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How old are you in "cinephile years"?

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Re: How old are you in "cinephile years"?

#41

Post by Fergenaprido » April 11th, 2019, 5:26 pm

Really cool topic idea. :thumbsup:

I'd say 5 years, coinciding with when I joined this forum, and I was able to access films in such a way that I wasn't limited purely by cinematic/video store availability when deciding what to watch.

Growing up, I was limited to whatever my parents let me see on TV, VHS, or in theatres. Disney definitely ruled in my home. Sometimes there'd be tapes of tv recordings (especially kids movies at my grandparents' place), and in my teen I got to go see more commercial fare with friends without parental guidance (I still remember being allowed to see Eraser for my friend's 14th birthday, even though a bunch of us were only twelve and the rating was 14A (adult accompaniment), and feeling thrilled that they let us in). Two milestone film events I remember are seeing The Sound of Music one New Year's Eve in the mid-90s with family friends (and it wasn't the first time I saw it), and my mom sitting us down to watch Schindler's List as a family on tv a few years after it came out, explaining it was a very important film for us to see (and why). But by and large, all I saw was mainstream fare in English (or occasionally French, either on TV or in class, due to bilingualism - I pretty sure the first non-English film I saw was Bonheur d'occasion [The Tin Flute] in 1997 in French class).

2001-2005 - the early university years - The student union showed 2 films every Sunday night in one of the old lecture halls, usually a mix of recent stuff that had just left theatres, old classics, or acclaimed foreign films. That, coupled with a downtown arthouse cinema, and two local video stores (one commercial, and the other more eclectic - sadly it went out of business last year, but this they sorted their main video collection by director, which was the first time I was ever forced to think about who directed a film, and thus started to become more aware of auteurs and director-focused films), meant that I had access to films I'd never even known existed before. It's also the first time I remember creating a lit of films I wanted to see (I think I might even have the post-it note somewhere), and being more intentional in my viewing instead of just going to the store and seeing what they had and then deciding. It's also during this period that I first saw Sunrise, Citizen Kane, and 2001 of my own volition. I think I wasn't ready for them yet, as the first was bland and the latter two were actual dislikes. I've since rewatched Kane and it became a favourite, so I think it's time to rewatch the other two. Pretty sure Sunrise or The Kid was my first silent film too. Amelie was the only film I ever owned, and I first saw it in 2002 (at the local arthouse) and then twice more in the next year at the student-run cinema. I saw it again and finally decided to create an account on imdb in January 2004 with the sole intention of being able to rate it a 10 (I must have been aware of the Top 250 by this point, but it didn't really drive my filmmaking decisions, and I didn't rate another film on imdb for another 4 years).

Some time between this period and the next I created my first film spreadsheet, but it was more of a desire to track stats and data than for cinephilia, so while the first seeds probably were planted 15 years ago, I don't think they really count as a starting point.

2010-2013 - I've always been a book person, and I think reading is still my favourite pastime, even though I don't read nearly as much as I used to. The main reason is convenience. Starting in 2010, I moved abroad, and it was impractical to buy a lot of books (in uni I didn't have drinking money, I had book money). By this point I'd become more interested in music, and with the digitalization of it I'd already transferred my entire cd collection before I went abroad so that I could have it all with me. (At least I think I did. I know I'd digitized it, but I didn't have a laptop back then so now I'm wondering how I got took it with me to Europe :shrug: ) After a few years I got tired of music, and started to watch more films. This coincided with someone on the music forum I was on posting a link to icm. I joined in December 2011 when I was living in Croatia. six months later I moved to Kazakhstan for a year for work, and was alone/isolated for a lot of the time (linguistically and physically), so started to watch more films. Having lived in Europe also exposed me to much more foreign cinema (when there were subtitles).

2013-2014 - I then moved back to Canada, met and briefly dated (and maybe fell in love with) a guy who was a big cinephile - He'd bought every Best Picture winner he could find, and on our first date was impressed when I could name the winners from both of our years of birth. We watched a lot of films together, especially when we took a road trip across country and then stayed at his parents place out west for a week before I flew back home. At this point I was looking for permanent work, but had only found a "temporary summer job" working for my sister's father-in-law at the main food terminal. It was shitty manual work (literally - sorting and regrading rotten produce) that started early, and I was usually home by 1 or 2 in the afternoon. This, coupled with my public library surprisingly having acquired a large number of DVDs, I started to watch a lot of films. I'd say this is when I started to regularly watch a film every other day or so, and when I was using my own watchlist or icm's lists to prioritize which films I wanted to checkout from the library. They had a decent range of foreign and classic films (aside from recent releases), considering it's just a suburban public library, which was perfect for someone just starting to really dive deeper into cinema. I joined the forum in Jun 2014, right around the time I was applying for a job at my current company. You can see a noticeable spike in my film-watching after this time, as well as a shift in the types of films I was watching. It's also when I started to be more willing to watch films that I wasn't necessarily interested in, but were highly acclaimed or recommended by others on here.

