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Which films Did You See Last Week? 30/06/19 - 06/07/19

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sol
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Which films Did You See Last Week? 30/06/19 - 06/07/19

#1

Post by sol » July 7th, 2019, 12:00 pm

Which Films Did You See Last Week?

Please share with us which films you saw last week. It would be great if you could include some comments on each film. It would be awesome if you could also take some time to comment on everyone else's viewings (if you're like me, "real life" sometimes gets in the way, so no need to feel obliged).

This is what I saw:

★★★★ = loved it /// ★★★ = liked it a lot; ~7/10 /// ★★ = has interesting elements; ~6/10 /// ★ = did very little for me; ~5/10 and lower

Innocence Unprotected (1968). Dusan Makavejev interviews the cast and crew of a Serbian film released but then withdrawn from circulation during the Nazi occupation of Belgrade in this unusual documentary. In addition to interviews, Makavejev splices in footage of the 1940s film at increasingly random points, toying with the order of the action at times and occasionally hand-tinting certain frames. The film's acrobat lead actor also re-performs many of his stunts from the film, and the stunts themselves are quite amazing feats of balance and human strength. As a hardly straightforward documentary, the film provides a limited insight into the controversy the film sparked (as a non-German approved movie) and the background of the acrobat, but we do get to see him eat an entire meal on fast-forward, among other things, in this daring different movie. (first viewing, DVD) ★★

Lifespan (1975). Thinking of "ageing as a disease" that can be cured, an ambitious doctor tries to carry on the research of a colleague who committed suicide in this intriguing Dutch thriller. The film is full of philosophical quips and ramblings with the idea of Transcendence style "electronic reincarnation" floated in addition to thoughts about ageing and how it might be due to radiation and other factors that can be controlled. The film is significantly marred though by an overuse of voice-over narration that spells out the obvious and says things better left shown, e.g. "tomorrow she said that" rather than a scene of a character talking. The film also includes a romantic subplot that goes nowhere. A mysterious Klaus Kinski is as great ever though, the ideas are generally cool, and abrupt as the ending is, the final line actually makes it a pitch perfect note to end on. (first viewing, online) ★★★

Gymkata (1985). Circumstance lead to an Olympic athlete combining his gymnastics and martial arts training in a dangerous game in a foreign country in this action thriller from Enter the Dragon director Robert Clouse. The storyline is ridiculous - and an insanely elaborate given that the film is built mostly around its stunts and set pieces. This is pretty entertaining though for all its drawbacks. The stunts are as impressive as those in Enter the Dragon with Kurt Thomas flipping around in the air in every angle, jumping and kicking two different baddies at once, swinging on poles and so on. The urban locations are amazing too with the film shot in creepy-looking ancient cities in Yugoslavia. There is also quite a bit of imagination to such sequences as Thomas having to travel through a village where the country's bloodthirsty, insane residents are kept. (first viewing, VHS) ★★

Arena (1989). Described by some as "Rocky in space", this quirky movie circles around a human waiter roped into wrestling in an intergalactic arena against alien monsters. The film benefits from elaborate sets on a budget and some of the monsters (especially one that looks like a giant praying mantis) are wildly imaginative and well crafted, even if the humanoid ones are dull. For a film about wrestling though, we see very little action. It is a 35 minute wait after the opening sequence before we see our next arena fight, and awesome as it is, there is only one other arena fight before the film ends! What is more, in between the fights all that we get are typical scheming antagonists, a dull romance (or two) and lengthy song numbers. Hamilton Camp doing his best Peter Falk impression is a lot of fun though as the protagonist's four-handed best friend. (first viewing, online) ★

Anaconda (1997). Hired to make a documentary about a long-lost Amazonian tribe, a film crew pick up a stranded man en route who tries to convince them to make a movie about the large local snakes instead in this big budget thriller. Jon Voight seems so devious throughout as the stranded stranger that it is surprising that it takes them so long to realise that he might have a hidden agenda regarding the snakes, but this is a decent ride while it lasts. The CGI snake special effects are very good with the extreme speed of the creature more impressive than its looks, and there are some great shots of it digesting whole bodies and plummeting through the air to catch victims, plus a cool shot from inside its throat. The rest of the film is less impressive with characters barely fleshed out beyond plot function, but once the snake action begins, it nicely seldom lets up. (first viewing, online) ★★

Twilight (2008). Returning to her hometown after more than a decade away, a teenager becomes fascinated by her mysterious male lab partner who may or may not have supernatural powers in this high school drama with a fantasy twist. The film has been denigrated for tapping into the teen girl fan market and between the useless voice-over narration and less-than-stellar performances, Twilight is certainly not a great movie, but it is decent for what it is. The filmmakers build up the mysteriousness of Robert Pattinson's character well with scarce details only gradually revealed, Carter Burwell's music is appropriately moody and Catherine Hardwicke does at least try to add some visual flair, even if her angular shots ultimately come off as random. The film kind of loses its edge once all is revealed about Pattinson, but it is watchable to the end. (first viewing, Blu-ray Disc) ★★

Borgman (2013). Hunted by a violent priest for unknown reasons, a homeless man seeks shelter at an affluent couple's home where he begins to overstay his welcome in this decidedly different Dutch thriller. What initially seems likely a tame tale of an unwanted guest soon morphs into something very strange and unusual to the point that it becomes delightfully unpredictable as to what will happen next. The film concludes with a number of answered questions (perhaps too many for its own good), but by the end of the movie it becomes obvious what the title character and his mysterious friends represent even without writer-director Alex van Warmerdam explicitly stating it. The whole thing is incredibly creepy too and downright unsettling at times as we see the behaviour of all members of the affluent household altered during the course of the film. (first viewing, online) ★★★★

John Wick (2014). Embittered when the son of his former boss kills his dog and steals his car, a retired underworld hitman plots revenge in this action thriller starring Keanu Reeves. While there are some intriguing elements (Reeves having to return to the world he tried to leave behind; the boss wanting to protect his son but knowing that he screwed up), the plot is pretty basic and straightforward. The kill count also feels unjustly high to the point where it is a bit hard to root for Reeves with his path of death and destruction. And yet, the whole film is incredibly watchable thanks to breathtaking fight choreography, excellent stunts and much visual pizzazz. Neon lights are effectively in several interior scenes, most notably in a nightclub/bath house in which the oblivious discotheque patrons carry on dancing while Reeves shoots silenced bullets in the chaos. (first viewing, online) ★★★

Circle (2015). Unable to move from where they have been, fifty abducted strangers are forced to play a game in which they have to vote for who among them lives and dies in this Cube-like thriller. Shot almost entirely in a single location with negligible special effects, this is a remarkably intense motion picture. While some have been critical of how bland the film looks due to the minimalist approach, this allows the film to focus on the psychology of the characters, and it is fascinating to listen to them debate morality and ethics in such a grueling situation. The ending is not too strong here, leaving a fair bit unresolved, but the vast majority of the film works with its intimate portrait of humanity and inhumanity coming out under pressure. The sound effects are great too at drumming up suspense and the set design is appropriately eerie and daunting. (first viewing, online) ★★★★

