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¶ Which first time viewings last month made you tune in? - July 2020

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Perception de Ambiguity
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¶ Which first time viewings last month made you tune in? - July 2020

#1

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » August 1st, 2020, 10:13 am

Ѧine:

1 Consolations (Love Is an Art of Time) Part 2: The Lighted Clearing 1988 r. bruce elder
2 Yakona 2014 anlo sepulveda & paul collins
3 一个死者对生者的访问 / Yi ge shi zhe dui sheng zhe de fang wen / Questions for the Living / A Dead Man Visits the Living 1986/1988 jian-zhong huang
4 humming, fast and slow 2013 rainer kohlberger
5 INVENTING THE FUTURE 2020 ISIAH MEDINA
6 Neon Parallel 1996 2015 jon rafman
7 DEVS 2020 alex garland
8 The Second Journey (To Uluru) ©1977-81 arthur & corinne cantrill
9 Epsilon / Alien Visitor (1995 cut) "1997" rolf de heer
10 अदि शंकराचार्य / Adi Shankaracharya / The Philosopher / The First Teacher Sankara 1983 g.v. iyer
11 Heliography 1979 hiroshi yamazaki
12 Lawale 1969 dore o.
13 The Gate to the Mind's Eye 1994 michael boydstun
14 Kaldalon 1971 dore o.
15 Ex-memoriam 1993 beriou
16 Edward James: Builder of Dreams 1995 avery danziger & sarah stein
17 Supersense 1988 john downer
18 TOO OLD TO DIE YOUNG 2019 nic.win.ref
19 The Velvet Underground in Boston 1967 andy warhol
20 INAATE/SE/ [it shines a certain way. to a certain place./it flies. falls.] 2016 adam khalil & zack khalil
21 It has to be lived once and dreamed twice 2019 rainer kohlberger
22 Death Day / Día de muerte 1934 sergei m. eisenstein

Honorable Mentions

Lines: Vertical 1960 evelyn lambart & norman mcLaren ● Půlnoc / Midnight 2010 klára tasovská ● Still Life (Betamale) 2013 jon rafman ● 1857 (Fool's Gold) 1981 r. bruce elder ● Schnittstelle 1995 harun farocki ● A Man Digging 2013 jon rafman ● パルチザン前史 / Prehistory of the Partisans / Pre-History of the Partisan Party / Paruchizan Zenshi 1969 noriaki tsuchimoto ● Erysichthon 2015 jon rafman ● Malfilm 1967 hhk schoenherr ● Silver Traces 1976 bruce wood ● Sonate: Graubild/Fraubild/Blaubild & Weisskader 1968 hhk schoenherr ● The Handeye: Bone Ghosts 2012 anja dornieden & juan david gonzález monroy aka ojoboca ● Necronomicon: Book of Dead 1993 brian yuzna & shûsuke kaneko & christophe gans ● Dream No Evil / Now I Lay Me Down to Die / The Faith Healer 1970 john hayes ● ゲ–ムセット Machu Picchu / Gēmusetto Machu Picchu 2019 created by maxime simonet ● Fallen Angels: Tomorrow I Die 1995 john dahl ● Gwen, le livre de sable / Gwen et le livre de sable / Gwen, the Book of Sand 1985 jean-françois laguionie

special shoutouts / Online Media

The Joe Rogan Experience [#1255 - Alex Jones Returns! (2019) #1511 - Oliver Stone (2020) #1213 - Dr. Andrew Weil (2018) #550 - Rupert Sheldrake (2014) #1240 - Forrest Galante (2019) #1155 - Henry Rollins (2018)]

AYAHUASCA DMT Trip Simulation (POV) | What Ayahuasca "Looks” Like ● LSD Trip Simulation Replication [Accurate POV] ● 12 Year Old Terrarium - Life Inside a closed jar, Over a decade in isolation ● Creating a Woodland Stream Ecosphere (With PARASITE!) ● [YT channel "PowerfulJRE" (JRE Toons)] ● Walking Rifle Adventures (part two) [by Damon Packard] ● Why Passivity Breeds Mediocrity and Mental Illness ● Why Public Schools and the Mainstream Media Dumb Us Down ● THOTH's PROPHECY read from the Hermetic Texts by Graham Hancock ● Is EVERYTHING CONSCIOUS!? | Russell Brand & Prof. Philip Goff ● HardRAVE Festival 9 0 Official Aftermovie

