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What media traumatized you as a child?

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What media traumatized you as a child?

#1

Post by blocho » August 6th, 2020, 10:36 pm

Minkin wrote:
August 6th, 2020, 10:04 pm
I suspect this film traumatized many childhoods with its nightmarish sequences (such as when one boy is turned into a mouse in graphic detail). The film makes the horrors on screen seem too realistic – and brings them to real life by making you question whether there are witches everywhere around you.
Indeed! And quite apropos the discussion in the kid movie topic right now, my mother was very lax about which movies her children could see growing up. On the whole, I think this was a good policy. But there were occasional drawbacks. She took my brother to see The Witches when he was 7 (I was 5 and spared the experience), and it really got to him. He had nightmares, and I eventually traded bedrooms with him because he found he slept better in my room.

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#2

Post by Minkin » August 6th, 2020, 11:03 pm

blocho wrote:
August 6th, 2020, 10:36 pm
Minkin wrote:
August 6th, 2020, 10:04 pm
I suspect this film traumatized many childhoods with its nightmarish sequences (such as when one boy is turned into a mouse in graphic detail). The film makes the horrors on screen seem too realistic – and brings them to real life by making you question whether there are witches everywhere around you.
Indeed! And quite apropos the discussion in the kid movie topic right now, my mother was very lax about which movies her children could see growing up. On the whole, I think this was a good policy. But there were occasional drawbacks. She took my brother to see The Witches when he was 7 (I was 5 and spared the experience), and it really got to him. He had nightmares, and I eventually traded bedrooms with him because he found he slept better in my room.
What media traumatized you as a child?

For me it was mostly Are You Afraid of the Dark? - which at age 5 left me so scared that I spent the rest of my life sleeping with my head under the covers. Even on rewatch, the show is seriously fucked up + is still scarier than most horror films. I can't be the only one with lasting trauma from that show!

That and I remember my older sister watching an episode of Ghostwriter - where some purple blob monster covers kids with slime .... and I was just screaming and crying behind the couch for it to stop. Apparently I'm not the only one to suffer from this episode.

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Last edited by Minkin on August 7th, 2020, 12:00 am, edited 2 times in total.

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#3

Post by Minkin » August 6th, 2020, 11:56 pm

Thanks for the thread split. Here was my review of The Witches which mentioned the traumatizing aspects:

The Witches (1990)
A young boy must fend off an entire hotel convention of witches – who are hellbent on turning every child in England into a mouse. I like the way the film builds the mythos – with this evil society of witches being everywhere and then covering the ways to spot them (plain shoes, itchy wigs, gloves, etc). It makes me wonder how many children thought their grandma or elderly neighbor were a witch after watching this movie. I criticized Labyrinth for being too juvenile, but this felt too intense for younger audiences. I suspect this film traumatized many childhoods with its nightmarish sequences (such as when one boy is turned into a mouse in graphic detail). The film makes the horrors on screen seem too realistic – and brings them to real life by making you question whether there are witches everywhere around you.
====================================================

Sometimes you see a kid's movie and think "how did they allow that for children?" Granted kids react to things differently - and I've heard reports of children reacting well to Svankmajer's Alice. But clearly certain media is designed to just be overtly scary and traumatizing. I'm thinking of Large Marge in Peewee's Big Adventure as a good example.

If you don't have a traumatizing experience, then can you think of some media that would be traumatizing when viewed through the lens of a child?

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#4

Post by funkybusiness » August 7th, 2020, 12:05 am

I was also traumatized as a young child by Are You Afraid of the Dark? The werewolf episode. I was convinced my dad was a werewolf for several weeks.

edit: actually no, it was Goosebumps: Werewolf Skin. My dad worked in the garden a lot, and sometimes had to work nights, so I was sure he was burying his werewolf skin the garden just like the show.