Brimstone (2016). Divided into four chapters with the second and third parts venturing backwards in time, Brimstone manages to leave quite an indelible impact for a film that is initially confusing to view. The plot concerns a corrupt fire and brimstone preacher who has a violent history with a mute midwife - the details of which only gradually come out as the second and third chapters intensely unfold. Suffice it to say, the film takes a sharp stab at religion and religious justification while focusing on a character who (much like the preacher in The Night of the Hunter) is genuinely deluded into believing that he is carrying out the Lord's will rather than downright evil. At two and a half hours, the project drags now and then, but there are plenty of highlights along the way - most notably, the female protagonist silently helping a woman to give birth. (first viewing, DVD) ★★★

Geostorm (2017). Set in a future in which special satellites are used to regulate weather all over the planet, this disaster thriller focuses on a series of deadly malfunctions that may or may not be the result of sabotage. Thrown into the mix is Gerard Butler as the scientist who invented the satellite and the film spends far too much time developing a sibling rivalry angle when the special effects are the chief sell-point here. While some of the stunt driving scenes towards the end are a little silly, all of the disaster segments are well crafted and imaginative, with some truly breathtaking moments as Hong Kong overheats and bursts into flames, as Rio de Janeiro freezes, as lightning plagues an American freeway and the list goes on. The pseudoscience might not quite add up, but this is a fairly engaging look at climate change of the most extreme kind. (first viewing, Blu-ray Disc) ★★

The Nun (2018). Sent by the Vatican to investigate a young nun's suicide in 1950s Romania, a middle aged priest and a novice nun discover an unleashed evil spirit in this horror thriller. The film is a spin-off of the second Conjuring movie but makes sense on its own, though the story is not particularly great, consisting more of boo-moment jump scares than anything else. The film's biggest plus is the setting with plenty of dark crevices and hidden passageways at the nunnery that bring to mind The Name of the Rose; the titular evil nun is pretty creepy too, though whenever she opens her mouth, the resemblance to Pennywise from It is distracting. All in all, this is not as worthless as the low IMDb rating might cause one to expect. A number of the scares admittedly work and the period/foreign setting distinguishes this from other films of its ilk. (first viewing, online) ★★

The Resistance Banker (2018). Recounting how several individuals created a secret bank to fund resistance in Nazi-occupied Holland, this Dutch drama focuses on a slice of history seldom depicted on screen. Some of the initial ins and outs are quite interesting as they have to contend with issues like the government outlawing high value bank notes. This is not, however, a well paced film overall with more talk than action; the subject is decent enough but feels better suited to a tight-paced, urgent thriller rather than the slow melodrama that this is. The film lacks compelling characters too, which causes all of the scenes unrelated to financing (especially a romance) to fall flat. Merlijn Snitker's beautiful music suits the film well though and the period sets and costumes are fine, but this is one of those films for which the poster is better than the movie itself. (first viewing, online) ★

Murder Mystery (2019). Vacationing in Europe, two Americans inadvertently become chief suspects in a millionaire's murder in this entertaining blend of comedy, mystery and adventure elements. Reunited from Just Go with It, the chemistry between Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston is divine and there are lively supporting turns from Dany Boon and Terence Stamp. While not as character driven as the best Agatha Christie mysteries, the filmmakers manage to drum up some genuine suspense and mystery regarding who the killer is. Some of the red herrings do not quite add up, but this is a lot of fun while it lasts as the couple traverse exotic foreign landscapes and wander about eerie buildings. The jokes are a little hit-and-miss, but there are more hits than misses and the majority of dialogue flows well, especially the banter between the leads. (first viewing, online) ★★★

Parasite (2019). Circumstances bring an affluent family and an impoverished family closer together in this very dark black comedy, best entered into with as few expectations as possible. Suffice it to say, the film varies effectively from utter hilarity to nail-biting thrills and suspense as it compares and contrasts the two families in order to examine class divides and the necessity of the working classes to be parasites (as such) to the wealthier in order to survive. Also striking is how strong the bonds are between the poorer family who are happy to stick together and always support each other compared to the richer family who cannot control and only manage to suffocate their own children. The film runs a little long with a final ten minutes that could have easily been shaved, but this generally a highly immersive experience that needs to be seen for itself. (first viewing, cinema) ★★★★

OtherShow
Rock All Night (1957). Various youths and an aspiring singer hang out at a nightclub where a hostage situation develops in this low budget Roger Corman movie. For a film that clocks in at just over an hour, Rock All Night is a poorly paced affair with the hostage subplot only cropping up in the final 20 minutes. There is admittedly real tension with this angle, but the first two thirds of the film feel like mindless filler as we are treated to what is basically a continuous string of song performances. It is eight minutes in before there is even a break in the singing, and even then the breaks only provide the sketchiest insight into what the characters are like and how they tick as individuals. On the plus side, the songs are very decent, but The Petrified Forest the film is not -- though it could have been a nifty tribute with less songs and more characterisation. (first viewing, online) ★

Wait Until Spring, Bandini (1989). Discovering "a way around it" via confessional, an adolescent boy spends a cold winter indulging in sinful thoughts, beating up his brothers and disrespecting his parents in this Belgian drama that is unfortunately never half as interesting as it sounds. Michael Bacall is fine as the young protagonist but he is never really in focus with the film spending copious time with his mother and father. The premise is never taken to the satirical extremes of something like Rosalie Goes Shopping either; in fact, it is a sobering drama for the most part. Whenever Bacall and his friends, Bacall's experiences at school and his interactions with his brothers are centre stage, this a reasonably engaging affair, but that it is not often enough for this to register as much more than a curio as a Belgian adaptation of a very American novel. (first viewing, online) ★★

De Flat (1994). Released under the title House Call overseas, this Dutch thriller focuses on a female doctor who begins a sexual relationship with a neighbour who may or may not be a serial killer. With The 4th Man's Renée Soutendijk in the lead role, this is initially rather interesting as a potential gender reversal of the Verhoeven movie, but it is nowhere near as mysterious or atmospheric. The "is he or isn't he?" dilemma also becomes tiresome as the film plods along and keeps injecting conflicting evidence. Soutendijk is very good here though grappling with some dynamite dynamics; her lover is such a great surrogate father to her kid and such a good listener that she tries her hardest to ignore evidence to the contrary, while still being morbidly curious. There is not a whole lot else driving the film, but for Soutendijk this is at least an okay watch. (first viewing, online) ★★
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#2

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » July 7th, 2019, 12:01 pm

To the Night (Peter Brunner, 2018) (theatrically) 4/10

Another Sky (Gavin Lambert, 1954) 5+/10

歌麿 夢と知りせば / Utamaro's World (実相寺昭雄/Akio Jissoji, 1977) 7+/10
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shorts