Honorable Mentions - most fruitful rewatches

Kyoto 京 / 日本の心 / Kyoto: Heart of Japan 1969/1970 kon ichikawa 8+ ● Bad Lieutenant 1992 abel ferrara. 8+ ● Farewell, My Lovely 1975 dick richards. 9 ● Der Rabe 1951 kurt steinwendner. 8 ● Adidas: The Wall 1993 david lynch 6+ ● Reasons to be Glad 1980 jeffrey noyes scher. 7 ● To the Happy Few 2003 thomas draschan & stella friedrichs. 7 ● The 3 Rs / Viennale Trailer 2011 2011 david lynch. 8 ● Only God Forgives 2013 nic.win.ref. 9 ● mother! 2017 darren aronofsky. 9 ● Senna 2010 asif kapadia. 8 ● 告白 / Confessions 2010 tetsuya nakashima. 8

♆☸⼐℟ې‽
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#2

Post by Traveller » August 1st, 2020, 4:32 pm

Seen a lot of movies in July. No new favorites (9/10 or better) though, but many exceptional ones (8/10).

Gambling, Gods and LSD (2002)
A Borrowed Life (1994)
The Corporation (2003)
The Unfaithful Wife (1969)
Days of Wine and Roses (1962)
The Soft Skin (1964)
Picture of Light (1994)
Panique (1946)
The Boxer and Death (1963)
Next of Kin (1984)
Cat in the Sack (1964)
Dying at Grace (2003)
Ekstase (1933)
The Facts of Murder (1959)
Brand Upon the Brain! (2006)
Possible Worlds (2000)
ICM
August Challenge: Image
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#3

Post by pitchorneirda » August 1st, 2020, 9:31 pm

Very quiet month...

7/10 or higher (8/10 or higher in bold), by chronological order of watching:

1. Morvern Callar (2002, Lynne Ramsay)
2. Le cousin Jules (1972, Dominique Benicheti)

Honorable mentions (6+): Historias extraordinarias (2008, Mariano Llinás), Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda (2017, Stephen Nomura Schible)

Renowned movies that left me cold: Tini zabutykh predkiv (1964, Sergei Parajanov), The Tree of Life (2011, Terrence Malick), Raging Bull (1980, Martin Scorsese), Tystnaden (1963, Ingmar Bergman)

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#4

Post by OldAle1 » August 1st, 2020, 9:46 pm

Not the most amazing month quality-wise due to it's particular focus, but still some gems or at least gem-like rocks -

MASTERPIECE
-
EXCELLENT
1. The Undead (Roger Corman, 1957)
VERY GOOD
2. The Capture (John Sturges, 1950)
3. Waydowntown (Gary Burns, 2000)
4. The Scarlet Coat (John Sturges, 1955)
5. Përjetërsi / The Eternity (Dhimiter Anagnosti, 1974) (short)
6. Rock All Night (Roger Corman, 1957)
7. Notfilm (Ross Lipman, 2005)
8. Curious Alice (???, 1968) (short)
GOOD-TO-VERY GOOD
9. Picture Claire (Bruce McDonald, 2001)
10. Cannibal Girls (Ivan Reitman, 1973)


MOST VALUABLE RE-WATCHES

1. E.T.: The Extraterrestrial (8th)
2. Deputy Droopy (3rd)
3. Mac and Me (2nd)

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#5

Post by prodigalgodson » August 2nd, 2020, 12:17 am

Heya!

I watched Devs all the way through, which is rare for a series, but I thought it didn't hit its potential.
SpoilerShow
If free will is possible, but only if someone's seen their atomically determined future, weren't all those genius disruptor tech physicists incentivized to break the chain? Wouldn't that be the first thing they'd try? Is the lead unique among the people of the world in being immune to determinism? The ending is so incompatible with the established world up to that point; I was expecting something waay cleverer. Much like War and Peace, which I just finished, it seems to want to have its cake and eat it to with free will.
Maybe I missed something, I'm sure it's been talked about a lot. Aside from the philosophy, the characters occupy an uncanny valley between real people and idea/plot mouthpieces, which isn't helped by a generally mediocre cast, where the lead stands out as especially really very bad. I don't know how she landed that role. Garland's a solid director, but there's something too sterile and symmetrical for me in his approach, which fortunately tends to suit the material he chooses.

