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What is Your All-Time Favourite Film and Why? [TALKING IMAGES]

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St. Gloede
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What is Your All-Time Favourite Film and Why? [TALKING IMAGES]

#1

Post by St. Gloede » May 27th, 2020, 6:13 am

There is something special about hearing someone tell you about a film they love, and hearing them describe why they love it. It gives you insight into the film, them, and how the film can affect someone.

This was the topic of our latest podcast, and we had a wonderful time, you can listen to it here:

Sounder: https://talkingimages.sounder.fm/show/talking-images
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3GhRXnb6OzOnfae2Uvkvus

So, what is your all-time favourite film, and why?

Can't wait to read these!

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#2

Post by prodigalgodson » May 27th, 2020, 8:00 am

Ah, thanks for the update gloede, I've got to listen to that podcast! For the last few years it's been a three-way tie:

Andrei Rublev - Stalker was the movie that made me fall in love with film as an art form, but seeing this on film a couple years later changed the way I experience the world; I have yet to have another such mystical, immersive cinematic experience, and every rewatch deepens my appreciation for that magic zone only Tarkovsky could bring to life
Floating Clouds - saw this at a really bad point in my life and my emotional connection with it helped put me in touch with humanity again; I hadn't really watched films for the genuine human element until I discovered Naruse, and the scope, the romance, the evocation of life itself reached me on a profound level when I really needed it
Vertigo - took me a number of rewatches to fully appreciate it, and it didn't become my go-to favorite until I saw it on 70mm the first time; it's a difficult film to talk about, so much and so little to discuss, but suffice it to say that for me it's the perfect rendering of an aura of poetic mystery that's a unique feature of film, and the ultimate realization and interconnection of the medium's aesthetic, analytical, and emotional potentials

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#3

Post by Onderhond » May 27th, 2020, 8:24 am

Personally I'd hoped to learn more about peoples (broader) favorites and taste in film in general. It's impossible to draw a clear line when looking at all your favorites of course, but if you filter out the top-rated ones I think most people should be able to find underlying elements that drew them to these films, even when the films themselves can be very different.

For me it comes down to two keywords I think.

First of all I love purity, films that focus on one thing and try to do that to the best of their ability, even when that means sacrificing other things (like internal logic, plot holes, exposition). It's also why I can stomach genre films so well I think, since they often take this approach. If a character making a dumb decision leads to a better/killer horror moment, I'm all for it. Trying to fix these kind of plot holes and inconsistencies often takes more time and effort, which in return takes time away from the horror, ultimately making it less interesting for me. That approach also carries over to films which try to combine more than one genre/atmosphere. There I prefer the ones that contrast different things rather than blend them together into a more even mix. To use a simple analogy (because I think it's a point where more typical film buffs and I often clash), if you have an image that is 50% white and 50% black, the image can either be half black/half white or completely even gray. When I look at the films I love the most, I clearly love the ones that offer more contrast/are a bit edgier.

The other keyword is visceral. I love to experience films and I'm more attracted to their abstract beauty, much like you can be in love with a piece of beautiful music (ie the sound, not the lyrics). I always find it much more interesting when something appeals to me where I can't really describe what it is that draws me to it. There doesn't need to be an intellectual aspect for me to love a film, but that's also because I don't feel film is a very capable medium to challenge me intellectually, nor do I see it having much real-world effect (other than people fearing sharks).

So if you combine these two, I think it gives a pretty good idea why I chose any of my 5* films. My current favorite (Avalon) is a pretty good match too, though you might notice that it is not exactly my ideal film. The problem is that films cost a lot of money and involve a lot of people, which is a bit of a problem when you want to "purity" and "visceral" well. My ideal films would probably take about 50 million dollar to make and would appeal to maybe 100 people, so I've long since accepted that I probably will never see it.

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#4

Post by prodigalgodson » May 27th, 2020, 9:34 am

Onderhond wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 8:24 am
My ideal films would probably take about 50 million dollar to make and would appeal to maybe 100 people, so I've long since accepted that I probably will never see it.
Haha, well put my man!

It's hard for me to rope off the boundaries of my taste, but if I could find axioms they'd be pretty general, or a long incomplete list; there are so many different things about film I love and so many random things that don't appeal to me. Despite talking about Vertigo above like some Platonic ideal, I can imagine loving a hypothetical film more that explored a completely different aspect of the medium. Some films are great because of their purity -- your definition calls to mind anything from Michael Snow to Michael Mann -- or visceral quality (I'm also not quite sure how you're using this, I don't usually associate visceral with abstract beauty; Hardcore Henry, just going by the trailer, or Noe call to mind a more traditional usage) -- say, Pasolini or Wakamatsu -- or because they're pure and visceral -- Greenaway? Sternberg? Weerasethakul? depends on definitions. But then I love others that are unfocused and scattershot -- some Godard, Jodorowsky, Schroeter -- or sensually aloof -- Straub/Huillet, Hong, Marker -- or neither 'pure' nor visceral -- where are we in the Venn diagram now, Roy Andersson? Even setting aside my maybe overly auteurist approach to film appreciation, I feel strongly that the specifics of a film's merits depend on what's being conveyed. I also feel like film is an ideal medium to challenge me intellectually, but the fact that I can enjoy so many other aspects of it too make it an especially meaningful form of expression to me.

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#5

Post by St. Gloede » May 27th, 2020, 9:45 am

That was a great read Onderhond, and you just gave us a great idea for a future podcast!

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#6

Post by St. Gloede » May 27th, 2020, 9:56 am

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 8:00 am
Ah, thanks for the update gloede, I've got to listen to that podcast! For the last few years it's been a three-way tie:

Andrei Rublev - Stalker was the movie that made me fall in love with film as an art form, but seeing this on film a couple years later changed the way I experience the world; I have yet to have another such mystical, immersive cinematic experience, and every rewatch deepens my appreciation for that magic zone only Tarkovsky could bring to life
Floating Clouds - saw this at a really bad point in my life and my emotional connection with it helped put me in touch with humanity again; I hadn't really watched films for the genuine human element until I discovered Naruse, and the scope, the romance, the evocation of life itself reached me on a profound level when I really needed it
Vertigo - took me a number of rewatches to fully appreciate it, and it didn't become my go-to favorite until I saw it on 70mm the first time; it's a difficult film to talk about, so much and so little to discuss, but suffice it to say that for me it's the perfect rendering of an aura of poetic mystery that's a unique feature of film, and the ultimate realization and interconnection of the medium's aesthetic, analytical, and emotional potentials
Really interesting and extremely diverse set.

