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Favorite directors?

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prodigalgodson
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Favorite directors?

#1

Post by prodigalgodson » April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am

Hey guys, made this list last night, with my favorite of their films included. Love to hear yours + thoughts/discussion

1. Naruse Mikio (Floating Clouds, A Wanderer’s Notebook, Apart from You)
2. Andrei Tarkovsky (Andrei Rublev, Stalker, Mirror)
3. Hou Hsiao-hsien (Flowers of Shanghai, A City of Sadness, Goodbye, South, Goodbye)
4. Robert Bresson (Lancelot du Lac, Diary of a Country Priest, The Devil Probably)
5. Daniel Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub (Othon, Sicilia!, Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bach)
6. Hong Sangsoo (Night and Day, Like You Know It All, On the Beach Alone at Night)
7. Chris Marker (A Grin Without a Cat, The Last Bolshevik, La jetee)
8. Raul Ruiz (Mysteries of Lisbon, The Suspended Vocation, The Penal Colony)
9. Orson Welles (Chimes at Midnight, Mr. Arkadin, The Lady from Shanghai)
10. Oshima Nagisa (Death by Hanging, In the Realm of the Senses, Shiiku)
11. Jean Renoir (The Rules of the Game, Boudu Saved from Drowning, Night at the Crossroads)
12. Eric Rohmer (La collectionneuse, My Night at Maud’s, Perceval le Gallois)
13. Werner Herzog (Lessons of Darkness, Heart of Glass, Aguirre: the Wrath of God)
14. Maurice Pialat (A nos amours, Under the Sun of Satan, The Gaping Maw)
15. Stan Brakhage (Dog Star Man, The Text of Light, Star Garden)
16. Mizoguchi Kenji (47 Ronin, Princess Yang Kwei-fei, Sisters of the Gion)
17. Abbas Kiarostami (Life and Nothing More…, Where Is the Friend’s House?, Close-up)
18. Jean-Luc Godard (Contempt, Week End, Notre musique)
19. Howard Hawks (Rio Bravo, Bringing Up Baby, The Big Sleep)
20. Josef von Sternberg (The Last Command, Anatahan, The King Steps Out)
21. Werner Schroeter (Eika Katappa, Salome, The Smiling Star)
22. Robert Altman (McCabe and Mrs. Miller, The Long Goodbye, Nashville)
23. Alain Resnais (Last Year at Marienbad, Muriel, My American Uncle)
24. Luchino Visconti (The Leopard, Senso, Death in Venice)
25. Stanley Kubrick (Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Dr. Strangelove)
26. Dziga Vertov (Enthusiasm, Kinoweek, Kinoglaz)
27. Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Berlin Alexanderplatz, Satan’s Brew, World on a Wire)
28. Satyajit Ray (The World of Apu, Charulata, Devi)
29. Nicholas Ray (Johnny Guitar, Rebel Without a Cause, The Lusty Men)
30. Peter Hutton (Images of Asian Music, Time and Tide, At Sea)
31. Fritz Lang (Die Nibelungen, Rancho Notorious, Ministry of Fear)
32. Michelangelo Antonioni (L’avventura, Zabriskie Point, The Passenger)
33. Ingmar Bergman (Winter Light, The Seventh Seal, Scenes from a Marriage)
34. Jim Jarmusch (Dead Man, Stranger Than Paradise, Only Lovers Left Alive)
35. Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Tropical Malady, Phantoms of Nabua, Cemetery of Splendor)
36. David Lynch (Twin Peaks: The Return, Inland Empire, Mulholland Dr.)
37. Anthony Mann (Bend of the River, Desperate, Raw Deal)
38. Raoul Walsh (The World in His Arms, Colorado Territory, The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw)
39. Gregory Markopolous (Gamellion, The Illiac Passion, Twice a Man)
40. Martin Scorsese (Silence, Bringing Out the Dead, Mean Streets)
41. Carlos Reygadas (Silent Light, Battle in Heaven, Post Tenebras Lux)
42. Ethan and Joel Coen (The Big Lebowski, A Serious Man, No Country for Old Men)
43. Bong Joon-ho (Memories of Murder, Parasite, Mother)
44. Sam Peckinpah (Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, The Wild Bunch, Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia)
45. Jacques Tourneur (I Walked with a Zombie, Stranger on Horseback, The Leopard Man)
46. Max Ophuls (Madame de…, Lola Montes, Letter from an Unknown Woman)
47. Luis Bunuel (Nazarin, The Young One, Simon of the Desert)
48. Kenneth Anger (Lucifer Rising, Scorpio Rising, Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome)
49. Wakamatsu Koji (Shinjuku maddo, United Red Army, Violent Virgin)
50. Glauber Rocha (Antonio das Mortes, Terra em transe, Black God White Devil)

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#2

Post by OldAle1 » May 1st, 2020, 4:09 pm

That's a lot to digest. I will just start with a bit on the directors I'm less familiar with (several) and/or don't like that much (not many)

5. Huillet/Straub - probably every time I've written anything about one of their films I've mentioned how difficult they are; what sticks out is the absolute mastery of 20th century European history they have, and how they don't make any concessions to their audiences' possible lack of such knowledge. Half the time at least I really don't know what the fuck they're talking about. Still I always find them interesting and keep seeing more, albeit only occasionally. Favorite so far is definitely the Bach film but I suspect Not Reconciled will knock me out whenever I revisit it

6. Hong - I've only seen 3-4, liked them all but not really loved any. Needs more work on my part obviously.

10. Oshima - only seen a couple. Loved Death by Hanging but haven't seen that in over 20 years.

14. Pialat - only seen one feature and one short, and those both in the last year or so. I recall mentioning that he was one of the more significant directors I'd seen nothing from on this forum - I've now remedied that but don't have a clear vision of him yet, certainly need to see more.

15. Brakhage - just watched The Dante Quartet and loved it, so he's more on my radar now. Probably 15 or so films seen, most at Facets in Chicago in the mid-90s.

21. Schroeter - seen nothing. Have known the name for a while, but just haven't gotten around to him.

22. Altman - not an enormous fan. He does have a few films I love - Nashville, 3 Women, Quintet - but also a lot I disliked or have mixed feelings about. I've warmed more to him in recent years for sure though.

30. Hutton - just seen 2-3, not unimpressed but not necessarily strongly taken with them either.

35. Weerasethakul - seen a few, haven't been blown away yet, but have liked them all a fair bit. Syndromes and a Century feels like it might be the film to put me fully on board.

38. Walsh we already discussed elsewhere

39. Markopoulos - I've liked the few I've seen (one of them Twice a Man) quite a bit but I need to see more. Overall more impressed with the work of his partner Robert Beavers (The Ground, The Hedge Theater).

41. Reygadas - just seen Stellet Licht which did nothing for me.

42. Coens - first name on your list that the plebs would recognize! Sort of in the same camp as Altman for me - a couple of films I love (Lebowski, No Country), a few films I like a fair bit, several I don't like so much.

43. Bong - don't dislike anything but Memories of Murder is the only thing that approaches a great film for me

49. Wakamatsu - only seen Go, Go, Second Time Virgin which I guess is his most famous film, and I found it interesting and mostly liked it. Jury's just left the courtroom and will be out for a while.

50. Rocha - just seen the western diptych, liked both a lot but I don't know that they're enough to go on.


Couple of general comments - no women directors (apart from 1/2 of a team), no African directors. Not a criticism, just something I noticed. Not much from the silent era. Very much an "arthouse" or "critics"-type list. And being a big fan of Iranian cinema, it's nice to see Kiarostami but he shouldn't be alone. :(

Here's my list, grouped as you can see in the description. I last updated it significantly 2 1/2 years ago so it needs work; I would probably put Varda in the top 10 now and drop Maddin to the second rank - not because I like Maddin any less but because I've watched and re-watched several great Varda films since. And there'd be around 40-50 new directors I'll consider when I next update it.

https://www.imdb.com/list/ls027734909/

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#3

Post by St. Gloede » May 1st, 2020, 8:27 pm

Wow, this is giving me so many Film General flashbacks ...

At a first glance it is quite clear there are some differences (but also many similarities) in what we are drawn to. For instance, while Naruse does make my runner-ups, Floating Clouds is far from one of my favourite films, and I have an unfortunate record of great vs. just good with him, more extremely Hou is likely the biggest director I have never loved/strongly liked a film from, and I have similar struggles with Hong - further to that Oshima is likely the Japanese New Waver (with the exception of Wakamatsu) I am least impressed (compared to standing). This may, however, be sensibilities that will change over time.

At the same time you obviously have Godard, Tarkovsky, etc. and there are so many major overlaps.

My list: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls000238472/

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#4

Post by kongs_speech » May 1st, 2020, 8:55 pm

I haven't yet seen films by many of them, but this seems like a great list and you clearly went to a lot of work compiling it. :cheers: My favorite director is Paul Thomas Anderson, but I'm open to changing that as I see more classics.
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#5

Post by prodigalgodson » May 3rd, 2020, 4:02 am

OldAle1 wrote:
May 1st, 2020, 4:09 pm
That's a lot to digest. I will just start with a bit on the directors I'm less familiar with (several) and/or don't like that much (not many)

5. Huillet/Straub - probably every time I've written anything about one of their films I've mentioned how difficult they are; what sticks out is the absolute mastery of 20th century European history they have, and how they don't make any concessions to their audiences' possible lack of such knowledge. Half the time at least I really don't know what the fuck they're talking about. Still I always find them interesting and keep seeing more, albeit only occasionally. Favorite so far is definitely the Bach film but I suspect Not Reconciled will knock me out whenever I revisit it

14. Pialat - only seen one feature and one short, and those both in the last year or so. I recall mentioning that he was one of the more significant directors I'd seen nothing from on this forum - I've now remedied that but don't have a clear vision of him yet, certainly need to see more.

15. Brakhage - just watched The Dante Quartet and loved it, so he's more on my radar now. Probably 15 or so films seen, most at Facets in Chicago in the mid-90s.

22. Altman - not an enormous fan. He does have a few films I love - Nashville, 3 Women, Quintet - but also a lot I disliked or have mixed feelings about. I've warmed more to him in recent years for sure though.

30. Hutton - just seen 2-3, not unimpressed but not necessarily strongly taken with them either.

35. Weerasethakul - seen a few, haven't been blown away yet, but have liked them all a fair bit. Syndromes and a Century feels like it might be the film to put me fully on board.

39. Markopoulos - I've liked the few I've seen (one of them Twice a Man) quite a bit but I need to see more. Overall more impressed with the work of his partner Robert Beavers (The Ground, The Hedge Theater).

41. Reygadas - just seen Stellet Licht which did nothing for me.

42. Coens - first name on your list that the plebs would recognize! Sort of in the same camp as Altman for me - a couple of films I love (Lebowski, No Country), a few films I like a fair bit, several I don't like so much.

43. Bong - don't dislike anything but Memories of Murder is the only thing that approaches a great film for me

49. Wakamatsu - only seen Go, Go, Second Time Virgin which I guess is his most famous film, and I found it interesting and mostly liked it. Jury's just left the courtroom and will be out for a while.

