence to those realities as opposed to if those pasts were all recorded by memory only. Maybe a greater sense of the past Self being an Other, existing independently from oneself, an increased state of schizophrenia that if indulged in maybe can lead to a dissolving of the self into all those ghosts of past- and future-Self, for present-Self to become no longer the pivotal point but just another ghost, ethereal and bound to evaporate.
Just one among other ramifications that those technologies might have. But I don't necessarily see them as an evil, while they increasingly complicate our understanding of ourselves I believe looked at the greater picture they are a good, we evolve along with the technology, making us grow as a species, even as living through these times makes for a confusing mess.

Tesla - By and large I guess it's what you would expect from a biopic, certainly if you look at the film in terms of plot. What intrigued me primarily about it were the ideas that Tesla - according to the film anyway - was preoccupied/obsessed with, and that the film itself dealt with as well. Some visionary and lofty ideas about hitherto unthought of possibilities and the nature of the world, but perhaps above all the power of thought itself as a creator of realities. Converting energy, transmitting data, transferring electricity, all just part of the same force in a world were everything is interconnected. That maybe information is the very material the world is made out of, and a creative power can illuminate to perhaps create a reality by way of putting a light on particular elements of this vast world of virtually limitless possibilities? At any case, it shows Tesla as a big dreamer to the extent of being considered a nutjob with his head in the clouds by many during his lifetime, but who in its wake invented what now has become our present and his dreams have not yet ceased to inspire people and shape the future.
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#11

Post by PirateJenny » September 1st, 2020, 7:55 pm

I started a war film marathon but didn’t get very far, really liked The Dirty Dozen, then started watching some rubbish, mostly old war films and the incredibly cheesy Red Dawn. Why is there always a sergeant bravely running out and bullet dancing? Some of the older ‘classic’ war films I watched weren’t much cop either.

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#12

Post by burneyfan » September 1st, 2020, 11:59 pm

Favorited in August (slightly weak month):

Thartharah fawq al-Nil a.k.a Adrift on the Nile -- Kamal, 1971
Ex Libris: The New York Public Library -- Wiseman, 2017
The Gilded Lily -- Ruggles, 1935

Honorable mentions / worth a look:

The Hellstrom Chronicle -- Spiegel & Green, 1971
Streetwise -- Bell, 1984
Red Riding: In the Year of Our Lord 1974 -- Jarrold, 2009
La traversée de Paris a.k.a. Four Bags Full -- Autant-Lara, 1956
Terra Estrangeira a.k.a. Foreign Land -- Salles & Thomas, 1995
Edifício Master -- Coutinho, 2002

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#13

Post by blocho » September 2nd, 2020, 3:57 am

I did a lot of reading in August, so I saw only 22 movies.

The Best
Shane (rewatch)
The Great Silence (rewatch)
Phoenix
The Front Page
Sauvage
Le Locataire
Reise der Hoffnung

The Worst
Rollerball
Mandingo

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#14

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » September 2nd, 2020, 9:45 pm

Perception de Ambiguity wrote:
September 1st, 2020, 7:21 pm

A Place In the World - I became interested in this one when I saw it among your viewings, it wasn't on my radar before. Will watch soon, probably. A film I'll dig, you think?
'Tchoupitoulas' I put on my watchlist, too.

Got some juicy thoughts on 'Systemsprenger'?

Le Horla - Interesting take, and yeah, the yellow boat stuck out for me as well as a resonant image. I watched this on a day of soul searching where the past came back to me in intense ways, and I came to contemplate a lot on how the mind works and develops. I was in dialogue with my past selves, something that I saw reflected in this film and being in the thick of it this temporary madness was further nurtured by the experience of watching it. What I saw in the film was that trying to explain some mysterious phenomenon a man consequently follows the golden thread of his thoughts and keeps holding on to them, common sense be damned, creating a new reality in its wake. I felt in some ways as going mad along with the character in the film, as I followed his train of thought and bought into his reality.
There is certainly something to it that possessing technology that enables to record words, voices, images, ready to be played back at any given later point in time, gives a different kind of presence to those realities as opposed to if those pasts were all recorded by memory only. Maybe a greater sense of the past Self being an Other, existing independently from oneself, an increased state of schizophrenia that if indulged in maybe can lead to a dissolving of the self into all those ghosts of past- and future-Self, for present-Self to become no longer the pivotal point but just another ghost, ethereal and bound to evaporate.
Just one among other ramifications that those technologies might have. But I don't necessarily see them as an evil, while they increasingly complicate our understanding of ourselves I believe looked at the greater picture they are a good, we evolve along with the technology, making us grow as a species, even as living through these times makes for a confusing mess.

