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Which films Did You See Last Week? 06/01/19 - 12/01/19

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Onderhond
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Re: Which films Did You See Last Week? 06/01/19 - 12/01/19

#41

Post by Onderhond » January 15th, 2019, 3:28 pm

sol wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 2:46 pm
Just sticking with the Netflix website.
Myeah, the Netflix site/apps are horrible. They're geared at TV viewers really. "Don't give them too much choice and choose for them". Even though TV is pretty much dead, most people are still zombie watchers.

I use third party sites (like this on) for keeping track of new releases. Also, Netflix is not really the kind of service where you look for things you want to watch (they have about 3000 titles in stock with hundreds of thousands titles out there, odds are small you will find the thing you are looking for). Instead it's better to keep track of what they offer and see whether any of these titles tickle your curiosity. I discovered quite a few unknown gems like that.

If you are only interested in new/acclaimed films of course, then Netflix' offerings are kinda slim, but that's exactly because their range is quite broad ;)

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#42

Post by maxwelldeux » January 15th, 2019, 5:48 pm

sol wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 2:46 pm
Onderhond wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 2:39 pm
sol wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 2:23 pm
The range of Netflix Australia at least is certainly very limited.
Are you using third party services/websites to keep up to date with their content or are you just sticking with the Netflix app? I must say I'm often surprised how broad (though not very deep) the Netflix catalogue really is. It's a bit hard to believe Netflix Belgium would have a broader range than Netflix Australia.
Just sticking with the Netflix website.

I have searched both Letterboxd and iCM for lists of films available on Netflix Australia and was only able to found out-of-date lists. :shrug:
https://www.justwatch.com/au/provider/netflix

From there, you can filter by genre, year... They grab data through APIs or web scraping, so it's about the most up-to-date service I've seen.

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#43

Post by OldAle1 » January 15th, 2019, 5:54 pm

Last week was the most minimal movie-watching week for me since May 2017 - at least. Having a severe cold all week, no mental or physical energy, I certainly didn't go out to movies and watching anything that required any thinking at all was too much. Thus, my incredibly tiny list - though filled out by more TV than usual -

This Film ROCKED
This Film SUCKED

Logan's Run (Michael Anderson, 1976) (re-watch)

Probably 4th viewing but first on BD which definitely made a difference over previous viewings. I think this was first broadcast on TV in advance of the 1977-8 TV series and that I first saw it then, before seeing about half the episodes of the TV show at the time. Early in my sci-fi obsession, and also early in adolescence I'm sure I thought most of it was pretty cool and definitely thought leading lady Jenny Agutter as Jessica 6 was pretty hot. Subsequent viewings deflated some of my enthusiasm and I saw the weaknesses more, particularly screenplay issues and huge plot holes and goofs - the relative confidence with which Logan and Jessica move through the Outside for example despite not even knowing it existed days earlier, or the fact that we never see anyone eat food and never have the faintest idea where they could get it or how. But I have to say I'm warming more to the positive elements these days - the production design is frequently lovely, and the feeling of tension in Logan and Jessica's run is palpable. And a great Jerry Goldsmith score always helps as well. It's still pretty far from what I'd call a favorite and certainly doesn't to mind deserve comparison with the best in the genre, but it's a nice time capsule of what a relatively "big" SF film was in the USA just before Star Wars came along and upended everything.

From Hell It Came (Dan MIlner, 1957)

And back to Hell it should go...there's a reason it was there in the first place. Godawful monster movie of the Creeping Terror variety where the monster is so slow - and without any powers other than crushing people - that suspension of disbelief in it's ability to terrify and kill lots of people is impossible. A man is killed on a Pacific island for consorting too much with the Evil White Doctors who tried to save his father, and he vows vengeance and comes back as "Tabanga", a voiceless mobile tree stump that moves at probably 1 km/hour at best. Is it a spoiler to say that he goes after all of his enemies - the three who conspired to kill his mortal self - and that the white scientists of course save the day? Who cares. Definitely pretty funny at times, with universally terrible acting and FX, very much worthy of so-bad-it's-good status.

The Black Hole (Tibor Takács, 2006)

Even worse than the previous film but not enjoyable enough to be worth considering for future b-movie festivals is this Sci Fi Channel release starring apparently hard-up 80s stars Judd Nelson (who seems drunk all the time - I would have been too if I were reduced to this) and Kristy Swanson as a couple of scientists/lovers at a lab in St. Louis who have to stop a black hole that's been accidentally formed from gobbling up the city and then the world. Oh and there's also a slow-moving electrical monster that was somehow created at the same time as the black hole but is independent of it, and they have to get the two together or something because something something stupid worthless mumbo jumbo who the fuck cares? FX are what you'd expect from a 2006 TV movie that you've never heard of. Very close to unbearable.