2014-present - I discovered a few other cinephiles at work, and we started a weekly film night, where we would rotate picking films that we had already seen and wanted to share. Three years on and it's kind of died down, but we still sporadically meet. Malaysia is good for cinema in that we get movies here right away (or sometimes even before the US), and it gets all the major Hollywood, Indian, and Chinese films (usually with English subtitles), as long as you don't mind putting up with the censorship (Malaysia used to be the #1 country for pirating movies, because people had to wait so long before it played in theatres here... they changed their strategy and now piracy is way down, apparently). I also discovered a few cinema clubs (but they're either inconvenient to get to or sporadic in their selection) which has allowed me access to a few underseen and unavailable films (notably from Indonesia). Then with all the forum challenges (last year I really pushed myself), I've been branching out a lot in what I see. I also bought a MUBI subscription last year (no Netflix yet... selection in Malaysia's not that great, and I'm worried that I'll get sucked in to all the tv shows people rave about... something I've managed to avoid thus far). This year I'm easing back and going at a slower pace and being more selective about what I see.

Another reason why I think 5 years makes sense, is that I think one part of being a cinephile is having a few niches that you are more developed in. Aside from queer and Canadian cinema, which I've been actively seeking out for over 15 years, in the past five I've also identified Balkan, Central Asian, and Southeast Asian cinema as areas that intrigue me more and have been actively delving into (largely influenced by living there, it seems).

I wrote way much more than intended, but that's my story so far. I still feel like quite a novice compared to most people on this forum, but at work I'm the de facto "movie guy". It's been an amazing five years for films for me, and I'm looking forward to another 50 with y'all.

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#42

Post by Lonewolf2003 » April 12th, 2019, 9:14 am

When did you move to Malaysia? Was that for your new job you were applying for in June 2014? Did you know you had to move there when you applied?

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#43

Post by Shagrrotten » April 12th, 2019, 3:07 pm

I would say that I'm about to be 20. I saw Taxi Driver as a 16 year old and it haunted me in a way that a movie had never done before. That was the beginning of my cinephile days. Then a couple years later I started exploring world cinema through Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Kurosawa, and Herzog.

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#44

Post by Fergenaprido » April 12th, 2019, 5:15 pm

Lonewolf2003 wrote:
April 12th, 2019, 9:14 am
When did you move to Malaysia? Was that for your new job you were applying for in June 2014? Did you know you had to move there when you applied?
Yes, I knew when I applied that it would require a move. I couldn't find anything worthwhile back home (by virtue of never having graduated from university, so no degree), and this particular company didn't care about that, and I was able to submit my official transcript in order to get the visa. When I started the process, it was just one of many jobs I was applying for (I'd also applied to work for the PanAm Games, and was really hoping to get that job, plus some other postings in Northern Canada), but as time went on it was the only one I was still in the running for, so when I received the offer at the beginning of August, I thought, why not? I moved to Malaysia in October 2014.

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#45

Post by Ebbywebby » April 13th, 2019, 2:13 am

cinewest wrote:
April 11th, 2019, 1:41 am
@Ebbywebby

"If I could do it over again, I would start keeping a film log back in the '80s and would give IMDb ratings to every film I see. But it's too late now...I seriously feel like I'm running out of older films that interest me. Hello barrel-bottom, nice to meet you."

Not sure what exactly you mean by "older films," but I have been surprised to discover how little people here are familiar with a recent decade like the 2000's, especially in terms of films made in another language other than English.
Well...at the moment, my watchlist contains exactly four features from the 2000s. I'm not pompously claiming that I've already seen every quality film from the 2000s, but I may have seen about all of them that would personally interest me.

The top 25 films from the forum's 2000s poll that I haven't seen:
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring
The Son
3-Iron
Hero
Tropical Malady (I walked out of this)
V for Vendetta
As I Was Moving Ahead Occasionally I Saw Brief Glimpses of Beauty
2046 (I'm fairly likely to see this)
Mysterious Skin (I'd watch that too...I think I saw a chunk of it in the distant past)
Syndromes and a Century (I do not like Applesauce Wienerschnitzel, as already demonstrated above)
The Fall (started to watch this once and was a lot less interested than expected)
Persepolis
Waltz with Bashir (semi-likely to see this, just because it's on the "366 Weird" list)
Head-On
The Child (I'm not really a Dardennes fan)
Friday Night
The Triplets of Belleville (maybe)
Letters from Iwo Jima
Love Exposure (sort of a watchlist runner-up...quite likely to see this)
Coraline
Dah (another "runner-up")
No Man's Land
Platform
Nobody Knows
Infernal Affairs

Shrug.