Only seen Andrey Rublev once, and I loved it. Can't wait to rewatch it (and I really wish for a rewatch). Stalker (my old favourite film) fell on a rewatch, as discussed in the podcast, and as did Solyaris (and much further), and that was at the cinema. Yet, Zerkalo still impressed as an absolute masterpiece, and belongs in my top 10. I think Rublev could climb high, but really hard to tell.

Floating Clouds was one of my first films from Naruse, and felt like his most American. I just didn't care for it too much, though it is beautifully made. It has also been well over a decade since I saw it, so I can't say how I'd react today.

Vertigo is also a masterpiece in my eyes, it holds up beautifully on rewatch, and is such a gorgeous, and hypnotic film that does so much with the medium. Perhaps Hitchcock's most artistically challenging film.

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#7

Post by St. Gloede » May 27th, 2020, 9:57 am

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 9:34 am
Onderhond wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 8:24 am
My ideal films would probably take about 50 million dollar to make and would appeal to maybe 100 people, so I've long since accepted that I probably will never see it.
Haha, well put my man!

It's hard for me to rope off the boundaries of my taste, but if I could find axioms they'd be pretty general, or a long incomplete list; there are so many different things about film I love and so many random things that don't appeal to me. Despite talking about Vertigo above like some Platonic ideal, I can imagine loving a hypothetical film more that explored a completely different aspect of the medium. Some films are great because of their purity -- your definition calls to mind anything from Michael Snow to Michael Mann -- or visceral quality (I'm also not quite sure how you're using this, I don't usually associate visceral with abstract beauty; Hardcore Henry, just going by the trailer, or Noe call to mind a more traditional usage) -- say, Pasolini or Wakamatsu -- or because they're pure and visceral -- Greenaway? Sternberg? Weerasethakul? depends on definitions. But then I love others that are unfocused and scattershot -- some Godard, Jodorowsky, Schroeter -- or sensually aloof -- Straub/Huillet, Hong, Marker -- or neither 'pure' nor visceral -- where are we in the Venn diagram now, Roy Andersson? Even setting aside my maybe overly auteurist approach to film appreciation, I feel strongly that the specifics of a film's merits depend on what's being conveyed. I also feel like film is an ideal medium to challenge me intellectually, but the fact that I can enjoy so many other aspects of it too make it an especially meaningful form of expression to me.
(l) (l) (l) (l) (l)

You really should consider joining the podcast at some point, Prodigal! I love the way you think.

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#8

Post by Onderhond » May 27th, 2020, 10:12 am

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 9:34 am
It's hard for me to rope off the boundaries of my taste, but if I could find axioms they'd be pretty general, or a long incomplete list; there are so many different things about film I love and so many random things that don't appeal to me.
I guess it's like this for everyone, but the closer I get to the top of my favorites, the more I start to see a common thread between the films up there. That's why I singled out my 5* films only. Once I start including 4.5* ratings, it becomes way more difficult. If you're someone who has 200 5* ratings, it's still going to be very difficult of course :)
prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 9:34 am
or visceral quality (I'm also not quite sure how you're using this, I don't usually associate visceral with abstract beauty; Hardcore Henry, just going by the trailer, or Noe call to mind a more traditional usage)
Visceral/abstract in the sense that it feels like it's bypassing the brain completely. Not necessarily in the abstract vs figurative meaning. As film fans we have developed a language to talk about visual quality, but in the end it's just personal preference that's near impossible to rationalize (like trying to explain someone why green is your favorite color instead of blue). There's actually a good example in the podcast (the Seven Samurai bit) where Kurosawa's sliding edits are mentioned. I checked my review of the film and I brought it up as a negative point rather than a positive back then. I think the best analogy there is the musical one, where I love the beauty of a good melody (or noises) much more than the meaning of the lyrics. In film, I can really appreciate the audiovisual qualities of a film, regardless or narratives, characters and other more traditional focus points.
prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 9:34 am
I also feel like film is an ideal medium to challenge me intellectually
I'm definitely not saying it can't be, whatever sparks people's brain of course, but for me it does very little. Not quite sure if it's due to the medium itself or the topics/directors predominantly present in films, but I find I get more inspiration from real life in that regard.

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#9

Post by Onderhond » May 27th, 2020, 10:25 am

Also, favorite-wise it seems I have the closest connection with you St. Gloede. Stalker is by far my favorite Tarkovsky (gave it 4* back then - although not sure if it will maintain that on rewatch) and Marienbad was a solid 3.0* for me. From all the films made before '62, that makes it my third-favorite.

I'll refrain from giving my ratings of the other favorites mentioned, in order to keep the positive spirit of the episode alive :D
St. Gloede wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 9:45 am
That was a great read Onderhond, and you just gave us a great idea for a future podcast!
Would definitely like that!

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#10

Post by mjf314 » May 27th, 2020, 12:47 pm

I don't like answering the question "What's your favorite film?" because I have several favorites that I like almost equally, and there's no single film that represents my taste. When people ask me this question, I usually show them my unranked top 25.

Many of my favorites are either beautiful, intelligent, surreal, or fun, but it's hard to be more precise than that. For example, there are many surreal films that I don't like, and I'm not sure how to explain why I like some surreal films but not others. There are films that other people consider fun, but I don't.

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#11

Post by St. Gloede » May 27th, 2020, 1:37 pm

I can agree with that. I always had a list of 6-12-30 favourites (don't recall if I left that in the podcast now, I went so overboard in my portion that I had to severely cut it) - and no film can truly be my top favourite. Stalker always had a little more of a special position, but it would still be in a tie. I picked Last Year at Marienbad as I had seen it again just last year so I knew it would hold up (and also rewatched it the day before the podcast) - but it could easily have been another film. I can see Le bonheur or Children of Paradise, Zerkalo or about 5-6 Godards climbing up - and others too - but as it stood I just had more confidence in my feelings for LYaM. This is the problem when it is a long time between each time you rewatch your favourites - something I'm hoping to end.

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#12

Post by Onderhond » May 27th, 2020, 2:10 pm

It's also an interesting topic, because it's something I've seen mentioned before quite often, and it's completely alien to me. I admit that my Top 600 isn't etched in stone, some films I haven't seen too recently and the exact time of remaking the list (once a year) will have its influence of the final ranking, but my top 10 hasn't changed in ages. I generally have no trouble at all ranking things.