Capricorn One (Peter Hyams, 1978) (re-watch)

2nd or 3rd viewing of this I think but first in a long time - only remembered the vaguest details and of course the overall plot. It's a good one to go into blind so I will not get into plot details at all beyond mentioning that it falls very much into the "70s paranoid conspiracy" genre of American film, and while it's far from the best example, it's another film that like LR above I'm starting to enjoy more, and forgive more for it's manifest faults. The biggest problem here is the biggest problem in most of Hyams' films, which is his writing. He's got a reasonably good visual sense - and in later films he's often acted as his own DP - and a competent director of action sequences; there's a pretty solid speeding car sequence in the middle of the film and a helicopter/airplane chase later on. And he's all right with actors though Elliott Gould probably didn't need the help at this point for this kind of role (he's the crusading reporter who's always in trouble for following the controversial or crazy lead), but though the basic idea here - a conspiracy involving a mission to Mars - is a pretty good one, the particular ways in which he flips between his various plot threads, and the near-nil backgrounds for all of the characters quickly divorce one from much sense of realism, or from really caring. And yet the last sequence still holds power - and maybe more so in an age even more cynical than the post-Watergate period when this was made.

TV:

The X-Files - Season 2 - Episode 12 - Aubrey (Rob Bowman, 1995)
The X-Files - Season 2 - Episode 13 - Irresistable (David Nutter, 1995)

I never watched this show regularly when it was originally on - never a regular TV watcher to begin with and this started out during the peak years of my cinephilia when I was seeing 250-350 films per year in the cinema. I think the only show I watched at the time was The Simpsons; perhaps Frasier as well. But like several other shows from the 90s-00s including Babylon-5 and Battlestar Galactica it's right up my alley and something I wouldn't mind going through someday. So having this on TV on a day when I was particularly unable to concentrate was great.

"Aubrey" deals with a long-cold murder case re-entering daylight, and Mulder and Scully finding out that the local cops on the scene may have more to do with things than it originally seems. "Irresistable" is about a fetishist who mutilates dead bodies but may go on to the living if he's not found - I was reminded heavily of Se7en at times for whatever reason. Both kept me awake at least but it's hard to say more at this point, I was just too out of it. I definitely do want to prioritize this series though

Frasier - Season 1 - Episodes 1-4 - The Good Son/Space Quest/Dinner at Eight/I Hate Frasier Crane (1993 - first three dir James Burrows, 4th David Lee) (rewatches - at least 4th viewing for each)

There's a moment in the second half of the first episode - just a minute or so - that crystallizes the greatness of this show for me. Frasier has just taken his disabled father in to live with him, the two aren't getting along and fighting, and Frasier says something like "would it kill you to show some thanks, some appreciation, just once?". A lesser show would probably have had a tearful embrace at this point, or a snide jokey putdown on the part of the father, Martin; here, we just have Martin stare at his son for about 10 seconds, expressionless, and then call his dog. This show was willing to take it's time developing it's characters and their relationships, and nearly always - despite being a comedy first and foremost - tried to show that relationships aren't easy and aren't a matter of the right one-liner or joke or maudlin moment.

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#44

Post by OldAle1 » January 15th, 2019, 6:50 pm

&sol - Nice to see someone else who likes Zvenigora, seems like most of the comments I've seen about Dovzhenko in general have been fairly negative; also love Die Puppe, might be my favorite Lubitsch in fact, and Your Name which floored me. Liked Eighth Grade a fair amount but I guess didn't love it like many.

&PdA - Deux fois is a marvel; both Ozu films are really good though I definitely like the earlier film more; Strange Days is high on my re-watch list, no real memory of it; The Driver was pretty cool. And I'll echo sol's comment about the "didn't finish" though I don't expect anything

&Onderhond - shockingly, I actually kind of liked Crank, though it'd probably be 2 1/2 on your scale. I can enjoy this kind of mindless shlock if it has enough - or the right kind of style, but it's virtually never going to be something I'd call great. A Matter of Life and Death on the other hand, I would call great, though it's at most Powell's 10th-11th best film. Parenthood is another film I think about revisiting sometimes - 30 years now, wow - but it's Ron Howard, chances are strong I'd like it less (it's the only film of the dozen I've seen I rated higher than 5 I think).

&Vik - seems about right for Sniper which I probably overrated cuz Clint; LOVED Laurence Anyways and liked The Leopard Man a lot

&joachim - not as fond of A Quiet Place as most though I did like it overall - just too schematic and obviously artificial in it's construction I guess; mostly agree on Fences; no real memory of the Ozu but I liked it 20 years ago or whatever; liked Lust for Life a bit more than you, Tarzan a bit less - I don't really like any Disney films post-Beauty and the Beast very much frankly; I rather liked Elf surprisingly, and I'm not a fan of Ferrell either - but I'm very soft on Christmas films

&mighty - Solyaris is, like all of Tarkovsky's features, one of my favorites but I haven't seen it since probably 2000 and I may well re-watch it this month, hell maybe tonight. ST Beyond I guess I liked but have no real memory of it, just as I have no memory of the other recent ST films. Modern action blockbusters just fucking rot your brain, it's sad that ST is now part of this problem.