Tesla - By and large I guess it's what you would expect from a biopic, certainly if you look at the film in terms of plot. What intrigued me primarily about it were the ideas that Tesla - according to the film anyway - was preoccupied/obsessed with, and that the film itself dealt with as well. Some visionary and lofty ideas about hitherto unthought of possibilities and the nature of the world, but perhaps above all the power of thought itself as a creator of realities. Converting energy, transmitting data, transferring electricity, all just part of the same force in a world were everything is interconnected. That maybe information is the very material the world is made out of, and a creative power can illuminate to perhaps create a reality by way of putting a light on particular elements of this vast world of virtually limitless possibilities? At any case, it shows Tesla as a big dreamer to the extent of being considered a nutjob with his head in the clouds by many during his lifetime, but who in its wake invented what now has become our present and his dreams have not yet ceased to inspire people and shape the future.
A Place In the World - it is a film about being part of an idealistic community and positing a caring and hopeful vision of the world despite miserable conditions. It's a very draining film. It's beyond ethics and even what you'd call "society" or norms. It sure serves a glimpse into an alternate way of life. Aristakisyan seems like a very extreme kind of person, he actually believed in there being a countercultural idealistic movement in the homeless community - which I sure sympathize with, but when you watch the film it's mostly a dreadful experience. Cinematically it is also very one of a kind. It may sooth your soul in some way or another.

'Systemsprenger' - other than it being a very heartfelt, tender and emotionally intense experience, one thing that stood out to me was how Benni's anger always came forth when being inside some kind of institution that being school, orphanage, psychiatrist etc. and feeling most at ease with the world when she was in the nature. In that way she may be even more in contact with the origins of man that 'sane' people are? That the film ends in an airport makes perfect sense in that way, the airport being the paradigm for humanbeings in the 21st century. Her running away from this dreadful institution which millions of people pass through everyday like it is nothing. Maybe she actually sees the world clearer than 'sane' people do? She just don't how to express it and hence her extreme anger.

Le Horla - sounds like you were in the perfect mindset for the film and hence you had a very unique experience with it.
I think you're right in technologies not being evil per se, but actually making way for new and alternate ways of life and ways of understanding and experiencing your 'self'. How these technologies may put you in contact with a schizophrenic way of perceiving the world without being an actual 'clinical schizo'. The world has become schizophrenic so why not embrace it and use it for the better? Use for dissolving the demarcation between self and other and as you say past, future and present-self. Le Horla emblematizes quite elegantly Gilberto Perez's notion of The Material Ghost as film it self. The yellow boat might be the empty cinema hall where film simply runs without an audience or all the torrents out there without any seeders, just waiting for someone to wake them up.

Tesla - thanks for the write-up. Looking forward.
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#15

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » September 3rd, 2020, 7:09 am

September greetings, PdA! Hope you are bobbing away merrily, yellow boat or not...

My August wasn't really one to write home about, but these were the FTVs that I'll remember fondly (arranged chronologically & with standouts in red):

The Heart of Britain (1941, Humphrey Jennings)
Tyneside Story (1943, Gilbert Gunn)
We of the West Riding (1946, Ken Annakin)
The Senator Was Indiscreet (1947, George S. Kaufman)
Võlg / Debt (1966, Valdur Himbek)
Little Fauss and Big Halsy (1970, Sidney J. Furie)
The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler (1971, Bob Wynn)
Espejismo / Mirage (1972, Armando Robles Godoy)
Fear Is the Key (1972, Michael Tuchner)
Straight on Till Morning (1972, Peter Collinson)
Phase IV (1974, Saul Bass)
Pati Patni Aur Woh / The Husband, Wife and Mistress (1978, B.R. Chopra)
La coda / The Tail (1989, Gianluigi Toccafondo)
Thalía: Amor a la Mexicana (1997, no director credited)
Juanes: La camisa negra (2005, Rogelio Sikander)
Juanes Feat. Fuego: Mía Mía (2020, Oscar Vasquez)

:cheers:
That's all, folks!

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#16

Post by Lonewolf2003 » September 3rd, 2020, 10:28 am

None of my ftv last month made me one with the cosmic hum, but this one I liked a lot (out of 21 ftvs)

Phase IV (Saul Bass, 1974) :: 7.8

All my others favs were rewatched.