Ah, I forgot Too Old to Die Young was out already! Psyched to watch that. The Neon Demon's one of my favorite from Refn, I was thinking about rewatching that recently actually. That Velvet Underground footage sounds cool too.

Mine:

1. Gambling, Gods, and LSD (Peter Mettler, 2002) 10/10
2. Picture of Light (Peter Mettler, 1994)
3. Film Socialisme (Jean-Luc Godard, 2010) 9/10
4. Imposters (Mark Rappaport, 1979)
6. La Chinoise (Jean-Luc Godard, 1967)
5. Petropolis (Peter Mettler, 2009)
7. Behemoth (Zhao Liang, 2015) 8/10
8. Path of Cessation (Robert Fulton, 1974)
9. Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard, 2014)
10. The Nun (Jacques Rivette, 1966)

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#6

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » August 2nd, 2020, 8:56 am

1. Martin Eden (Pietro Marcello, 2019)
2. Empty Metal (Adam Khalil & Bayley Sweitzer, 2018)
3. First Cow (Kelly Reichardt, 2019)
4. Rancho Notorious (Fritz Lang, 1952)
5. 簪 / Ornamental Hairpin (Hiroshi Shimizu, 1941)
6. Soleil Ô (Med Hondo, 1967)
7. 白日焰火 / Black Coal, Thin Ice (Yi'nan Diao, 2014)
8. Die Innere Sicherheit / The State I am In (Christian Petzold, 2000)
9. The Docks of New York (Josef von Sternberg, 1928)
10. 按摩と女 / The Masseurs and a Woman (Hiroshi Shimizu, 1938)
11. Unichtbare Gegner / Invisible Adversaries (Valie Export, 1977)*
12. 御法度 / Taboo (Nagisa Oshima, 1999)

HM's: Ghost of OT301 (Takashi Makino, 2014), The Violence of a Civilization without Secrets (Adam & Zack Khalil, 2018), ചിദംബരം / Chidambaram (Govindan Aravindan, 1985), Ich bin den Sommer über in Berlin geblieben / I Stayed in Berlin All Summer (Angela Schanelec, 1994), You Are Not I (Sara Driver, 1981)

* = theatrical
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#7

Post by Onderhond » August 2nd, 2020, 9:11 am

Image

01. Hot Gimmick: Girl Meets Boy [Hotto Gimikku: Garu Mitsu Boi] by Yûki Yamato (2019)
If you read the manga, beware. Yamato didn't set out to make a simple manga adaption, instead she wanted to make cinema. The tropes of the genre are exaggerated, the cinematography is lush, the soundtrack an interesting update of classical pieces and the editing ... well, the editing is simply to die for. This was awesome.


Image

02. The Day of Destruction [Hakai no Hi] by Toshiaki Toyoda (2020)
Toshiaki Toyoda is back. The renegade director returns with a film that tackles the current epidemic, though not without some broader stabs at humankind's greed and egocentricity. While there is a rough narrative, The Day of Destruction is a mood piece first and foremost, hammering home its message. This is the Toyoda I love.


Image

03. 4.0* - Dancing Mary by Hiroyuki Tanaka (2019)
Dancing Mary is a superb blend of so many genres that it's nearly impossible to categorize. Fantasy, horror, crime, comedy and drama seamlessly mix together to tell a beautiful story about a long-lost romance that ended in tragedy. The cinematography is beautiful, the editing is excellent. Add a great score and a fine cast and you have another Tanaka masterpiece.

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#8

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » August 2nd, 2020, 9:16 am

prodigalgodson wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 12:17 am
Heya!

I watched Devs all the way through, which is rare for a series, but I thought it didn't hit its potential.
SpoilerShow
If free will is possible, but only if someone's seen their atomically determined future, weren't all those genius disruptor tech physicists incentivized to break the chain? Wouldn't that be the first thing they'd try? Is the lead unique among the people of the world in being immune to determinism? The ending is so incompatible with the established world up to that point; I was expecting something waay cleverer. Much like War and Peace, which I just finished, it seems to want to have its cake and eat it to with free will.
Maybe I missed something, I'm sure it's been talked about a lot. Aside from the philosophy, the characters occupy an uncanny valley between real people and idea/plot mouthpieces, which isn't helped by a generally mediocre cast, where the lead stands out as especially really very bad. I don't know how she landed that role. Garland's a solid director, but there's something too sterile and symmetrical for me in his approach, which fortunately tends to suit the material he chooses.