I wonder if it has to do with actually being unable to pick a favorite, or with the idea that just picking 1 film (or whatever) doesn't adequately represents one's taste as a whole, which might lead to people pigeonholing you to be something you're not?

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#13

Post by cinewest » May 27th, 2020, 2:20 pm

Just finished listening to the latest podcast on "favorite films," and it sounds like you guys are really getting the feel for how to do these. I've seen all of the choices spoken about except for Videodrome, which I've been meaning to get to for ages. I have mixed feelings about Cronenberg, I guess, and his style and sensibility doesn't really speak to me, though I'll admit that he's created some very memorable scenes over the years. I did enjoy listening to Sol talk about his love for both the film and director, and always appreciate a passionate intelligent promotion whether it matches my own taste or not, and I have often experienced a kind of empathetic enthusiasm watching films that aren't usually my cup of tea with friends who are passionate about them

As for the other films mentioned, I think they are all standouts, and both Seven Samurai and Last Year at Marienbad have been among my own favorites at certain points in time. I wrote a term paper at university on the latter, and loved Magnificent Seven as a kid, until I saw Seven Samurai, which might be the best "Western" of all time.

As for my own favorites, I posted a bunch after the first podcast in talking about what inspired me to get into film, but I left off speaking about new inspirations towards the end of the 90's. As I consider filmmaking in the 2000's to be one of the watershed decades (perhaps second only to the 1960's in terms of the number and variety of outstanding cinema), I've decided to choose one from that decade and one from the most recent.

In consideration of the 2000's, my first inclinations were to choose In the Mood For Love, or something by Michael Haneke, who reeled off one masterpiece after another for more than a decade. I've always had a thing for tragic yet transformative romances (Hiroshima Mon Amor was my favorite film for years), and though Mood for Love relit that torch for me, it has probably suffered from overexposure, given its appraisal among 21st century cinema.
As for Haneke, it's really hard to choose my favorite of his, and none of them seized my heart the way Andrey Zvyagintsev's The Return did when I saw it theatrically without knowing much about it or the director back in 2003. Absolutely stunning to me, from the first shots until the last. This film does everything with the medium that has made it such an inspiration to me, whether we are talking about scripting, imagery, performances, sound, editing, et. all towards the exploration of its thematic content, and ability to completely sweep me up in its reality.
The Return is essentially about the fractured relationship between an absent father and his two sons who make a mysterious and life changing journey together that tragically concludes without revealing what is most important to everyone involved. A different kind of tragic yet transformative film about love, or in this case, its withholding.

For the 2010's, I'll go in a different direction and nominate Holy Motors: In one sense it is a homage to movies, Carax's own included. It works on so many levels at once that I look back on it in amazement: Every "job" is a reflection of the variety of the roles that are played in the movies, and that we also play in our lives, every skit, a brilliant, unique take on cinematic stories and visual art forms that we are familiar with. At the same time, the film is full of contemporary, surreal twists and commentaries, or juxtapositions that border on genius.
A tour de force performance piece by Denis Levant, it is also an ode to a variety of stories and characters. But more than anything, i saw the "film characters" as symbolic of the different "parts we play" (metaphorically) in the course of our own lives, even, sometimes, during the course of each and every day.
Last edited by cinewest on May 27th, 2020, 2:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#14

Post by St. Gloede » May 27th, 2020, 2:22 pm

Onderhond wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 2:10 pm
It's also an interesting topic, because it's something I've seen mentioned before quite often, and it's completely alien to me. I admit that my Top 600 isn't etched in stone, some films I haven't seen too recently and the exact time of remaking the list (once a year) will have its influence of the final ranking, but my top 10 hasn't changed in ages. I generally have no trouble at all ranking things.

I wonder if it has to do with actually being unable to pick a favorite, or with the idea that just picking 1 film (or whatever) doesn't adequately represents one's taste as a whole, which might lead to people pigeonholing you to be something you're not?
I think it is relatively easy ranking things, but that is because ranking, especially when looking at something as complex as films (a film will give you a slightly different reaction, at least, on almost every viewing) is arbitrary - and at the point of ranking it you are also mostly ranking the representation/emotions/thoughts associated with the films within your mind - which makes it easier to compartmentalize them, but at the same time might not be the image you experience next time you put it on. Reality vs. Internalized Fiction/Memory. As a quick example, I was speaking to Adam about The Aviator's Wife and he had forgotten how "short" the park scene actually was - this is because your mind can grab onto and expand what really worked for you and thus lives on within you.

TL:DR: Oh dear, everything can change on a rewatch.

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#15

Post by mjf314 » May 27th, 2020, 2:46 pm

The idea that one film doesn't represent my taste is part of it, but it's more about not remembering my favorites well enough. I watched some of them more than 10 years ago. Even if I watched the film today, any rating would only be an estimate.

I don't feel confident in saying "This film deserves a 9.97/10, and that film deserves a 9.96/10," but I can say "Both films deserve approximately a 10/10."

I do make ranked lists, but they're approximations. If I say that my list is ranked, I don't necessarily like #1 more than #2, but I definitely like #1 more than #20.

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#16

Post by Onderhond » May 27th, 2020, 3:11 pm

Well yes, ranking is always going to be a reflection or your current you, but that's why it's called a "personal favorite". I get everything you guys are saying, but for me that's just naturally part of what a "favorite" means. In the end a personal favorite says more about you then it says about the film, so that personalized filter is to be expected. The last rewatch is leading for me.

On the other hand, films rarely make big jumps up/down when I rewatch them, especially not the higher ranked ones. I've been rewatching my favorites for the past 8 years (1 every two weeks so that a little over 200 rewatches) and I think maybe 10 or so films jumped 0.5 points up/down (on a 5* scale). I don't think I've ever had a rewatch that moved a film over 1.5 points, and that's only for films in genres that were so much out of my comfort zone and I got used to over time. I never ever had the "I used to think this mediocre but know I love it" experience, which makes me a bit more confident in my past ratings I guess.

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#17

Post by mjf314 » May 27th, 2020, 3:38 pm

I agree it's personal, but I can't say "my personal enjoyment of this film was 9.97, and my personal enjoyment of that film was 9.96" because I can't measure enjoyment that precisely.

I don't see why subjective things should be easier to measure, or easier to compare, than objective things.