50. Rocha - just seen the western diptych, liked both a lot but I don't know that they're enough to go on.

Couple of general comments - no women directors (apart from 1/2 of a team), no African directors. Not a criticism, just something I noticed. Not much from the silent era. Very much an "arthouse" or "critics"-type list. And being a big fan of Iranian cinema, it's nice to see Kiarostami but he shouldn't be alone. :(

Here's my list, grouped as you can see in the description. I last updated it significantly 2 1/2 years ago so it needs work; I would probably put Varda in the top 10 now and drop Maddin to the second rank - not because I like Maddin any less but because I've watched and re-watched several great Varda films since. And there'd be around 40-50 new directors I'll consider when I next update it.

https://www.imdb.com/list/ls027734909/
Huillet/Straub - similar to what I said about Mediteranee when I saw it a couple months ago, I feel like these guys make the kind of films I only see in my dreams; but yeah a number of them are pretty hard to follow, especially with the rapid-fire dialogue/monologue; Anna Magdalena Bach, Not Reconciled, and Sicilia all took two watches before I felt like I really got them, and they're now all among my favorite films, but others like Othon (my personal favorite) and Moses and Aron are pretty watchable off the bat

Pialat - has a very distinct style...I said after I watched We Won't Grow Old Together recently he seems like the true precursor to Hong Sangsoo, rather than Rohmer and Antonioni who are more often mentioned

Brakhage - the first experimental filmmaker I'd heard of, so I got a nice head start on him, but still discover new ones I love; The Dante Quartet was one of my favorites when I first saw it, but it kinda blends together with his other hand-painted films of that era in my memory

Altman - surprised you're not a big fan, somehow seems like you would be...cool you like Quintet though

Hutton - have you seen At Sea?; that's probably his most impressive one in terms of ambition

Weerasethakul - I actually wasn't as hot on Syndromes and a Century when I rewatched it recently, but I did like Uncle Boonmee more the second go-around; other than Tarkovsky, he's probably the first slow cinema director whose work I got into, which probably gives me a soft spot -- if I was watching Tarr or Diaz at the time instead, they might well be up there

Markopoulos - I wasn't too into him at first, but the more I got his style the more I dug it, especially watching the evolution of his career; I'd still like to see many more, but they're pretty tough to find; only seen 2 from Beavers but love The Ground, also a guy I wanna see more from

Reygadas - surprised you didn't like Silent Light considering your regard for Dreyer, but maybe it wears its influences on its sleeves too much?; Reygadas falls into a similar category as Weerasethakul for me

Coens - hey, I do have Kubrick pretty far up; even the Coen duds I enjoy, and they've made a few of my favorites -- even if their style can get a liiiittle twee at times, I really appreciate their consistent dedication to quality uniqueness

Bong - Memories of Murder's my favorite, but I think Parasite was masterfully directed, the high point in the evolution of his style so far; the way he approaches story and uses the camera and editing I think really brings something new to the table

Wakamatsu - his stuff definitely works best in a theater; I liked Go Go Second Time Virgin okay but I prefer his more political stuff

Rocha - I've only seen those three myself, though I feel like that's a good survey of his art; he was a last minute replacement for Paul Verhoeven, who I've seen more from but haven't loved quite as much, but in retrospect, maybe Yang or Yilmaz Guney would've been a better choice

I mentioned when I posted this on the FG reddit the lack of female directors and the western-centric focus, both things I'd like to remedy, if only for the sake of expanding my exposure. Ramsay and Varda almost made the list, and I need to see more from Duras, Martel, and Denis. I've explored African films a little bit, but have a lot more work to do there and don't have anyone thus far who seems like a potential major favorite. My two favorite African films are Harvest: 3000 Years and the short Diary of an African Nun, both of which are made by people more associated with Los Angeles. A propos, my list doesn't even have any African American directors, though Lee and especially Burnett were close (need to see more from the former and wish the latter made more). Re: silents, Murnau, Dovzhenko, Stroheim, and Keaton would be close, and I need to see more from all of them. Ditto Iranian film; Makhmalbouf's the only guy who seems like he might approach Kiarostami's contribution to the art form so far, but I haven't seen much. I guess arthouse stuff has always been more my cup of tea, but I think that's a muuuuch broader umbrella than popular film regardless of country; I also don't think it's that far out, these guys are still mostly acclaimed narrative filmmakers.

Thanks for the link to your list! I'm (appropriately) going through Out 1 right now, I'll use some time between episodes to comment on the ones that aren't on my list. I'm sure I'll get some good recommendations.

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#6

Post by prodigalgodson » May 3rd, 2020, 4:05 am

St. Gloede wrote:
May 1st, 2020, 8:27 pm
Wow, this is giving me so many Film General flashbacks ...

At a first glance it is quite clear there are some differences (but also many similarities) in what we are drawn to. For instance, while Naruse does make my runner-ups, Floating Clouds is far from one of my favourite films, and I have an unfortunate record of great vs. just good with him, more extremely Hou is likely the biggest director I have never loved/strongly liked a film from, and I have similar struggles with Hong - further to that Oshima is likely the Japanese New Waver (with the exception of Wakamatsu) I am least impressed (compared to standing). This may, however, be sensibilities that will change over time.

At the same time you obviously have Godard, Tarkovsky, etc. and there are so many major overlaps.

My list: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls000238472/
Haha, right? The good old days.

The first Naruse I saw was When a Woman Ascends the Stairs, which I remember thinking was solid but pedestrian. Many movies later I think he's the best who's done it, helps that I've gotten more into psychological realism over the last few years. Not that surprised at Hong or Oshima, I am about Hou. Thanks for the list, I'll take a look through it and respond later!

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#7

Post by prodigalgodson » May 3rd, 2020, 4:06 am

kongs_speech wrote:
May 1st, 2020, 8:55 pm
I haven't yet seen films by many of them, but this seems like a great list and you clearly went to a lot of work compiling it. :cheers: My favorite director is Paul Thomas Anderson, but I'm open to changing that as I see more classics.
Thanks my friend! PTA's definitely one of the best working today.

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#8

Post by Onderhond » May 3rd, 2020, 7:42 am

I'm afraid I don't have much substantial to add to this list.

If I'd draw up a Top 50, I think Hou would be the only match, though he'd probably be quite close to the bottom (#46 in my list last year it seems). Lynch was very close (#55) and I do like Wakamatsu, who would be a bit further down the list. From there on the Coens and Bong would be the only ones left with an average (slightly) above 2.5/5, the other 25 or so directors I've seen films from would be below that mark.

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#9

Post by tobias » May 4th, 2020, 12:58 am

It seems to me we have quite similar tastes. There's a lot of the classical directors that I adore too (Bunuel, Bresson, Lang, Bergman, Tarkovsky, Kubrick, Welles, Renoir, etc.), some great American B-movie, a slew of somewhat slow Asian social realists, the Euro new wave and associated and then some nice surprises like e.g. Straub/Huillet and Ruiz. It's interesting to see Naruse and Mizoguchi but nto Ozu but the insane reverence for Ozu actually sometimes gets on my nerves. I always found Mizoguchi much more sassy, Naruse to me seemed to differ from both in that he subordinated the stylistics to the story much more, whereas both Ozu and Mizoguchi often made films that hinge primarily on aesthetics.

Personally I have only seen a single Naruse film, Floating Clouds, so of course I'm uneducated but I liked Floating Clouds a whole lot and would love to see more. I'd gladly take recommendations.

I haven't seen anything by Hou Hsiao-hsien, I'll gladly take recommendations on what to start with.

Bresson is a class act and insanely consistent, he has so far been completely incapable of boring me and I've seen his wacky short film about plane crashes and the city frozen in time.

Straub-Huillet I also like a lot but my top 3 would look completely different (haven't seen Othon yet though).

Hong Sangsoo is slowly becomming one of my favourite currently working directors. I saw Right Now Wrong Then on a train trip last year and thought it was amazing (probably the best film of the year) and then I saw The Woman Who Ran at the world premiere this year which was such a delightful and simple film.

Marker without mentioning Sans Soleil confuses me but I'm a huge fan.

I'm a huge Ruiz fan but I've seen neither The Suspended Vocation or The Penal Colony, it's certainly the most unique batch of Ruiz favourites I've seen.

I should see death by hanging. I watched The Realm of Senses on TV like 2 years ago or more and I liked it much more than I would have expected.

Jean Renoir I love for the sheer ammount of great films he made (mainly in the 30's) and the worlds he so effortlessly builds. I rewatched The Rules of the Game on the big screen last year and had an absolute blast.

Eric Rohmer is basically my favourite director.

Very nice to see Lessons of Darkness here.

Maurice Pialat greatly intruiges me. I'd like to see almsot all the films he made, though I do feel he sometimes falls short.

I have to see something by Schroeter sometime. He's probably my biggest Neuer Deutscher Film omission.

I like Visconti a lot too, particularly The Leopard as I adore well made historical epics and this is one of the absolute best ever made (besides Barry Lyndon and Mysteries of Lisbon)

Vertov is surprising. What do you see in him? Especially as Man with a Movie Camera is not listed. I've never dug deeper than that (though Man with a Movie Camera certainly is a great film, was definitely an eye-openener back when I watched it at 16).

Fassbinder's Berlin Alexanderplatz singlehandledly convinced me Fassbinder is one of the greatest directors ever, every other great film he made is just a bonus.

Satyajit Ray I'd love to explore more but I don't seem to connect with him to quite the level of say Renoir, Rohmer or Kiarostami. I've only seen the Apu trilogy, liked them all quite a bit, thought the last was handily the best though. Looking forward to The Music Room and Charulata.

Nicholas Ray is basically the shit.

Never seen anything by Hutton.

Your selection of Lang films is super weird. Ministry of Fear and Rancho Notorious I would describe as some of the low-points of his career from what I've seen (still nice and well made films but don't remotely have the edge of many of his other works). Can you elaborate why you like them so much? Personally everything Lang made outside of Germany is kind of an afterthought for me. Films like Fury or The Woman in the Window are high craftsmanship and super involving but I prefer Fuller or Ray in that case. His German stuff however is unmatched. I actually think the films he made in Germany in the late 50's/early 60's were a return to form.

Great to see some love for Zabriskie Point, love Antonioni, I think The Passenger and Zabriskie Point are my favourites.

Any recommendations on Mann? I've only seen Winchster 73.

I've only seen White Heat and Regeneration but I don't really think Raoul Walsh is my type (Regeneration was surprisingly good, White Heat was nice but felt kind of flat). Can you say anything about what makes him great?

Never heard of Markopolous.

Reygadas is scary. I thought Stellet Licht was great but I hated Post Tenebras Lux.

Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid is so surprisingly good! The Wild Bunch left me a bit cold, want to see some more Peckinpah.

Jacques Tourneur is amazing, I need to see more. I adore I Walked with a Zombie.

Love Ophüls as well. Have you seen The Company's In Love? I found that surprisingly sweet, it's Ophüls doing a rom-com musical, though it's pretty rough as you'd expect from an early 30's debut.