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#46

Post by RedHawk10 » April 13th, 2019, 4:00 am

8-9 years ago was when I saw The Seventh Seal as a youngster, which blew my mind and not only ignited my passion for films, but for art in general, really. So I'm coming up on a decade of being a movie buff.

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#47

Post by blocho » April 13th, 2019, 4:29 am

RedHawk10 wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:00 am
8-9 years ago was when I saw The Seventh Seal as a youngster, which blew my mind and not only ignited my passion for films, but for art in general, really. So I'm coming up on a decade of being a movie buff.
Seventh Seal was the first Bergman movie I saw, probably back around senior year of high school or first year of college. It definitely made a major impression.

How about a new question: what was the one or two movies that "blew your mind," or in more exact language, opened your eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do?

For me, it might have been freshman year of high school, when I saw Dr. Strangelove and A Clockwork Orange. I already loved movies at that point, but those movies really made me realize there was a huge world out there beyond my usual fare. The only other movie that might have made a similar impact on me was Strangers on a Train, which was my first Hitchcock, when I was maybe 10 or 11.

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#48

Post by GruesomeTwosome » April 13th, 2019, 5:16 am

blocho wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:29 am
How about a new question: what was the one or two movies that "blew your mind," or in more exact language, opened your eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do?

For me, it might have been freshman year of high school, when I saw Dr. Strangelove and A Clockwork Orange. I already loved movies at that point, but those movies really made me realize there was a huge world out there beyond my usual fare. The only other movie that might have made a similar impact on me was Strangers on a Train, which was my first Hitchcock, when I was maybe 10 or 11.
2001: A Space Odyssey and Eraserhead were the two for me, watched in close proximity to each other when I was in high school, and I saw them with my older brother. Before that, I’d say I was more of a movie fan than most of my friends, but still I was mostly just seeing whatever mainstream fare that was playing at the multiplex. Being exposed to those two films (and then more Kubrick and Lynch) was really the launching pad for me.
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#49

Post by cinewest » April 13th, 2019, 6:34 am

@Ebbywebby

You sounded bored and out of ideas in your original post, so I made a suggestion which has little to do with the forum's 2000 list.
In fact, you should have been able to infer from what I wrote that I don't think it's a good list, nor that the recommendation lists in general for that decade come close to touching upon the decade's wealth of good films.
Even the TSP top 1000 for the 21st Century fails to touch on quite a few of my favorites.

Here's a list of 100 that stand out for me: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls069706220/
Last edited by cinewest on April 15th, 2019, 3:10 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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#50

Post by mightysparks » April 13th, 2019, 7:13 am

blocho wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:29 am
How about a new question: what was the one or two movies that "blew your mind," or in more exact language, opened your eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do?
You know, I don't think there's ever been one for me. I guess there's a handful of 'memorable experiences' but I don't think I've had a film completely blow my mind :/
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#51

Post by maxwelldeux » April 13th, 2019, 7:36 am

blocho wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:29 am
How about a new question: what was the one or two movies that "blew your mind," or in more exact language, opened your eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do?
Oh that's tough - I'm immediately going to break the rules and name three. But one of the nice thing about being so "young" is that all these are relatively recent in memory...

1. Sunset Boulevard (1950).
This is the first movie I watched specifically because it was on a shit-ton of official ICM lists that I loved. Great story and great entertainment, which is what I always went for, but there was so much more - the mood, the sets, etc. This is the film that really cemented cinephilia as something I might want to stick with.

2a. 12 Angry Men (1957).
This is probably the first film that made me angry it was so good. I was familiar with this because my mother liked it, though I had never seen it. I expected to like it, but not this much. Immediate favorite (current #1). I loved it so much I made my wife watch it with me the following night. [Side note - if you like parodies, Amy Schumer's 12 Angry Men parody is truly amazing.]

2b. Brief Encounter (1945).
And this is the first movie I loved that I did not expect to like going into it (currently my #2). I felt every single moment of this. The mood, the feel, the love, the anguish was all perfect to me. This is the film that made me believe feelings could be captured that well.

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#52

Post by cinewest » April 13th, 2019, 8:42 am

Double post

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#53

Post by flaiky » April 13th, 2019, 11:30 am

blocho wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:29 am
How about a new question: what was the one or two movies that "blew your mind," or in more exact language, opened your eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do?
As a young teen, Pulp Fiction, The Shining and A Clockwork Orange all blew my mind, and I watched them over and over, but I don't credit them with triggering my full cinephilia. Two films stand out for that: The White Ribbon, which really made me see film as an art form, and Sunset Boulevard, which taught me that "old black and white films" could also be incredible. It was soon after watching both of these that I felt obsessively compelled to watch as many films as possible.
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#54

Post by albajos » April 13th, 2019, 11:52 am

I think it might be Ben-Hur. It might still be the one movie I have seen the most (excluding stuff that is on TV every year)

But Ben-Hur was also a connection to my dad. He was working as a machinist when that one was in cinema, so he ran it (about) 18 times himself.