&peep - Time Travellers is pretty cool yeah - have you seen 1960's Beyond the Time Barrier? That's truly a great example of how to do time travel on a low budget. It Came from Outer Space and it's near-duplicate-titled friend are both also above-average for what they are, and of course Plan 9 is the second-greatest film ever made after Glen or Glenda.

&carmel - those 3 features all rock, can't remember if I've seen the Kirsanoff and my kompyuter is too slow now for me to open another screen and check

&coryn - haven't seen Irreversible or Like Father Like Son; like all the rest to one degree or another, esp Phantom Thread & Blade Runner. Oh, except for Love Actually which I violently hated.

&Grue - not gotten to the new Coen yet but maybe in the next week or two

&GWH - I need to see Arkadin again, I only saw it once, in the cinema, probably the "Corinth" version but couldn't say for sure at this point. I have the Criterion and if I go ahead with my Orson Welles project this year I'll likely watch all three versions and read the novel but the chances of that...??? I watched Le doulos quite recently and loved it, probably my favorite of Melville's overtly noir films; I just saw Beale Street yesterday and probably agree almost entirely, I hope to write it up at a bit of length for next week.

&mdf - I've actually seen one of yours! My thoughts on The Favourite were in one of the last few weekly threads, suffice it to say I largely agree. Also want to see Kurt Russell doing Santa but might not happen till next year.

&45 - only seen Bill & Ted which I like more than you I guess though I like the sequel more. Very cool that you saw Empire, I suspect I wouldn't be willing to spend the time on that now even if I had the opportunity though I might've back in the 90s.

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#45

Post by RBG » January 15th, 2019, 7:08 pm

i didn't see much either but was prepping for a 1994 poll

Image

In the Heat of the Sun 1994 Directed by Jiang Wen -- i see why people love this, was into it myself until a certain turn of events really pissed me off 3/5

Image

Back to Back, Face to Face 1994 Directed by Huang Jianxin -- very dark comedy of the bureaucracy that deserves much better subs!! 3.5/5 maybe 4

Image

Ermo 1994 Directed by Zhou Xiaowen -- good stuff about the dream of capitalism 3.5/5

Image

Casa de Lava 1994 Directed by Pedro Costa -- excellent mashup of stromboli and i walked with a zombie. technical brilliance! 4/5

Image

Crooklyn 1994 Directed by Spike Lee -- *sob* all the feels 3.5/5
icm + ltbxd

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#46

Post by joachimt » January 15th, 2019, 7:31 pm

sol wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 2:46 pm
I have searched both Letterboxd and iCM for lists of films available on Netflix Australia and was only able to found out-of-date lists. :shrug:
There's only one person on iCM who's determined enough to keep such a list up-to-date every month. :rolleyes:
Unfortunately for you that person keeps a Dutch Netflix list up-to-date. :P
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#47

Post by joachimt » January 15th, 2019, 7:34 pm

RBG wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 7:08 pm
Back to Back, Face to Face 1994 Directed by Huang Jianxin -- very dark comedy of the bureaucracy that deserves much better subs!! 3.5/5 maybe 4
The first version of those subs had a line saying "Argo fuck yourself". :lol:
Is that screenshot still somewhere?
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#48

Post by joachimt » January 15th, 2019, 7:38 pm

joachimt wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 7:34 pm
RBG wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 7:08 pm
Back to Back, Face to Face 1994 Directed by Huang Jianxin -- very dark comedy of the bureaucracy that deserves much better subs!! 3.5/5 maybe 4
The first version of those subs had a line saying "Argo fuck yourself". :lol:
Is that screenshot still somewhere?
Found it!

viewtopic.php?p=323681#p323681
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#49

Post by RBG » January 15th, 2019, 7:44 pm

zhangalan wrote:
July 3rd, 2015, 2:10 pm
After monty's reply I believe it's due to my poor sub.
Now I should rename it Bad Too Bad, Facepalm
:facepalm:
i think this is a v good film but the subs were somewhat alienating. a lot of it was very funny (intentionally so). still i probs woulda voted fejos too
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#50

Post by 45MinuteZoom » January 15th, 2019, 8:01 pm

Sol: It’s been a while since seeing Vinyl but I do remember how terrible all the dialog sounded. A tv show horror host from DC, Count Gore de Vol did call it the worst movie he’s ever seen, but it wasn’t that bad. Always happy to see love for Eighth Grade.

Perception: For didn’t finish, does that mean you only made it 12 minutes into the Suspiria remake? That remake was such a disappointment to me.

Onderhond: I really liked Jeff, Who Lives at Home while going through my mumblecore phase. Which of its peers did you like best?

Victor: That’s a good rating for Song to Song. How do you compare it to other Malick movies?

Joachimt:
SpoilerShow
The dogs in that movie did seem to have it rough. All the stuffed dog heads were something else. And they definitely needed to walk Borras

Mightsparks: Did you watch the Purge tv show at all? I was wondering how that compared to the movies.

Peeptoad: Sorry, haven’t seen any of those.

Carmel: I loved the Before movies too, and Before Sunset is easily my favorite. Which was your favorite one?

Coryn: It’s nice to see some move Love Actually hate.