Nocturne (Philip S. Solomon/Phil Solomon, 1980) 7/10

The Exquisite Hour (Philip S. Solomon/Phil Solomon, 1994) 7/10

Anima (PTA, 2019) 8-/10

Education for Death: The Making of the Nazi (Clyde Geronimi, 1943) (2nd+ viewing) 7--/10 (from 8)


RiffTrax & MST3k

Die Sieben Männer der Sumuru / The Girl from Rio (Jess Franco/Jesús Franco, 1969) 2/10


music videos

Gesaffelstein: Reset
Gesaffelstein: PURSUIT
Gesaffelstein: "Hate or Glory"
Gesaffelstein & Pharrell Williams: Blast Off

a collective +=

257er: Holz (2016) ==

SDP feat. 257ers: Merkste selber, wa?! (2019) +=

Ed Sheeran ft. Chance the Rapper & PnB Rock: Cross Me (2019) ==

SXTN: Made 4 Love (Arabella Bartsch, 2016) +=

Lana Del Rey: Video Games (Lana Del Rey, 2011) 6/10

Lana Del Rey: Born to Die (Woodkid, 2011) (2nd viewing) 5/10

Lana Del Rey: Blue Jeans (second version) (2012) (2nd+ viewing) 6/10


didn't finish

Malpertuis (Harry Kümel, 1971) [4 min]


notable online media
top:
Dog Reaction to Magic Trick with Blanket - Funny Dog Reaction to Magic Trick Compilation
Radiohead - Street Spirit (Fade Out)
Radiohead - Creep (Best Live Performance)
Thom Yorke: ANIMA Interview
My Waking Nightmare [Seizure Warning]
rest:
[Tuturu stuff]
RADIOHEAD-CREEP//SUB [by Paul Garcia]
The Authenticity of LANA DEL REY
If I Wrote Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata
Bill Murray's American Humor Monologue - SNL
The Jeremiah Show #1: A Conversation With My 10 Year Old Self
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#3

Post by Onderhond » July 7th, 2019, 12:30 pm

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Had a week off, made the best of it. Watched a lot of good films, also had some time to catch up with a few classics. Sadly, even a week like this hardly makes a dent in my backlog.


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01. 4.0* - Love on Sunday [Koi Suru Nichiyobi] (2006)
Like most of Hiroki's films, this is small and delicate, but still manages to pack a punch. It's a very sweet, laid-back tale about moving away to a bigger city, saying goodbye to your childhood and your best friends. Things get a little trickier when secret crushes need to be confessed, but that drama is light and the mood is breezy. Very nice.

02. 3.5* - The Liquidator [Xin Li Zui: Cheng Shi Zhi Guang] (2017)
A smooth and sexy crime thriller that looks slick, features a strong killer, discusses some relevant issues and is properly paced. There's a lot of material to go through, but since most of the first half is familiar territory the film is smart not to spend too much time on the obvious. Better than I expected and close to being a masterpiece.

03. 3.5* - Under the Silver Lake (2018)
A modern, fun and quirky variation on films like Mulholland Drive and Inherent Vice. A big, somewhat absurd quest in the middle of LA, submerging the main character in a shady world that lives right beneath the surface of everyday life. There are some slight pacing issues, but apart from that it felt very fun and refreshing.

04. 3.5* - The Tag Along: Devil Fish [Ren Mian Yu: Hong yu Xiao nuhai Waizhuan] (2018)
Not a direct sequel to the earlier films, but very much alike in tone and style. I don't think I've ever seen a haunted fish story before, but in the end that hardly matters. Devil Fish is an atmospheric, well directed demon flick that stands well on its own while paying homage to its predecessors. A prime choice if you're on the lookout for some good horror filler.

05. 3.5* - The Last Witch Hunter (2015)
Surprisingly fun. Didn't expect a whole lot from this one, but it was a lot better than I imagined. Superb monster design, solid effects and slick pacing make this film a fun diversion. It's nothing too remarkable and Vin Diesel is somewhat of a miscast, but that doesn't really stand in the way of the fun. I rarely like Hollywood fantasy, but this was a welcome exception.

06. 3.5* - Hyouka: Forbidden Secrets [Hyôka] (2017)
A somewhat surprising film from Mari Asato, who is best known for her work in the horror genre. This is full-blown drama with a touch of mystery thrown into the mix. A quest of a couple of high school kids into the mysterious events that happened 33 years earlier. A low-key and calm little film that does just about everything right, but doesn't truly excel at anything.

07. 3.5* - Heaven's Bookstore [Tengoku no Honya - Koibi] (2004)
A fine drama that plays like a more sentimental version of Koreeda's After Life. Shinohara isn't as subtle, the drama itself has a clearer direction and some moments can be a bit much, but overall this is a sweet, loveable and slightly fantastical film that had little trouble convincing me of its qualities. Fans of '00 Japanese dramas won't be disappointed.

08. 3.5* - When I Get Home, My Wife Always Pretends to Be Dead [Ie ni Kaeruto Tsuma ga Kanarazu Shinda Furi wo Shiteimasu] (2018)
A quirky comedy that turns a lot more serious towards the end. The turn to drama is a decent one though and doesn't feel as forced compared to many of its American counterparts. The romance is sweet, the comedy is amusing and surprising, even so the film itself is a bit too safe to be a true standout. Well recommended.

09. 3.0* - Take Me Home Tonight (2011)
A basic romantic comedy that does things by the book, but manages itself pretty well within the accepted boundaries of the genre. The cast is decent, the gags are fun and the romance is acceptable. There's nothing particularly outstanding about this film, but it's amusing filler that holds its own.

10. 3.0* - Alone in the Night [Yoru ga Mata Kuru] (1994)
Typical 90s Takashi Ishii film. With its roots firmly in the pinku genre, Ishii adds plenty of crime elements and gives the whole a nice polish. The cinematography is remarkable, the plot is interesting enough and the drama has actual impact. It's far from a masterpiece, but very entertaining and much better than you'd expect a film like this to be.

11. 3.0* - Feedback (2019)
A nice little thriller with minor horror influences. Somehow radio booth horrors tend to be quite interesting, Feedback is no exception. It's a pretty solid affair, nothing too original, but because of Marsan's fine performance and some genuinely gruesome violence the film maintains its appeal. Nice filler, though for genre fans only.

12. 3.0* - Yesterday (2019)
Fine but safe romantic fantasy that has an interesting premise, but doesn't do a whole lot with it. People hoping to see some of the old Boyle magic will be slightly disappointed, apart from Patel the casting is a little weak and the film has trouble making the premise 100% convincing. It's not a bad film, but with the material at hand it could and should have been better.

13. 3.0* - In the Shadow of Iris (2016)
A solid thriller that has the basics down, but forgets to add anything of its own. The cinematography is nice, the actors do a good job and the story is interesting enough. The tension swells and subdues when needed, but in the end it all feels very much by the book and it's not a film I'll remember for very long.