Wakamatsu Koji never heard about him.

Here are some director's I think you'd enjoy based on your list but I've no idea how much you've seen by them:
-Manoel de Oliveira (I find him to be the closest match to Ruiz but instead of an avant-gardist he's a hardcore classicist first and foremost)
-Jacques Rivette (Rivette is basically American B-movies thrown in a blender with French social realism)
-Roberto Rosselini
-Douglas Sirk
-Olivier Assayas (try Summer Hours, Irma Vep and Demonlover)
-Helmut Käutner (especially Große Freiheit nr. 7 and Unter den Brücken)
-Christian Petzold (Petzold also loves American B-films but he's much more dry and analytical than Rivette, though he actually has a lot of talent for pure craft if he wants to)

Here's my List:
https://www.imdb.com/list/ls053073641/

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#10

Post by prodigalgodson » May 5th, 2020, 8:49 pm

Onderhond wrote:
May 3rd, 2020, 7:42 am
I'm afraid I don't have much substantial to add to this list.

If I'd draw up a Top 50, I think Hou would be the only match, though he'd probably be quite close to the bottom (#46 in my list last year it seems). Lynch was very close (#55) and I do like Wakamatsu, who would be a bit further down the list. From there on the Coens and Bong would be the only ones left with an average (slightly) above 2.5/5, the other 25 or so directors I've seen films from would be below that mark.
Ah, your two favorites from Hou are my least favorites too. :D

Nice to see Aoyama on your list -- Eureka was my favorite movie at one point, and Sad Vacation's up there too.

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#11

Post by Onderhond » May 5th, 2020, 9:15 pm

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 5th, 2020, 8:49 pm
Nice to see Aoyama on your list -- Eureka was my favorite movie at one point, and Sad Vacation's up there too.
That list is simply by movie counts though, not really a favorites list there.

The best-of list I compiled for on the ICM polls is here: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls027762524/

Aoyama is definitely interesting, but not many great films, apart from Eli, Eli ... That one was something else :)
Last edited by Onderhond on May 5th, 2020, 9:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#12

Post by Cinepolis » May 5th, 2020, 9:19 pm

Sorted by my average rating of their films:

1. Dario Argento (Favorite: Inferno)
2. Werner Herzog (Aguirre)
3. David Cronenberg (The Brood)
4. Roman Polanski (Chinatown)
5. Ingmar Bergman (Virgin Spring)
6. Andrei Tarkovsky (Stalker)
7. Béla Tarr (Werckmeister Harmonies)
8. Ousmane Sembene (Camp De Thiaroye)
9. Luis Bunuel (The Exterminating Angel)
10. Kenji Mizoguchi (Ugetsu)

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#13

Post by prodigalgodson » May 5th, 2020, 10:44 pm

tobias wrote:
May 4th, 2020, 12:58 am
It seems to me we have quite similar tastes. There's a lot of the classical directors that I adore too (Bunuel, Bresson, Lang, Bergman, Tarkovsky, Kubrick, Welles, Renoir, etc.), some great American B-movie, a slew of somewhat slow Asian social realists, the Euro new wave and associated and then some nice surprises like e.g. Straub/Huillet and Ruiz. It's interesting to see Naruse and Mizoguchi but nto Ozu but the insane reverence for Ozu actually sometimes gets on my nerves. I always found Mizoguchi much more sassy, Naruse to me seemed to differ from both in that he subordinated the stylistics to the story much more, whereas both Ozu and Mizoguchi often made films that hinge primarily on aesthetics.

Personally I have only seen a single Naruse film, Floating Clouds, so of course I'm uneducated but I liked Floating Clouds a whole lot and would love to see more. I'd gladly take recommendations.

I haven't seen anything by Hou Hsiao-hsien, I'll gladly take recommendations on what to start with.

Bresson is a class act and insanely consistent, he has so far been completely incapable of boring me and I've seen his wacky short film about plane crashes and the city frozen in time.

Straub-Huillet I also like a lot but my top 3 would look completely different (haven't seen Othon yet though).

Hong Sangsoo is slowly becomming one of my favourite currently working directors. I saw Right Now Wrong Then on a train trip last year and thought it was amazing (probably the best film of the year) and then I saw The Woman Who Ran at the world premiere this year which was such a delightful and simple film.

Marker without mentioning Sans Soleil confuses me but I'm a huge fan.

I'm a huge Ruiz fan but I've seen neither The Suspended Vocation or The Penal Colony, it's certainly the most unique batch of Ruiz favourites I've seen.

I should see death by hanging. I watched The Realm of Senses on TV like 2 years ago or more and I liked it much more than I would have expected.

Jean Renoir I love for the sheer ammount of great films he made (mainly in the 30's) and the worlds he so effortlessly builds. I rewatched The Rules of the Game on the big screen last year and had an absolute blast.

Eric Rohmer is basically my favourite director.

Very nice to see Lessons of Darkness here.

Maurice Pialat greatly intruiges me. I'd like to see almsot all the films he made, though I do feel he sometimes falls short.

I have to see something by Schroeter sometime. He's probably my biggest Neuer Deutscher Film omission.

I like Visconti a lot too, particularly The Leopard as I adore well made historical epics and this is one of the absolute best ever made (besides Barry Lyndon and Mysteries of Lisbon)

Vertov is surprising. What do you see in him? Especially as Man with a Movie Camera is not listed. I've never dug deeper than that (though Man with a Movie Camera certainly is a great film, was definitely an eye-openener back when I watched it at 16).

Fassbinder's Berlin Alexanderplatz singlehandledly convinced me Fassbinder is one of the greatest directors ever, every other great film he made is just a bonus.

Satyajit Ray I'd love to explore more but I don't seem to connect with him to quite the level of say Renoir, Rohmer or Kiarostami. I've only seen the Apu trilogy, liked them all quite a bit, thought the last was handily the best though. Looking forward to The Music Room and Charulata.

Nicholas Ray is basically the shit.

Never seen anything by Hutton.

Your selection of Lang films is super weird. Ministry of Fear and Rancho Notorious I would describe as some of the low-points of his career from what I've seen (still nice and well made films but don't remotely have the edge of many of his other works). Can you elaborate why you like them so much? Personally everything Lang made outside of Germany is kind of an afterthought for me. Films like Fury or The Woman in the Window are high craftsmanship and super involving but I prefer Fuller or Ray in that case. His German stuff however is unmatched. I actually think the films he made in Germany in the late 50's/early 60's were a return to form.

Great to see some love for Zabriskie Point, love Antonioni, I think The Passenger and Zabriskie Point are my favourites.

Any recommendations on Mann? I've only seen Winchster 73.

I've only seen White Heat and Regeneration but I don't really think Raoul Walsh is my type (Regeneration was surprisingly good, White Heat was nice but felt kind of flat). Can you say anything about what makes him great?

Never heard of Markopolous.

Reygadas is scary. I thought Stellet Licht was great but I hated Post Tenebras Lux.

Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid is so surprisingly good! The Wild Bunch left me a bit cold, want to see some more Peckinpah.

Jacques Tourneur is amazing, I need to see more. I adore I Walked with a Zombie.

Love Ophüls as well. Have you seen The Company's In Love? I found that surprisingly sweet, it's Ophüls doing a rom-com musical, though it's pretty rough as you'd expect from an early 30's debut.

Wakamatsu Koji never heard about him.

Here are some director's I think you'd enjoy based on your list but I've no idea how much you've seen by them:
-Manoel de Oliveira (I find him to be the closest match to Ruiz but instead of an avant-gardist he's a hardcore classicist first and foremost)
-Jacques Rivette (Rivette is basically American B-movies thrown in a blender with French social realism)
-Roberto Rosselini
-Douglas Sirk
-Olivier Assayas (try Summer Hours, Irma Vep and Demonlover)
-Helmut Käutner (especially Große Freiheit nr. 7 and Unter den Brücken)
-Christian Petzold (Petzold also loves American B-films but he's much more dry and analytical than Rivette, though he actually has a lot of talent for pure craft if he wants to)

Here's my List:
https://www.imdb.com/list/ls053073641/
Cheers my friend! I'll definitely give your list a gander.

Ozu - yeah, he's someone who on paper I should love, but in actuality I have a lot of trouble getting into; I do appreciate his contributions to the form, especially pillow shots; hopefully I'll gain more of an appreciation as I get older

Naruse - I think he's actually a subtle but very vivid stylist -- for one thing, he's probably the most symmetrical filmmaker of all time in how he positions people and objects in many of his films, and no one films walking and talking like him; Kurosawa's quote about raging currents under a serene surface or whatever seems very apt, and is a testament not just to his work with actors but to his shot choices and editing decision; every Naruse I've seen feels like a unique experience I leave feeling more connected to the world, and I don't think you can go wrong with a next step (When a Woman Ascends the Stairs is the first one I saw and the only one I wasn't crazy about, but that'd probably benefit from a rewatch)

Hou - Dust in the Wind feels like a good starting place

Straub/Huillet - ah you've gotta see Othon, the appeal is something like an art film Game of Thrones

Hong - yep, incredible, and not surprising since you like Rohmer; I'm eager to see Right Now Wrong Then since it's spiritual successor, On the Beach at Night Alone, is one of my favorites from recent years

Marker - Sans soleil was definitely the movie that got me into Marker and documentaries in general, tough call between that and La jetee for the third slot; A Grin Without a Cat for favorite was the only easy choice there

Ruiz - there are so many I haven't seen, which might explain the odd favorites, though it's hard to imagine the top 2 changing anytime soon; The Suspended Vocation is insanely underrated

Oshima - Death by Hanging was the first one I saw, really opened up a wider world of film for me at the time

Renoir - I've seen a lot on the big screen, but The Rules of the Game remains the best, both in general and in that setting

Pialat - if you like Rohmer I feel like you'd have to love him; I've only got that falling short feeling with Police and slightly with Van Gogh, though I'd like to rewatch the latter

Schroeter - an acquired taste, for me as much as anyone; I first saw Maria Malibran on a shitty online rip and it didn't do much for me, the experience on film is something else though

Visconti - The Leopard, Barry Lyndon, and Mysteries of Lisbon are my top 3 of their kind too, interesting comparison; I still need to see more from him, but he made it up here on the strength of 5 films alone

Vertov - he used the documentary form to totally revolutionize the way film could portray the world, I'd put his importance in the development of the medium up there with Eisenstein and Griffith, though personally I'm much more drawn to his style than those guys'; his evolution from the Kino-week and Kino-pravda newsreels to the symphonic Sixth of the World and Enthusiasm is incredible to see, though his clunkers -- Soviet Toys, Three Heroines -- are pretty awful

Fassbinder - I'd agree Alexanderplatz is obviously his magnum opus, but he took a lot of different approaches and I love a lot of his output

S. Ray - I'd like to see more myself; The World of Apu was easily my favorite from that trilogy, and everything else I've seen has been near that level of quality

