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Something is changing at the Oscars in the 2010's

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cinewest
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Something is changing at the Oscars in the 2010's

#1

Post by cinewest » February 25th, 2020, 5:28 pm

No, I 'm not referring to the award presentation being without a host for the second straight year, but rather about the creeping takeover of the Academy Awards by bunch of foreigners.

Parasite may he been the first foreign language Best Picture winner where a language other than English was spoken for 2 hours, but this "takeover" has some insidious roots.

Does anyone remember the best picture winner at the beginning of the decade, in 2011? A French film called The Artist, which may have fooled you because nobody spoke a word in this very forgettable tribute to silent cinema. Somehow the academy overlooked Tree of Life, which is the only memorable film that they nominated even though they have gone to 8-10 nominations since 2009.

It probably should have happened again in 2012 with Amour, which was nominated, but they gave it instead to a forgettable movie about an American diplomatic team's escape from Iran in the 1970's, in the process holding true to one of the Academy's favorite staples: re-encatments of historical incidents.

The Oscar for best picture in 2013 went to a Brit (just as it had in 2010), but also stealthily marked the beginning of a creeping insurgency from south of the border by the 3 amigos (4 if you include Terrence Malick's cinematographer). If you don't know what I'm taking about.

The 2014 winner? Ok it wasn't a film in a foreign language, but need I say 3 Amigos?

2015 marks a return to that awards staple- the re-enactment of a historical incident, but one of the 3 amigos is close again with a nomination.

The 2016 best picture might as well have been given to foreign language film since it was a small indie about a gay African American.

2017: Won by one of the 3 amigos, who also has a few things in common, stylistically with the director of Parasite.

2018: Returned to a hollywood staple- the white/black quasi buddy movie (based on a real story) with societal lessons about race relations that have been rehashed for years and years. Hate to say it, but one of the 3 amigos should have won in 2018, or at least the Greek guy who made the British film.

2019: Finally, FL takeover complete with the award going to the South Korean Parasite, which I enjoyed, but which is getting far too many plaudits, now, If Tarantino only had something meaningful to say, he could be Bong Joon-Ho. And if only something really outstanding were nominated, Parasite wouldn't have seemed like the only choice.

Is this the beginning of the end, or does America / Hollywood retake their Awards program and entertainment medium it has dominated for that last 100 years?

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#2

Post by St. Gloede » February 25th, 2020, 6:16 pm

It must really sting that when you look at the 10 last best director winners only one of them was (half) American.

For comparison 6/10 were American in the 00s and 8/10 were American in the 90s.

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#3

Post by cinewest » February 26th, 2020, 1:00 am

St. Gloede wrote:
February 25th, 2020, 6:16 pm
It must really sting that when you look at the 10 last best director winners only one of them was (half) American.

For comparison 6/10 were American in the 00s and 8/10 were American in the 90s.
Wow, it's worse than I thought.

Maybe, they'll get around to what the British do. They have a "best film" category, a "Best British Film," and a "Best foreign language film," and presumably the same film could win in two of those categories.

Now, if the film body in question could only get around to acknowledging the year's best films, starting with the nomination process rather than those heavily promoted for awards by the film industry. In that respect, I suppose that Moonlight ( a small indie) was as big a coup as Parasite, though as we can see, these winners were anticipated a few years ago.

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#4

Post by DareDaniel » March 5th, 2020, 5:01 pm

Lol this thread reminds me of this.


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cinewest
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#5

Post by cinewest » March 6th, 2020, 10:21 am

DareDaniel wrote:
March 5th, 2020, 5:01 pm
Lol this thread reminds me of this.

This guy is an idiot, who can’t even make a logical argument to make his point. In fact, he undermines his own argument when he says, “it isn’t like we have category for Best United States Film,” because that’s exactly what he is arguing the Best Picture category should be.
If he wants to say that it’s unfair for a film to be nominated in two categories then he should just say that, and not get caught up in “foreign” versus “American.”

One of the big problems with Americans is that they are often full of their own uneducated opinions, not only because they believe they have a right to be, but because they actually believe their opinions are as important as anyone else’s, even if they completely ignore the facts, and sound critical reasoning. In fact, that is a big reason why Donald Trump became president.
Last edited by cinewest on March 6th, 2020, 1:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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#6

Post by albajos » March 6th, 2020, 10:36 am

How many british movies have won over the years? Some Americans wouldn't even know they are british simply because they don't have subtitles.

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#7

Post by St. Gloede » March 6th, 2020, 12:10 pm

albajos wrote:
March 6th, 2020, 10:36 am
How many british movies have won over the years? Some Americans wouldn't even know they are british simply because they don't have subtitles.
As far as I can tell 8, excluding US/UK co-productions, many US productions, like Braveheart, Mrs. Miniver, etc. were also set in Britain.

Do note though that The King's Speech was the only British film to win in the last 30 years (Shakespeare in Love was a US/UK co-production), and that over half are from the 60s.

The British winners:

The King's Speech
The Last Emperor (Italian co-production)
Chariots of Fire
Gandhi
Oliver!
A Man for All Seasons
Tom Jones
Lawrence of Arabia

(Let me know if I missed anything).

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#8

Post by Teproc » March 6th, 2020, 12:19 pm

Surely Olivier's Hamlet should count. If you missed it I guess it's a co-production, but still.

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#9

Post by albajos » March 6th, 2020, 12:41 pm

Yes, I would add Hamlet, and remove The Last Emperor (international co-production - 3 or 4 countries, I think)

If you wont allow The Bridge over River Kwai because it's co-prod, then The Last Emperor should not be allowed either

--

But british movies has won big in the other categories as well. The Darkest Hour won for best actor etc

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#10

Post by cinewest » March 6th, 2020, 1:38 pm

Historically, It has been very common for at least 1 British film to be nominated every year, which fits with the “high minded” importance Best Picture nominations are supposed to have.
You can also usually count on movies about historical events or people and literary adaptations, and every year there seems to be an issue that becomes topical ( not always a movie’s theme, but at times something to do with a film production).
Oddly enough, Parasite had none of this going for it, and somehow just picked up a swell of support at the right time, at least in part because no other film could capture the committee’s attention by voting time.
As I said earlier, I think the win by Moonlight was just as much of a groundbreaker for various reasons.

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#11

Post by St. Gloede » March 6th, 2020, 1:40 pm

Oh yes, completely missed Hamlet! The Bridge of the River Kwai can be included as well, it is clearly more British than American.

*The Last Emperor was included because it was not a US co-production, that was the disqualifying mark I set given the topic of US supremacy.

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#12

Post by Lonewolf2003 » March 6th, 2020, 1:44 pm

cinewest wrote:
March 6th, 2020, 1:38 pm
Historically, It has been very common for at least 1 British film to be nominated every year, which fits with the “high minded” importance Best Picture nominations are supposed to have.
You can also usually count on movies about historical events or people and literary adaptations, and every year there seems to be an issue that becomes topical ( not always a movie’s theme, but at times something to do with a film production).
Oddly enough, Parasite had none of this going for it, and somehow just picked up a swell of support at the right time, at least in part because no other film could capture the committee’s attention by voting time.
As I said earlier, I think the win by Moonlight was just as much of a groundbreaker for various reasons.
What do you mean? Parasite got a lot of traction because it deals with a topical issue; "social-economical injustice". Without that it would never have won.

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#13

Post by cinewest » March 6th, 2020, 1:50 pm

@Lonewolf,

There are a lot of films about social issues that do well, which is covered by my “topical issue” reason, but I wasn’t aware that this issue was really in the limelight this Oscar season.

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