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#5

Post by pitchorneirda » August 7th, 2020, 12:12 am

I had some traumatic nightmares where my dad died bizarrely because of Goosebumps. I've rewatched an episode recently and I laughed because it seems so ridiculous now but it had scared me for years

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#6

Post by mightysparks » August 7th, 2020, 12:26 am

I loved Are You Afraid of the Dark. My brother sometimes watched it with me but had to hide behind cushions lol. I also had some traumatic eps: Tale of the Thirteenth Floor, and the X-Ray specs one. Of course my favourite episodes. Never watched Goosebumps but read all the books :)

I was sure I made a list somewhere but can’t find it so other stuff: The Shining mini-series (mostly because of the 217 lady), Campfire Tales (People Can Lick Too), Alice in Wonderland 1985 movie (jam tomorrow jam yesterday, and the jabberwocky), and most of all The Evil Dead. I’ve said it a million times but I have never been so terrified in my life and then I cried when I couldn’t handle it anymore. Still my most powerful and favourite film experience.

Possibly some others but those are the big ones. After the age of like 9-10 nothing bothered me anymore.
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#7

Post by shugs » August 7th, 2020, 6:53 am

The 1990 remake of Night of the Living Dead. Watched only the beginning of it when I was about 7, and was afraid of the dark for months afterwards.



The video thumbnail still gives me the creeps, even though I rewatched the movie a few years back.

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#8

Post by Onderhond » August 7th, 2020, 7:00 am

Can't think of a single thing.

I remember being quite frightened by films like Child's Play and Halloween when I was 8-9, but never so much I couldn't sleep or that it lingered beyond the film. In fact, I was very much drawn to horror from that point. The only thing that ever kept me up at night was a story I heard about a house catching fire after someone had thrown away a cigarette. Not even sure if it was actually true, but that really shook me.

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#9

Post by Fergenaprido » August 7th, 2020, 10:06 am

I can't think of any traumatic film experience (though I have some from books, especially one in Grade 7 when I read that the sun was going to explode in a couple of billion years and I was mortified that my body and the planet would no longer exist (even though I knew that I would be long dead by then and my body would have disintegrated) - I cried myself to sleep for almost a year and I had nightmares about it, and that was when I had my first bout of depression - it even caused me to be triggered whenever I heard Bon Jovi's "Always" on the radio, because there's a line where he sings "When the heavens burst", even though I really liked that song and still know all the lyrics). I've never been a fan of horror, and it was way too scary for me as a kid, so I never tried to see any. And I loved The Witches both as a kid and as an adult upon rewatch.

The closest I can think of is at a friend's birthday party in Grade 4, we watch Robin Hood Prince of Thieves. At the beginning they cut someone's hand off, and that was it for me, I was too squeamish. I think I even covered my eyes and ears knowing it was coming. I left the room and played something else for the rest of the film until the food was ready. I was teased about it mercilessly afterward. Even in high school, at another friend's birthday party, I refused to watch I Know What You Did Last Summer because it was a slasher. Instead, I played ping pong in the basement with one or two others who also didn't care to watch. No one shamed me about it then, though.

Also, Ghostwriter! I forgot about that show, though I didn't see any episode with this purple guy everyone's mentioning. I read all the Goosebumps books, but don't think I saw the TV show. I do remember seeing a few episodes of Are You Afraid of the Dark? but don't think I was ever too scared.

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#10

Post by xianjiro » August 7th, 2020, 10:06 am

Onderhond wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 7:00 am
Can't think of a single thing.
never thought we'd agree, but here we are - but then again, movies weren't anywhere near as available as they are now and as a youngster the things I would have had access to would likely fall into the noirish category - wait, I take it all back mysterious femme fatales traumatized me!!!