Lang - ahh I loved Lang's move to American films, with a few major exceptions -- it's been a long time since I've seen either, but I remember Rancho Notorious and Ministry of Fear combining the otherworldly, mysterious stylistic remnants of silent filmmaking with the best of American genre templates; Rancho Notorious, in addition to its appealing strangeness, I remember finding psychologically tense and ambiguous, well-structured, and adventurous in the mode of his silents; Ministry of Fear I remember being eerie, dreamlike, and unique among noir, similar vibes to Tourneur but super Lang-y, though I'm embarrassed to say I don't remember the details, and this third place could go to Secret Beyond the Door or House by the River too

Mann - can't go wrong with any of it really -- among his noirs, I think the most interesting are Reign of Terror, Desperate, Raw Deal, and The Tall Target, while my favorite westerns are Bend of the River, The Naked Spur, and Man of the West; The Fall of the Roman Empire is a great Hollywood epic, then there are odd genre-bending inclusions like Thunder Bay and God's Little Acre, and of course

Walsh - one of the more recent American directors I got into, his films exude that magic lantern feel that epitomizes the appeal of the studio system for me; great sense of composition and mise en scene, and an intuitive sense of cinematic energy reminiscent of, though totally distinct from, Hawks

Markopoulos - huge figure in the development of American experimental film, but yeah, he's oddly obscure and I myself hadn't heard of him til I went to my first retrospective

Peckinpah - The Wild Bunch left me cold the first time too, but really connected on subsequent viewings; Peckinpah doesn't sound like someone I'd particularly like on paper, and I'm a bit worried that this list has kind of a violent masculine streak, but I can't deny the power of his vision

Ophuls - haven't seen The Company in Love and don't think I'd heard of it, thanks for the rec!; I actually haven't seen any of his German films, which I should rectify

Wakamatsu - New Wave-adjacent guy who got his start in sexploitation and used it for a jumping off point to explore sociopolitical issues in Japanese youth culture; some of his stuff is among the most hilarious and bonkers things I've seen in theaters, while others are pretty frightening

Thanks for the recs!

-Manoel de Oliveira - sad to say I haven't seen any
-Jacques Rivette - just watched Out 1 and eager to see more; loved Le Coup du berger, which felt very Straub, and was ambivalent towards Celine and Julie, but I'd like to revisit it after my experience with Out 1
-Roberto Rosselini - almost made the list, but I feel like I need to see more; I'm indifferent to his earlier neorealist stuff, but I love his later history stuff to death; The Age of the Medici, General della Rovere, and India: Matri Bhumi are my biggest priorities
-Douglas Sirk - love him, Imitation of Life especially is one of my favorite American movies, but I've been lukewarm on enough of his output to omit him
-Olivier Assayas - only seen Irma Vep, which I really enjoyed, I'll check out those others
-Helmut Käutner - name doesn't ring a bell, though a few of his titles do; thanks much for the recommendation!
-Christian Petzold - saw and loved Transit (funny you should mention Rivette, his ability to use film to create a whole other world within a familiar setting feels similar); I'll check out more, thanks

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prodigalgodson
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#14

Post by prodigalgodson » May 5th, 2020, 10:45 pm

Onderhond wrote:
May 5th, 2020, 9:15 pm
prodigalgodson wrote:
May 5th, 2020, 8:49 pm
Nice to see Aoyama on your list -- Eureka was my favorite movie at one point, and Sad Vacation's up there too.
That list is simply by movie counts though, not really a favorites list there.

The best-of list I compiled for on the ICM polls is here: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls027762524/

Aoyama is definitely interesting, but not many great films, apart from Eli, Eli ... That one was something else :)
Gotcha -- I'll check out Eli, Eli, cheers!

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#15

Post by prodigalgodson » May 5th, 2020, 10:49 pm

Cinepolis wrote:
May 5th, 2020, 9:19 pm
Sorted by my average rating of their films:

1. Dario Argento (Favorite: Inferno)
2. Werner Herzog (Aguirre)
3. David Cronenberg (The Brood)
4. Roman Polanski (Chinatown)
5. Ingmar Bergman (Virgin Spring)
6. Andrei Tarkovsky (Stalker)
7. Béla Tarr (Werckmeister Harmonies)
8. Ousmane Sembene (Camp De Thiaroye)
9. Luis Bunuel (The Exterminating Angel)
10. Kenji Mizoguchi (Ugetsu)
Awesome list! Of the ones we don't share:

Argento - only seen Suspiria, and that just recently; not sure he's gonna be my cup of tea, but then I love pretty much every other director you've listed
Cronenberg - dig his stuff a lot, don't know why I didn't even think of him for this list; haven't seen The Brood, thanks for the rec
Polanski - haven't seen enough, but what I have I've mostly loved
Tarr - not quiiite there for me, though I'd imagine many of his films would benefit from a rewatch; my favorite's The Man from London, which kinda feels like the least Tarrish
Sembene - I seriously need to see more, only seen Black Girl which I didn't love, but seemed to harbor an abundance of potential; never heard of your favorite, thanks for the rec

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Cinepolis
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#16

Post by Cinepolis » May 6th, 2020, 7:43 am

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 5th, 2020, 10:49 pm
Cinepolis wrote:
May 5th, 2020, 9:19 pm
Sorted by my average rating of their films:

1. Dario Argento (Favorite: Inferno)
2. Werner Herzog (Aguirre)
3. David Cronenberg (The Brood)
4. Roman Polanski (Chinatown)
5. Ingmar Bergman (Virgin Spring)
6. Andrei Tarkovsky (Stalker)
7. Béla Tarr (Werckmeister Harmonies)
8. Ousmane Sembene (Camp De Thiaroye)
9. Luis Bunuel (The Exterminating Angel)
10. Kenji Mizoguchi (Ugetsu)
Awesome list! Of the ones we don't share:

Argento - only seen Suspiria, and that just recently; not sure he's gonna be my cup of tea, but then I love pretty much every other director you've listed
Cronenberg - dig his stuff a lot, don't know why I didn't even think of him for this list; haven't seen The Brood, thanks for the rec
Polanski - haven't seen enough, but what I have I've mostly loved
Tarr - not quiiite there for me, though I'd imagine many of his films would benefit from a rewatch; my favorite's The Man from London, which kinda feels like the least Tarrish
Sembene - I seriously need to see more, only seen Black Girl which I didn't love, but seemed to harbor an abundance of potential; never heard of your favorite, thanks for the rec
For Argento, you could try "Profondo Rosso", since it's more narrative-driven and less supernatural. If you don't like this one, you probably won't like any of his other works.
Haven't seen "The Man From London" yet, but I'm planning to. You may also like Tarr's earlier works like "Prefab People" and "Autumn Almanac".

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#17

Post by tobias » May 6th, 2020, 12:37 pm

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 5th, 2020, 10:44 pm
Cheers my friend! I'll definitely give your list a gander.
Thanks for the nice reply! :)

@Ozu - I think I have a somewhat similar opinion. I remember watching Tokyo Story when I was 16 and being kind of bored - though I did like the film, just didn't find it particularly amazing. It's to date still my least favourite Ozu film. What knocked him out of the water for me was watching An Autumns Afternoon around 1 or 2 years later which - despite being only 9 years younger - feels ages more modern or perhaps post-modern. I always found it to be a much more relatable tale of the fracture of a family because it is more reminiscent of the times we live in today. Also the absolutely beautiful colour cinematography really helps, in general I find that colour helps Ozu a lot and he did beautiful things with it, as it coresponds beautifully with his formula and adds another layer to what sometimes seem a bit stale in B/W. My 2nd favourite is actually I Was Born But... - which is before Ozu established his stringent formula. However I must say that even though I did end up enjoying quite a few of his films a lot, I'm going through his filmography extremely slowly.

@Straub/Huilet - Yes, Othon is what I'm most excited to see by them right now actually.

@Pialat - I agree that he has strong similarities with Rohmer, though he's more working class I guess. I personally liked A Nos Amour a lot but was a bit let down by Naked Childhood which was drier than I expected and then also Under The Sun of Satan which I feel wasted a lot of its potential by going middle of the road (but my expectations were not that high, it was actually better than I expected). Very excited to see We Won't Grow Old Together and his TV Series which ARTE generously put into their Mediathek.

@Fassbinder - I agree, Fassbinder evolved so extremely quickly stylistically from the almost Straubian beginnings to Melodrama and then all the way to historical epics.

@Lang - interesting take on these 2 films.

@Ophüls - In that case you must watch Liebelei which is his only masterwork from Germany but has everything that would make him famous well established allready, be it in a bit more rocky early 30's variation (though it also does feel more authentic and directly connected to his source material than his later french films). The Company's in Love in contrast very much feels like a debut, so don't expect way too much, it's very much rough around the edges but I also find that it's such a sweet and unusual film. Ophüls made nothing like it and it's completely under the radar. The Bartered Bride, his follow up, pioneered an entire genre but I didn't find it that enticing personally.

@Rosselini - personally I like when he transitions from Neo-Realism to the decadent alienation (ala Antonioni) with his Ingrid Bergman films (especially Journey to Italy).

@Sirk - Sirk is a super odd filmmaker in the way that if he stopped making films just 4 years earlier he would be almost entirely forgotten today. It's completely crazy how all the high-points of his career are a successive streak made at the tail-end - and then he made his greatest film, being the absolute amalgamation of the themes he dealt with in the past years - and just stopped. I don't think anyone else ever pulled anything like that.

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#18

Post by prodigalgodson » May 7th, 2020, 5:47 am

tobias wrote:
May 6th, 2020, 12:37 pm
Thanks for the nice reply! :)

@Ozu - I think I have a somewhat similar opinion. I remember watching Tokyo Story when I was 16 and being kind of bored - though I did like the film, just didn't find it particularly amazing. It's to date still my least favourite Ozu film. What knocked him out of the water for me was watching An Autumns Afternoon around 1 or 2 years later which - despite being only 9 years younger - feels ages more modern or perhaps post-modern. I always found it to be a much more relatable tale of the fracture of a family because it is more reminiscent of the times we live in today. Also the absolutely beautiful colour cinematography really helps, in general I find that colour helps Ozu a lot and he did beautiful things with it, as it coresponds beautifully with his formula and adds another layer to what sometimes seem a bit stale in B/W. My 2nd favourite is actually I Was Born But... - which is before Ozu established his stringent formula. However I must say that even though I did end up enjoying quite a few of his films a lot, I'm going through his filmography extremely slowly.

@Straub/Huilet - Yes, Othon is what I'm most excited to see by them right now actually.

@Pialat - I agree that he has strong similarities with Rohmer, though he's more working class I guess. I personally liked A Nos Amour a lot but was a bit let down by Naked Childhood which was drier than I expected and then also Under The Sun of Satan which I feel wasted a lot of its potential by going middle of the road (but my expectations were not that high, it was actually better than I expected). Very excited to see We Won't Grow Old Together and his TV Series which ARTE generously put into their Mediathek.

@Fassbinder - I agree, Fassbinder evolved so extremely quickly stylistically from the almost Straubian beginnings to Melodrama and then all the way to historical epics.