14. 3.0* - The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007)
A decent Western that is well-acted, looks stylish and avoids many of the typical genre pitfalls. Even so, I'm not a big fan of the genre and the characters, nor the events, managed to truly engage me. It's definitely one of the best films in the genre I've seen so far, but it's far from a film I'd count among my favorites.

15. 3.0* - Pink Ribbon [Pinku Ribon] (2004)
An interesting doc if you want to know more about the mysteries of Japanese pinku cinema. Its strict rules have allowed for more creative freedom, which in turn made it a perfect starting point for many famous directors. Interviews with Koji Wakamatsu and Kiyoshi Kurosawa underline the unique position of this Japanese niche in the film industry. A tad too long, but otherwise good fun for films fans.

16. 3.0* - Struck by Lightning (2012)
Light drama, light comedy. Struck by Lightning is a film that doesn't leave a bewildering impression, but is fun and amusing while it lasts. The cast is decent, the comedy is on point and the drama isn't overly destructive but does hits its mark. It's a small, sweet and pleasant diversion, especially since it doesn't overstay its welcome. Good.

17. 2.5* - The Amityville Murders (2018)
Amityville, the origin story. A film that doesn't go the obvious horror route, but tells the story of the factual murders that happened inside the house. The actors do a decent job and the 70s vibe is pretty apt, but it takes a little long to get going and the pay-off isn't all that great. Still, this film is a lot better than most of the other Amityville episodes.

18. 2.5* - Afternoon [Na Ri Xia Wu] (2015)
More art project than documentary, even so this conversation between director Ming-liang Tsai and his protégé Kang-sheng Lee wasn't as dull as I had feared. It doesn't feel entirely natural and Tsai is a little too dominant, but it does offer a nice peek into the lives of two famous men who left an incredible mark on Taiwanese cinema. 135 minutes is just too long though.

19. 2.5* - Green Zone (2010)
A pretty run-of-the-mill Greengrass film. Think Matt Damon in an urban war zone, without the visual bravura of Bay or Scott. It's not a bad film if you like this kind of thing, the pacing is decent and the action is exciting enough, but I couldn't escape the feeling that I've seen this done a lot better before. Expensive genre filler.

20. 2.5* - Annabelle Comes Home (2019)
Third part in the series, though not really a core Annabelle film. It feels more like a franchise crossroad, where Annabelle is used to introduce several new spin-off-ready curses. Dauberman does a good job setting up fake jump scares, but has considerable trouble with the pay-offs. It's not a terrible film, but at times it feels like a marketing ploy rather than an actual film.

21. 2.5* - Ghost Squad [Gôsuto Sukuwaddo] (2018)
With the Sushi Typhoon craze behind us, directors like Iguchi are left struggling to make something worthwhile. Ghost Squad has its moments, especially during the second half of the film, but the cheap look, bad acting and dull bits in between make it needlessly difficult to appreciate what is supposed to be fun and light-hearted entertainment.

22. 2.5* - The Fall of the House of Usher [La Chute de la Maison Usher] (1928)
I'm not familiar with the two Edgar Allan Poe tales that were mixed together here, but it's clear that Epstein was more interested in atmosphere than pure storytelling. The film looks nice for its age, the soundtrack was fitting and there were quite a few memorable moments. Outdated techniques held it down a little, but overall not a bad classic.

23. 2.5* - Chernobyl (2019)
Decent but long-winding and overly grave rendition of the Chernobyl disaster. It's incomprehensible they didn't go for Russian actors, but I guess that's still too big a hurdle for most people. The first episode is by far the best, from there on out it starts to drag and the last two episodes are little more than ordinary filler. Way overhyped.

24. 2.0* - Alita: Battle Angel (2019)
Mediocre adaptation of a superior manga/anime. Rodriguez has plenty of money to play around with, but safe some pretty vistas and decent CG little remains but a silly, somewhat cheesy Hollywood production. The acting is rather terrible, Alita herself looks goofy and the severity of the world never really translates to the screen.

25. 2.0* - Twins (1988)
A rudimentary comedy that doesn't get far beyond the obvious differences in physique. Both Schwarzenegger and DeVito fail to impress, Reitman's direction is pretty lazy and the crime plot that develops alongside the comedy isn't very interesting. It's an okay film as long as you don't expect too much of it, but it hasn't aged that well.

26. 2.0* - The Good Shepherd (2006)
De Niro wants to do it right, but forgets to add any thrills to this bog standard espionage thriller. Looking at the cast, running time and sets, there clearly wasn't a lack of funding, but it never comes together to make an intruiging, exciting film. It's Hollywood at its most generic, a film that despite its deep pockets fails to be memorable.

27. 1.5* - Crazy Rich Asians (2018)
Very poor and shallow film completely undeserving of all the hype. If you want to see films about crazy rich Asians, just watch some Asian films instead. The East vs West theme is weak, the characters are all horrible clichés, poorly portrayed and the comedy is pretty cringe. Apart from the lush setting, this was a complete waste of time.

28. 1.5* - The Mummy's Tomb (1942)
Very simple mummy flick, featuring an amusing bag of rags that isn't very scary, nor does he look very lethal, but at least he gets the job done. The acting is a little stiff and the story is razor thin, but the pacing is decent and the film is short. It's hardly prime horror material, but it wasn't a total disaster.

29. 1.5* - Age of Gold [L'Âge d'Or] (1930)
Buñuel and Dalí doing a film together, it sounds a lot better than it actually is. There are some funny ideas here, but overall the comedy is pretty bland and even though the film only lasts 60 minutes, it starts to drag during the second part. Buñuel's technique is still quite amateurish and the surreal elements don't really have the intended impact. Not great.

30. 1.0* - Zero for Conduct [Zéro de Conduite: Jeunes Diables au Collège] (1933)
A pretty loud and annoying film by Jean Vigo. I kind of wished he would have made it a silent, because between the noisy kids and the bellowing soundtrack it started to get on my nerves very quickly. The film itself is trivial, with a bunch of school kids staging a revolt against their teachers. The pillow fight scene is kinda nice, the rest is terrible.

31. 1.0* - Above the Law (1988)
Terribly cheesy action flick. The entire film is built around Steven Seagal, but his performance is dire. The action is bland, secondary roles are cringeworthy and the plot is dull. But the biggest problem is that the film takes itself way too serious, which just adds insult to injury. Crappy 80s action shelf filler, it's really not my thing.

32. 0.5* - Greed (1924)
With a title like that and not an ounce of nuance to be seen, I was in for a rough ride. von Stroheim's Greed is a dreary look at mankind, a film that piles on the drama and goes on endlessly. In the end I figure it might have been better to watch the short version instead, this was overly long, overly simplistic and just plain boring.

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#4

Post by sol » July 7th, 2019, 1:40 pm

PdA:

Damn, I love Lana Del Rey's music and her video clips. National Anthem is probably the best, but I have always thought that Video Games was pretty terrific too with its meticulously timed collection of stock and source footage, all assembled to coincide with the lyrics/music.