Ah, I forgot Too Old to Die Young was out already! Psyched to watch that. The Neon Demon's one of my favorite from Refn, I was thinking about rewatching that recently actually. That Velvet Underground footage sounds cool too.

Mine:

1. Gambling, Gods, and LSD (Peter Mettler, 2002) 10/10
2. Picture of Light (Peter Mettler, 1994)
3. Film Socialisme (Jean-Luc Godard, 2010) 9/10
4. Imposters (Mark Rappaport, 1979)
6. La Chinoise (Jean-Luc Godard, 1967)
5. Petropolis (Peter Mettler, 2009)
7. Behemoth (Zhao Liang, 2015) 8/10
8. Path of Cessation (Robert Fulton, 1974)
9. Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard, 2014)
10. The Nun (Jacques Rivette, 1966)
One can endlessly philosophize on the question of free will, but I believe that eventually it's a question of state of mind rather than of laws of nature, making it really an issue of faith, you have agency if you believe you do.
SpoilerShow
If the mindset of the people is deterministic then so is the direction of the company itself. The company is an amoral entity, and in order to function its human parts need to be amoral as well, or rather, of course, money is the highest morality that best ensures the machine to work.

'DEVS', although sci-fi, naturally is about the present concerns regarding the dark directions into which humanity could be heading, and the present mindsets that produce those possible futures, which generally is quite a limiting one of scientific rationality and progress worship. Science has become our God (DEVS=DEUS).

So here you have the most extreme example imaginable of a company that knows of their destructive influence but stays on course without deflection, with everyone willfully (as it were) reducing themselves to clogs in the machinery so they can rid themselves of their responsibility, powerless to make a change to what they think of as a mammoth train. They really know better, but this is the difference between knowing the path and walking the path. They choose to be part of the problem by not choosing to be part of the solution.

The genius disruptor tech physicists as people of science (and creators of digital worlds) would in fact be one of the most susceptible people to believe themselves mere human machines and hence prisoners of determinism.
Ohnmacht [ohne ("without") Macht ("power")] is a German word that comes from the field of psychology and means both powerless and unconscious. This describes everyone who facilitates Devs to function. The protagonist is somebody who breaks out of that Ohnmacht and gains autonomy.

My take, in other words, is that the protagonist by having seen her future just experienced something of a sudden awakening, freeing her of that deterministic thinking. As with real enlightenment there is no surefire way to obtain it and most never do, even if they "meditate" with the DEVS machine hundreds of times. She awakened at the right place at the right time to make her break out of the apathy, preparing herself to make a self-sacrifice, acting beyond the self-preservation of the ego, and thus becomes the "savior". And perhaps inevitably this savior had to be an outsider, to become the creator that the situation asked for, she could make the change to a system that the people inside the company couldn't do, all their creativity inadvertently always went into maintaining the system, because that system constituted their whole world.

I'd say the series uses its high tech concepts to explore philosophical themes throughout the different episodes, maybe in this regard the final episode is something of an outliner as it provides something of a solution instead of just asking questions. It's probably not a particularly clever conclusion, but the to me perhaps most sound one in accordance with my own beliefs and any convictions that I think I might hold, and thus also the most satisfying one that I could have hoped for with this sci-fi mini-series.



Mettler is King. Fulton is Deus, though.
Dug 'The Nun', too.
'Behemoth' I stopped watching early on because I guess of a problem you described, the shoehorned-in-feeling human interest element, or as I put it at the time: "I guess it felt too much like a repeat of films dealing with similar (or many of the same) subjects in similar types of documentaries that I just didn't get much fresh out of this viewing experience and hence didn't see a point to force myself through the whole film. Oh, and I just remembered the occasional voice-over, the poetry of which I didn't swing with."
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#9

Post by matthewscott8 » August 2nd, 2020, 10:05 am

A slow month for me for sure. Didn't watch much. Lift to the Scaffold was wondrous. Moreau lives forever.