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#18

Post by Onderhond » May 27th, 2020, 3:44 pm

mjf314 wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 3:38 pm
I agree it's personal, but I can't say "my personal enjoyment of this film was 9.97, and my personal enjoyment of that film was 9.96" because I can't measure enjoyment that precisely.
I can't either, but that has more to do with figuring out where exactly to make the 0.01 jumps. I'm sure it's possible, but it would be a pretty arduous job with lots of back and forths and very little to gain. I can however do a confident ranking based on my memory of films.

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#19

Post by Teproc » May 27th, 2020, 3:50 pm

It's not so much that subjective things are easier to mesure, it's that it's easier to accept the uncertainty of the measuring.

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#20

Post by mjf314 » May 27th, 2020, 4:00 pm

Onderhond wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 3:44 pm
mjf314 wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 3:38 pm
I agree it's personal, but I can't say "my personal enjoyment of this film was 9.97, and my personal enjoyment of that film was 9.96" because I can't measure enjoyment that precisely.
I can't either, but that has more to do with figuring out where exactly to make the 0.01 jumps. I'm sure it's possible, but it would be a pretty arduous job with lots of back and forths and very little to gain. I can however do a confident ranking based on my memory of films.
If your top 600 (and all copies of it) got deleted, and you had to recreate the list from scratch, would the new list have the same order as the old list?

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#21

Post by Onderhond » May 27th, 2020, 4:24 pm

Not exactly the same of course, but I already explained that above
I admit that my Top 600 isn't etched in stone, some films I haven't seen too recently and the exact time of remaking the list (once a year) will have its influence of the final ranking
It's also a matter of time, where my top 10 is a bit more thought through compared to 540-550 for example. But even then, the list would still change over time (as it already does, each year).

If I would redo it right now, the bottom 200 would probably be shuffled around, but the higher I'd get the closer it would get to the current list. And my top 10 wouldn't change a single spot.

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#22

Post by prodigalgodson » May 27th, 2020, 6:05 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 9:56 am
prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 8:00 am
Ah, thanks for the update gloede, I've got to listen to that podcast! For the last few years it's been a three-way tie:

Andrei Rublev - Stalker was the movie that made me fall in love with film as an art form, but seeing this on film a couple years later changed the way I experience the world; I have yet to have another such mystical, immersive cinematic experience, and every rewatch deepens my appreciation for that magic zone only Tarkovsky could bring to life
Floating Clouds - saw this at a really bad point in my life and my emotional connection with it helped put me in touch with humanity again; I hadn't really watched films for the genuine human element until I discovered Naruse, and the scope, the romance, the evocation of life itself reached me on a profound level when I really needed it
Vertigo - took me a number of rewatches to fully appreciate it, and it didn't become my go-to favorite until I saw it on 70mm the first time; it's a difficult film to talk about, so much and so little to discuss, but suffice it to say that for me it's the perfect rendering of an aura of poetic mystery that's a unique feature of film, and the ultimate realization and interconnection of the medium's aesthetic, analytical, and emotional potentials
Really interesting and extremely diverse set.

Only seen Andrey Rublev once, and I loved it. Can't wait to rewatch it (and I really wish for a rewatch). Stalker (my old favourite film) fell on a rewatch, as discussed in the podcast, and as did Solyaris (and much further), and that was at the cinema. Yet, Zerkalo still impressed as an absolute masterpiece, and belongs in my top 10. I think Rublev could climb high, but really hard to tell.

Floating Clouds was one of my first films from Naruse, and felt like his most American. I just didn't care for it too much, though it is beautifully made. It has also been well over a decade since I saw it, so I can't say how I'd react today.

Vertigo is also a masterpiece in my eyes, it holds up beautifully on rewatch, and is such a gorgeous, and hypnotic film that does so much with the medium. Perhaps Hitchcock's most artistically challenging film.
Thanks old friend! I'll definitely think about getting on the podcast one of these times I'm familiar with the topic.

Hope you enjoy that Rublev rewatch, to me that, Stalker, and Mirror are his three definitive masterpieces. I wonder if the echoes of American film were part of why Floating Clouds worked so well for me, it is definitely different than most of his films. Unlike the other two I've only seen it once, but it was such a perfect time in my life to watch it I'm afraid to jinx it with a rewatch haha. I'm sure I'll be drawn back to it eventually.

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#23

Post by prodigalgodson » May 27th, 2020, 6:40 pm

Onderhond wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 10:12 am
prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 9:34 am
It's hard for me to rope off the boundaries of my taste, but if I could find axioms they'd be pretty general, or a long incomplete list; there are so many different things about film I love and so many random things that don't appeal to me.
I guess it's like this for everyone, but the closer I get to the top of my favorites, the more I start to see a common thread between the films up there. That's why I singled out my 5* films only. Once I start including 4.5* ratings, it becomes way more difficult. If you're someone who has 200 5* ratings, it's still going to be very difficult of course :)
prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 9:34 am
or visceral quality (I'm also not quite sure how you're using this, I don't usually associate visceral with abstract beauty; Hardcore Henry, just going by the trailer, or Noe call to mind a more traditional usage)
Visceral/abstract in the sense that it feels like it's bypassing the brain completely. Not necessarily in the abstract vs figurative meaning. As film fans we have developed a language to talk about visual quality, but in the end it's just personal preference that's near impossible to rationalize (like trying to explain someone why green is your favorite color instead of blue). There's actually a good example in the podcast (the Seven Samurai bit) where Kurosawa's sliding edits are mentioned. I checked my review of the film and I brought it up as a negative point rather than a positive back then. I think the best analogy there is the musical one, where I love the beauty of a good melody (or noises) much more than the meaning of the lyrics. In film, I can really appreciate the audiovisual qualities of a film, regardless or narratives, characters and other more traditional focus points.
prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 9:34 am
I also feel like film is an ideal medium to challenge me intellectually
I'm definitely not saying it can't be, whatever sparks people's brain of course, but for me it does very little. Not quite sure if it's due to the medium itself or the topics/directors predominantly present in films, but I find I get more inspiration from real life in that regard.
There are definitely some trends in my highest-rated stuff, but I think I'd need a longer list to give some sense of them. For example The Big Lebowski, which would probably make my top twenty, would seem out of place among a bunch of arty stuff unless you know my sense of humor, love of noir, vibe-based filmmaking, etc. I do have probably about 200 10/10s, haha.