Onderhond:

Probably agree with you on Green Zone, which I haven't seen since it came out theatrically. I didn't like Twins much at all; perhaps the very definition of a one-joke comedy. Our take on The Good Shepherd seems pretty similar too... but we are still yet to have a week in which we see eye-to-eye on everything. I haven't seen LÂge d'Or in at least ten years, but I liked it quite a bit at the time. Not top tier Buñuel stuff or quite up to the level of Un Chien Andalou, which you must have seen (?), but definitely something that appealed to me a lot as a budding filmgoer.
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#5

Post by peeptoad » July 7th, 2019, 3:48 pm

Hi all...

sol-
Gymkata (1985) saw this in the theater on release but don't have it rated. I 'd def have to rewatch it in order to jog my memory.
Anaconda (1997) another I saw in the theater and recall more of... I have this down as a 4. In reality it might be closer to a 5, given some of the tripe I've seen since.
Twilight (2008) 4 (ahem)
John Wick (2014) 6

PdA-
nada

Onderhond-
The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007) 6 watched this recently for the western challenge in May
Age of Gold [L'Âge d'Or] (1930) 8
Zero for Conduct [Zéro de Conduite: Jeunes Diables au Collège] (1933) 8
The Fall of the House of Usher [La Chute de la Maison Usher] (1928) been on my watch list forever it seems- like you even some time off doesn't make a sizable dent :ermm:

mine-
Faust (Czech Republic, 1994) 8 fantastic animation yet again
Una farfalla con le ali insanguinate (1971) The Bloodstained Butterfly 6
Il gatto dagli occhi di giada (1977) Watch Me When I Kill 6
La pelle sotto gli artigli (1975) The Skin Under the Claws 4
La morte ha fatto l'uovo (1968) Death Laid an Egg 7 cool camera angles and shots plus the chicken mojo I mentioned in the challenge thread. Well, to expound... chickens abound.
Dial M for Murder (1954) 8 had this on disc and just never got around to it. The fam liked it (and so did I apparently)

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#6

Post by Onderhond » July 7th, 2019, 4:10 pm

sol wrote:
July 7th, 2019, 1:40 pm
Onderhond:

Probably agree with you on Green Zone, which I haven't seen since it came out theatrically. I didn't like Twins much at all; perhaps the very definition of a one-joke comedy. Our take on The Good Shepherd seems pretty similar too... but we are still yet to have a week in which we see eye-to-eye on everything. I haven't seen LÂge d'Or in at least ten years, but I liked it quite a bit at the time. Not top tier Buñuel stuff or quite up to the level of Un Chien Andalou, which you must have seen (?), but definitely something that appealed to me a lot as a budding filmgoer.
I've seen Un Chien Andalou, didn't really appeal to me either. As you know, classic cinema is not really my thing, I consider 2.5* ratings (like House of Usher) a big win already.

Glad you liked Murder Mystery, also happy to see you like Circle. A nice variation on the old Saw setup, sadly it's the first and last thing the directors seem to have done in the feature film realm. Recommendation-wise, I'd say Under the Silver Lake is a film you might like?

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#7

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » July 7th, 2019, 5:49 pm

Hi all,I hope everyone is having a good weekend,and this week I saw my first Roman Porno.

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Man of the West (1958) 10

"There's a point where you either grow up and become a human being or you rot, like that bunch."

Including a booklet with detailed essays on the title,such as Jean-Luc Godard's "Supermann",and new extras such as a informative audio commentary, Masters of Cinema present a masterful transfer,with the image being pristine and the soundtrack being clean.

Returning to the Wild West with a different outlaw, directing auteur Anthony Mann & his regular cinematographer Ernest Haller continue their razor-sharp de-constructing, frontier-pushing examination of the genre, vividly bursting to life in Mann's sparse use of blood putting Link on a knife edge, and the red bullet wounds making each shot land with a thump. Contrasting the visceral with the poetic, Mann and Haller continue to build on their visual theme of the left and right corners of the frame being stylishly gripped by the threats towards Link and Billie pushing them to the corners of being on the wrong tracks.

Bringing Link back to his old friends, Mann lassos them with a rich brooding atmosphere of pastel colours and fading blue skies on Noir-like loner Link having to confront the past he had left behind. From the framing of Link in the corner of the screen in his intro, Mann displays a outstanding creativity in the subtle stylisation of shots, as Mann breaths in Link's regrets with long-held medium wide-shots, being cut by Mann's lateral tracking shots firing at the menacing state of the gang,with the anxiety wrapped around Link.

Largely working in TV before he adapted Will C. Brown's novel, the compact nature of TV is one that Reginald Rose makes a perfect fit for the lean movie, where Rose slices the excellent dialogue with a thoughtful maturity of uncovering another layer of Link, leading to a enticing play against traditions, ( such as Link and Billie liking each other,but not being passionately in love) and a tangible grit to the outlaws forcing Link to watch them order Billie to undress,matched by them expressing a harsh bitterness over Link leaving their side.

Accepting a role which led to James Stewart never speaking to Mann again after missing out,Gary Cooper gives a haunting performance, weighed with a gravitas on his shoulders and a enticing Billie, (a terrific, vulnerable Julie London) Cooper holds Link's head high as he fights pain, sorrow and regret until he leaves himself in the wilderness,as the man of the west.

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Delicate Skilful Fingers 1972 8

Pickpocketing characters who would have been on the wrong side of the tracks in Nikkatsu Noir from a decade earlier, the screenplay by co-writer/(with Tatsumi Kumashiro) director Toru Murakawa slots them all into the Roman Porno genre with ease,via loner Yuki becoming entangled with each two-bit thief on the street, whilst the cops look over her shoulders as Yuki learns the moves of thrives. Told "The ceremony is over" (classy!) the writers neatly blend the skin flick antics with the Noir/crime thrills via Yuki's loss of innocence also leading to a loss of any doubt on staying in the petty underworld.

Appearing to be illegally filmed outdoors, (the odd passing member of the public looks into camera) director Murakawa & cinematographer Shinsaku Himeda brush a Pop-Art shine on the flick with rapid whip-pans, reflecting pans along windows reflecting Yuki's view,and closely-held hand-held tracking shots following the pickpocketing in the middle of a bustling city. Whilst offering all the naked Yuki you could want, Murakawa displays a subtle touch to the sex scenes, going from dark shadows and lingering close-ups on Yuki's face, to glossy, glamour showcases for Yuki's love of crime and Taku. Joined by Ichiro Araki as the swaggering with dark glasses, street-smart Taku, Hiroko Isayama gives a terrific turn as Yuki, thanks to Isayama pulling at Yuki's anxieties until they snap to Yuki's embrace of Taku and crime with her delicate skilful fingers.

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#8

Post by Onderhond » July 7th, 2019, 7:11 pm

@morrison-dylan-fan: if you can find it, check the Pink Ribbon doc on pinkus. Some interesting stuff there.