@Lang - interesting take on these 2 films.

@Ophüls - In that case you must watch Liebelei which is his only masterwork from Germany but has everything that would make him famous well established allready, be it in a bit more rocky early 30's variation (though it also does feel more authentic and directly connected to his source material than his later french films). The Company's in Love in contrast very much feels like a debut, so don't expect way too much, it's very much rough around the edges but I also find that it's such a sweet and unusual film. Ophüls made nothing like it and it's completely under the radar. The Bartered Bride, his follow up, pioneered an entire genre but I didn't find it that enticing personally.

@Rosselini - personally I like when he transitions from Neo-Realism to the decadent alienation (ala Antonioni) with his Ingrid Bergman films (especially Journey to Italy).

@Sirk - Sirk is a super odd filmmaker in the way that if he stopped making films just 4 years earlier he would be almost entirely forgotten today. It's completely crazy how all the high-points of his career are a successive streak made at the tail-end - and then he made his greatest film, being the absolute amalgamation of the themes he dealt with in the past years - and just stopped. I don't think anyone else ever pulled anything like that.
Ozu - ha, we're weirdly similar there -- I was about 16 when I saw Tokyo Story and disliked it (feel like I need to see it again), have An Autumn Afternoon as my highest-rated (though I don't honestly remember it too well), and would probably put I Was Born But..., which I just saw recently, second

Pialat - I was really high when I saw it, but Under the Sun of Satan was my favorite of his at the time (and I had very high expectations); I'd probably call A nos amours my favorite now cuz it stuck more vividly in my mind; L'enfance nue was the first one I saw and I was super impressed, especially considering I don't usually like movies about childhood -- I think his dryness/aloofness works really well considering his choices of subject

Ophuls - yeah, Liebelei seemed by far his most acclaimed/famous early work, but thanks for the pointers on the others

Rosselini - I like Voyage in Italy and especially Stromboli a lot more than his War Trilogy or whatever it's called, but I like his later stuff even more

Sirk - interesting, I hadn't thought about how condensed all his classics are; and that's a case where I agree with the consensus on his best work -- what I've seen of his earlier stuff, while promising, just isn't on the same level

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#19

Post by RedHawk10 » May 7th, 2020, 8:32 am

That's a very interesting list. I really like the majority of them. Naruse is a cool #1, never seen him top someone's group before.

Here's my 10 favorite filmmakers, only roughly ordered -

David Lynch
*gap*
Sion Sono
Edward Yang
Carl Dreyer
Ingmar Bergman
Stanley Kubrick
Pier Paolo Pasolini
Guy Maddin
Charlie Chaplin
Hayao Miyazaki

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#20

Post by prodigalgodson » May 7th, 2020, 9:21 am

RedHawk10 wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 8:32 am
That's a very interesting list. I really like the majority of them. Naruse is a cool #1, never seen him top someone's group before.

Here's my 10 favorite filmmakers, only roughly ordered -

David Lynch
*gap*
Sion Sono
Edward Yang
Carl Dreyer
Ingmar Bergman
Stanley Kubrick
Pier Paolo Pasolini
Guy Maddin
Charlie Chaplin
Hayao Miyazaki
Interesting list yourself!

Lynch - I feel like I really have a sense of people when their favorite director is Lynch heh, he's carved out an amazing, unique part of cinematic space and just gotten better with age
Sono - very much enjoyed the few things I've seen, but don't see him becoming a favorite; Noriko's Dinner Table's my favorite, followed by crowd favorite Love Exposure
Yang - one of the greats, and should maybe be on my list despite having only seen 3; eager to see the rest, especially Taipei Story
Dreyer - I'm more a fan of the people he influenced than his films themselves, but I'd like to revisit Gertrud, Vampyr, and Joan of Arc and watch more of his silents
Bergman - one of the most psychologically incisive directors ever
Kubrick - obviously one of the American goats
Pasolini - Accattone's one of my favorite films, but I have yet to see anything else I've liked as much (dug both St. Matthew and its location scouting documentary too); his folklore trilogy is leaving Criterion his month, so I'm planning to watch those
Maddin - haven't seen too many, but I've enjoyed what I have; seems like a much more adept repurposer of past styles than Tarantino for instance
Chaplin - not my sense of humor or sentiment; that said I loved The Great Dictator and thought The Gold Rush and Mr. Verdoux were solid
Miyazaki - liked almost everything I've seen, with Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away being favorites, but his sensibilities don't entirely match up with mine

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#21

Post by Onderhond » May 7th, 2020, 10:40 am

Guess I could post my own top 10 (with some comments).

01. 3.86*/23 - Mamoru Oshii: Not just the director with the most 5* ratings for me, also the director who made the most films that played a pivotal role in my growth as a film fan. Namely Ghost in the Shell, Avalon and Angel's Egg all played their part opening up new parts of cinema to me. What I love about Oshii is that he's often seen as a more serious director, but he also is great with comedy (Mini-Pato, The Red Spectacles, Talking Head). Apart from that his aesthetic sensibilities are amazing. I wouldn't say he's the perfect director for me (ultimately I prefer chaos over tranquility), but between those two he's the one that gets closest to perfection for me.

02. 3.43*/82 - Takashi Miike: I like to be surprised and who better than Miike to make that happen. He has worked in virtually every niche and genre, and always manages to do something different or add something of his own. He's also directed quite a bit of mediocre stuff, but the good films easily cancel that out. One of the very few directors who can make me laugh out loud.

03. 3.89*/19 - Shinya Tsukamoto: Tetsuo was a landmark for me, it's stuff like this that I love for. Tsukamoto has everything to be my favorite director, except that he's still somewhat stuck in the 80s/90s and never managed to upgrade his particular style of film making to a more contemporary level. I still love a lot of what he does, simply because he's still one of the few doing what he does (raw soundtracks, hyperediting, strong genre elements), it's just that I see an unfulfilled potential there that is hard to ignore.

04. 4.08*/06 - Gaspar Noé: But it's really the combo with Benoit Debie that makes it great for me. Debie is by far my favorite cinematographer and coupled with Noé's dark sensibilities it makes for amazing, visceral cinema. Not very subtle, but subtlety is not something I see as essential (though it sure has beauty in its own right). The only reason he doesn't have the highest average of the directors listed here is because the other shorts in the Destricted anthology brought it down for him.

05. 4.10*/19 - Takeshi Kitano: Love Kitano's quirky comedy, especially in combination with the slightly harsher elements in his work. He's made very few stinkers and has kept a pretty consistent level of quality throughout the years, the reason why he isn't higher is because he's only made one true masterpiece. Dolls really is the stand-out for me, a stylistic marvel that showcases Kitano's unique sense of pacing and editing.

06. 4.06*/08 - Kôji Morimoto: Probably the least known of the bunch, no doubt because he mostly works on shorter films. Luckily there are plenty of great anime anthologies and as the co(?)-founder of Studio 4°C he's had most of his films included in them. Has an amazing sense of style, pushes technical boundaries like no other and also makes great use of soundtracks. Together with Oshii's Tenshi no Tamago, Noiseman is the only unsubbed Japanese DVD I own. It cost crazy much for a 10-minute short, but it was so worth it.

07. 4.83*/03 - Hiroshi Ishikawa: Doesn't make many films, but he makes them count. The funny thing is that Ishikawa comes from the world of advertising, but his films are the polar opposite of commercials. Slow and extremely subtle, but with a warmth underneath them I haven't found anywhere else. You have to be able to stand the typical stilted Japanese acting though, but that's just part of the subtlety and appeal to me. Grossly overlooked, then again his work isn't very commercial. Not sure why he doesn't do better in the festival circuit though.

08. 3.85*/17 - Gakuryû Ishii: Rebranded himself a couple of times already (formerly known as Sogo Ishii), which makes it a little hard to pin him down. His most famous work falls into the category of Tsukamoto, but he's also made calmer, more introspective films. Or quirkier, light-hearted ones. Always with a very unique sense of style though, and great use of music.

09. 4.37*/04 - Hitoshi Matsumoto: Kitano's rival. Turns out he's also pretty great at making films. Symbol is his most famous one, but his other work is hilarious too. It's a shame he kinda disappeared from the stage, then again these guys have so many things going on that it's a surprise he even managed to make 4 films. Favorite scene from his work is Matsumoto standing in giant underpants, waiting for his big Kaiju transformation to happen. Comedy doesn't get much drier than that.

10. 3.28*/33 - Sion Sono: As much as I love some of his work and as much as I know he hates the comparison, I still feel like he's trailing Miike. Somehow these two will forever be connected, even though there are as many differences as there are similarities. When it comes to raw originality though, I think Miike is still the clear winner, which is why he's higher up my ranking.

11. 4.10*/14 - SABU/Hiroyuki Tanaka: the reason I'm doing 11 is because Tanaka is my number 11. I don't know what went wrong for him, but his films have so much broad appeal that I simply cannot understand why he isn't better known internationally. I know France and Germany regularly have his films out on DVD, which is even more frustrating because my German/French isn't good enough for that. He makes amazing films, apart from a somewhat slow start he's made one superb film after another, offering great variation, a clear signature and many memorable scenes. Can't wait until he gets the credits he deserves.

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#22

Post by peeptoad » May 7th, 2020, 12:49 pm

Here's the list I posted on IMDB a few months ago. It's already a little out of date though: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls091622165/

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#23

Post by RedHawk10 » May 7th, 2020, 4:11 pm

Onderhond wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 10:40 am
10. 3.28*/33 - Sion Sono: As much as I love some of his work and as much as I know he hates the comparison, I still feel like he's trailing Miike. Somehow these two will forever be connected, even though there are as many differences as there are similarities. When it comes to raw originality though, I think Miike is still the clear winner, which is why he's higher up my ranking.
That's an interesting comment. I don't really see many similarities between the two, but I've also only seen like 4 of Miike's films (and as a fan you obviously know how huge his body of work is), so maybe I'd change my mind if I watched more from him. What're your favorites from Miike?

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#24

Post by RedHawk10 » May 7th, 2020, 4:12 pm

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 9:21 am
RedHawk10 wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 8:32 am
That's a very interesting list. I really like the majority of them. Naruse is a cool #1, never seen him top someone's group before.

Here's my 10 favorite filmmakers, only roughly ordered -

David Lynch
*gap*
Sion Sono
Edward Yang
Carl Dreyer
Ingmar Bergman
Stanley Kubrick
Pier Paolo Pasolini
Guy Maddin
Charlie Chaplin
Hayao Miyazaki
Interesting list yourself!