Gruesome: my ranking for Scruggs is pretty different. From best to worst it was (All Gold Canyon, Gal who Got Rattled, Near Angodones, Buster Scruggs, Meal Ticket and finally Mortal Remains)

Good Will Harding: I’ve been meaning to check out Cuarón’s first movie for a while, it’s too bad it doesn’t sound too promising.

Morrison: Totally agree about The Favorite.

OldAle1: I might give the Bill & Ted sequel a try. I was excited to see who would turn up for an Empire screening, but nothing really stood out. One person did leave 5 hours in though!

RBG: That description of Casa de Lava makes it sound amazing!

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#51

Post by Onderhond » January 15th, 2019, 9:38 pm

45MinuteZoom wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 8:01 pm
Onderhond: I really liked Jeff, Who Lives at Home while going through my mumblecore phase. Which of its peers did you like best?
None really spring to mind to be honest. I'm not a big fan of dramady. I usually find these films pretty easy to stomach, but I dunno if I ever ran into one I considered "great" or "sublime". In the "dramady-with-a-famous-comedian" category, I guess Everything Must Go jumped out for me (if only just a little).

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#52

Post by 45MinuteZoom » January 15th, 2019, 11:15 pm

Onderhond wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 9:38 pm
45MinuteZoom wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 8:01 pm
Onderhond: I really liked Jeff, Who Lives at Home while going through my mumblecore phase. Which of its peers did you like best?
None really spring to mind to be honest. I'm not a big fan of dramady. I usually find these films pretty easy to stomach, but I dunno if I ever ran into one I considered "great" or "sublime". In the "dramady-with-a-famous-comedian" category, I guess Everything Must Go jumped out for me (if only just a little).
I forgot about that movie, I’ll need to check it out!

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#53

Post by Ivan0716 » January 15th, 2019, 11:28 pm

45MinuteZoom wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 8:01 pm
That description of Casa de Lava makes it sound amazing!
Saw it last night, can confirm. My 4th Costa and the first one I've fallen in love with.

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#54

Post by Carmel1379 » January 16th, 2019, 12:02 am

sol wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 2:59 am
Carmel:

Nope. I wasn't even aware that Bo Burnham was a former YouTuber or that he had made Make Happy (which recently did well in some forum poll) until after I saw Eighth Grade. Obviously, I'm intrigued now, though I am not a big fan of stand-up comedy in general. I've seen some of the classics - Eddie Murphy etc. - and a lot of stand-up comedy seems to be directed towards "easy" laughs, which isn't quite my cup of tea.

Huh, you've made the Before trilogy sound more intriguing than ever before, though on the same note I don't know if I should just wait until 2022 to watch Sunrise, Sunset, Midnight and Before Twilight (guessing a title here) all in the course of the same week.

Linklater seen, in rough order of preference:

A Scanner Darkly
Waking Life
Slacker
Me and Orson Welles
School of Rock
Bernie
Dazed and Confused
Fast Food Nation


Of those, A Scanner Darkly is an all-time favourite. Waking Life is also very good. The rest those would be 6s and 7s.
"Make Happy" is the best stand-up musical ever made, but to be fair everything he's made is good and there really does exist an evolution in his thought and approach to stand-up (no one has subverted, dissected, and exploited (as in used all forms of creative techniques available to the medium) the artform more than him); I even think the youtube channel Wisecrack made an usual to them pseudo-intellectual analysis on his trajectory. Anyway, even the first one he performed at 20, "Words Words Words", isn't bad, see for example. Or if you really wanna go back in time and see the videos he made when only slightly older than Kayla, there's this classic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZoO8LyizLA

I doubt another one will come out until Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy are in their 70s (to make something like Haneke's 'Amour', although the latest "Before" instalment isn't too far off in the bitter realism), which is still like 20 years away. Seriously, definitely do see the trilogy at some point soon.

Jesse & Celine actually have a cameo in 'Waking Life'. They're in bed and talk about reincarnation, basically reiterating the same conversation they had in the first "Before" film.

"A Scanner Darkly is an all-time favourite" - Nice. It's definitely high up my mental to-rewatch list, although I'd probably like to read PKD's novel before I do.
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The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
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#55

Post by Carmel1379 » January 16th, 2019, 12:12 am

45MinuteZoom wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 8:01 pm
Carmel: I loved the Before movies too, and Before Sunset is easily my favorite. Which was your favorite one?
'Before Sunrise', easily. I'm currently about their age there, found the youthful conversations much more engaging (partly because "Sunset" and "Midnight", being sequels, need to include a lot of exposition to fill-in the viewer what happened in the meantime), it features train journeys, and I loved the Viennese locations much more than the ones in the sequel. I wonder if when I get older I'd rather prefer the sequels... only time will tell I guess.

