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Panique (1946) Film of the Week #276

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Cocoa
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Panique (1946) Film of the Week #276

#1

Post by Cocoa » April 14th, 2019, 1:42 pm

Film of the Week #276: Panique (1946)

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Summary:
After an elderly maid is murdered, opinions are manipulated, evidence is planted, violence erupts, and panic ensues.

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#716 on 1000<400, with 131 checks.
Nominated by blocho, Cocoa, and joachimt.
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On iCM

From the 500<400 resultsShow
#771(⇩24, #747) Panique (1946)
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Directed by: Julien Duvivier
(205.09 Pts, 7 Votes) , Top 1–10–50: 0–0–1
History: 7717479821872NA←NA
ICheckMovies: 94 Checks , 12 Favourites , 2 Official lists
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cinephage (42)
VVKT (71)
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St. Gloede (382)

This movie fits the current 1940s Challenge.



Here is a schedule of all the FotWs.
Last edited by Cocoa on April 21st, 2019, 12:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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hurluberlu
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#2

Post by hurluberlu » April 14th, 2019, 2:45 pm

Cocoa wrote:
April 14th, 2019, 1:42 pm



This movie fits the current 1940s Challenge

Also Dtc Noms ! :thumbsup:
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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Lonewolf2003
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#3

Post by Lonewolf2003 » April 14th, 2019, 2:52 pm

I coincidentally bought the Criterion for the 40s challenge so it's on my watchtlist for this month. Will try to get to it this week.

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#4

Post by rnilsson19 » April 14th, 2019, 3:37 pm

Viviane Romance :wub:

The new restoration looks and sounds incredible.

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#5

Post by Lonewolf2003 » April 15th, 2019, 9:12 pm

Saw it today. In style a good example of the overlap between noir and poetic realism (the first own a lot to the later, so it's hard to make the distinction. Maybe someone more enlightened could do that.) In plot it's clearly a product of its production time and place; prejudices and gossip leading to mob rule being a clear allegory to French behavior during the occupation.
Michel Simon is very convincing in the lead, by first being a haughty outsider that falls for the femme fatale because of his secret loneliness and need for human contact.
I thought Paul Bernard looked like he was maked up like in a silent movie with his über pale face and big lipstick lips and felt out of place therefor in this movie. (not his performance fault to)
rating: 8.0

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#6

Post by weirdboy » April 19th, 2019, 3:04 am

Love this one, and Michel Simon is fantastic as usual. I also gave it an 8/10.

I suppose I agree about Paul Bernard looking like he belongs in a silent film, although when I was actually watching it that didn't bother me at all. What did bother me was the occasionally discordant music in a couple of scenes.

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#7

Post by Cocoa » April 21st, 2019, 12:49 pm

I enjoyed the cinematography. It was fun seeing the fair rides (l)

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#8

Post by OldAle1 » April 23rd, 2019, 11:26 pm

OK I watched this a few days ago myself and here's my take:

I saw Monsier Hire when it was first released in the US almost 30 years ago, and my memory is awfully dim, so I'm not sure I would have recognized this as the earlier version of the same story - apart from the name of the title character of course, played in this film by the great Michel Simon in an uncharacteristically melancholy, almost subdued performance. He still manages to totally dominate the screen and give a "big" performance despite the lack of overt gusto - a tribute to the actor and to Duvivier's careful filmmaking I think. Essentially this is one of those "somebody's been murdered, let's blame the weird guy who's not like the rest of us" story, with Simon's Mr. Hire a rather misanthropic, sometimes rude intellectual and mystic who keeps to himself and resists the friendship of others or any real sense of community. One interesting element - never overt as I recall - is the origin of M. Hire - whose real name is "Hirovich". One year after the war, and I don't think many French filmmakers wanted to deal with antisemitism, and the possible hounding of someone to death merely for his (perceived) Jewishness - so it is little remarked upon, but it is there. It's all beautifully done, very noir I guess in many respects, though I can't say it bowled me over.

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#9

Post by matthewscott8 » May 22nd, 2019, 4:48 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
April 23rd, 2019, 11:26 pm
OK I watched this a few days ago myself and here's my take:

I saw Monsier Hire when it was first released in the US almost 30 years ago, and my memory is awfully dim, so I'm not sure I would have recognized this as the earlier version of the same story - apart from the name of the title character of course, played in this film by the great Michel Simon in an uncharacteristically melancholy, almost subdued performance. He still manages to totally dominate the screen and give a "big" performance despite the lack of overt gusto - a tribute to the actor and to Duvivier's careful filmmaking I think. Essentially this is one of those "somebody's been murdered, let's blame the weird guy who's not like the rest of us" story, with Simon's Mr. Hire a rather misanthropic, sometimes rude intellectual and mystic who keeps to himself and resists the friendship of others or any real sense of community. One interesting element - never overt as I recall - is the origin of M. Hire - whose real name is "Hirovich". One year after the war, and I don't think many French filmmakers wanted to deal with antisemitism, and the possible hounding of someone to death merely for his (perceived) Jewishness - so it is little remarked upon, but it is there. It's all beautifully done, very noir I guess in many respects, though I can't say it bowled me over.
His excommunication from society happened before the events in the film, somewhat related to his Jewishness, but not entirely, he describes his time being an attorney and saying that despite being proficient at his profession he wasn't making any headway professionally. Wasn't getting the cases in through the door. He didn't appear to be a practising Jew but I don't think that's the point. He's not part of any club. As you say people saw him as weird, and so he turned being weird into a profession, which is pretty damned heartbreaking tbh. In terms or resisting the friendship of others or any real sense of community, that seems to be a reasonable move given the scumbags of the town. Simenon's writing is characterised by this, society as a vice that grips or crushes you, crime the inevitable result.

So as you might guess this one hit me quite hard, it felt very personal. I talk to people about M Hire a lot in my "rl". Just to be really maudlin, I remember as a kid being told the story of the ugly duckling, who didn't fit in and was very sad, but grows up to be a beautiful swan. And that was pretty comforting to me. But sometimes you just carry on being the ugly duckling.

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