Lynch - I feel like I really have a sense of people when their favorite director is Lynch heh, he's carved out an amazing, unique part of cinematic space and just gotten better with age
Sono - very much enjoyed the few things I've seen, but don't see him becoming a favorite; Noriko's Dinner Table's my favorite, followed by crowd favorite Love Exposure
Yang - one of the greats, and should maybe be on my list despite having only seen 3; eager to see the rest, especially Taipei Story
Dreyer - I'm more a fan of the people he influenced than his films themselves, but I'd like to revisit Gertrud, Vampyr, and Joan of Arc and watch more of his silents
Bergman - one of the most psychologically incisive directors ever
Kubrick - obviously one of the American goats
Pasolini - Accattone's one of my favorite films, but I have yet to see anything else I've liked as much (dug both St. Matthew and its location scouting documentary too); his folklore trilogy is leaving Criterion his month, so I'm planning to watch those
Maddin - haven't seen too many, but I've enjoyed what I have; seems like a much more adept repurposer of past styles than Tarantino for instance
Chaplin - not my sense of humor or sentiment; that said I loved The Great Dictator and thought The Gold Rush and Mr. Verdoux were solid
Miyazaki - liked almost everything I've seen, with Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away being favorites, but his sensibilities don't entirely match up with mine
Nice! I wish there was a "LIKE" button on this forum!

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#25

Post by RedHawk10 » May 7th, 2020, 4:13 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
May 1st, 2020, 8:27 pm
Wow, this is giving me so many Film General flashbacks ...
Ha, I love it! I miss these kinda fun little rankings.

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#26

Post by Onderhond » May 7th, 2020, 5:13 pm

RedHawk10 wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 4:11 pm
That's an interesting comment. I don't really see many similarities between the two, but I've also only seen like 4 of Miike's films (and as a fan you obviously know how huge his body of work is), so maybe I'd change my mind if I watched more from him. What're your favorites from Miike?
I think it's the pacing of their oeuvre (both directors have made 6 films in one year for example), the variety in their output and the weirdness/extreme elements that both got famous for. And they're Japanese of course. But again, there are just as many differences between the two.

If you click the Miike link, all the reviewed ones are more or less in order of preference. My two absolute favorites are Big Bang Love, Juvenile A (for the more arthouse-like, Von Trier treatement) and Visitor Q (extremely culty dark comedy). Both films couldn't be further apart. The most typical one is probably Yakuza Apocalypse though. That's really the best Miike best-off in my eyes.

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#27

Post by prodigalgodson » May 7th, 2020, 11:42 pm

Alright, Ale's top 100 (who aren't on my list/I haven't commented on in this thread already):

Maddin - wow, two people on this thread alone have him in their top 10
Powell/Pressburger - not a huge fan of anything I've seen

Capra - a bit saccharine for me, though much more technically interesting than, say, Spielberg; The Bitter Tea of General Yen was easily my favorite, but I haven't seen it in years
Cassavettes - love what he stands for, less enamored of what he actually produces; Chinese Bookie and Husbands are easily my favorites
Davies - only seen Distant Voices, Still Lives, which I enjoyed, but wasn't quite in my stylistic wheelhouse; eager to see more though
Feuillade - haven't seen any, should remedy that
Fleischer - like Bimbo's Initiation, other than that, eh
Ford - enormously talented and influential, but I don't always dig his sensibilities
Hitchcock - ditto Ford, though Vertigo's my favorite film (The Searchers is probably my number 2 American)
Chuck Jones - ditto Ford and Hitchcock for animation lol
Leone - made some pretty epic stuff but can also feel a bit corny
Murnau - would be very close to my list, Sunrise, The Last Laugh, and Tabu are favorites
Naruse - haven't seen several of your favorites, thanks for the recs
Resnais - looks like we have the same top 3
Varda - see Leone haha, still would almost make my list
Yang - so close, need to see more, especially Taipei Story
Akerman - wasn't too fond of Jeanne Dielman, but I've enjoyed some others and definitely want to see more
Angeloupolos - like his style in theory, but wasn't blown away by either of his I've seen
Avery - fun stuff, probably prefer his sensibilities to Jones'
Beizai - only seen Downpour, which I liked but didn't think was anything to write home about; I'd love some recommendations
Boetticher - would make a longer list, I like those six Westerns a lot
Borzage - haven't seen enough, but I loved Moonrise
Al Brooks - still haven't seen any, should remedy that
Burnett - close to making my list, wish he'd made more; My Brother's Wedding and Killer of Sheep are favorites
Bob Clampett - saw a few of his at a retrospective of racist cartoons in this weird little theater in Seattle years ago, I wasn't too impressed lol
Demy - doesn't really jibe with my sensibilities, like The Umbrellas of Cherbourg as a lovelorn high schooler but less so now
Deren - would probably make a longer list, I like most of what I've seen (maybe an hour of material in total) a lot
Diaz - need to explore
Dolan - haven't seen any, any recs?
Dovzhenko - almost made my list but need to see more, Arsenal's one of my favorite silents and I love Earth and Zvenigora too
Eastwood - usually enjoy his stuff, not a favorite
Eisenstein - love love love his theory and techniques, less intrigued by his subject matter and results; feel like his associative montage is echoed in the style of many of my favorite rappers (especially Roc Marciano and Ghostface Killah)
Endfield - haven't seen any, would like to see Zulu at least
Fischinger - interesting approach, far from a favorite so far (see also: Jordan Belson)
Fuller - close to my list and one of the best American directors, though I feel like his work was often compromised by Hayes code/studio system constraints
Gilliam - like the imaginative approach, though the results are often a bit underwhelming
Golestan - haven't seen any, any recs?
Griffith - love A Corner in Wheat and appreciate his influence, but a lot of his actual output falls short
Jost - haven't seen any, recommendations or pointers on where to watch?
Keaton - easily my favorite silent comedian (no competition I've seen really), should watch some more of his stuff
Kieslowski - seen his big titles and wasn't all that impressed, but I love White; I should watch his earlier stuff too
Kinugasa - don't think I've seen any; any recs aside from Gate of Hell?
Kurosawa - see Ford/Hitchcock
Lee - like most of what I've seen a lot, especially Do the Right Thing; should check out more
Lubitsch - enjoy most of what I've seen a lot, might be a favorite if I see more
Makhmalbouf - only seen two, but he definitely has potential to be a favorite; A Moment of Innocence I especially loved
McCarey - meh, competent craftsman
Melies - dig his style, would be on a longer list for sure
Panahi - need to check out his stuff, I think I fell asleep during Taxi though
Parajanov - not crazy about his style, though maybe it's worth revisiting The Color of Pomegranate; I definitely dug Forgotten Ancestors
Rappaport - haven't seen any but definitely want to
Rasoulof - haven't seen any, any recs?
Snow - like the couple I've seen a lot
Spielberg - uggh
Stroheim - want to see more, but great director and actor; The Wedding March and Greed are favorites
Sturges - don't generally find him all that funny or compelling
Tarr - not quite exactly my style of slow cinema, though I wouldn't mind rewatching some and seeing his early stuff
Tati - love Playtime and Mon oncle, but not enough to make him a favorite
Vidor - almost made my list, I need to see more; one of Hollywood's most underrated
Vigo - don't love the few he's made enough for him to be a favorite, though I very much appreciate his approach and influence
Wakins - liked the few I've seen okay, but not a favorite; would like to see The Commune though
Wenders - haven't seen anything I've loved except The American Friend, weird vacillation between artsy and corny
Wyler - more than competent, less than inspired

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#28

Post by RedHawk10 » May 8th, 2020, 1:04 am

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 11:42 pm

Maddin - wow, two people on this thread alone have him in their top 10
Funny thing is I'm pretty sure OldAle was my first exposure to hearing about Maddin back in the IMDb days (which, as a young teenager first getting really into film, was my gateway to a lot of cool stuff I wouldn't have heard of otherwise - we all know the FG board was literally not moderated and there was a ton of nonsense on there daily, but it holds a special place in my heart for the kind of thing I said). He's one of the guys whose taste's closest to mine, and he was clearly very knowledgeable about film, so that combined with the premise of a lot of Maddin's stuff really interested me.

Cool take on the Eisenstein and rap thing...I definitely get what you mean there, though I never thought about it that way.

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#29

Post by prodigalgodson » May 8th, 2020, 1:30 am

RedHawk10 wrote:
May 8th, 2020, 1:04 am
prodigalgodson wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 11:42 pm

Maddin - wow, two people on this thread alone have him in their top 10
Funny thing is I'm pretty sure OldAle was my first exposure to hearing about Maddin back in the IMDb days (which, as a young teenager first getting really into film, was my gateway to a lot of cool stuff I wouldn't have heard of otherwise - we all know the FG board was literally not moderated and there was a ton of nonsense on there daily, but it holds a special place in my heart for the kind of thing I said). He's one of the guys whose taste's closest to mine, and he was clearly very knowledgeable about film, so that combined with the premise of a lot of Maddin's stuff really interested me.

Cool take on the Eisenstein and rap thing...I definitely get what you mean there, though I never thought about it that way.
Ah yeah, I think he and tosser were Maddin's biggest champions on there. And yeah, FG definitely played a huge role in the development of my interests.

I watched October recently and it struck me vividly how similar the approach to association of ideas was.

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#30

Post by matthewscott8 » May 8th, 2020, 1:14 pm

Nice to see a new version of this list.

Where is Demy? Where is fun? This list in aggregate feels a little over-serious. What about Billy Wilder? Let the ladies in, Varda for one seems like a director you would like, Danièle Huillet is lonely. Kelly Reichardt, Marguerite Duras?
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
24. Luchino Visconti (The Leopard, Senso, Death in Venice)
A Conversation Piece and Ludwig >>>> Senso
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
25. Stanley Kubrick (Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Dr. Strangelove)
Obviously, but maybe Clockwork Orange, 2001 and Eyes Wide Shut >>> Dr Strangelove?
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
26. Dziga Vertov (Enthusiasm, Kinoweek, Kinoglaz)
This is a healthy sign on a list, cinema for cinema's sake, you are in the right place.
27. Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Berlin Alexanderplatz, Satan’s Brew, World on a Wire)
Acht Stunden is pretty sweet, have you seen that one? Big hype train last couple of years, just got canonized into DtC. Rereleased into cinemas and onto Bluray couple of years back.I never really see world on a wire as Fassbinder's. Who had more creative input on it, him or Ballhaus, Ballhaus for my money.
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
30. Peter Hutton (Images of Asian Music, Time and Tide, At Sea)
Hutton but not Benning? I like the dude a lot too.
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
32. Michelangelo Antonioni (L’avventura, Zabriskie Point, The Passenger)
Did you ever see The Mystery of Oberwald? Very different compared to his canonical stuff, but :wub:
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
42. Ethan and Joel Coen (The Big Lebowski, A Serious Man, No Country for Old Men)
Have you seen Inside Llewyn Davis? I get more interested in these guys as they mature. Llewyn Davis actually changed my life. Really helpful for me thinking about mindfulness.
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
44. Sam Peckinpah (Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, The Wild Bunch, Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia)
Have you seen Major Dundee? I get different kicks from the different cuts, I love it.
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
46. Max Ophuls (Madame de…, Lola Montes, Letter from an Unknown Woman)
La Ronde is not included in his top three films :blink:
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
48. Kenneth Anger (Lucifer Rising, Scorpio Rising, Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome)
I would probs swap out Scorpio Rising for Fireworks, but yeah he is fonky.