However, and again related to the discussion of a family-friendly or kid-appropriate movie list, my father was a Bond fan and I pretty much fell right in line. No idea which one it was, but maybe You Only Live Twice, but then again, all Bond films are pretty similar. Anyway, it was one of the rare events where we did something as a family at home - dinner in front of the TV (at a time when we actually HAD a TV). I was probably 13 give or take a year and my brothers are 10 and 11 years younger. Anyway, my stepmother told us after putting the kids to bed, one, I forget which, starting crying about the guns and being scared. I was 13 or so, so didn't really get it, but it's clear someone was traumatized by the gun battle.

Undoubtedly he got over it. As far as I know, we're all still pretty big Bond fans for who knows what real reason. :think:

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#11

Post by Armoreska » August 7th, 2020, 12:25 pm

not traumatized but
The Omen
remained in my top 20 most disturbing after all the salos and augusts

running around Silent Hill is also memorable as your first survival horror experience altho it was second (Resident Evil came out earlier).

i remember Are You Afraid of the Dark too, but yet to watch the series in full
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#12

Post by OldAle1 » August 7th, 2020, 12:57 pm

Being of the same generation as xianjiro, and growing up in an area with few tv channels, and not getting to see movies in theaters often at all - yeah, not many memories of being "traumatized". Maybe the Child Catcher from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, or some elements in Willy Wonka? Maybe Pinocchio which I think I saw in the 1971 reissue at 5-6. That's about it. I had over-protective parents and had absolutely zero exposure to horror films or anything even close to horror in film, tv or literature until... college, actually. I don't know that I saw any horror films before I was 17 or 18 except perhaps some of the Universal stuff on TV which wouldn't scare anybody even when I was growing up.

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#13

Post by peeptoad » August 7th, 2020, 1:03 pm

when I was very young I loved the Muppets with the exception of:
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#14

Post by Harco » August 7th, 2020, 1:23 pm

mightysparks wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 12:26 am
The Shining mini-series (mostly because of the 217 lady)
Is that the woman in the bathtub? If so, yep, that was also my biggest fear as a kid. My father rented the VHS in, I suppose, 1997 or 1998, so I was either 7 or 8 years old, and that woman was my biggest fear for years. Wasn’t afraid of bathtubs or bathrooms in general but just that thing.

And yeah, loved Goosebumps and Are You Afraid of the Dark? (although I only caught the reruns of the latter in or around 2001) as a kid. Somehow I never became a horror fan until 2010-ish though.
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#15

Post by mightysparks » August 7th, 2020, 2:31 pm

Harco wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 1:23 pm
mightysparks wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 12:26 am
The Shining mini-series (mostly because of the 217 lady)
Is that the woman in the bathtub? If so, yep, that was also my biggest fear as a kid. My father rented the VHS in, I suppose, 1997 or 1998, so I was either 7 or 8 years old, and that woman was my biggest fear for years. Wasn’t afraid of bathtubs or bathrooms in general but just that thing.
Yep, she terrified me. I was probably around the same age. And the number 217 has haunted me ever since :D I've also had an issue with shower/bathtubs with closed curtains since then. The flat I lived in London had one and my roommates always kept the curtain pulled closed and every time I walked in there my heart would stop and I had to bravely open it every time I went in there or I'd get too anxious.
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#16

Post by Knaldskalle » August 7th, 2020, 4:51 pm

peeptoad wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 1:03 pm
when I was very young I loved the Muppets with the exception of:
Image
Some of the large monsters in The Muppet Show gave me nightmares when I was young (6-8 yo I suppose) and the characters in The Moomins forever scarred me, Little My in particular and The Groke was so tragic and yet scary that I just couldn't watch the show.
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#17

Post by Fergenaprido » August 7th, 2020, 5:13 pm

Ooh, that reminds me of the Muppets episode where one of muppets starts eating everyone and everything. I don't think I was that scared, but I do remember dreaming/thinking about it often growing up, so it must have stuck in my psyche for some reason. It must be this episode that I'm thinking of. And now I need to go watch it again. :D