Ascenseur pour l'échafaud / Lift to the Scaffold (1958 - Louis Malle)
Children of Men (2006 - Alfonso Cuarón)
All Can Become a Rose (1992 - Linda Christanell)
Gods of Egypt (2016 - Alex Proyas)

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#10

Post by Lonewolf2003 » August 2nd, 2020, 2:02 pm

My best FTVs out of 38 FTVs:

1. One, Two, Three (Billy Wilder, 1961) :: 8.0
2. Come Back to the 5 & Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean (Robert Altman, 1982) :: 8.0
3. Images (Robert Altman, 1972) :: 8.0
4. Un homme et une femme (Claude Lelouch, 1966) :: 8.0

HMs: That Cold Day in the Park (Robert Altman, 1969) :: 7.8

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#11

Post by burneyfan » August 2nd, 2020, 3:16 pm

Favorited in July:

Le magnifique a.k.a. The Man from Acapulco -- de Broca, 1973.

Jean-Paul Belmondo parodies his own action films (and those of other too-cool-for-school action heroes)! And he's actually funny! Color me surprised with this one.

Weapons of the Spirit a.k.a. Les armes de l'esprit -- Sauvage, 1987.

Wonderful documentary, and definitely the sort of thing you should watch if you'd like to restore a bit of faith in humanity during these dark times. It's about a French village that protected and nurtured Jews in the middle of the Holocaust -- the whole village. The documentary interviews villagers and former Jewish residents, as well as exploring why it is that this particular village might have been so welcoming and why they may have gotten away with as much as they did. The narration is in English, and the French interviews are subtitled. Some sources have it hiding under the French title, rather than the English one. Highly, highly recommended.

Una mujer fantástica a.k.a. A Fantastic Woman -- Lelio, 2017.

Great film about a woman grieving the loss of her older lover -- I don't want to say much more than that, for those who haven't read much about it. Outstanding lead performance.

A Tale of Two Cities -- Thomas, 1958.

Dirk Bogarde was basically born to play Sydney Carton (upon whom I had a teen crush -- well both Carton and Bogarde, I suppose). Very nice adaptation overall.

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#12

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » August 2nd, 2020, 4:49 pm

@PdA:

Yakona has been watchlisted for sure. Looks very groovy, same goes for many of the others, A Dead Man, Jon Rafman, Klára Tásovska all of which I didn't know much of before.
INVENTING THE FUTURE - I sure didn't tune in on this one... I did see its potential and appeal though.
You just reminded me that I need to view some Dore O asap.
Rainer Kohlberger - hope to watch his stuff theatrical at some point, I missed one opportunity already though...
Lines: Vertical - yeah
Schnittstelle - one of my favorite Farocki's - Farocki giving the Farocki treatment on Farocki, love it.
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#13

Post by blocho » August 2nd, 2020, 5:15 pm

I saw thirty-one movies in July.

The Best
Vera Drake
Happy-Go-Lucky
Secrets & Lies
All or Nothing
Kill Chain
The Dirties
Intruder in the Dust
Birdy

The Worst
The Runner
Act of God
La La Land
Road to Nowhere

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#14

Post by Ivan0716 » August 2nd, 2020, 10:01 pm

Rita Azevedo Gomes was a great discovery, thanks MUBI.

Fragile as the World (2001, Rita Azevedo Gomes)
First Cow (2019, Kelly Reichardt)
Transit (2018, Christian Petzold)
The Portuguese Woman (2018, Rita Azevedo Gomes)
Bonnie’s Kids (1973, Arthur Marks)
Angel in the Wardrobe (1988, Stanisław Różewicz)
Nymphomaniac: Vol. II (2013, Lars von Trier)
Big Bad Mama (1974, Steve Carver)
Nymphomaniac: Vol. I (2013, Lars von Trier)
Chopping Mall (1986, Jim Wynorski)

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#15

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » August 2nd, 2020, 10:22 pm

Hi there, PdA!