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#9

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » July 7th, 2019, 8:12 pm

Onderhond wrote:
July 7th, 2019, 7:11 pm
@morrison-dylan-fan: if you can find it, check the Pink Ribbon doc on pinkus. Some interesting stuff there.
Thanks hond,with Roman Porno,I've heard about plenty about the genre/style,but don't know much about specific films (what flick is usually called the peak of Roman?) Your mention of Witch Hunter has reminded me of a surprising video of Vin appearing to be a real D&D fan:


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#10

Post by sol » July 8th, 2019, 3:10 am

peeps:

Ah, so you have seen Twilight. ;) As a horror fan, I felt I owed it to myself to check out the film at some stage, though I agree with IMDb that it falls more under the Fantasy than Horror banner despite the vampirism angle. Honestly, it was nowhere near as trashy as I had expected, though Stewart and Pattinson would of course soon go onto much better things with the likes of Personal Shopper and Good Time.

Gymkata was much better than I had expected too; it is not quite Enter the Dragon's equal, but I was never a big fan of the Bruce Lee film in the first place. Anaconda isn't great, but it is okay for what it is, and it is possible that I am overrating John Wick due to all the neon, but I absolutely love films that can make good use of neon lighting. It's an aesthetic thing, I guess.

Onderhond:

Saw didn't impress me too much (except for the big reveal near the end), but I am really into Cube-esque films, which describes Circle very well. I'm not surprised that I liked Murder Mystery given my affinity for mysteries and comedies - and the fact that I find Adam Sandler more tolerable than most, but yeah, I appreciate the recommendation.

Under the Silver Lake looked intriguing when I first heard about it, but the comparisons to Inherent Vice and Lynch are a little off-putting. We'll see. It is showing down here at the moment and there is not much else good playing at the moment, so it is possible that I will see it for this month's Thriller Challenge. It Follows was pretty cool, even if I didn't like it as much as most.

m-d-f:

Ah, Man of the West - the original A History of Violence (the plot similarities are uncanny). I had some trouble getting into the film due Gary Cooper looking so old and a younger-looking Lee J. Cobb being cast as his uncle, but definitely a lot of interesting dynamics at play in that one.
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#11

Post by Onderhond » July 8th, 2019, 5:30 am

Thanks hond,with Roman Porno,I've heard about plenty about the genre/style,but don't know much about specific films (what flick is usually called the peak of Roman?)
I'm really not a connaisseur myself. But since a lot of directors i've been following started out doing these films (and had their revival two or three years ago), I run into them sometimes. The world of pinku cinema is a strange one.
sol wrote:
July 8th, 2019, 3:10 am
Saw didn't impress me too much (except for the big reveal near the end), but I am really into Cube-esque films, which describes Circle very well. I'm not surprised that I liked Murder Mystery given my affinity for mysteries and comedies - and the fact that I find Adam Sandler more tolerable than most, but yeah, I appreciate the recommendation.
Saw/Cube, I guess it depends on what elements of the film you want to focus. Apart from the premise Circle isn't very Saw-like alright, it's very much its own thing. As for Sandler, we seem to be in the same boat there, if only because he's one of the few people left who makes core comedies. It's so hard to find something that doesn't go dramady after 10 minutes.
sol wrote:
July 8th, 2019, 3:10 am
Under the Silver Lake looked intriguing when I first heard about it, but the comparisons to Inherent Vice and Lynch are a little off-putting. We'll see. It is showing down here at the moment and there is not much else good playing at the moment, so it is possible that I will see it for this month's Thriller Challenge. It Follows was pretty cool, even if I didn't like it as much as most.
Well, those comparisons are about structure, not so much about atmosphere. The film felt more like Scott Pilgrim to me. Light, modern, nerdy with enough visual trickery to keep me engaged. I'm not saying it'll become an all-time favorite, but after watching it I was really glad I did :)

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#12

Post by joachimt » July 8th, 2019, 8:27 am

Dear Zachary: A Letter to a Son About His Father (2008, 1 official list, 5047 checks) 9/10
Watched because it's on iCM Forum's Favorite Movies.
Sure it's not like a documentary is supposed to be. It tells the story from one side, which is of course a very subjective side. But OMG, this is one hell of a tragic story and the fact that the filmmaker is involved and the story develops while making the film, makes this a very heartbreaking experience. Not only once, but multiple times did events during the shooting change the outcome of the story. He uses lots of interviews from before later event and these interview are even more emotional once you know the events later on. Add to this the great editing to tell the complete story by combining all the different footage and I'm hooked.
Searching (2018, 0 official lists, 1675 checks) 8/10
Watched because a student of mine recommended it.
I don't normally take recommendations from a single person, but this 18-year-old guy is trying to become a filmmaker and he despices Hollywood blockbusters. He's currently in the process of making his first feature, which is about pedophile and the boundaries of what is socially acceptable. Not quite an easy thing to make a movie about for an 18-year-old boy. Anyway, he recommended this movie to me because of the structure (everything you see it computerscreens and smartphonescreens) and the fact that it kept him at the edge of his seat despite that structure. Has this been done before, I wonder? Seems to me like this is some first-time-movie and whenever this is done in the future, it will be a copycat. Or am I misstaken? I very much agreed with my student. The movie keeps you at the edge of your seat and it just works how it is told. I really liked how the story unfolded. It is a bit of a shame thought that they gradually had to get away from computer- and smartphonescreens and had to use surveillancecamera's and such as well. But still, quite a ride.
In the Mouth of Madness (1994, 2 official lists, 4341 checks) 7/10
Watched because it's on iCM Forum's Favorite Movies.
Enjoyable horror. Feels like a Stephen King.
The King of Kong AKA The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters (2007, 1 official list, 9573 checks) 7/10
Watched because it's on iCM Forum's Favorite Movies.
A well structured doc about some really weird characters, but I find it hard to tell what I should believe and what not.
This World, Then the Fireworks (1997, 0 official lists, 52 checks) 6/10
Watched because it was FotW.
Worth the 5 euros I paid for it. Because of the looks of it and the use of sex, it felt a bit sleezy, but it was entertaining.
Venom (2018, 1 official list, 3543 checks) 6/10
Watched because it's a random official check popping up on Netflix.
It's quite entertaining because of the cool sci-fi-visuals and action. A shame the story feels too much like same old same old.
Sweetgrass (2009, 3 official lists, 249 checks) 5/10
Watched because it's on 500<400.
It's just as slow and empty as the lives of these men. Doesn't make it more interesting though.
The Karate Kid (2010, 1 official list, 27126 checks) 5/10
Watched because it's a random official check popping up on Netflix.
Pointless remake.
Just Go with It (2011, 1 official list, 13297 checks) 4/10
Watched because it's a random official check popping up on Netflix.
I enjoy subtle comedy. This is not. It's a stupid idea of a story and it's annoying to see all the characters around the main on going along with his stupid plan. I'm surprised by the number of decent ratings I noticed among my kumpels on Criticker.
Shaft AKA The Son of Shaft ( :lol: ) (2019, 0 official lists, 149 checks) 4/10
Watched because it's starring Samuel L. Jackson and popped up on Netflix.
Why did they give this the same title? It's a sequel to the previous edition with Jackson. This time his son is going on an investigation and he asks his father to help him after they hadn't seen each other in 25 years. The investigation is totally ridiculous. First of all, the son totally abandons his work at the FBI and nobody seems to care at first. Secondly, the investigation itself feels like a kids movie. Everywhere they go they find a new clue to keep the plot going. It doesn't help at also that the guy who plays the son is a terrible actor, although I must admit that it fits the douchebag he already is in the movie. Anyway, Jackson tries hard to save the movie, he's fine as always, but it's not enough to make this a worthwhile sequel.
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#13