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#18

Post by peeptoad » August 7th, 2020, 5:21 pm

Knaldskalle wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 4:51 pm
peeptoad wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 1:03 pm
when I was very young I loved the Muppets with the exception of:
Image
Some of the large monsters in The Muppet Show gave me nightmares when I was young (6-8 yo I suppose) and the characters in The Moomins forever scarred me, Little My in particular and The Groke was so tragic and yet scary that I just couldn't watch the show.
I remember The Moomins, but didn't see to much of them in my neck of the woods at that early age. A classmate of mine in very early school (like nursery school or kindergarten) was afraid of Sweetums though, and it was because of his size. He was also Taminella's crony of course. The Phantom from the Muppets was also a little crrepy to me, but I also thought he was cool (his mouth and tendrils sort of reminded me of Big League Chew, for one thing).

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#19

Post by maxwelldeux » August 7th, 2020, 7:36 pm

Unsolved Mysteries terrified me as a kid. Robert Stack had an unsettling voice, and the fact that those were real and unsolved mysteries freaked me out - I was terrified someone was going to come in my house and hurt/kill me or my parents. On top of that, I saw an episode with a mystery from my hometown, so that made it worse.

Also, the scene from Flight of the Navigator where the alien in the spaceship first shows up freaked me out. So creepy and scarring. Loved the rest of the movie, but I had to close my eyes during that scene.

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#20

Post by burneyfan » August 7th, 2020, 8:10 pm

No movies I can think of, but I had a hard time with "Puff the Magic Dragon" when I was little, and I thought the song "Wildfire" (about the horse) was really creepy.

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#21

Post by xianjiro » August 7th, 2020, 8:11 pm

Since the topic title says "media" and not just movies, I'm going to throw this one out there. I'm sure that there have been other traumatizing things I've been exposed to in my life thanks to media, but for whatever reason, most aren't something like a scene in a movie or at least my definition of "traumatizing" is somehow different or my standard is different.

But having my clock radio wake me up on 9.11 - that was traumatic. I've no idea what I actually heard, but what I remember is the voice saying something about a plane flying into a building and it was probably followed by something like it being deliberate. Don't remember exactly what time it was and of course NYC is hours ahead of me, so I'm thinking that it was after the first plane hit and before either tower collapsed. I remember turning on the TV, getting ready for a vet appointment, and also being much more afraid of what the W administration would do in response (turns out that fear was very well founded). Took the dog to the vet and we went to a deserted dog park which happens to be in the flight path to Portland International (PDX). The silence of no planes was very, very eerie, even eerier than that first week of the lockdown since it all happened in the space of a couple hours.

Even though I've talked about what happened afterwards, it's that moment of being woken up by the radio that was traumatic and I've never used the radio as an alarm since and never will.

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#22

Post by maxwelldeux » August 7th, 2020, 8:27 pm

burneyfan wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 8:10 pm
No movies I can think of, but I had a hard time with "Puff the Magic Dragon" when I was little, and I thought the song "Wildfire" (about the horse) was really creepy.
I have a problem with the song Puff the Magic Dragon now - I will forever associate it with the funeral I went to of a teacher killed in a school shooting. I was 13 at the time, so I guess that counts?

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#23

Post by maxwelldeux » August 7th, 2020, 8:32 pm

xianjiro wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 8:11 pm
But having my clock radio wake me up on 9.11 - that was traumatic.
I was woken up by a friend. Basically, the conversation went "Turn on the TV." Me: "What channel?" Her: "Doesn't matter." It was on all the channels. Nothing else mattered.

I've had a similar thing happen one other time, too. When the I-35W bridge collapsed in Minneapolis in 2007, I had a student come into class and tell me to look up what happened. When I asked what site, he said "Doesn't matter."

For me, nothing scarier than suddenly having everything be only about one thing.

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#24

Post by 3eyes » August 7th, 2020, 8:48 pm

The Shadow (radio serial)
sundry 1940s comic strips you've never heard of
When the dinosaurs all died in Fantasia
:run: STILL the Gaffer!