These were my July highlights (arranged chronologically and with standouts in red):

6 Hours to Live (1932, William Dieterle)
Virtue (1932, Edward Buzzell)
Spellbound (1941, John Harlow)
Como tú lo soñaste / As You Dreamed It (1947, Lucas Demare)
Film ohne Titel / Film Without a Title (1948, Rudolf Jugert)
Hellfire (1949, R. G. Springsteen)
Man on the Run (1949, Lawrence Huntington)
Portrait from Life (1949, Terence Fisher)
Los isleros / The Islanders (1951, Lucas Demare)
Nachts auf den Straßen / Detour (1952, Rudolf Jugert)
City That Never Sleeps (1953, John H. Auer)
La "Moara cu noroc" / The Mill of Good Luck (1955, Victor Iliu)
Timeslip (1955, Ken Hughes)
Bednata ulitza / Poor Man's Street (1960, Hristo Piskov)
Jazz Boat (1960, Ken Hughes)
Peeping Tom (1960, Michael Powell)
Station Six Sahara (1963, Seth Holt)
Noite Vazia / Men and Women (1964, Walter Hugo Khouri)
The Nanny (1965, Seth Holt)
Ponedelnik sutrin / Monday Morning (1966/1988, Irina Aktasheva, Hristo Piskov)
Iluzija / Illusion (1967, Krsto Papić)
Osenniye svadby / Autumn Weddings (1967, Boris Yashin)
Aradhana / Worship (1969, Shakti Samanta)
Lisice / Handcuffs (1969, Krsto Papić)
Gorod pervoi lyubvi / City of First Love (1970, Boris Yashin, Manos Zacharias)
Kati Patang / The Severed Kite (1970, Shakti Samanta)
Rajnigandha / Tuberose (1974, Basu Chatterjee)
Chhoti Si Baat / A Small Matter (1976, Basu Chatterjee)
Mascara (1983, Henri Pachard)
Les adoptés / The Adopted (2011, Mélanie Laurent)
Respire / Breathe (2014, Mélanie Laurent)

I ended up enjoying a pretty incredible month, thanks to flavo and his Run The Director Challenge!

:cheers:
That's all, folks!

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#16

Post by GruesomeTwosome » August 3rd, 2020, 3:47 am

1. First Cow (2019, Kelly Reichardt)
2. ⁠Serial Experiments Lain (1998 anime mini-series)
3. ⁠Mikey and Nicky (1976, Elaine May)
4. Model Shop (1969, Jacques Demy)
5. ⁠Air Doll (2009, Hirokazu Koreeda)
6. Waves (2019, Trey Edward Shults)
7. ⁠Angel’s Egg (1985, Mamoru Oshii)
8. The Wild Goose Lake (2018, Yi’nan Diao)
9. The Far Country (1954, Anthony Mann)
10. Samadhi (1967 short, Jordan Belson)
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#17

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » August 3rd, 2020, 10:01 am

Ivan0716 wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 10:01 pm
Rita Azevedo Gomes was a great discovery, thanks MUBI.

Fragile as the World (2001, Rita Azevedo Gomes)
First Cow (2019, Kelly Reichardt)
Transit (2018, Christian Petzold)
The Portuguese Woman (2018, Rita Azevedo Gomes)
Bonnie’s Kids (1973, Arthur Marks)
Angel in the Wardrobe (1988, Stanisław Różewicz)
Nymphomaniac: Vol. II (2013, Lars von Trier)
Big Bad Mama (1974, Steve Carver)
Nymphomaniac: Vol. I (2013, Lars von Trier)
Chopping Mall (1986, Jim Wynorski)
Yo! Fragile as the World is one of the best things ever. Never experienced a poetic sensibility akin to the one in that film.
Cheers for First Cow, what a great film on friendship and capitalism (as it often is with Reichardt's films), Reichardt is a saving grace in contemporary USA.
Transit is also one of my favorites from the last decade, Petzold is king.
not everything is fish, but fish are teeming everywhere

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#18

Post by St. Gloede » August 3rd, 2020, 10:35 am

Only one rewatch last month - Ucho / The Ear going from 7 to 9.5 (l) (l) (l) Beyond that I saw 66 first-time viewings, of which the below were the highlights:

9s
De ce trag clopotele, Mitica? / Carnival Scenes (1982, Lucian Pintilie)
Lásky mezi kapkami deste / Love Between the Raindrops (1980, Karel Kachyna)

8.5s
Phoenix (2014, Christian Petzold)
Les amours d'Astrée et de Céladon / The Romance of Astrea and Celadon (2007, Eric Rohmer)
Barbara (2012, Christian Petzold)