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#55

Post by RBG » April 13th, 2019, 1:01 pm

definitely seven samurai seen on pbs sometime in the 80s!? i should also probably mention kaiju marathons at the house of a friend with a japanese mom :thumbsup: hi naomi
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#56

Post by pitchorneirda » April 13th, 2019, 1:18 pm

"Holy Motors", definitely, was the most special movie I have ever seen, in a sense that the "arty" style seems particularly alien to me when examined cursorily, but it reads my mind, my hopes and my fears as in an open book. And yet it's a "total movie" in the same sense there is a "total football", it's about life, love, the film industry, politics etc. at the same time.

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#57

Post by cinewest » April 13th, 2019, 2:56 pm

pitchorneirda wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 1:18 pm
"Holy Motors", definitely, was the most special movie I have ever seen, in a sense that the "arty" style seems particularly alien to me when examined cursorily, but it reads my mind, my hopes and my fears as in an open book. And yet it's a "total movie" in the same sense there is a "total football", it's about life, love, the film industry, politics etc. at the same time.
Absolutely love Holy Motors, and can totally see this one being a mindblower for those that can tune in

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#58

Post by Lonewolf2003 » April 13th, 2019, 2:58 pm

blocho wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:29 am
RedHawk10 wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:00 am
8-9 years ago was when I saw The Seventh Seal as a youngster, which blew my mind and not only ignited my passion for films, but for art in general, really. So I'm coming up on a decade of being a movie buff.
Seventh Seal was the first Bergman movie I saw, probably back around senior year of high school or first year of college. It definitely made a major impression.

How about a new question: what was the one or two movies that "blew your mind," or in more exact language, opened your eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do?

For me, it might have been freshman year of high school, when I saw Dr. Strangelove and A Clockwork Orange. I already loved movies at that point, but those movies really made me realize there was a huge world out there beyond my usual fare. The only other movie that might have made a similar impact on me was Strangers on a Train, which was my first Hitchcock, when I was maybe 10 or 11.
Reservoir Dogs, but I saw that way before my "birth" as a cinephile. Saw it somewhere in the late 90s. I remember it opening my eyes to what movies can do outside of the norm, like playing with story structure and I was also astonished that the movie music came from sources in the movie and actually stopped when outside of the character ears. And this all while being an absolutely cool and highly quotable movie. That's the first movie that opened my eyes there is more than the standard (American) comedies, action, Disney and other blockbusters.

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#59

Post by sol » April 13th, 2019, 3:06 pm

blocho wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:29 am
How about a new question: what was the one or two movies that "blew your mind," or in more exact language, opened your eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do?
I would like to say *Corpus Callosum, but I don't know if that's a legitimate choice since I only came across it fairly recently in my filmgoing career. Snow's film did, however, make me reconsider experimental anti-narrative filmmaking - something that I had previously always thought was better left to shorts rather than full length features.

Some of the documentaries that I watched as part of a uni course (Cane Toads, Broomfield films, Wisemans) were probably quite pivotal too since I was only really interested in narrative movies during my formative film buff years.

I don't know if I can pinpoint a single narrative movie that really "opened [my] eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do". My cinephile journey began fairly young and I have always loved narrative movies as far back as I can remember. Some films have of course made me go 'whoa' over the years (The Cremator in particular) but I don't know if any have really changed my approach to cinema as much as those docs and the films of Michael Snow.
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#60

Post by OldAle1 » April 13th, 2019, 3:20 pm

My journey into cinephilia, briefly...

I always liked movies, but didn't get to see very many at all in my early years - as another person who hit adolescence before there was video - and who lived out in the country where cable wouldn't have been available, and having cheapskate parents who never even got a VHS player until maybe 1990 or so, I was restricted to four TV channels and the VERY occasional cinema experience. But even in those early years, 1973-7 or so, I was falling in love at least with genre films on TV, like The Time Machine and the old Flash Gordon serials. For many reasons I never had the issues with older films - or older anything for that matter - that many young people and some not-young-anymore have; I always looked forward to visiting my grandparents in Ohio who lived in a house built in 1850, near the oldest city in the midwest with some 18th century buildings, and much about my youth involved the past in some way.