Post by peeptoad » July 8th, 2019, 12:13 pm

sol wrote:
July 8th, 2019, 3:10 am
peeps:

Ah, so you have seen Twilight. ;) As a horror fan, I felt I owed it to myself to check out the film at some stage, though I agree with IMDb that it falls more under the Fantasy than Horror banner despite the vampirism angle. Honestly, it was nowhere near as trashy as I had expected, though Stewart and Pattinson would of course soon go onto much better things with the likes of Personal Shopper and Good Time.

Gymkata was much better than I had expected too; it is not quite Enter the Dragon's equal, but I was never a big fan of the Bruce Lee film in the first place. Anaconda isn't great, but it is okay for what it is, and it is possible that I am overrating John Wick due to all the neon, but I absolutely love films that can make good use of neon lighting. It's an aesthetic thing, I guess.
Yes, on Twilight... I got forced to watch it (I use the word "force" loosely, but she insisted repeatedly) by a friend of mine a few years ago. I agree it's more fantasy than horror and completely not my type of film, but yeah, it wasn't terrible. Thus my 4 rating, which could potentially be a 4+ but not a 5. ;)

...I absolutely love films that can make good use of neon lighting.
Are you a fan of Refn? Under the Skin? Beyond the Black Rainbow? This would make an interesting thread topic actually...

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#14

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » July 8th, 2019, 3:03 pm

Not much this week:

The Fourth Dimension (Trinh T. Minh-ha, 2001) - 8+

Anima (PTA, 2019) - 5+

+

A couple episodes of Gilmore Girls
The first 2 episodes og STRANGER THINGS 3
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#15

Post by GruesomeTwosome » July 8th, 2019, 4:32 pm

Hi sol. I've only seen Anaconda (bleh) and John Wick from yours. I've seen all three John Wick films, and they're pretty solid straight-up action flicks with Keanu's skills on full display. I still do like that first film the best of the three, FWIW. The next two films open up this criminal underworld universe even more, and to their credit the visual flair is upped in these sequels, but I dunno, the initial entry still made the biggest impression on me.


My viewings last week:

Midsommar (2019, Ari Aster) theatrical - 7.5/10. I wasn’t a big Hereditary fan (Ari Aster's previous film from last year), and I thought Midsommar was better and much more my cup of tea. It uses a folk horror setting and rituals to depict a young woman dealing with family tragedy and a distant, non-committal boyfriend...I read that Aster had just been through a break-up in a serious relationship when he wrote this film, and it shows. Maybe a bit overlong and I’m not quite sure the ending totally worked (still, the last act to me is better than Hereditary, where I thought that film really faltered), but overall this was a good, strange horror flick. Once we get to this isolated Swedish commune, it becomes a really immersive and fascinating world that Aster builds.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2019, Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey & Rodney Rothman) - 6/10. I dunno, it was fine, but apparently I'm not getting all the positive fuss over this one? I wasn't crazy about the animation style either. Fleetingly fun but it felt longer than it was.

Spider-Man 3 (2007, Sam Raimi) - 6/10. Finally got around to seeing the last of Raimi's Spidey trilogy. Yeah it's pretty dumb all right, but I didn't mind the ever-heightened campiness (this is Sam Raimi after all) when Peter is influenced by the symbiote, hilariously acting overly cocky while dancing down the street, and then that weird jazz club scene. The Eddie Brock/Venom bit is too undercooked, probably. An entertaining piece of fluff though.


TV stuff:
I'm five episodes into the new season of Stranger Things, and it's been as enjoyable as expected so far.
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#16

Post by sol » July 8th, 2019, 11:41 pm

joachimt:
he recommended this movie to me because of the structure (everything you see it computerscreens and smartphonescreens) and the fact that it kept him at the edge of his seat despite that structure. Has this been done before, I wonder? Seems to me like this is some first-time-movie and whenever this is done in the future, it will be a copycat. Or am I misstaken?
Yes, you're mistaken. Unfriended did the whole computer-screen-only thing four years before Searching. In the interim, there have also been some other less high profile films that have tried the concept, most notably Open Windows with Elijah Wood. I agree that the computer-screen-only concept makes for a very intense viewing experience. I thought that Searching was excellent, especially John Cho's performance, but I found Unfriended more unnerving. Open Windows is also really cool, but sort of undone by a ridiculous twist.

Seen four others of yours this week, of which I liked In the Mouth of Madness the most and This World the least.

peeps:
...I absolutely love films that can make good use of neon lighting.
Are you a fan of Refn? Under the Skin? Beyond the Black Rainbow? This would make an interesting thread topic actually...
Yes, I'm big into Refn. I loved Under the Skin; less so Black Rainbow and Mandy, but I definitely liked their aesthetics. At the risk of referencing Twilight again though, it is Pattinson's Good Time that first springs to mind though as a recent film that puts neon throughout to really good use.

viktor:

Seen none. I could watch Anima, but it looks about as exciting as your rating indicates.

Gruesome:

Thanks for the tip on the John Wick trilogy. You had me at "to their credit the visual flair is upped in these sequels", but I do note your preference for the first film. We'll see. The second film is streaming on Netflix, so I could watch it this month were I able to pull myself away from Official Checks in the Thriller Challenge. I don't think the third has been released on DVD yet, but I will definitely try to get to it at some point in time.

Yours:

Huh. :huh: A review of Midsommar that doesn't mention The Wicker Man. I saw the trailer when I went to see Parasite on the weekend and the vibe that I got from the film was a 21st century Wicker Man with perhaps a dose of The Endless. Definitely intrigued by this one even though I similarly did not think that Hereditary was the best thing since sliced bread.

I somehow managed to avoid most of the marketing before sitting down to watch Into the Spider-verse, which I think helped. The twist and turn-filled plot had me engaged throughout and I absolutely love the Sunflower theme song, though I guess that the film's "it can be anyone behind the mask" theme is a little on-the-nose.
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#17

Post by maxwelldeux » July 9th, 2019, 12:03 am

Holidays and Challenge Series kept me away on Sunday...

Murder by Death (1976) - 7/10
Watched for the MST challenge and because flavo5000 recommended it. Funny to see all those famous detectives together.