Thanks for explaining. Re: blue and green, it's always been hard for me to pin down a favorite color too; I can find any one more evocative depending on how it's used. If I had a gun to my head I'd probably say blue, but just because of its psychological connotations and versatility (and because it looks good on me :lol:), not its inherent aesthetic. Of course, that's no less subjective, but I feel like it's easier to elucidate. And in addition to context the different appeals are so mood-based. Maybe I overthink things to much to be too in touch with my gut reactions, heh.

Likewise with music, I'll get pretty obsessive about lyrics in hip-hop (having written a few albums of raps myself) or singer-songwriters in the Dylan/Cohen tradition, but I also love instrumental jazz or my girlfriend's Indonesian music, and then you have people like Van Morrison or Curtis Mayfield who managed an incredible synthesis of lyrical and sonic meaning. Re: sliding edits, I don't remember feeling strongly about them, but I could see someone taking a historical approach finding them innovative and dynamic, and I could see someone my age who grew up watching them in Star Wars and whatnot finding them dated and clunky. I'd say in many or most cases I appreciate the audiovisual qualities in film first and foremost (especially if you're including editing there), which is one of the reasons I'm so drawn to abstract or experimental films; once a story gets involved I tend to focus on that, or on the interplay between the narrative and aesthetic elements.

But...films make so much more sense than real life. :P

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#24

Post by blocho » May 27th, 2020, 7:42 pm

The first thing people ask me when they learn I'm very interested in movies is what my favorite movie is. And I'm always a bit speechless. What, just one? How does one even define favorite? Does it mean the best, the most enjoyable, the one you have fondest memories of, the one you've watched the most times, the one that you would be most willing to rewatch every day for the next year?

So I never have an answer. It's a good question for a podcast, but a far better question, for the sake of casual conversation, would be: "What kind of movies do you like?"

Anyway, if I had been on that podcast, I probably would have picked The Right Stuff, which is definitely a favorite movie but perhaps not the favorite movie. It's a good one to discuss because while many like it (and some really dislike it), I think very few people consider it an all-time great. It's also a very complex movie and a very long movie, and there's a lot to say about it. And how serendipitous that today the United States plans to return to spaceflight after a nine-year absence.

Off we got into the wild blue yonder!

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#25

Post by Onderhond » May 27th, 2020, 7:49 pm

blocho wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 7:42 pm
How does one even define favorite? Does it mean the best, the most enjoyable, the one you have fondest memories of, the one you've watched the most times, the one that you would be most willing to rewatch every day for the next year?
How you define favorite is entirely up to you is entirely up to you I guess. For most people it will be a weighed combination of all the versions you listed (and possibly more) that pushes one film to the top.

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#26

Post by OldAle1 » May 27th, 2020, 7:57 pm

blocho wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 7:42 pm
The first thing people ask me when they learn I'm very interested in movies is what my favorite movie is. And I'm always a bit speechless. What, just one? How does one even define favorite? Does it mean the best, the most enjoyable, the one you have fondest memories of, the one you've watched the most times, the one that you would be most willing to rewatch every day for the next year?

So I never have an answer. It's a good question for a podcast, but a far better question, for the sake of casual conversation, would be: "What kind of movies do you like?"

Anyway, if I had been on that podcast, I probably would have picked The Right Stuff, which is definitely a favorite movie but perhaps not the favorite movie. It's a good one to discuss because while many like it (and some really dislike it), I think very few people consider it an all-time great. It's also a very complex movie and a very long movie, and there's a lot to say about it. And how serendipitous that today the United States plans to return to spaceflight after a nine-year absence.

Off we got into the wild blue yonder!
Interesting pick. That film might well be my pick if the question was "what's a film you LOVED when you were younger that really disappointed you on a recent re-watch?" The memory of seeing that when it was new in one of the biggest and best theaters in Chicago at the time is still potent, but it really did not hold up at all when I saw it again 2 years ago. Tom Conti's music still sticks in my mind though.

I know what you mean about the "just one" even if I'm usually able to name one off the top of my head myself - so often though the people asking are only moderately interested in films, and maybe just have a very few (usually very, very mainstream) favorites they watch over and over, and when you don't say The Dark Knight or Die Hard or Star Wars or The Godfather or The Sound of Music (see, one for every age range) they're just mystified. Or they say "but what about Game of Thrones" or some other TV show, because there's no difference in their minds.

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#27

Post by Onderhond » May 27th, 2020, 8:07 pm

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 6:40 pm
Thanks for explaining. Re: blue and green, it's always been hard for me to pin down a favorite color too; I can find any one more evocative depending on how it's used. If I had a gun to my head I'd probably say blue, but just because of its psychological connotations and versatility (and because it looks good on me :lol:), not its inherent aesthetic. Of course, that's no less subjective, but I feel like it's easier to elucidate. And in addition to context the different appeals are so mood-based.
For me the really, really good stuff is never mood-based (as in, based on my current mood). A full mark film gets me in a certain mood regardless of how I go in, that's one of my key identifiers for a full mark.

I don't really have a favorite color either btw, but it's one of those classic/basic questions most people can relate to which spark a gut response rather than a rationalized answer. Alternatively (since you're into music it seems), it's like trying to explain why you prefer one melody or instrument sound over another. You can try to rationalize it and get somewhere, but in the end it's just a combination of psychological connotations and physiology that are near impossible to pin down.

Not sure if you're familiar with it, but there something called "The 3 (or 5) Whys", which states that with every extra "why" you get a little closer to the core of your answer. It works well, but in the end you always hit a wall where you simply can't rationalize things anymore. That for me is "abstract beauty".
prodigalgodson wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 6:40 pm
But...films make so much more sense than real life. :P
Hah, exactly! No challenge there :lol:

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#28

Post by kongs_speech » May 28th, 2020, 1:35 am

Almost Famous, specifically the "Untitled" director's cut.

I'm as passionate about music as I am film, and Almost Famous feels like the ultimate rock epic. It's also a representation of an America that is long gone, where having talent and motivation was actually enough to give you a reasonable shot at success. The performances are phenomenal, especially Kate Hudson and Philip Seymour Hoffman. The plot is fascinating, particularly since it's inspired by Cameron Crowe's own experiences, and his director's cut really makes it feel like you're on tour with a mid-level rock band in the early '70s. The characters are so well-written; while it would have been very easy to make them stereotypes, they all have depth. The only way it could possibly be improved is if Led Zeppelin eventually allows the "Stairway to Heaven" scene to be used in a definitive Final Cut.
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#29

Post by cinewest » May 28th, 2020, 2:03 am

blocho wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 7:42 pm
The first thing people ask me when they learn I'm very interested in movies is what my favorite movie is. And I'm always a bit speechless. What, just one? How does one even define favorite? Does it mean the best, the most enjoyable, the one you have fondest memories of, the one you've watched the most times, the one that you would be most willing to rewatch every day for the next year?