Star Wars got me to really LOVE movies though, and from that biggest step there are several intermediary ones to Full Blown Cinephilia - seeing foreign films, on TV (Grand Illusion is the earliest I remember, maybe around 1977 also, and Das Boot in the cinema when new), moving to Chicago and going to school and getting interested in watching films on campus - they did a Kurosawa retro and a silent film series my first year, 1983-4, and finally starting to work in video stores in 1987, meeting several friends who were more developed in their film passions than me, and starting to read criticism regularly - Ebert, Kehr and Rosenbaum were the locals that I read most, but before long I was picking up the occasional Film Comment or Sight and Sound also. And going to the arthouse cinemas and eventually the local film festival, and starting to build a collection on VHS.

To simplify - as a "movie lover" I'm about 42, as a "cinephile", more like 32.
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#61

Post by OldAle1 » April 13th, 2019, 3:58 pm

Oh and as to blocho's question:
How about a new question: what was the one or two movies that "blew your mind," or in more exact language, opened your eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do?
Star Wars - seen in 1977 at 11. I was into sci-fi and fantasy literature - the pulpy stuff mostly though I think I knew about Tolkien or had started reading The Hobbit, and I also read Dune at about the same time - and comics, so this was perfect - it was the first time I got the same kind of thrill out of a film as I did out of reading.

Distant Voices, Still Lives - seen in the fall of 1989. This opened up the possibilities of the non-chronological or fractured narrative. It is possible that I had already seen Resnais' first two features before this but if I had they didn't make as much impression as Davies' masterpiece (and they still don't). Within the next couple of years I saw The Mirror and Once Upon a Time in America which furthered my interest in such methods of storytelling.

The Sacrifice - seen in 1989-90 I think, in the winter, on VHS. The first Tarkovsky I saw and the only one I saw first on video (it might have been the only one available at the time) , it was probably the film that more than any other single example set me on the road to the kind of cinephilia I still experience today. And it's long-shot technique and relative slowness was something I either hadn't experienced before or hadn't connected with.

Ménilmontant (1926) - seen around 2005 on DVD, part of Kino's "Avant Garde" set. I had always watched shorts, including some experimental shorts - I saw several Brakhage films and Buñuel's Un chien andalou in the cinema years earlier for example - but for whatever reason it was seeing this, and that 2-disc set as a whole, that really jump-started a greater and continuing interest in the avant-garde, and in searching out those 10 or 20 or 30 minute films that can be just as compelling and offer just as much in story or narrative or art as a feature.

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#62

Post by joachimt » April 13th, 2019, 5:33 pm

The first time I remember thinking "hey, old movies are really cool" was when I watched Metropolis.
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#63

Post by cinewest » April 14th, 2019, 1:41 am

@OldAle1,

You bring up a very good point about early exposure to things like B&W movies (I might add subtitles), or whatever having big influence on what we are able to accept as viewers.

Our Background has a huge influence on our concepts and our tastes, though in part what people are talking about, here, are the moments when there are conceptual breakthroughs that essentially change or enrich our tastes.

What often happens with people, though, is that they are unable to reform notions so connected to identity after a certain age
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#64

Post by RedHawk10 » April 14th, 2019, 10:00 pm

blocho wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:29 am
How about a new question: what was the one or two movies that "blew your mind," or in more exact language, opened your eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do?
Well, definitely The Seventh Seal, as I said before. But the other ones that truly impacted me on that super high level are Mulholland Drive (especially when I "got" the story) and Love Exposure.

There's a lot of movies that knocked me out, but those three were the life-changing ones, so to speak.

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#65

Post by hurluberlu » April 16th, 2019, 6:05 pm

Lost Highway in theater (1997) was my first cinematic mind blowing experience but my cinephile career only started in 2004 when I started to watch cheap DVDs amassed while travelling in Asia without knowing what I was buying: the first unexpected trigger was Wild Strawberries and I registered to IMDb shortly after.
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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Armoreska
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#66

Post by Armoreska » January 7th, 2020, 2:41 pm

Fergenaprido wrote:
April 12th, 2019, 5:15 pm
Lonewolf2003 wrote:
April 12th, 2019, 9:14 am
When did you move to Malaysia? Was that for your new job you were applying for in June 2014? Did you know you had to move there when you applied?
Yes, I knew when I applied that it would require a move. I couldn't find anything worthwhile back home (by virtue of never having graduated from university, so no degree), and this particular company didn't care about that, and I was able to submit my official transcript in order to get the visa. When I started the process, it was just one of many jobs I was applying for (I'd also applied to work for the PanAm Games, and was really hoping to get that job, plus some other postings in Northern Canada), but as time went on it was the only one I was still in the running for, so when I received the offer at the beginning of August, I thought, why not? I moved to Malaysia in October 2014.
What do you think of life in Malaysia?
re
https://freedomhouse.org/report/freedom ... 9/malaysia
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currently working towards a vegan/low waste world + thru such film lists (besides TV): 2010s bests, RW Fassbinder, Luis Bunuel, Yasujiro Ozu, Eric Rohmer, Visual Effects nominees, kid-related stuff, great animes (mini-serie or feature), very 80s movies, 17+ sci-fi lists on watchlist, ENVIRO, remarkable Silent Films and Pre-Code (exploring 1925 atm) and every shorts and docu list I'm aware of and
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1434
and "Gordon" Liu Chia-Hui/Liu Chia-Liang and Yuen Woo-ping and "Sammo" Hung Kam-bo