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#17

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » September 3rd, 2020, 11:46 pm

viktor-vaudevillain wrote:
September 2nd, 2020, 9:45 pm
Perception de Ambiguity wrote:
September 1st, 2020, 7:21 pm

A Place In the World - it is a film about being part of an idealistic community and positing a caring and hopeful vision of the world despite miserable conditions. It's a very draining film. It's beyond ethics and even what you'd call "society" or norms. It sure serves a glimpse into an alternate way of life. Aristakisyan seems like a very extreme kind of person, he actually believed in there being a countercultural idealistic movement in the homeless community - which I sure sympathize with, but when you watch the film it's mostly a dreadful experience. Cinematically it is also very one of a kind. It may sooth your soul in some way or another.

'Systemsprenger' - other than it being a very heartfelt, tender and emotionally intense experience, one thing that stood out to me was how Benni's anger always came forth when being inside some kind of institution that being school, orphanage, psychiatrist etc. and feeling most at ease with the world when she was in the nature. In that way she may be even more in contact with the origins of man that 'sane' people are? That the film ends in an airport makes perfect sense in that way, the airport being the paradigm for humanbeings in the 21st century. Her running away from this dreadful institution which millions of people pass through everyday like it is nothing. Maybe she actually sees the world clearer than 'sane' people do? She just don't how to express it and hence her extreme anger.

Le Horla - sounds like you were in the perfect mindset for the film and hence you had a very unique experience with it.
I think you're right in technologies not being evil per se, but actually making way for new and alternate ways of life and ways of understanding and experiencing your 'self'. How these technologies may put you in contact with a schizophrenic way of perceiving the world without being an actual 'clinical schizo'. The world has become schizophrenic so why not embrace it and use it for the better? Use for dissolving the demarcation between self and other and as you say past, future and present-self. Le Horla emblematizes quite elegantly Gilberto Perez's notion of The Material Ghost as film it self. The yellow boat might be the empty cinema hall where film simply runs without an audience or all the torrents out there without any seeders, just waiting for someone to wake them up.

Tesla - thanks for the write-up. Looking forward.
A Place In the World - Certainly sounds like it could be very interesting, but I could see this going either way for me, especially as my track record with drab Russian films (I almost want to ask "is there any other kind?") isn't the greatest. I cherish a lot of films where people live under miserable conditions but where there still is a sense of community, glimmers of hope, and people caring about each other at least a little bit. And yeah, a certain idealism, "who are they to tell us how to live"? Maybe because all of this is sort of the opposite to my life. Although I probably very much tend to prefer the documentary variety of this sort of topic to the fiction one. But we'll see.

Systemsprenger - Nicely put. I saw it very much along the same lines. I watched it very close to seeing 'Joker' at the same theater, and I conflate them with each other (not that I would ever run risk of confusing them with each other), having watched both with the same city-life-detesting, anarchy-yearning mindset. I extrapolated a bit in the case of 'Systemsprenger', I guess, certainly its director is vocal about not having had any such radical notions in mind with her film.
It's sad (to put it tritely) that with all the available resources and knowledge nations still govern populations of millions of people like we are running a tribe in respects to like trying to fit every single member into a mold. That there is no real offer of alternative lifestyle options.
So much big-hearted efforts trying to help Benni which only causes pain on all sides because the rigid systems that employ the people doesn't allow them to give her the help she needs without overstepping their jurisdiction, and that doesn't even speak of the fact that those same systems bore those now largely ill-equipped people with rigid minds, incapable of seeing beyond those few laid out tracks. They are supposed to be able to help a child that so clearly doesn't into a mold? Maybe she can be broken so that at best she can go on to live an unhappy functional existence in this society. Wonderful job.

Maybe she's more of a nature girl, sure, but a big part of it was Micha, as a human being who gave her undivided attention and an authority who could give her structure. But this weekend retreat thing never was going to cut it for her, nice experiences and lessons and everything, just to be put back into the same environments and structures that she had already rejected.
I also see it as being in a lineage of films about protagonists who quite simply are in desperate need for love in a society too alienated and maybe too complicated to give that experience to them in immediate enough ways (John Cassavetes films come to mind). You could say that Benni has an unhealthy need for love, that she has abandonment issues, etc., but by the same token what more important thing is there than love? Is it really so difficult to understand that some people behave crazy in a society that doesn't exactly give much priority to this most important thing?