Murder on the Orient Express (1974) - 7/10
Watched for the MST challenge and for the 1974 poll and because Lumet. Great adaptation of the story, but nothing terribly interesting visually.

The Bandit (1996) - 7/10
Watched for the MST challenge and to get a Turkish film on that list. Really interesting look at Istanbul and the culture therein. The story itself was only so-so, as was the overall film, but a pretty enjoyable film with a dark ending.

Mr. Freedom (1969) - 8/10
Watched for the 4th of July. So darkly anti-American imperialism it was awesome. So much detail in there.

Independents' Day (2016) - 2/10
Watched for the Low-IMDB challenge. This was shockingly pro-right-wing militia. Rednecks fight aliens. The president asked them to.

Racer and the Jailbird (2017) - 6/10
Watched for the BeNeLux challenge. I liked the first half quite a bit, but then it turned to a sad romance, and it lost me.

Lost Highway (1997) - 8/10
Watched for the MST challenge. No clue what was going on, but it was a lot of fun. Not my favorite of Lynch's, but still a very good film.

Murder Mystery (2019) - 6/10
Watched for MST and because it looked light it could be funny. And there were some laughs here and there. Nothing special, but it was entertaining enough.

Clue (1985) - 10/10
Watched because it's awesome. And for the MST challenge. My 8th viewing in the past 3 or so years.

Sharkansas Women's Prison Massacre (2015) - 4/10
Watched because sharks and low-IMDB. Not as exploitive as you'd expect, and remarkably fun and self aware.

Psycho (1998) - 7/10
Watched for the MST challenge. This was a fascinating film experience, comparing this version (which didn't work) to Hitch's masterpiece.

All Girls Weekend (2016) - 3/10
Watched for low-IMDB. Not at all exploitive, though you'd never guess it based on the poster. Took a while to warm up, but not terrible once it got there.

Planet of the Sharks (2016) - 1/10
Watched for low-IMDB and because sharks. Just awful.

Ibiza Undead (2016) - 2/10
Watched for low-IMDB. Terrible film, better known as Zombie Spring Breakers. It just didn't do anything or wrap up any part of the story.

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#18

Post by maxwelldeux » July 9th, 2019, 12:22 am

@sol:

I haven't seen Gymkata, but I remember being interested in it looking at the video shelves in my youth; definitely looked ridiculous, but I might try and work that into the rotation sometime soon. Anaconda I have fond memories of - interesting snake effects and acted pretty well. Agreed on Twilight - not bad, but the sequels get worse. Circle and Geostorm we've chatted about. I actually spent the first half of the movie thinking the Aniston/Sandler chemistry was awful in Murder Mystery - but it did pull me around in the end, and I saw what they were doing. I did like the fish-out-of-water aspect to it, and thought that was played well for some laughs.

@Pda: nada

@Onderhond:

Take Me Home Tonight I have almost no memory of, and I think it's because of what you mention. It's by the book and unremarkable and does nothing to distinguish it from all the other similar films from the mid-90s onward. And yeah, Greed was a tough sell. I appreciated it more than liked it, but it was definitely overlong.

@peeptoad:

I love Dial M for Murder (9/10 for me). It's not a complex film, but it builds the tension really well and makes it one hell of a thrill ride.

@joachimt:

Dear Zachary I need to rewatch - I agree with you that it's an emotional ride and well worth watching, but it's been too long for me to comment on the specifics. Searching actually sounds really interesting. I've seen other films with computer footage like that (can't recall any names off the top of my head), but it's not super common.

@viktor: nada on films, but GG is awesome (my cat is named Roary Gilmore)

@Gruesome: nada

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#19

Post by joachimt » July 9th, 2019, 4:51 am

Thanks for the tip, sol. I've watchlisted Unfriended, although it's an horror and not even on TSZDT, so it can't be any good. :lol:
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#20

Post by Onderhond » July 9th, 2019, 5:33 am

Since TSZDT is focusing more on including classic titles, some of the decent modern horror doesn't stand a chance anymore. That said, not a big fan of Unfriended, Searching was okay.

@sol: we already had a 21st century Wicker Man! There's also Apostle. Might be getting crowded 😁

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#21

Post by Onderhond » July 9th, 2019, 6:17 am

GruesomeTwosome wrote:
July 8th, 2019, 4:32 pm
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2019, Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey & Rodney Rothman) - 6/10. I dunno, it was fine, but apparently I'm not getting all the positive fuss over this one? I wasn't crazy about the animation style either. Fleetingly fun but it felt longer than it was.
That's probably it then. Apart from that it's a pretty basic/generic superhero flick. The animation is quite unique though, but if it doesn't appeal that there's not that much left.

@maxwelldeux:
Take Me Home Tonight I have almost no memory of, and I think it's because of what you mention. It's by the book and unremarkable and does nothing to distinguish it from all the other similar films from the mid-90s onward.
True, but it certainly wasn't the worst of these films either. Just decent fluff. I guess I expected a little more from the director though (based on It's All Gone Pete Tong).

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GruesomeTwosome
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#22

Post by GruesomeTwosome » July 9th, 2019, 12:34 pm

sol wrote:
July 8th, 2019, 11:41 pm
Gruesome:

Thanks for the tip on the John Wick trilogy. You had me at "to their credit the visual flair is upped in these sequels", but I do note your preference for the first film. We'll see. The second film is streaming on Netflix, so I could watch it this month were I able to pull myself away from Official Checks in the Thriller Challenge. I don't think the third has been released on DVD yet, but I will definitely try to get to it at some point in time.

Yours:

Huh. :huh: A review of Midsommar that doesn't mention The Wicker Man. I saw the trailer when I went to see Parasite on the weekend and the vibe that I got from the film was a 21st century Wicker Man with perhaps a dose of The Endless. Definitely intrigued by this one even though I similarly did not think that Hereditary was the best thing since sliced bread.

I somehow managed to avoid most of the marketing before sitting down to watch Into the Spider-verse, which I think helped. The twist and turn-filled plot had me engaged throughout and I absolutely love the Sunflower theme song, though I guess that the film's "it can be anyone behind the mask" theme is a little on-the-nose.
Heh, yeah I felt I didn't need to be yet another person mentioning The Wicker Man when talking about Midsommar, as it seems anyone talking about this film inevitably brings up The Wicker Man (and rightfully so, I also thought of The Wicker Man not long into watching the trailer for Midsommar, and Ari Aster was clearly influenced by it). But Midsommar definitely stands on its own and becomes something else, it's certainly not simply a "Wicker Man rip-off". Hopefully you watch this one at some point and like me, have a better experience here than with Hereditary.
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chrispeddler
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#23

Post by chrispeddler » Yesterday, 12:25 pm

I've watched Disney's Aladdin, Marvel's Spiderman Far From Home. Had a good laugh as well on Adam Sandler's Murder Mystery (Netflix) and Stranger Things.

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