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Fergenaprido
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#67

Post by Fergenaprido » January 7th, 2020, 3:40 pm

Armoreska wrote:
January 7th, 2020, 2:41 pm
Fergenaprido wrote:
April 12th, 2019, 5:15 pm
Lonewolf2003 wrote:
April 12th, 2019, 9:14 am
When did you move to Malaysia? Was that for your new job you were applying for in June 2014? Did you know you had to move there when you applied?
Yes, I knew when I applied that it would require a move. I couldn't find anything worthwhile back home (by virtue of never having graduated from university, so no degree), and this particular company didn't care about that, and I was able to submit my official transcript in order to get the visa. When I started the process, it was just one of many jobs I was applying for (I'd also applied to work for the PanAm Games, and was really hoping to get that job, plus some other postings in Northern Canada), but as time went on it was the only one I was still in the running for, so when I received the offer at the beginning of August, I thought, why not? I moved to Malaysia in October 2014.
What do you think of life in Malaysia?
re
https://freedomhouse.org/report/freedom ... 9/malaysia
I'm ready to leave. If all goes as planned this year, there's a good chance I'll move to Estonia where my company has another office. If that doesn't pan out, I may just quit my job and look for a new one. Ideally, I want to move back to Europe or Canada, or maybe try out South America. I also met with a former colleague over the Christmas break, and her husband thinks I'd be great at his brother's company doing operations management, but it's in LA and I have serious reservations about living in the States.

As for the Freedom World Report, I'm surprised Malaysia scores that highly, to be honest. Yes, there have been some minor improvements since the elections last year, most notably regarding the corruption of the previous prime minister, but a lot of the changes are negligible or superficial, and most of the big ones that were promised still haven't been implemented 18 months later. Will be interesting to see if there is any additional improvement in the 2020 report, or if some gains from 2019 slide back to where they were before. Without questioning their methodology (which appears to be quite rigorous), I think they're too generous in their scoring for Malaysia on a number of points.

Compared to other countries I've lived in or spend a significant amount of time in, I'm surprised Malaysia ranks higher than some others:

Freedom World's Scores
99 - Canada
94 - Spain
94 - Estonia
85 - Croatia
52 - Malaysia
48 - Kenya
22 - Kazakhstan

Overall, I think FW is too generous for most countries (including Canada, where they only dock 1 point for our treatment of indigenous peoples, when they really should do so in other areas as well), though that score for Kazakhstan is surprisingly low. Malaysia tied with Ethiopia for the most improved nation in 2018 (the year covered in the 2019 report), increasing +7, but I think the improvements in Ethiopia are more tangible and robust than in Malaysia.

Now, granted, this report looks at a relatively narrow definition of freedom (political rights and civil liberties) that I don't think give a full picture of life in a particular country (for example, I felt safer living in Kazakhstan than I do in Malaysia, and far safer than I did in Kenya), and being a non-citizen of these countries means that I have a different perspective and face different (and sometimes less) obstacles than citizens do, so I don't mean to infer that my perception is the only/accurate one. With Malaysia specifically, being queer also means that I'm more adversely affected by some of their laws and policies.

All in all, I was only planning to live here for 2-3 years, and never expected I'd stay this long. Malaysia has its pros and cons, and many of my fellow expat colleagues love living here (mainly for the climate and the fact that they can live at a higher relative wealth level than in their home country), but for me it doesn't provide what I'm looking for (personal safety, possibility of citizenship/transferable pension, progressive culture, ...) so it's time to move on.

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Lakigigar
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#68

Post by Lakigigar » January 7th, 2020, 5:16 pm

2015 is my birth year as a cinephile. In my childhood i know i detested movies, and hated them. You couldn't make me watch a movie. I've started to watch movies on school that i liked (Klass, Mean Creek, Das Experiment, American History X, ... ), which i all liked. At the time, i really liked 2012, i have an old list of my favourites but I somehow unfortunately lost it. But it had movies like Twilight in it. The first real good movie i watched was The Exorcist, and when I started watching Cidade de Deus, i really got into movies. Cidade de Deus is still in my top 10, and The Exorcist still in my top 20. Now i have watched around 850 movies, almost all in the timespan of like 5 years.

I'm 23 years old so i hope i still have a good future moviewise ahead. Tomorrow i'm 24.