Seen 'Roma' from yours (didn't find it as engaging as you, but it's a fine movie, sure) and bits of 'Empire'. Enjoyed reading about your whole 'Empire' viewing haha, I could definitely picture myself engaging in some (self-)reflection because of it as well, it would probably be comparable to meditation.
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Image
whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
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#56

Post by Chilton » January 16th, 2019, 1:26 am

joachimt wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 7:31 pm
sol wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 2:46 pm
I have searched both Letterboxd and iCM for lists of films available on Netflix Australia and was only able to found out-of-date lists. :shrug:
There's only one person on iCM who's determined enough to keep such a list up-to-date every month. :rolleyes:
Unfortunately for you that person keeps a Dutch Netflix list up-to-date. :P
There's one guy in Poland as well :P

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#57

Post by Ivan0716 » January 16th, 2019, 2:07 am

Carmel1379 wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 12:12 am
(partly because "Sunset" and "Midnight", being sequels, need to include a lot of exposition to fill-in the viewer what happened in the meantime)
SpoilerShow
I actually loved the exposition aspect of Before Sunset, it all came off so naturally seeing how the characters themselves had no contact with each other since the events of the first film. It felt very intimate watching them talk about their past encounter, what they had been up to, and pointing out how each other has changed - it felt like I was there sharing the experience with them and I myself was rediscovering two old friends that I hadn't seen for almost a decade, even though I watched the two films in the same week! It also made me wonder how different I will be after the same time gap(I'm also closer to their Sunrise age), will the years make me as bitter and cynical as Celine?
answerShow
fuck yes

I'm still very reluctant to watch Before Midnight though (my recent crush on Ariane Labed did nothing change that). From what I've heard they actually stayed together after Sunset, so that takes the viewer/me out of the picture, and I'm sure it just won't have the same kind of magic it did going from Sunrise>Sunset. :(

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#58

Post by sol » January 16th, 2019, 3:21 am

45MinuteZoom:

Yeah, there is no way that Vinyl is the worst film ever made, or even the worst film with Andy Warhol's name on it, but I guess if one enters it expecting a literal interpretation of A Clockwork Orange, it is bound to disappoint. The dialogue was certainly a little clunky, and the poor lead performance was no help, but I loved the innovation of everything taking place in merely two single takes and a singular location. It was like watching a stage performance with it left up to us to fill in the blanks.

Yours:

I'm with you all the way on Bill & Ted and Roar, neither of which really impressed me either. Apparently the latter film was meant to be some sort of ode to the majestic nature of the animals. Apparently.

Oh, and your username - does it refer to Wavelength by any chance? Love that film.

Onderhond and maxwelldeux:

Thanks for the links. Yours in particular is quite interesting, max - though it kind of only confirms my suspicions about the limited range. I own close to 9000 films on DVD, Blu-ray etc, so any streaming service that can only offer 3000 common/well-known films is never going to have that much to offer me.

OldAle:

Er, lol, I'm just happy to find somebody else who has actually seen Zvenigora, let alone liked it. The film seems to be pretty obscure (and in all honesty, I didn't know of its existence until the Russian Challenge began). I guess I can understand the hate -- even though most reviews that I came across myself seemed pretty positive -- since the folklore-based story of the film is a little hard to nut out, but damn, the whole visual side of the film almost impressed me more than Potemkin.

I'm a big fan of Trouble in Paradise, but yeah, inasmuch as I dig The Shop Around the Corner, I think Die Puppe would rate as my second favourite Lubitsch film. It's so well assembled, quirky and imaginative, and I kept "forgetting" while watching the film that it was from 1919 - years before Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd's heyday. I mean, as a silent film, Die Puppe is pretty good in itself, but as something so early and innovative. Well, all that I can say is that totally kicks Back to God's Country out of the water (the only other pre-20s film that I have seen).

Yours:

Agreed on the production design and great music in Logan's Run. Funnily enough, while I have seen it a couple of times, I haven't viewed it since turning 30 myself; I wonder what difference that could make to my viewing experience.

I like Capricorn One quite a bit; seen it a couple of times and have it on Blu-ray Disc too. Fantastic music score, maybe even his very best composition, and I've always liked the conspiracy themes and ideas of the film even if bits and pieces seem a little ridiculous. See also Operation Avalanche for another decent space venture conspiracy movie.

RBG:

Seen none. Am interested in Crooklyn, what with BlacKkKlansman renewing my interest in Spike Lee and all. His 1990s films are generally great to look at (interesting camera angles and all) and your screenshot seems to confirm that Crooklyn is no exception to this rule.

Carmel:

Thanks for the links. Regarding A Scanner Darkly, I haven't read the Philip K. Dick novel either. I'm sure the book would tackle a lot more interesting ideas, but there's something about Linklater's experimental visuals and all the down-to-earth vocal delivery that I doubt would come out at all in book form.
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#59

Post by OldAle1 » January 16th, 2019, 3:32 am

Oh yeah, I meant to mention the score to Cap One - Goldsmith again, and is it me, or does this sound like the missing link between Goldsmith's Planet of the Apes and Poledouris' Conan the Barbarian? It's certainly one of Goldsmith's most percussive, military-sounding scores (appropriately) but there are lovely little atonal bits here and there that remind me of much of his earlier sf/fantasy work.

Don't know Operation Avalanche, will have to look into that.