So I never have an answer. It's a good question for a podcast, but a far better question, for the sake of casual conversation, would be: "What kind of movies do you like?"

Anyway, if I had been on that podcast, I probably would have picked The Right Stuff, which is definitely a favorite movie but perhaps not the favorite movie. It's a good one to discuss because while many like it (and some really dislike it), I think very few people consider it an all-time great. It's also a very complex movie and a very long movie, and there's a lot to say about it. And how serendipitous that today the United States plans to return to spaceflight after a nine-year absence.

Off we got into the wild blue yonder!
Totally agree with the first part of what you say, here. It's impossible for me to choose a favorite, which is why I answered the way I did. I have been inspired in a big but different way by quite a few films over the years, which could be called my favorites at a particular time, though some have faded in their importance to me now, while others have become more so.

It's even often difficult to choose my favorite film of the year, so I have a category I call top 5's, which describes the best of the bunch (might be actually be 3, to at times even 7 or 8).

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#30

Post by Reflect » May 28th, 2020, 4:33 am

It's basically a tie between End of Evangelion, Love Exposure, and Twin Peaks: The Return (couldn't care less about the film vs TV debate - it self-identifies as a film, Lynch calls it a film, and at worst you could just consider it a limited miniseries type thing, which I don't separate from films when counting my favorites + no one has any problem calling something like Out 1 a film, which is split into "episodes" in the same way). But I think I give the edge to End of Evangelion most days. Here's the review I have for it on Letterboxd -
SpoilerShow

Greatest film on the human condition, fear, and growth. A powerful, sincere rejection of defeatism and acceptance of the suffering that comes with living. How Anno employs his influences from other master directors here is executed perfectly (especially in regards to Godard), and the way a lot of the incredible imagery - so much of which is heavy with (often dense and even difficult) symbolic meaning taken from old literature/religious texts and psychology - contrasts savagery/gore and triumphant beauty is overwhelming, and it drifts not only the story, but some of my own key memories and experiences, into emotionally abstract territory, and this all comes together leaving profound implications and deepening the inevitable self-scrutinizing done by the artist/viewer as the work plays out. How the film manages to be so definitively life-affirming while never once suger-coating all the worst pains that accompany reality is one of the most admirable feats I've ever seen an artist pull off. Asuka fighting back against the MP Evas, Shinji's decision, and the ending are, for me, all among the very most transcendent stretches in film.

My reading of the various meanings of the brilliant last line, "disgusting" -

1. An observation on the existence they inhabit, externally and internally (the former likely especially pronounced in the forefront of Asuka's mind given how brutally she was killed).

2. A response to Shinji's act of finally touching her ("why won't he hold me?") being a strangulation resulting from a traumatized, angry outburst.

3. A jab at Shinji's emotional breakdown ("aren't you a man?!").

4. An acknowledgement of what Shinji did while she was in the hospital.

5. The thought that it took all of this for him to finally be completely emotionally open in front of her.

6. The abrupt realization that the two of them aren't *that* different - she'd (at least initially) choose to look at this in a way that makes the very idea seem hokey as a defense mechanism, and what could be more disgusting than that?

One of the artworks that means the most to me, probably the best film I've seen, and something that comes really close to exactly aligning with my own view of life/the world. "Crying isn't going to solve anything either."
Also - I can't wait to check this podcast out! I've been pretty busy this last year and so not overly active on this forum, but it sounds awesome! This really is the place on the Internet with the most knowledgeable group of people on film as far as I'm concerned. I always think I've seen a decent amount and then am staggered at the lists you guys put up.

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#31

Post by prodigalgodson » May 28th, 2020, 6:31 am

Onderhond wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 8:07 pm
I don't really have a favorite color either btw, but it's one of those classic/basic questions most people can relate to which spark a gut response rather than a rationalized answer. Alternatively (since you're into music it seems), it's like trying to explain why you prefer one melody or instrument sound over another. You can try to rationalize it and get somewhere, but in the end it's just a combination of psychological connotations and physiology that are near impossible to pin down.

Not sure if you're familiar with it, but there something called "The 3 (or 5) Whys", which states that with every extra "why" you get a little closer to the core of your answer. It works well, but in the end you always hit a wall where you simply can't rationalize things anymore. That for me is "abstract beauty".
The instrument sounds example is interesting. I'd still argue it's a matter of how they're used, and of course still subjective, but there are certain basic sonic aesthetics I tend to enjoy more across a broad spectrum of context. I'm not sure they'd be overly represented in a list of my very favorite music though.

I'm not sure if I've heard of the 3 Whys called that, sounds kind of familiar. I definitely agree there's a human cap on epistemic regression, and with the subjective appeal of abstract beauty.

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#32

Post by prodigalgodson » May 28th, 2020, 6:53 am

RedHawk10 wrote:
May 28th, 2020, 4:33 am
It's basically a tie between End of Evangelion, Love Exposure, and Twin Peaks: The Return (couldn't care less about the film vs TV debate - it self-identifies as a film, Lynch calls it a film, and at worst you could just consider it a limited miniseries type thing, which I don't separate from films when counting my favorites + no one has any problem calling something like Out 1 a film, which is split into "episodes" in the same way). But I think I give the edge to End of Evangelion most days. Here's the review I have for it on Letterboxd -
SpoilerShow

Greatest film on the human condition, fear, and growth. A powerful, sincere rejection of defeatism and acceptance of the suffering that comes with living. How Anno employs his influences from other master directors here is executed perfectly (especially in regards to Godard), and the way a lot of the incredible imagery - so much of which is heavy with (often dense and even difficult) symbolic meaning taken from old literature/religious texts and psychology - contrasts savagery/gore and triumphant beauty is overwhelming, and it drifts not only the story, but some of my own key memories and experiences, into emotionally abstract territory, and this all comes together leaving profound implications and deepening the inevitable self-scrutinizing done by the artist/viewer as the work plays out. How the film manages to be so definitively life-affirming while never once suger-coating all the worst pains that accompany reality is one of the most admirable feats I've ever seen an artist pull off. Asuka fighting back against the MP Evas, Shinji's decision, and the ending are, for me, all among the very most transcendent stretches in film.