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#69

Post by Lakigigar » January 7th, 2020, 5:24 pm

blocho wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:29 am
RedHawk10 wrote:
April 13th, 2019, 4:00 am
8-9 years ago was when I saw The Seventh Seal as a youngster, which blew my mind and not only ignited my passion for films, but for art in general, really. So I'm coming up on a decade of being a movie buff.
How about a new question: what was the one or two movies that "blew your mind," or in more exact language, opened your eyes to a completely new concept of what movies could be and do?
The Exorcist and Cidade de Deus for me. But i have to watch that old movie that will get me into old movies, although i've liked Rear Window, Vertigo, Psycho a lot. I think i would like black and white movies, but not as much as recent movies. And to be fair, i'm sure there are older movies than Rear Window i'll like, probably from Hitchcock (i have two untouched Hitchcock blu ray boxes at home), but some others as well. I will give M - Eine Stadt Sucht Eine Morder a try in one of the upcoming weeks. I have this list prepared to watch before the end of the nominations period for ICM Favourite movies.

1) Focus on Italian movies for Italy list + focus on ICM Favourites as well (combined)
2) Italian movies i have on dvd / br (combined icm favourites / italy focus)
3) Focus on ICM Favourites
4) Focus on ICM Favourites but what i have on dvd / br (watched yesterday paris, texas)
SpoilerShow
Ladri di biciclette
Seven Samurai
Dogville
La meglio gioventu
Il conformista
Once Upon a Time in America
Magnolia
The House that Jack Built
Il conformista
Suburra
Dogman
Le conseguenze dell'amore
Ladri di biciclette
Suspiria
La stanza del figlio
Le meraviglie
Lazzaro Felice
Una giornata particuloro
The Great Beauty

Profondo Rosso
Suspiria
Inferno
Tenebre
Phenomena

A l'interieur
haute tension
Festen
Aguirre, der zorn Gottes
Picnic at Hanging Rock
Walkabout
Fitzcarraldo
Repulsion
Les diaboliques
The Innocents
Ghost World
A Woman Under The Influence
Network
La double vie de Veronique
Solyaris
Casablanca
La passion de Jeanne D'Arc
Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans
Samaria
Joker
Princess Mononoke
Witness for the Prosecution
M - Eine Stadt Sucht Eine Murder
The Sting
Double Indenmnity
Kimi no na wa.
Capharnaum
To Kill a Mockingbird
The Apartment
L.A. Confidential
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
Rashomon
Yojinbo
Unforgiven
Some Like It Hot
All About Eve
Ran
Idi i smotri
Tengoku to jigoku
Judgment at Nuremberg
Det sjunde inseglet
There Will Be Blood
The Third Man
Gran Torino
Memories of Murder
Gwoemul
Madeo
Persona
Cool Hand Luke
Network
Stand By Me
Mad Max: Fury Road
Platoon
Nausicaa and the Valley of Wind
Helter Skelter
Melancholia
The Tree of Life
Seul contre tous
The Thin Red Line
La haine
The Return
Double Indemnity
Last Year at Marienbad
L.A. Confidential
Suna no onna
Platoon
Raise the Red Lantern
The Florida Project
Perfect Blue
Cashback
Don't Look Now
Only Lovers Left Alive
Tengoku to jigoku
Garden State
The Killing of a Sacred Deer
Dogtooth
Birds of Passage
Der Himmel uber Berlin
Suicide Circle
Guilty of Romance
Strange Circus
Noriko's Dinner Table
The Whispering Star
Tokyo Tribe
Tag
The Forest of Love
Kamikaze girls

Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Edge of Tomorrow
Lady Bird
You Were Never Really Here
Kawaki
Stand By Me
Annihilation
Lion
Mulholland Dr.
Dare no shiranai
Dolls
Rosemary's Baby
Still Walking
Blade Runner
Blade Runner 2049
Stalker
Persona
Donnie Brasco
Climax
Shoplifters
Sunset Blvd.
The Birds
North by Northwest
The Godfather part I
The Godfather part II
The Godfather part III
Joker
Das Boot
Embrace of the Serpent
El Secreto de sus Ojos
Warrior
The Big Lebowski
Ah-ga-ssi
Dial M for Murder
Mother!
Reconstruction
Martyrs
Sin City
Kill Bill vol. 1
Kill Bill vol. 2
Burning
Goksung
Mandy
Forushande
Heartstone
The Chaser

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Tim2460
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#70

Post by Tim2460 » January 7th, 2020, 7:25 pm

Interesting Question.
I have always considered myself a cinema/movie lover.
I have a lot of memories
My first movie @ the cinema was The Rescuers 1977 ... It was scarry ;)
then Seing the Return of the Jedi forest chase from the first row.
And the last coup de coeur was Nikita... i had no spoil at all ... Seen it once ... Then imédiatly baught another seat for the next screening ,)

Had no huge surprise til lthat time and i don't go as often as before, being equipped with an Home-Cinema now.