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#60

Post by maxwelldeux » January 16th, 2019, 4:12 am

sol wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 3:21 am
Onderhond and maxwelldeux:

Thanks for the links. Yours in particular is quite interesting, max - though it kind of only confirms my suspicions about the limited range. I own close to 9000 films on DVD, Blu-ray etc, so any streaming service that can only offer 3000 common/well-known films is never going to have that much to offer me.
For sure - I'm mostly only paying for Netflix myself right now because my parents and grandparents use my login. But I wanted to point you to that site because it's the best I've found for a third-party search site for streaming services. But it's a good way to browse what's available to you on whatever streaming services you have. It's about the only one I've found that also tells me if what I want to watch is on Hoopla or Kanopy, which I get through my library.

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#61

Post by Onderhond » January 16th, 2019, 6:32 am

sol wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 3:21 am
Onderhond and maxwelldeux:

Thanks for the links. Yours in particular is quite interesting, max - though it kind of only confirms my suspicions about the limited range. I own close to 9000 films on DVD, Blu-ray etc, so any streaming service that can only offer 3000 common/well-known films is never going to have that much to offer me.
Just a couple of horror/fantasy films I doubt you own on DVD, are everything but common and are definitely worth a look: III - The Ritual, Véronica (the Mexican one), The Maus, The Land of Cards. Films I never would've heard of if it hadn't been for Netflix and reside on that weird edge between genre and auteur. Also noticed The Similars, The Incident, Wind Blast, Accident, Tales of the Dark 2 ... pre-Netflix these were either filmfest-only films or blind imports.

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#62

Post by joachimt » January 16th, 2019, 7:03 am

Chilton wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 1:26 am
joachimt wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 7:31 pm
sol wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 2:46 pm
I have searched both Letterboxd and iCM for lists of films available on Netflix Australia and was only able to found out-of-date lists. :shrug:
There's only one person on iCM who's determined enough to keep such a list up-to-date every month. :rolleyes:
Unfortunately for you that person keeps a Dutch Netflix list up-to-date. :P
There's one guy in Poland as well :P
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#63

Post by sol » January 16th, 2019, 8:29 am

maxwelldeux wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 4:12 am
I wanted to point you to that site because it's the best I've found for a third-party search site for streaming services. But it's a good way to browse what's available to you on whatever streaming services you have. It's about the only one I've found that also tells me if what I want to watch is on Hoopla or Kanopy, which I get through my library.
Cheers for that. I'll have a go using it later to search kanopy. Kanopy, kanopy, kanopy. :circle: Love that service!
Onderhond wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 6:32 am
Just a couple of horror/fantasy films I doubt you own on DVD, are everything but common and are definitely worth a look: III - The Ritual, Véronica (the Mexican one), The Maus, The Land of Cards. Films I never would've heard of if it hadn't been for Netflix and reside on that weird edge between genre and auteur. Also noticed The Similars, The Incident, Wind Blast, Accident, Tales of the Dark 2 ... pre-Netflix these were either filmfest-only films or blind imports.
Thanks. I don't really need more sci-fi/fantasy recommendations this month. I already have plenty lined up, including that anime that you recommended to me a couple of weeks ago (I'll aim to see it this week so I can write about it on next week's thread) but I'll keep those titles in mind in case I get through my to-watch list quicker than anticipated. :thumbsup:
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#64

Post by Onderhond » January 16th, 2019, 9:31 am

Just add them to your Netflix watchlist and see whenever you can fit them in (Russian fantasy/horror, Mexican mystery/thriller, Spanish/East-European mystery/horror, Indian fantasy/musical). I'm sure there will be some challenges later on where these titles might come in handy.

Unrelated, but the challenges seems like a lot of hard work, schedule-wise. Feels actually quite liberating not having to worry about all of that even though I've never even participated with one :D

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#65

Post by peeptoad » January 16th, 2019, 2:16 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 6:50 pm

&peep - Time Travellers is pretty cool yeah - have you seen 1960's Beyond the Time Barrier? That's truly a great example of how to do time travel on a low budget.
Nope, but I'll check it out... :cheers:

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#66

Post by Carmel1379 » January 16th, 2019, 4:55 pm

Ivan0716 wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 2:07 am
Carmel1379 wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 12:12 am
(partly because "Sunset" and "Midnight", being sequels, need to include a lot of exposition to fill-in the viewer what happened in the meantime)
SpoilerShow
I actually loved the exposition aspect of Before Sunset, it all came off so naturally seeing how the characters themselves had no contact with each other since the events of the first film. It felt very intimate watching them talk about their past encounter, what they had been up to, and pointing out how each other has changed - it felt like I was there sharing the experience with them and I myself was rediscovering two old friends that I hadn't seen for almost a decade, even though I watched the two films in the same week! It also made me wonder how different I will be after the same time gap(I'm also closer to their Sunrise age), will the years make me as bitter and cynical as Celine?
answerShow
fuck yes

I'm still very reluctant to watch Before Midnight though (my recent crush on Ariane Labed did nothing change that). From what I've heard they actually stayed together after Sunset, so that takes the viewer/me out of the picture, and I'm sure it just won't have the same kind of magic it did going from Sunrise>Sunset. :(
SpoilerShow
Yeah, the film and actors handle the brief encounter after the many bygone years excellently. Also definite props for it being real-time with that sense of urgency attached: their time is even more finite than in 'Before Sunrise', and now they're obviously not strangers anymore (yet at the same time are...), so the desire to tell each other all these different things is reinforced, such that there's an obvious crescendo to the whole situation, with them increasingly revealing more intimate dreams and an emotional baggage they have never expressed to anyone else. Yet given this structure, for the film to taste so smoothly with a sense of natural spontaneity, is quite remarkable.