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#25

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » August 7th, 2020, 10:26 pm

I saw Alien and The Amityville Horror at the drive-in (yes, the drive-in) on separate occasions. Alien absolutely terrorized me while I was watching it, but then I was fine afterward. By contrast, The Amityville Horror didn't affect me much while I watched it (in fact, a friend of mine was the main kid in it, which I thought was hilarious), but it stayed with me afterward in a, ahem, haunting sort of way.

No other films ever really scared me excessively, as I think these two just hit the sweet spot of my inexperience and youth.

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#26

Post by nimimerkillinen » August 8th, 2020, 10:57 am

top-2 that i think of
The Langoliers for years
Many X-Files episodes particularily ghost in red dress

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#27

Post by peeptoad » August 8th, 2020, 11:56 am

Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 10:26 pm
(yes, the drive-in)
:cheers:

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#28

Post by Cocoa » August 9th, 2020, 2:40 am

I don't think I was "traumatized" by anything I watched as a child. I definitely watched horror films during the ages of 3-5 years old so nothing really bothered me, but the closest I can think of that scared me is the "No One Believes In Ghosts" scene in the Muppet Babies episode: Is There A Muppet In The House. They showed archival footage of KKK-style ghosts (from black-and-white films) in it. As an adult, I later watched the films they used for archival footage and it was definitely not as scary as how they edited it into the tv episode :lol:

The Zeebo the Clown episode from Are You Afraid of the Dark? (The Tale of the Laughing Clown) was also creepy. My parents had VHS tapes for me and my brother of a bunch of kids shows when we were toddlers and I would watch them for hours because of my insomnia until I fell asleep and those episodes usually appeared past midnight while I was watching them. I rarely ever watched them during daytime.

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#29

Post by xianjiro » August 9th, 2020, 3:12 am

Here's a question as follow up for the entire gang: how active were your parents/guardians in policing what you watched while growing up?

Guess slightly related to that is: did they watch difficult, adult themed, or violent pictures with you?

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#30

Post by mightysparks » August 9th, 2020, 3:25 am

xianjiro wrote:
August 9th, 2020, 3:12 am
Here's a question as follow up for the entire gang: how active were your parents/guardians in policing what you watched while growing up?

Guess slightly related to that is: did they watch difficult, adult themed, or violent pictures with you?
My parents wouldn't let me watch R-rated films (at least, overly graphic/difficult/scary ones) for a long time--I begged my dad to let me watch The Evil Dead when I was 7 and he eventually gave in, but after my reaction they refused to let me watch any other R-rated film for quite some time. But I think by about 11 I was making my own decisions.

I mostly watched films with my parents as a kid, so it occurred every now and then. I watched Irreversible and I Stand Alone with my dad, for example, but I was 15 by that point.
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#31

Post by Cocoa » August 9th, 2020, 5:28 am

xianjiro wrote:
August 9th, 2020, 3:12 am
Here's a question as follow up for the entire gang: how active were your parents/guardians in policing what you watched while growing up?

Guess slightly related to that is: did they watch difficult, adult themed, or violent pictures with you?
I don't recall my parents ever policing what I watched while growing up, although I could usually tell whether they like something or not which would influence which thing I would see with which parent. I remember my dad taking my brother and I to the movie theater to watch Hollow Man (2000) which came out when I was seven years old and we definitely watched a few other "violent" films together in the movie theater while I was 7-11 years old. I can't remember if we saw any violent films in theater before that, but we probably did. I know I watched Anaconda on VHS with my dad and that came out when I was 4 years old, maybe I also saw it in cinema idk. My dad had a bunch of action/sci-fi films on VHS while I was little and he was a fan of Arnold Schwarzenegger so we had films such as The Running Man, Total Recall, Predator at his home and we definitely watched some of that kind of stuff together. My parents divorced when I was 3 so I have no memories of them parenting together over this kind of topic. Their parenting styles were different and they didn't care what the other did while divorced. I typically saw horror films with my dad at the movie theaters while I would watch romcom and family movies with my mom at the movie theaters. I definitely saw some horror stuff with my mom but it was usually just movies we watched at home... I think I once saw Deep Blue Sea with her (I was 6 or 7 years old) while we were at a friend's house and I think I also saw Final Destination 3 with her while we were at another family member's home (I was 13 years old), we probably watched some other violent films together between that time but she wasn't a huge horror fan so we didn't watch those types of films together often. I also saw a few horror films with my step dad but he didn't have a relationship with my mom until I was 7 so that's mostly irrelevant for the early years of parenting but we saw a few things together like The Re-animator and Slashers (which I ended up leaving the room while he and my brother watched it because I didn't like the chainsaw noise :lol: ).