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#31

Post by matthewscott8 » May 8th, 2020, 1:50 pm

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 11:42 pm
Ford - enormously talented and influential, but I don't always dig his sensibilities
This is the big problem with Ford, he was an asshole.

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#32

Post by St. Gloede » May 8th, 2020, 2:56 pm

Not comments on my list, but I have yet to be able to find a proper Italian version of Conversation Piece ...

Will definitely shortlist The Mystery of Oberwald, though I really didn't care for his next film, Identification of a Woman. I have very mixed reactions to Antonioni in general, though L’avventuraand Blowup are among my favourites.

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#33

Post by matthewscott8 » May 8th, 2020, 9:44 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
May 8th, 2020, 2:56 pm
Not comments on my list, but I have yet to be able to find a proper Italian version of Conversation Piece ...

Will definitely shortlist The Mystery of Oberwald, though I really didn't care for his next film, Identification of a Woman. I have very mixed reactions to Antonioni in general, though L’avventuraand Blowup are among my favourites.
Oberwald is a one off experiment. Identification of a woman went back to more familiar territory. Shot in video as well. An orchid.

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#34

Post by Onderhond » May 8th, 2020, 9:58 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
May 1st, 2020, 8:27 pm
My list: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls000238472/
Not surprised there isn't much overlap, from the ones we do share I often like your worst-rated movie best (like Kar-Wai). But we do share a favorite for Miike, which is nice.

The overlap: Kar-Wai Wong, Ming-liang Tsai, Lars von Trier, Paul Thomas Anderson, David Lynch, Wes Anderson, Ki-duk Kim, Sion Sono, Hayao Miyazaki, Darren Aronofsky, Takashi Miike.
Biggest disappointment from your list: I would've said Spielberg, but then you also included Clint Eastwood.

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#35

Post by matthewscott8 » May 9th, 2020, 12:11 am

Onderhond wrote:
May 8th, 2020, 9:58 pm
St. Gloede wrote:
May 1st, 2020, 8:27 pm
My list: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls000238472/
Not surprised there isn't much overlap, from the ones we do share I often like your worst-rated movie best (like Kar-Wai). But we do share a favorite for Miike, which is nice.

The overlap: Kar-Wai Wong, Ming-liang Tsai, Lars von Trier, Paul Thomas Anderson, David Lynch, Wes Anderson, Ki-duk Kim, Sion Sono, Hayao Miyazaki, Darren Aronofsky, Takashi Miike.
Biggest disappointment from your list: I would've said Spielberg, but then you also included Clint Eastwood.
Maybe there's a third Miike appreciation angle, I love Ley Lines, Rainy Dog and especially Shinjuku Triad Society, his so-called Black Society trilogy.

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#36

Post by PGonzalez » May 9th, 2020, 1:59 am

Onderhond wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 10:40 am
11. 4.10*/14 - SABU/Hiroyuki Tanaka: the reason I'm doing 11 is because Tanaka is my number 11. I don't know what went wrong for him, but his films have so much broad appeal that I simply cannot understand why he isn't better known internationally. I know France and Germany regularly have his films out on DVD, which is even more frustrating because my German/French isn't good enough for that. He makes amazing films, apart from a somewhat slow start he's made one superb film after another, offering great variation, a clear signature and many memorable scenes. Can't wait until he gets the credits he deserves.
I've never seen any of his films, but I'm really hoping to finally be able to soon. My hometown of Porto (I have been away for three years now, but hopefully I'll be back soon) has a yearly festival called Fantasporto that screens pretty much everything he makes; unfortunately I was never able to attend any of his screenings, in early years because I wasn't much into horror and later on because the scheduling didn't work out, but his films are always some of the most eagerly awaited. He has even received the Grand Prix for Miss Zombie (incidentally, it's probably the festival with previous winners that most seem to align with your taste.)

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#37

Post by prodigalgodson » May 9th, 2020, 4:06 am

matthewscott8 wrote:
May 8th, 2020, 1:14 pm
Nice to see a new version of this list.

Where is Demy? Where is fun? This list in aggregate feels a little over-serious. What about Billy Wilder? Let the ladies in, Varda for one seems like a director you would like, Danièle Huillet is lonely. Kelly Reichardt, Marguerite Duras?
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
24. Luchino Visconti (The Leopard, Senso, Death in Venice)
A Conversation Piece and Ludwig >>>> Senso
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
25. Stanley Kubrick (Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Dr. Strangelove)
Obviously, but maybe Clockwork Orange, 2001 and Eyes Wide Shut >>> Dr Strangelove?
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
26. Dziga Vertov (Enthusiasm, Kinoweek, Kinoglaz)
This is a healthy sign on a list, cinema for cinema's sake, you are in the right place.
27. Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Berlin Alexanderplatz, Satan’s Brew, World on a Wire)
Acht Stunden is pretty sweet, have you seen that one? Big hype train last couple of years, just got canonized into DtC. Rereleased into cinemas and onto Bluray couple of years back.I never really see world on a wire as Fassbinder's. Who had more creative input on it, him or Ballhaus, Ballhaus for my money.
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
30. Peter Hutton (Images of Asian Music, Time and Tide, At Sea)
Hutton but not Benning? I like the dude a lot too.
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
32. Michelangelo Antonioni (L’avventura, Zabriskie Point, The Passenger)
Did you ever see The Mystery of Oberwald? Very different compared to his canonical stuff, but :wub:
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
42. Ethan and Joel Coen (The Big Lebowski, A Serious Man, No Country for Old Men)
Have you seen Inside Llewyn Davis? I get more interested in these guys as they mature. Llewyn Davis actually changed my life. Really helpful for me thinking about mindfulness.
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
44. Sam Peckinpah (Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, The Wild Bunch, Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia)
Have you seen Major Dundee? I get different kicks from the different cuts, I love it.
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
46. Max Ophuls (Madame de…, Lola Montes, Letter from an Unknown Woman)
La Ronde is not included in his top three films :blink:
prodigalgodson wrote:
April 30th, 2020, 5:29 am
48. Kenneth Anger (Lucifer Rising, Scorpio Rising, Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome)
I would probs swap out Scorpio Rising for Fireworks, but yeah he is fonky.
Yeeah, the Matthew commentary!

Re: fun, I remember you making a similar comment on my list of favorite movies in the ago with regards to humor, and I've given it a lot of thought over the years. My tautological conclusion is that as much as I love laughing and good times, movies that focus on trying to convey that usually don't hit me like the stuff from these guys (I'd argue that a lot of them have a good sense of dry humor, but that's not exactly the same kind of fun). If I made a list of favorite TV shows, most of them would be comedies, and I love stand up comedy, but I don't really consider the specials I watch to be films (maybe that's an arbitrary distinction). But a list of films or books is not gonna be dominated by comedy, probably has to do both with my sensibilities and the fact that most of the people who (imo) have contributed the most to the medium haven't been overtly comedically inclined. Needless to say, I do find watching films by these directors fun in a way, but I know what you mean, they're not exactly rip-roaring good times for the most part.

Re: women, I know, I know, it's not a good look. Lynne Ramsay was probably closest to making the list. Varda was also close, but there's something, how to put it, a little cloying about her sensibilities overall to me. My favorites, Vagabond, Le bonheur, and Cleo don't exhibit this, but her shorts, La Pointe Court, and especially The Gleaners and I do. Maybe that's a basic read? I definitely want to see more though, and revisit some. India Song is one of my favorite movies, but other than that I've only seen one short from Duras, something I'd love to remedy -- I wish her stuff was more widely available, still bummed SMz went down. (I also love Duras as a writer. I had a one night stand a few years ago call me out for not having any women on my bookshelf. I was like, what about Duras? And she was like, what, one author? I was embarrassed and since then have tried to remedy that, and though I have a long way to go, Middlemarch has now replaced Gravity's Rainbow as my favorite book.) I've only seen Meek's Cutoff from Reichardt, but River of Grass and Wendy and Lucy are leaving the Criterion streaming service at the end of the month, and I'm definitely planning to watch those. Other than Duras, Lucrecia Martel and Claire Denis seem the most up my alley, and I definitely need to see more from them both.

Demy - only seen Cherbourg and Rochefort, like the former but not as much as when I was younger, the latter didn't do much for me; I'll gladly take any recommendations though
Wilder - I love The Apartment and Ace in the Hole, haven't seen much else that's stood out, though he's definitely more than competent
Visconti - he made it farthest on this list with fewest seen, only 5, and Ludwig and Conversation Piece on both on that to-watch list, but Senso blew me away recently
Kubrick - hey, Strangelove's the most fun movie I have on here (well, after Lebowski); Eyes Wide Shut would've been in the top 3 if I hadn't rewatched it and liked it less a while ago, A Clockwork Orange is something else, great stuff but maybe would benefit from a rewatch
Fassbinder - haven't seen Eight Hours but want to! I missed the touring print; World on a Wire is probably the aesthetic high point of their collaboration, but it doesn't feel like a cinematographer's movie the way Petra von Kant does; you might like it, it's thrilling, highly watchable, and vaguely philosophically substantive in a proto-Matrix way
Benning - only seen El Valley Centro to my shame!
Coens - didn't know Llewyn Davis meant that much to you, but yeah, it's easily the best thing they made in the last decade; they've made a lot of really good movies in their careers, damn
Peckinpah - I have, maybe on your recommendation, and I must've loved it since I rated it a 9, but unfortunately I don't remember it well at all; maybe time to check out an alternate cut :D
Ophuls - indeed it's not; funny story with La ronde, it's the first of his I saw and I loved it, but I remembered it having a perfect tragic ending which I think I somehow copied and pasted from Rossellini's Paisan, so when I saw it the second time at a retrospective I was disappointed and confused, haha

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#38

Post by prodigalgodson » May 9th, 2020, 5:37 am

Gloede's favorites (skipping over redundancies from my and other lists I've already commented on):