Before Midnight - I definitely highly recommend it, they nailed it there again, for different reasons. It's unflinchingly mature and realistic, while still having a lot of magic to it.
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#67

Post by 45MinuteZoom » January 16th, 2019, 4:57 pm

sol wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 3:21 am
Oh, and your username - does it refer to Wavelength by any chance? Love that film.
It is! Definitely one of my favorites. I got real lucky, a few years back the National Gallery in DC decided to show it and flew Michael Snow down to talk about it and some of his other work. He seemed very nice.

They later showed WVLNT later in an unrelated group of shorts and you could tell the audience was not dealing well with the sound.

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#68

Post by GruesomeTwosome » January 16th, 2019, 5:39 pm

You guys' shit:

PdA: Ouch, a big drop for Strange Days. Maybe a re-watch would lead me to a similar result, but that film worked quite well for me. The Driver seems to have become a favorite of yours, nice. Also just a one-time viewing on my end, but really good film, probably my fav of Walter Hill that I've seen.


Onderhond: I've seen Jeff Who Lives at Home, nothing much to say/remember about it though. Liked Parenthood more than you, one of the better ones for the utterly mediocre Ron Howard.


viktor: Sounds about right for American Sniper, yeah. Song to Song was rather nice.


joachimt: This is what I said about A Quiet Place after seeing it in the theater (I rated it 5/10):

Ehh, I'm afraid I can't buy too much into the largely positive buzz that this one is receiving. The largely dialogue-free, "quiet" conceit is interesting in the context of the plot and this film's world, but that is often, and unfortunately, undone by an intrusive score, the same-y kind of music used in many a jump-scare horror film of recent years. And after a while this film kinda just feels like another take on Shyamalan's Signs. Millicent Simmonds, the deaf actress from Todd Haynes' Wonderstruck, is impressive again here, though.

I'm with you on Fences. As for Elf, I still quite like it (I caught chunks of it again on TV over the Christmas holiday a few weeks ago), and this was when Will Ferrell was still tolerable.


mightysparks: Solyaris is awesome; Hold the Dark was very disappointing, coming from someone who really enjoyed Jeremy Saulnier's previous two films (especially Blue Ruin). Hold the Dark did have a rather effectively creepy atmosphere to it (Alexander Skarsgard and Riley Keough were one fucked-up, eerie couple), but narratively this was a mess.


Carmel: I need to re-watch Groundhog Day, but I recall it being a good 'un. If I had to pick a favorite entry in the Before trilogy, Sunset would be it. Ghost World is a movie that I have an undying love for, particularly Thora Birch as Enid. Your positive rating is..."funky". Image


Coryn: Yeah those are all pretty cool, save for Love Actually - your rating is highly appropriate for that one.


Good_Will_Harding: Liked Lenny a lot; thought Vice was just OK, with Bale and Adams as the highlights but I didn't care much for McKay's The Big Short, and he applied a very similar approach to Vice.


morrison-dylan-fan: :worship: to your words on The Favourite. Nicely said, one of the best of last year.


45MinuteZoom: Haven't seen the Bill & Ted movies since I was a young kid, but they were VHS faves of my brother and me for a while. Roar is not a great "movie" but it's certainly entertaining in just how bonkers it is, when thinking of how incredibly fucking dangerous and insane it was to make this movie.


OldAle1: Not seen the films, but I've watched a lot of Frasier over the last year or so (there's some cable channel called Cozi TV that plays it daily), and it's a nice show for me to unwind to during the work week, when I'm just not up to watching a film. You're right, when it comes to the occasional serious/non-comedic moments, it's the Frasier-and-his-dad relationship that is the heart of the show. It's rare that you see such a complicated relationship in an American sitcom. And when the show does depart briefly from comedy, the tender moments are often so much more genuine and impactful than the schmaltzy stuff you'd see on most sitcoms. This Niles/Daphne moment is one of my favorites from the show:
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#69

Post by Carmel1379 » January 16th, 2019, 6:31 pm

GruesomeTwosome wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 5:39 pm
Carmel: I need to re-watch Groundhog Day, but I recall it being a good 'un. If I had to pick a favorite entry in the Before trilogy, Sunset would be it. Ghost World is a movie that I have an undying love for, particularly Thora Birch as Enid. Your positive rating is..."funky". Image
Image

I'll likely be revisiting it over the years, I could see it growing on me more. Have you seen 'Art School Confidential'? That one has even more jokes about the effortlessly-made abstract / conceptual / message-driven art getting better grades and attention in an art class, but it's also just a great movie about university, it comes close to 'The Rules of Attraction' and 'The Social Network' in that respect for me.