8s
Balanta / The Oak (1992, Lucian Pintilie)
Vitalina Varela (2019, Pedro Costa)
1917 (2019, Sam Mendez)
L'étrangleur / The Strangler (1970, Paul Vecchiali)
Boze Cialo / Corpus Christi (2019, Jan Komasa)
Les équilibristes / Walking a Tightrope (1991, Nikos Papatakis)
Triple Agent (2004, Eric Rohmer)
Wolfsburg (2003, Christian Petzold)
C'est la vie! (1980, Paul Vecchiali)
Riesutu Duona / Walnut Bread (1977, Arunas Zebriunas)
Ad Astra (2019, James Gray)
L'Anglaise et le duc / The Lady and the Duke (2001, Eric Rohmer)
Grazuole / The Beautiful Girl (1970, Arunas Zebriunas)
The Diary of a Chambermaid (1946, Jean Renoir)
Midsommar (2019, Ari Aster)
Velnio nuotaka / The Devil's Bride (1974, Arunas Zebriunas)
Maudie (2016, Aisling Walsh)
Le roi de coeur / King of Hearts (1966, Philippe de Brocca)
Gloria mundi (1976, Nikos Papatakis)
Hanele (1999, Karel Kachyna)

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prodigalgodson
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#19

Post by prodigalgodson » August 3rd, 2020, 9:51 pm

Perception de Ambiguity wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 9:16 am
One can endlessly philosophize on the question of free will, but I believe that eventually it's a question of state of mind rather than of laws of nature, making it really an issue of faith, you have agency if you believe you do.
SpoilerShow
If the mindset of the people is deterministic then so is the direction of the company itself. The company is an amoral entity, and in order to function its human parts need to be amoral as well, or rather, of course, money is the highest morality that best ensures the machine to work.

'DEVS', although sci-fi, naturally is about the present concerns regarding the dark directions into which humanity could be heading, and the present mindsets that produce those possible futures, which generally is quite a limiting one of scientific rationality and progress worship. Science has become our God (DEVS=DEUS).

So here you have the most extreme example imaginable of a company that knows of their destructive influence but stays on course without deflection, with everyone willfully (as it were) reducing themselves to clogs in the machinery so they can rid themselves of their responsibility, powerless to make a change to what they think of as a mammoth train. They really know better, but this is the difference between knowing the path and walking the path. They choose to be part of the problem by not choosing to be part of the solution.

The genius disruptor tech physicists as people of science (and creators of digital worlds) would in fact be one of the most susceptible people to believe themselves mere human machines and hence prisoners of determinism.
Ohnmacht [ohne ("without") Macht ("power")] is a German word that comes from the field of psychology and means both powerless and unconscious. This describes everyone who facilitates Devs to function. The protagonist is somebody who breaks out of that Ohnmacht and gains autonomy.

My take, in other words, is that the protagonist by having seen her future just experienced something of a sudden awakening, freeing her of that deterministic thinking. As with real enlightenment there is no surefire way to obtain it and most never do, even if they "meditate" with the DEVS machine hundreds of times. She awakened at the right place at the right time to make her break out of the apathy, preparing herself to make a self-sacrifice, acting beyond the self-preservation of the ego, and thus becomes the "savior". And perhaps inevitably this savior had to be an outsider, to become the creator that the situation asked for, she could make the change to a system that the people inside the company couldn't do, all their creativity inadvertently always went into maintaining the system, because that system constituted their whole world.

I'd say the series uses its high tech concepts to explore philosophical themes throughout the different episodes, maybe in this regard the final episode is something of an outliner as it provides something of a solution instead of just asking questions. It's probably not a particularly clever conclusion, but the to me perhaps most sound one in accordance with my own beliefs and any convictions that I think I might hold, and thus also the most satisfying one that I could have hoped for with this sci-fi mini-series.
Thanks for your perspective! Like the idea of accepting the inevitable as a way of relinquishing responsibility; I think we do see a lot of that kind of equivocal cognitive dissonance in the SF tech world (how else do you justify profiting from such explosive growth in a state with over 150,000 homeless). I forgot to mention I really like how Garland films the present day Bay in such a way that it looks dystopian, it captures something very true about the esprit du jour there, and of course thematically in line with his vision too. Any thoughts on the
SpoilerShow
Russian spy subplot
? Sure it nods to current American political paranoia and is farfetched enough to facilitate the attempted gaslighting of the lead, but of all the ways to move the story forward I couldn't figure out the reason for that direction.