My reading of the various meanings of the brilliant last line, "disgusting" -

1. An observation on the existence they inhabit, externally and internally (the former likely especially pronounced in the forefront of Asuka's mind given how brutally she was killed).

2. A response to Shinji's act of finally touching her ("why won't he hold me?") being a strangulation resulting from a traumatized, angry outburst.

3. A jab at Shinji's emotional breakdown ("aren't you a man?!").

4. An acknowledgement of what Shinji did while she was in the hospital.

5. The thought that it took all of this for him to finally be completely emotionally open in front of her.

6. The abrupt realization that the two of them aren't *that* different - she'd (at least initially) choose to look at this in a way that makes the very idea seem hokey as a defense mechanism, and what could be more disgusting than that?

One of the artworks that means the most to me, probably the best film I've seen, and something that comes really close to exactly aligning with my own view of life/the world. "Crying isn't going to solve anything either."
Also - I can't wait to check this podcast out! I've been pretty busy this last year and so not overly active on this forum, but it sounds awesome! This really is the place on the Internet with the most knowledgeable group of people on film as far as I'm concerned. I always think I've seen a decent amount and then am staggered at the lists you guys put up.
Now there's a top 3 that paints a coherent picture of one's taste, haha. Also all favorites of mine, and cool to see such love for The Return, the best thing Lynch has ever done imo. Nice End of Evangelion review, I agree Asuka's fight with the robot Evas and the ending were among the highlights.

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#33

Post by St. Gloede » May 28th, 2020, 9:03 am

cinewest wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 2:20 pm
As for my own favorites, I posted a bunch after the first podcast in talking about what inspired me to get into film, but I left off speaking about new inspirations towards the end of the 90's. As I consider filmmaking in the 2000's to be one of the watershed decades (perhaps second only to the 1960's in terms of the number and variety of outstanding cinema), I've decided to choose one from that decade and one from the most recent.

In consideration of the 2000's, my first inclinations were to choose In the Mood For Love, or something by Michael Haneke, who reeled off one masterpiece after another for more than a decade. I've always had a thing for tragic yet transformative romances (Hiroshima Mon Amor was my favorite film for years), and though Mood for Love relit that torch for me, it has probably suffered from overexposure, given its appraisal among 21st century cinema.
As for Haneke, it's really hard to choose my favorite of his, and none of them seized my heart the way Andrey Zvyagintsev's The Return did when I saw it theatrically without knowing much about it or the director back in 2003. Absolutely stunning to me, from the first shots until the last. This film does everything with the medium that has made it such an inspiration to me, whether we are talking about scripting, imagery, performances, sound, editing, et. all towards the exploration of its thematic content, and ability to completely sweep me up in its reality.
The Return is essentially about the fractured relationship between an absent father and his two sons who make a mysterious and life changing journey together that tragically concludes without revealing what is most important to everyone involved. A different kind of tragic yet transformative film about love, or in this case, its withholding.

For the 2010's, I'll go in a different direction and nominate Holy Motors: In one sense it is a homage to movies, Carax's own included. It works on so many levels at once that I look back on it in amazement: Every "job" is a reflection of the variety of the roles that are played in the movies, and that we also play in our lives, every skit, a brilliant, unique take on cinematic stories and visual art forms that we are familiar with. At the same time, the film is full of contemporary, surreal twists and commentaries, or juxtapositions that border on genius.
A tour de force performance piece by Denis Levant, it is also an ode to a variety of stories and characters. But more than anything, i saw the "film characters" as symbolic of the different "parts we play" (metaphorically) in the course of our own lives, even, sometimes, during the course of each and every day.
Many great overlaps here. I believe I am slightly younger than you so when I got into cinema Kar-Wai Wong was the world director everyone were excited about. My Blueberry Nights was still not made ( :lol: ) and he became one of the first directors I fully explored, and of course In the Mood For Love became an instant top favourite. Haneke was another director I quickly became enamoured with (and remains in tight competition for being my favourite current/active director), and Holy Motors was my favourite film of 2012 and I couldn't agree more on the Denis Levant performance.

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#34

Post by Lonewolf2003 » May 28th, 2020, 2:05 pm

blocho wrote:
May 27th, 2020, 7:42 pm
The first thing people ask me when they learn I'm very interested in movies is what my favorite movie is. And I'm always a bit speechless. What, just one? How does one even define favorite? Does it mean the best, the most enjoyable, the one you have fondest memories of, the one you've watched the most times, the one that you would be most willing to rewatch every day for the next year?

So I never have an answer. It's a good question for a podcast, but a far better question, for the sake of casual conversation, would be: "What kind of movies do you like?"

Anyway, if I had been on that podcast, I probably would have picked The Right Stuff, which is definitely a favorite movie but perhaps not the favorite movie. It's a good one to discuss because while many like it (and some really dislike it), I think very few people consider it an all-time great. It's also a very complex movie and a very long movie, and there's a lot to say about it. And how serendipitous that today the United States plans to return to spaceflight after a nine-year absence.

Off we got into the wild blue yonder!
I think that would be a great subject for a next podcast. Bit like Onderhond also explained above earlier about his taste. Especially if it's combined to personal histories, feelings and personalities. Some of you already did this a bit in this episode. Like sol telling about his liking of Videodrome and Fanny&Alexander and how they overlap thematically in his mind, or the one who picked A Clockwork Orange (I can't remember who it was, which is one little problem I have with the podcast I have at times trouble recognizing everyone) who told about where his love for banned films comes from.

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#35

Post by Lonewolf2003 » May 28th, 2020, 2:17 pm

My personal favorite is Donnie Darko, cause its themes about personal growth, self-sacrifice and taking personal responsibility resonated tremendously emotionally with me when I saw it the first time. My second favorite, Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter..and Spring overlaps thematically very much. DD is one of the very few movies I immediately rewatched the next day. Beside that it's also great mix of different genres; sci-fi and high school comedy. Every rewatch I'm always surprised again how funny it is in parts. Because it resonated so much with me personally it’s also a movie I'm anxious to rewatch, cause I was personally in such an other emotional state in my life, when I saw it the first time(s) or even the last time, which was in 2007.