"Buster Scruggs" is dope. I liked the first segment best too, at least it was definitely the funniest one for me (although "Pan shot! Bwahahaha!" + "Good enough. Hang him." were up there among the most laugh-out-loud moments for me too).

Interested in seeing True Detective 3. Maybe I'll just hang around a little longer and see how you find it just in case it doesn't deteriorate like #2 (which I didn't even finish (although I'll still forever commemorate the Colin Farrell beating up dad's bully scene)). ;)
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whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
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#70

Post by GruesomeTwosome » January 16th, 2019, 8:02 pm

Carmel1379 wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 6:31 pm
GruesomeTwosome wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 5:39 pm
Carmel: I need to re-watch Groundhog Day, but I recall it being a good 'un. If I had to pick a favorite entry in the Before trilogy, Sunset would be it. Ghost World is a movie that I have an undying love for, particularly Thora Birch as Enid. Your positive rating is..."funky". Image
Image

I'll likely be revisiting it over the years, I could see it growing on me more. Have you seen 'Art School Confidential'? That one has even more jokes about the effortlessly-made abstract / conceptual / message-driven art getting better grades and attention in an art class, but it's also just a great movie about university, it comes close to 'The Rules of Attraction' and 'The Social Network' in that respect for me.

"Buster Scruggs" is dope. I liked the first segment best too, at least it was definitely the funniest one for me (although "Pan shot! Bwahahaha!" + "Good enough. Hang him." were up there among the most laugh-out-loud moments for me too).

Interested in seeing True Detective 3. Maybe I'll just hang around a little longer and see how you find it just in case it doesn't deteriorate like #2 (which I didn't even finish (although I'll still forever commemorate the Colin Farrell beating up dad's bully scene)). ;)
Yes I've seen Art School Confidential; I didn't like it nearly as much as Ghost World, but yeah, it certainly expanded on Ghost World's art class scenes with its send-up of those that want to get attention for pseudo-transgressive, cheaply political "statement" art. I'd like to re-visit Art School Confidential down the road, as I remember being very sleepy while watching it, heh. I liked The Rules of Attraction more when I was younger; re-watched it later and it still has strong points but I recall the more nihilistic/bleak tone of it all to leave a more bitter taste that time around. A somewhat recent college film that I liked quite a lot was Whit Stillman's Damsels in Distress (2011), more of a whimsical comedy. The Social Network is a great one, for sure.

We'll see how this new season of True Detective goes. The first episode was very basic "introduce us to the main character, and set up the crime/mystery that the season will focus on" kind of stuff, but compellingly done. Haha, Colin Farrell did his best to salvage season 2, at least he held his end of the bargain with his performance, kicking bully-dad's ass was a highlight.
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#71

Post by Carmel1379 » January 17th, 2019, 12:03 am

GruesomeTwosome wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 8:02 pm
Yes I've seen Art School Confidential; I didn't like it nearly as much as Ghost World, but yeah, it certainly expanded on Ghost World's art class scenes with its send-up of those that want to get attention for pseudo-transgressive, cheaply political "statement" art. I'd like to re-visit Art School Confidential down the road, as I remember being very sleepy while watching it, heh. I liked The Rules of Attraction more when I was younger; re-watched it later and it still has strong points but I recall the more nihilistic/bleak tone of it all to leave a more bitter taste that time around. A somewhat recent college film that I liked quite a lot was Whit Stillman's Damsels in Distress (2011), more of a whimsical comedy. The Social Network is a great one, for sure.

We'll see how this new season of True Detective goes. The first episode was very basic "introduce us to the main character, and set up the crime/mystery that the season will focus on" kind of stuff, but compellingly done. Haha, Colin Farrell did his best to salvage season 2, at least he held his end of the bargain with his performance, kicking bully-dad's ass was a highlight.
ASC hasn't got any relatable or likeable characters (unlike 'Ghost World') and doesn't try to, but its dry deadpan black humour really worked for me the two times I saw it (first was a random catch on my parents' TV). It's just so thoroughly satirical of people and aspirations I had to love it.

'The Rules of Attraction' is a big favourite of mine, it deeply affected me in a way I can't describe. But yeah, I know what you mean. Roger Avary now also finally has two new upcoming films! Hopefully he'll now finally be able to adapt Bret Easton Ellis' 'Glamorama' like he had wanted for years, although I guess it's unfortunately very unlikely, given it's meant to follow up on one of the "Rules of Attraction" characters: the one who had that European trip (which the actor & Avary really undertook, there's even a feature-length version of that montage, 'Glitterati', which he hasn't released to the public and is meant to be the bridge between the two films).

Haven't heard of 'Damsels in Distress' before - thx, I'll keep it in mind.

I'll give TD3 a whirl eventually. :thumbsup:
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whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
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