Was trying to use the IMDB Top250 histry site https://250.took.nl/compare/full to better collect intersting movies (as i'm even more an collector than an movie fan) and then discovered ICM .... in late 2017.

Then watched a lot of weird Movies i had never heard about, found some great people on the forum and watch way too much movies / day theses last 7-8 month.

Got to slow down a bit ,)

Only 3 years Film Fanatic... Even if i had the book for a much longer time hehe

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45MinuteZoom
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#71

Post by 45MinuteZoom » January 7th, 2020, 7:36 pm

Either 9 or 10 years old, that was when I started taking it much more seriously. And definitely after 2013 when I joined icheckmovies. Joining made movie watching much more of a competition, I tried for a long time to catch up to some college friends.

Earlier on than that, I really liked the Netflix mailed disks. Casablanca, The Day the Earth Stood Still and Dr. Strangelove were my favorites from that era. I also remember wanted to watch all of the Oscar best picture winners.

Early on hot takes: I thought Night of the Living Dead was very boring and that The Exorcist was just too slow. My friends and I hated Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon because it wasn’t funny enough, like Kung Pow, but it couldn’t have been that since that came out two years later.

Watched a lot of movies with my friends in High School. Spirited Away and Children of Men were big in that era. Also Reservoir Dogs, though I hated the Kill Bills. The book store in town also opened up an art house kind of theater when I saw Rashomon, Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, and An American in Paris, but all probably too soon. My friend and I tried to watch Seven Samurai but quit 30 min in.

Worked in a movie theater from fall of 2006-end of 2011. Black Swan was really important to me here. Also finally watched 2001 after having been told it was too boring for years.

Last movie to really open my eyes was Wavelength since it was so radically different from anything else I had ever seen. I was lucky enough to hear Michael Snow talk about it years after seeing it.

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#72

Post by kingink » January 8th, 2020, 9:26 am

I guess I am 26. When I was thirteen I started keeping a log with all the movies I liked. I always watched some old movies because my mom loved watching old movies from all around the world when I was young so I watched many of them with her. But 13 was when I started watching movies for myself (other than Superman and Star Wars I mean, with which I practically grew up). I used to tape black & white films etc in my VCR and watched them afterwards. When I was 16 I started keeping a log of every film I watched and I rated each and every one of them. This is why it was easy for me to just rate everything on imdb when I found it. I still have those papers. Funny stuff we did before internet. When I was 16 I watched The Butterfly kiss by Winterbottom which blew my mind and it really clicked my hardcore cinephile addiction, but I will set 13 and my first film logs as a start.

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#73

Post by Lakigigar » January 10th, 2020, 11:09 am

16 december 2014: my top 10

1 Cidade de Deus my current 8
2 Pirates of the Caribeaan: Curse of the Black Pearl just outside my top 100 but i expect a big drop this year
3 Iron Man outside my top 100 but inside top 250. Still think it's one of Marvel's best films
4 American Pie inside my top 250 but outside top 100
5 Titanic still inside my top 50 but i expect a drop this year
6 Bad Boys 2 (vooral vanwege de actie - verhaal is minder dan andere films in top 10) outside my top 250
7 Intouchables felt outside my top 100 last year
8 Saw just barely inside my top 100 but i expect a drop this year, and it might drop out of the top 100
9 National Treasure barely inside my top 250
10 Ice Age just outside my top 250

My top 10 now
1. Kreuzweg
2. Respire
3. Assassination Nation
4. Suspiria
5. The Neon Demon
6. Taxi Driver
7. Bom yeoreum gaeul gyeoul geurigo Bom
8. Cidade de Deus
9. Eyes Wide Shut
10. The Fly

Like i said i only send in a top 100 / 150 for ICM Favourite movies, i expect only Cidade de Deus, Titanic, Saw and maybe Intouchables to make it. Maybe Pirates of the Caribbean but i expect a drop this year.

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#74

Post by AliciaHub » January 11th, 2020, 9:58 am

That's an excellent question...
I have always been interested in movies, and in my teens, in the years 93-94, I started keeping track of all the movies I saw (at the time, it was on notebooks). I had bought a magazine when across the Channel, in the UK, Timeout I think, and I ticked all the movies of year 92 that I had seen.
But I think I really became a cinephile on the day of my 20th birthday in 1999, when instead of studying for the most important exam of my life that I had to sit for the day after, I went out, bought a couple of video of "old movies" (From here to Eternity and my all time fav Notorious). I watched them, and there it was...

So my cinephile age is 21. And I have been an IMDB member since 2001.

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