I was always with my mom when we rented movies from the video store and she always let us rent horror films ever since I can remember. Most of the time I watched the films with my brother (until my preteen years/his teen years) or alone.

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#32

Post by blocho » August 9th, 2020, 2:53 pm

xianjiro wrote:
August 9th, 2020, 3:12 am
Here's a question as follow up for the entire gang: how active were your parents/guardians in policing what you watched while growing up?

Guess slightly related to that is: did they watch difficult, adult themed, or violent pictures with you?
My parents were very permissive. They seemed to think that they shouldn't try to hide the world from their children. My mother famously took my brother to see Pulp Fiction when he was 11, which outraged all of her mom friends. Overall, I applaud their permissiveness with movies. Still, it did lead to some tears. I came home crying from seeing Swing Kids when i was 8.

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#33

Post by OldAle1 » August 9th, 2020, 2:59 pm

xianjiro wrote:
August 9th, 2020, 3:12 am
Here's a question as follow up for the entire gang: how active were your parents/guardians in policing what you watched while growing up?

Guess slightly related to that is: did they watch difficult, adult themed, or violent pictures with you?
Though my parents were not particularly religious, they both grew up in pretty religious, conservative households, in the 30s on isolated farms, and though both had lived in big cities (Cleveland, Milwaukee, Chicago) through much of the 50s and 60s, they never really gave up on their country/churchy ways in many respects. My father NEVER swears - you might hear a "damn" from him once in a while, but that's it - and they both had strong aversions to violence, and my father to on-screen sex as well. And given that I grew up before video was widely available, and with no cable available in our rural area - let's just say I didn't get to see much. Star Wars was my first PG film, at 11, and I had to beg and beg to get to see that. Didn't see an R-rated film until I was 15. My mom's younger sister, who remained extremely religious through her whole life, was even stricter with her kids - and her husband (my dad's younger brother) also was ultra-conservative personally - not only no swearing, but no drinking or smoking, no coffee even. EVER. I don't think those kids saw an R-rated film until they went away to college, and their mother never watched any post-1950s films at all except Jesus stuff. So yeah, super-over-protective parents here. I also had to go to bed - and that meant lights off - by 10 PM all the way up through high school, because "nobody stays up past 10 pm", something my dad to this day actually believes.

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#34

Post by Onderhond » August 9th, 2020, 4:11 pm

xianjiro wrote:
August 9th, 2020, 3:12 am
Here's a question as follow up for the entire gang: how active were your parents/guardians in policing what you watched while growing up?

Guess slightly related to that is: did they watch difficult, adult themed, or violent pictures with you?
They quickly caught on that I liked horror and actually helped me watch some, by taping films that came on too late (like Hellraiser, Candyman etc). First time I was ever allowed to pick a film from the video store, I picked Braindead. Watched it together with my mom and dad (they didn't like it one bit), but they didn't make a big deal of it either.