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#36

Post by Reflect » May 28th, 2020, 11:32 pm

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 28th, 2020, 6:53 am
RedHawk10 wrote:
May 28th, 2020, 4:33 am
It's basically a tie between End of Evangelion, Love Exposure, and Twin Peaks: The Return (couldn't care less about the film vs TV debate - it self-identifies as a film, Lynch calls it a film, and at worst you could just consider it a limited miniseries type thing, which I don't separate from films when counting my favorites + no one has any problem calling something like Out 1 a film, which is split into "episodes" in the same way). But I think I give the edge to End of Evangelion most days. Here's the review I have for it on Letterboxd -
SpoilerShow

Greatest film on the human condition, fear, and growth. A powerful, sincere rejection of defeatism and acceptance of the suffering that comes with living. How Anno employs his influences from other master directors here is executed perfectly (especially in regards to Godard), and the way a lot of the incredible imagery - so much of which is heavy with (often dense and even difficult) symbolic meaning taken from old literature/religious texts and psychology - contrasts savagery/gore and triumphant beauty is overwhelming, and it drifts not only the story, but some of my own key memories and experiences, into emotionally abstract territory, and this all comes together leaving profound implications and deepening the inevitable self-scrutinizing done by the artist/viewer as the work plays out. How the film manages to be so definitively life-affirming while never once suger-coating all the worst pains that accompany reality is one of the most admirable feats I've ever seen an artist pull off. Asuka fighting back against the MP Evas, Shinji's decision, and the ending are, for me, all among the very most transcendent stretches in film.

My reading of the various meanings of the brilliant last line, "disgusting" -

1. An observation on the existence they inhabit, externally and internally (the former likely especially pronounced in the forefront of Asuka's mind given how brutally she was killed).

2. A response to Shinji's act of finally touching her ("why won't he hold me?") being a strangulation resulting from a traumatized, angry outburst.

3. A jab at Shinji's emotional breakdown ("aren't you a man?!").

4. An acknowledgement of what Shinji did while she was in the hospital.

5. The thought that it took all of this for him to finally be completely emotionally open in front of her.

6. The abrupt realization that the two of them aren't *that* different - she'd (at least initially) choose to look at this in a way that makes the very idea seem hokey as a defense mechanism, and what could be more disgusting than that?

One of the artworks that means the most to me, probably the best film I've seen, and something that comes really close to exactly aligning with my own view of life/the world. "Crying isn't going to solve anything either."
Also - I can't wait to check this podcast out! I've been pretty busy this last year and so not overly active on this forum, but it sounds awesome! This really is the place on the Internet with the most knowledgeable group of people on film as far as I'm concerned. I always think I've seen a decent amount and then am staggered at the lists you guys put up.
Now there's a top 3 that paints a coherent picture of one's taste, haha. Also all favorites of mine, and cool to see such love for The Return, the best thing Lynch has ever done imo. Nice End of Evangelion review, I agree Asuka's fight with the robot Evas and the ending were among the highlights.
:cheers:

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#37

Post by Lakigigar » May 29th, 2020, 7:43 pm

It's a four way tie

Kreuzweg: I like coming-of-age movies, and this one fits me very well, but what I especially like about this movie is how this movie is shot in like 14 chapters / scenes, centering around the Jesus crucifixion (as their main metaphor), restricting themselves enormously. Combine that with non-moving camera shots (static shots), and you've restricted yourself enormously and yet this movies passes by like time is nothing. It's the best movie about radicalism, and you sympathize a lot with the main character. Very well made movie. If i had to pick an all-time favourite, it's going to be this one.

Respire This is my personal favourite. Well made camera shots, but the emotional impact of it was a huge deal for me. I was absorbed by the movie, that i actually was going to do the same thing as the main character. It's about a toxic friendship. Just a movie that just fits me, and is made for me, and very underrated. I think it's one of the best movies ever made, but I know i have a heavy bias for it. I just like it so much.

Assassination Nation I liked especially the first part of it, which was so well made and captures the atmosphere of youth & childhood so much, about girls bitching around. Yeah, me like that :p. Second part is exaggerated, but just very fun. Not quality stuff, but really fun. The movie i can watch over & over & over again, simply said.

Suspiria (1977) The atmosphere of this movie will never be replicated, although some movies come close and have their own atmosphere (Blade Runner, Alien being two examples). Beautifully shot, beautiful music, and a movie about witches & ballet dancers. What do you want more, yeah.

And maybe this one as well

The Neon Demon: This was my best cinematic experience. I walked out of the cinema, in a trance. I'll never forget that. I was so absorbed by the movie, especially by the beauty of it. It's hard to explain and it's been a while before i've seen it. But i just like it so much. The theme, the shots, the main actress, the colouring, it's made for me.

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#38

Post by sol » May 30th, 2020, 1:27 am

Lonewolf2003 wrote:
May 28th, 2020, 2:05 pm
I think that would be a great subject for a next podcast. Bit like Onderhond also explained above earlier about his taste. Especially if it's combined to personal histories, feelings and personalities. Some of you already did this a bit in this episode. Like sol telling about his liking of Videodrome and Fanny&Alexander and how they overlap thematically in his mind
Thanks for the mention. I actually think it's quite interesting that four of my top 5 films all feature on male characters who cannot trust whether what they are seeing is real or all in their mind. Or perhaps, as you've pointed out, the connection that I have made between them is all in my mind. :lol:
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blocho
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#39

Post by blocho » May 30th, 2020, 2:05 am

sol wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 1:27 am
Lonewolf2003 wrote:
May 28th, 2020, 2:05 pm
I think that would be a great subject for a next podcast. Bit like Onderhond also explained above earlier about his taste. Especially if it's combined to personal histories, feelings and personalities. Some of you already did this a bit in this episode. Like sol telling about his liking of Videodrome and Fanny&Alexander and how they overlap thematically in his mind
Thanks for the mention. I actually think it's quite interesting that four of my top 5 films all feature on male characters who cannot trust whether what they are seeing is real or all in their mind. Or perhaps, as you've pointed out, the connection that I have made between them is all in my mind. :lol:
That would be a good podcast topic - what a buddy of mine once called mindfuck movies, although I suppose they could more tastefully be called phenomenology movies. Brain Dead (1990), Inception, Mulholland Dr. I'm talking about movies that make you lose your sense of what in the narrative is supposed to be real and what is an illusion.

tazz_85
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#40

Post by tazz_85 » May 30th, 2020, 9:28 pm

I have lots of favorite movies, but if i'd had to pick one i'd say 'Lost in translation'
I love about all of it, the story, the music, the characters

I found this music video years ago, and even if Coldplay isn't on the OST, it's still perfect imo :)


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