Godard - interesting rankings, haven't seen either of your top two (started Prenom Carmen at some point)
Pasolini - wow, forgotten you were such a fan
Haneke - I love Cache and The White Ribbon and would love to see more, his style seems like it might be a bit clinical for me though
Yoshida - seen absolutely none, and I really should at least watch those top 2
Maddin - damn, in your top ten too?! FG must've been the most avid collection of Maddin fans in the world
Wong - he's carved out a cool flashy-meets-classy metropolitan niche, but I often find his work hard to connect to; after a slightly disappointing rewatch of In the Mood for Love, Days of Being Wild is easily my favorite followed by Chungking Express
Okamoto - only seen Sword of Doom; I loved the style but found it hard to follow and it definitely feels unfinished, as it would; I'll check out Mr. Everyman
Melville - I like how his IMDb description goes into ridiculous detail about how he's not the author lol; much like Wong I like his style but have trouble connecting with his work, Bob le flambeur's easily my favorite followed by Le cercle rouge
Tsai - could see him becoming a favorite despite some misses; I'd like to see more, but I love Rebels of the Neon God especially (probably helps it's the only one I've seen in a theater)
von Trier - hadn't been crazy about the few I'd seen, but Dogville blew me away recently and I want to see more, definitely like how he keeps pushing
Fellini - surprised he wasn't on Ale's top 100; falls into the same category as Ford, Hitchcock, and Kurosawa for me -- enormous influence and originality, a few favorites, but overall just not that much up my alley
Malick - mixed bag, though The New World's one of my favorites ever and I loved A Hidden Life last year; my biggest gripe with him is editorial, I think we just have a very different sense of cinematic rhythm
Fassbinder - wow, never seen Chinese Roulette as a favorite, I'll have to check that one out
Robbe-Grillet - yikes, still haven't seen any!; forgot about this guy
Kazan - snooze
Coppola - only seen the big four (plus part III), might be a favorite if I see more, feel like I still don't have a good sense of him as a director
Huston - like him a lot (though not Wise Blood at all, despite having seen it twice); not quite a favorite, but wouldn't mind seeing more
Peckinpah - nice top 3 ;)
W. Anderson - like him, but not a favorite; Moonrise Kingdom's by far my fave
Forman - snooze
Szabo - haven't seen any or much Hungarian cinema in general
Kim - interesting choice for top Korean; I've only seen a few, which I liked, but I'd need to see more before making any sweeping claims
Bertolucci - The Conformist is incredible, but everything else I've seen suggests it was a bit of a fluke; still want to see The Sheltering Sky though
Carne - seen a handful, none of which I've loved, but I do like his poetic sensibility and I'd like to give Children of Paradise another go for sure
Fabri - haven't seen any and don't think I've ever heard of him
De Sica - only seen the big 2, which I thought were fun but he doesn't seem like a potential favorite
Roeg - wouldn't mind seeing more, dig his off-the-wall sensibilities
Techine - only seen Wild Reeds, which I didn't like much but remember had some interesting directorial elements
Russell - only seen The Devil and Tommy, doesn't seem like quite my kind of crazy but I respect his crazy lol
Mankiewizc - Rivette's definition of mise en scene as what's lacking in the films of Joe Mankiewizc slays me, this dude is blandsville
Lumet - hesitate to say overrated, but I have yet to be terribly impressed
Curtiz - snooze, though Casablanca's a magnificent fluke
Frankenheimer - dig his style, wouldn't mind seeing more
Malle - love a couple of the few I've seen (especially Elevator to the Gallows), but doesn't seem like favorite material
Aronofsky - hell no
Costa-Gravas - only seen Z, which was cool
Schatzberg - only seen your two favorites, don't like either, but we don't have to get back into that ;)
Dolan - since Ale's MIA, any recs?
Cronenberg - nice to see a Cosmopolis fan, but Maps to the Stars was godawful imo
Jakubisko - never heard of him, what's he like/any recs?
Litvak - nothing I've seen so far bespeaks particular inspiration
Truffaut - the most mainstream and generally least impressive New Wave cat I've seen, though I do love some of his stuff and would like to see many more
Park - talented and fun, but not a favorite
Svankmajer - doesn't quite jibe with me, but do you zaddy
Lean - I've loved the three I've seen, and should watch more, though I have a hunch his overall style's gonna seem a bit stodgy to me
Duvivier - ooh, haven't seen any, though being such a noir fan I'm ashamed
Rohmer - interesting, you have some of my favorites near the bottom and least favorites near the top
Hartley - only seen 1 short, should rectify that!
Ichikawa - only seen Fires on the Plain and Burmese Harp, both solid films and stylistically sharp, I'm sure I'll get around to more
Miike - seems like a competent and certainly prolific peddler of offbeat entertainment, but I find the few I've seen feel a bit hollow
Allen - great writer, able director, not a favorite
Reed - I'm a fan and share your top 3 (different order), wish he had more scripts like The Third Man to work with
Kachyna - you're really highlighting my Slavic shortcomings, haha; haven't seen/heard of any
Syderberg - haven't seen any but Hitler's a priority, remember it was in Sy's top 5
S. Ray - interesting favorites, haven't seen most of them
N. Ray - it's hard not to rank them together right? :P Johhny Guitar that low though'? :(
Fincher - one of the better Hollywood directors working now, but that's a looow bar
Greenaway - seen a handful recently, doesn't seem like quite my cup of tea but I appreciate him
Jires - can't believe I still haven't seen Valerie
Makavejev - I'll get around to WR, but I'm not in a huge rush
Kobayashi - The Human Condition was my favorite film at one point, but I haven't seen enough others to really judge
Zinnemann - actually think he's a pretty actively poor director
Haynes - doesn't scratch the itch for me, though I'd like to see I'm Not There again
Waters - remembered you're a champion of his; want to watch at least 1 or 2 eventually

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prodigalgodson
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#39

Post by prodigalgodson » May 9th, 2020, 6:01 am

Onderhond wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 10:40 am
Guess I could post my own top 10 (with some comments).

01. 3.86*/23 - Mamoru Oshii: Not just the director with the most 5* ratings for me, also the director who made the most films that played a pivotal role in my growth as a film fan. Namely Ghost in the Shell, Avalon and Angel's Egg all played their part opening up new parts of cinema to me. What I love about Oshii is that he's often seen as a more serious director, but he also is great with comedy (Mini-Pato, The Red Spectacles, Talking Head). Apart from that his aesthetic sensibilities are amazing. I wouldn't say he's the perfect director for me (ultimately I prefer chaos over tranquility), but between those two he's the one that gets closest to perfection for me.

02. 3.43*/82 - Takashi Miike: I like to be surprised and who better than Miike to make that happen. He has worked in virtually every niche and genre, and always manages to do something different or add something of his own. He's also directed quite a bit of mediocre stuff, but the good films easily cancel that out. One of the very few directors who can make me laugh out loud.

03. 3.89*/19 - Shinya Tsukamoto: Tetsuo was a landmark for me, it's stuff like this that I love for. Tsukamoto has everything to be my favorite director, except that he's still somewhat stuck in the 80s/90s and never managed to upgrade his particular style of film making to a more contemporary level. I still love a lot of what he does, simply because he's still one of the few doing what he does (raw soundtracks, hyperediting, strong genre elements), it's just that I see an unfulfilled potential there that is hard to ignore.

04. 4.08*/06 - Gaspar Noé: But it's really the combo with Benoit Debie that makes it great for me. Debie is by far my favorite cinematographer and coupled with Noé's dark sensibilities it makes for amazing, visceral cinema. Not very subtle, but subtlety is not something I see as essential (though it sure has beauty in its own right). The only reason he doesn't have the highest average of the directors listed here is because the other shorts in the Destricted anthology brought it down for him.

05. 4.10*/19 - Takeshi Kitano: Love Kitano's quirky comedy, especially in combination with the slightly harsher elements in his work. He's made very few stinkers and has kept a pretty consistent level of quality throughout the years, the reason why he isn't higher is because he's only made one true masterpiece. Dolls really is the stand-out for me, a stylistic marvel that showcases Kitano's unique sense of pacing and editing.

06. 4.06*/08 - Kôji Morimoto: Probably the least known of the bunch, no doubt because he mostly works on shorter films. Luckily there are plenty of great anime anthologies and as the co(?)-founder of Studio 4°C he's had most of his films included in them. Has an amazing sense of style, pushes technical boundaries like no other and also makes great use of soundtracks. Together with Oshii's Tenshi no Tamago, Noiseman is the only unsubbed Japanese DVD I own. It cost crazy much for a 10-minute short, but it was so worth it.

07. 4.83*/03 - Hiroshi Ishikawa: Doesn't make many films, but he makes them count. The funny thing is that Ishikawa comes from the world of advertising, but his films are the polar opposite of commercials. Slow and extremely subtle, but with a warmth underneath them I haven't found anywhere else. You have to be able to stand the typical stilted Japanese acting though, but that's just part of the subtlety and appeal to me. Grossly overlooked, then again his work isn't very commercial. Not sure why he doesn't do better in the festival circuit though.

08. 3.85*/17 - Gakuryû Ishii: Rebranded himself a couple of times already (formerly known as Sogo Ishii), which makes it a little hard to pin him down. His most famous work falls into the category of Tsukamoto, but he's also made calmer, more introspective films. Or quirkier, light-hearted ones. Always with a very unique sense of style though, and great use of music.

09. 4.37*/04 - Hitoshi Matsumoto: Kitano's rival. Turns out he's also pretty great at making films. Symbol is his most famous one, but his other work is hilarious too. It's a shame he kinda disappeared from the stage, then again these guys have so many things going on that it's a surprise he even managed to make 4 films. Favorite scene from his work is Matsumoto standing in giant underpants, waiting for his big Kaiju transformation to happen. Comedy doesn't get much drier than that.

10. 3.28*/33 - Sion Sono: As much as I love some of his work and as much as I know he hates the comparison, I still feel like he's trailing Miike. Somehow these two will forever be connected, even though there are as many differences as there are similarities. When it comes to raw originality though, I think Miike is still the clear winner, which is why he's higher up my ranking.

11. 4.10*/14 - SABU/Hiroyuki Tanaka: the reason I'm doing 11 is because Tanaka is my number 11. I don't know what went wrong for him, but his films have so much broad appeal that I simply cannot understand why he isn't better known internationally. I know France and Germany regularly have his films out on DVD, which is even more frustrating because my German/French isn't good enough for that. He makes amazing films, apart from a somewhat slow start he's made one superb film after another, offering great variation, a clear signature and many memorable scenes. Can't wait until he gets the credits he deserves.
Thanks for the list and write-ups. I've only seen the usual suspects but some of these guys sound intriguing!

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#40

Post by Onderhond » May 9th, 2020, 7:45 am

matthewscott8 wrote:
May 9th, 2020, 12:11 am
Maybe there's a third Miike appreciation angle, I love Ley Lines, Rainy Dog and especially Shinjuku Triad Society, his so-called Black Society trilogy.
You must check The Bird People in China then, should also be along those lines. Or a film like Shangri-La.
I actually think there's probably more than three appreciation angles to Miike, which is at least why I have him so high up my list. :)
PGonzalez wrote:
May 9th, 2020, 1:59 am
I've never seen any of his films, but I'm really hoping to finally be able to soon. My hometown of Porto (I have been away for three years now, but hopefully I'll be back soon) has a yearly festival called Fantasporto that screens pretty much everything he makes; unfortunately I was never able to attend any of his screenings, in early years because I wasn't much into horror and later on because the scheduling didn't work out, but his films are always some of the most eagerly awaited. He has even received the Grand Prix for Miss Zombie (incidentally, it's probably the festival with previous winners that most seem to align with your taste.)
He's a big BIFFF favorite too. SABU/Tanaka isn't a horror director btw. Miss Zombie is the only horror film he directed so far, and it's more on the arthouse side of horror. Tanaka swims around in comedy/crime and drama cinema, often mixing several genres at once to create something quirky and fun. Only reason I can think of that his films can't reach a broader audience is because they often tend to wander a bit. I love that about them, but because of that they never feel quite tight or cohesive on a narrative level.

Fantasporto is cool btw. Last Sunrise won there last year. Lovely film, very pleasant director too!

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