I need to see some Fulton in a proper presentation, I have a feeling I'd agree.

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Perception de Ambiguity
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#20

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » August 5th, 2020, 1:34 am

prodigalgodson wrote:
August 3rd, 2020, 9:51 pm
Perception de Ambiguity wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 9:16 am
One can endlessly philosophize on the question of free will, but I believe that eventually it's a question of state of mind rather than of laws of nature, making it really an issue of faith, you have agency if you believe you do.
SpoilerShow
If the mindset of the people is deterministic then so is the direction of the company itself. The company is an amoral entity, and in order to function its human parts need to be amoral as well, or rather, of course, money is the highest morality that best ensures the machine to work.

'DEVS', although sci-fi, naturally is about the present concerns regarding the dark directions into which humanity could be heading, and the present mindsets that produce those possible futures, which generally is quite a limiting one of scientific rationality and progress worship. Science has become our God (DEVS=DEUS).

So here you have the most extreme example imaginable of a company that knows of their destructive influence but stays on course without deflection, with everyone willfully (as it were) reducing themselves to clogs in the machinery so they can rid themselves of their responsibility, powerless to make a change to what they think of as a mammoth train. They really know better, but this is the difference between knowing the path and walking the path. They choose to be part of the problem by not choosing to be part of the solution.

The genius disruptor tech physicists as people of science (and creators of digital worlds) would in fact be one of the most susceptible people to believe themselves mere human machines and hence prisoners of determinism.
Ohnmacht [ohne ("without") Macht ("power")] is a German word that comes from the field of psychology and means both powerless and unconscious. This describes everyone who facilitates Devs to function. The protagonist is somebody who breaks out of that Ohnmacht and gains autonomy.

My take, in other words, is that the protagonist by having seen her future just experienced something of a sudden awakening, freeing her of that deterministic thinking. As with real enlightenment there is no surefire way to obtain it and most never do, even if they "meditate" with the DEVS machine hundreds of times. She awakened at the right place at the right time to make her break out of the apathy, preparing herself to make a self-sacrifice, acting beyond the self-preservation of the ego, and thus becomes the "savior". And perhaps inevitably this savior had to be an outsider, to become the creator that the situation asked for, she could make the change to a system that the people inside the company couldn't do, all their creativity inadvertently always went into maintaining the system, because that system constituted their whole world.

I'd say the series uses its high tech concepts to explore philosophical themes throughout the different episodes, maybe in this regard the final episode is something of an outliner as it provides something of a solution instead of just asking questions. It's probably not a particularly clever conclusion, but the to me perhaps most sound one in accordance with my own beliefs and any convictions that I think I might hold, and thus also the most satisfying one that I could have hoped for with this sci-fi mini-series.
Thanks for your perspective! Like the idea of accepting the inevitable as a way of relinquishing responsibility; I think we do see a lot of that kind of equivocal cognitive dissonance in the SF tech world (how else do you justify profiting from such explosive growth in a state with over 150,000 homeless). I forgot to mention I really like how Garland films the present day Bay in such a way that it looks dystopian, it captures something very true about the esprit du jour there, and of course thematically in line with his vision too. Any thoughts on the
SpoilerShow
Russian spy subplot
? Sure it nods to current American political paranoia and is farfetched enough to facilitate the attempted gaslighting of the lead, but of all the ways to move the story forward I couldn't figure out the reason for that direction.

I need to see some Fulton in a proper presentation, I have a feeling I'd agree.
SpoilerShow
I guess I haven't given the spy thing much thought before. Politically it seems topical with the propagated US-Russia competition in big tech. It does help to fester a general distrust of government, reminding that such a machine would almost certainly be used as a government tool and won't become public good, at least not initially, until maybe one day it can't be repressed anymore. The good-natured bum also turning out to be a spy furthers the notion of our lives at large to be under control by man-made systems.
She perceives it as a betrayal of her so much so that she sees the whole relationship to her boyfriend in a starkly different light retrospectively, seeing it as having been a performance, and riles her up to venture into dangerous territory and do what she eventually does. With this reveal there also is something of an aspect of him being a mirror double to her previous boyfriend. I'd have to guess on the intended significance, maybe that one is a government shill and the other one isn't. She had fallen for the shill and now learns to re-appreciate the genuine article.
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