They're not into arthouse or more difficult films themselves, though now they have Netflix it shows that they don't care about production countries. Last I heard they were watching an Isreali series? :shrug:

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#35

Post by burneyfan » August 9th, 2020, 7:17 pm

My mother was a pretty strict guardian. We mostly saw G and family-friendly PG stuff (like Star Wars). She could get in over her head, though. I know she was HORRIFIED when she took me to Amadeus with a few friends for my tenth birthday (I begged for it as my present) -- she expected it would be a mostly-educational film about Mozart, and wasn't prepared for the sexual banter and content. I also remember that around sixth or seventh grade, she made me return a very tame fantasy novel to the friend who loaned it to me simply because its title was The Harem of Aman Akbar, which alarmed her (if she had read most of the other fantasy I was reading at the time with more innocuous titles, I think her head would have exploded).

My siblings and I tended to circumvent Mom's strict media rules by going to our friends' house, where we would watch stuff like Enter the Ninja and Rambo and many, many horror movies. (Also all the Bones Brigade videos, but she wouldn't have outlawed those, had she known.)

My husband and I are more permissive with our kids, but when we think things are kind of dicey or could use some explanation, at least one of us watches with them, and I can't think of anything R-rated they've seen -- they're still only in elementary school. When I'm watching a movie in my room, the kids pause on the threshhold and ask if I'm watching something "gross" before they walk in far enough to see the screen. (If it is "gross," I pause it and/or black out the screen.)

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#36

Post by maxwelldeux » August 9th, 2020, 8:15 pm

xianjiro wrote:
August 9th, 2020, 3:12 am
Here's a question as follow up for the entire gang: how active were your parents/guardians in policing what you watched while growing up?

Guess slightly related to that is: did they watch difficult, adult themed, or violent pictures with you?
My parents were super lax on everything, so long as the film didn't contain a depiction of the human female nipple, the scourge of society.

Terminator 2? Fine. Probably saw that when I was about 10. No problem. Violence is bad - you know that, Max. Don't kill people. Don't shoot people. Terminator? NO - there was a brief flash of a titty, so it was off limits.

It was like that with everything. If there was a hint an unclothed female boob might appear on screen, movie went off. That was a hard no.

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#37

Post by OldAle1 » August 9th, 2020, 8:35 pm

Violence GOOD sex BAD, very typical American POV. Remember arguing about that with a conservative friend once, many years ago, and his justification was something like "well we all know that the violence in action and horror movies is fake, just fantasy, nobody believes that stuff or is affected by it - but sex is REAL and therefore should be restricted to the privacy of one married man and woman together - if people see it in movies they might do something weird and perverted or at least think it's ok." And this from a (seemingly) very smart, highly educated person. Azathoth, are we a fucked-up country.

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#38

Post by xianjiro » August 9th, 2020, 9:24 pm

Again, lmao! Though I beg to differ, the female nipple isn't inherently sexual, I mean, how many milkmaids get turned on at the office? And if so, I'd bet more dudes would be fighting for those jobs! But yes, absolutely, straight men (and maybe some lesbians) are absolutely obsessed with breasts and that obsession is suxual. Thank goodness no one ever gets stabbed, shot, or tortured anywhere, especially in the suburbs. But the points on the American psyche are well taken.

Have to wonder how Max got to watch anything not rated G ....

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#39

Post by OldAle1 » August 9th, 2020, 9:28 pm

xianjiro wrote:
August 9th, 2020, 9:24 pm

Have to wonder how Max got to watch anything not rated G ....
Keep in mind he's a young 'un compared to you and me. Sex has gotten much less common since the 70s - by the early part of this century even some R-rated comedies have no tits. Superbad for example - I don't think there's anything there but language (lots of it). It's still kind of amazing to me to watch some early 70s films that have loads of female nudity, maybe even some male nudity, but very little language or violence. Almost unheard of today in this country, I mean outside of actual porn of course.

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#40

Post by xianjiro » August 9th, 2020, 9:38 pm

depends how you define "male nudity" - full frontal? Even ass-shots were pretty rare with men back then, but there was ALWAYS lots of T&A

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