Spoilers > I think they want to send her to Africa for a period of time at the end of the film, right? I saw this as a possible light in the clearing for her, but who knows what would have really awaited her there, maybe little more than yet another institution? And there also was something satisfying and even cathartic about her escaping this possible reformation as well with this powerful gesture to end the story on, even as it points towards a probable continuation of the cycle, but at least there's the sign that her spirit has not be broken yet! Also it's just a badass flight of fancy and visual to end the film with.

Le Horla - All our lives are just the creation of the world that after our universe has ended makes up the virtual spacetime for higher dimensional beings to inhabit and play and replay to their liking. What we call reality is just the dry run for its final purpose, GTA Earth. It will be a bestseller.
We do not have to understand new things, but by dint of patience, effort and method to come to understand with our whole self the truths which are evident.Image
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viktor-vaudevillain
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#18

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » September 4th, 2020, 3:01 pm

Perception de Ambiguity wrote:
September 3rd, 2020, 11:46 pm
A Place In the World - It's very documentary-like. Aristakisyan made the whole film with the actual members of the actual commune and on location their building in Moscow, and I'd say it's really not as drab as Russian films can be. It's more on the Cassavetian, humane and intense aspect of cinema.

Hahaha, wow, I didn't think of Joker one bit while watching or thinking about Systemsprenger, but I can see why those two films could conflate if seen back to back. I don't think everybody see the anarchist potential in Systemsprenger, I for example watched with a friend who's a psychologist, and it was like we had seen two completely different films. I think my friend being closer to the director's vision than I was.

The philosopher Simone Weil says that "love is another word for attention", and I suppose that is why Benni is craving too much love, her love simply needs too much attention and nobody can give her all that attention.

I found it extremely critical that she was to be send to Africa. The way they talk about the whole thing in the film is also extremely critical - like Africa is simply "another institution" for her, then never really mention where, when and what there is going to happen in Africa. This also shows Europe's still extremely colonial arrogance regarding third world countries, but then on the other hand I actually think someone like Benni would have a better life in a less advanced society. The whole film may be a huge critique of how the western society is constructed.
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#19

Post by St. Gloede » September 8th, 2020, 9:14 am

Might be the latest I have been to joining this thread, really struggled to set aside the time.

Saw 90 first time viewing in August, plus 6 rewatches:

Shane (1953, George Stevens) - 7 --> 7
The Great Silence (1968, Sergio Corbucci) - 9 --> 8
Tout Va Bien (1972, Jean-Luc Godard & Jean-Pierre Gorin) 8.5 --> 8.5+
Le vent d'est AKA Wind From the East (1970, Dziga Vertov Group) 9 --> 9.5
Numéro deux (1975, Jean- Luc Godard) 8.5 --> 8.5
Ici et ailleurs AKA Here and Elsewhere (1976, Jean-Luc Godard, DVG) 8.5 --> 8.5

Top first-time viewings:

1. Der Strass / Rhinestones (1991, Andreas Höntsch) 9/10
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2. Film ohne Titel / Film Without a Name (1948, Rudolf Jugert) 8.5-9/10
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Die Stille nach dem Schuß / Legend of Rita (2000, Volker Schlöndorff) 8.5/10
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4. Wozzeck (1947, Georg C. Klaren) 8/10
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5. Guns at Batasi (1964, John Guillermin)
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6. Der Apfel ist ab / The Original Sin / The Apple Fell (1948)
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7. Karbid und Sauerampfer / Carbide and Sorrel (1963, Frank Beyer)
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8. I Shot Andy Warhol (1996, Mary Harron)
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9. Ihre Majestät die Liebe / Her Majesty Love (1931, Joe May)
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10. Thunderstorm (1956, John Guillermin)
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Others:

In weiter Ferne, so nah! / Faraway, So Close! (1993, Wim Wenders)
Mein Stern / Be My Star (2001, Valeska Grisebach)
Nackt unter Wölfen / Naked Among Wolves (1963, Frank Beyer)
Cinétracts (1968, Various, inc. Godard, Resnais)
Hannah Arendt (2012, Margarethe von Trotta)
Der Unhold / The Ogre (1996, Volker Schlöndorff)
Der neunte Tag / The Ninth Day (2004, Volker Schlöndorff)
Sex-Business - Made in Pasing (1969, Hans-Jurgen Syderberg)

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