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weirdboy
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#19521

Post by weirdboy »

I cannot get over Onderhond calling Casino Royal the worst Bond film where there are gems like Never Say Never Again and Moonraker in the running.


Not to mention You Only Live Twice wherein Sean Connery "successfully" passes for a native Japanese person in Japan.
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sebby
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#19522

Post by sebby »

Yeah I think he was using hyperbole to make a point maybe?

Anyway for me CR is the only Craig film in the series that isn't a total snore. I have no burning urge to ever watch it again but it was enjoyable enough for a modern blockbuster.
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#19523

Post by brokenface »

Ebbywebby wrote: February 14th, 2021, 11:45 pm Stump the Guesser isn't available for streaming, as far as I can tell?
Ah sorry. Available 122 countries but seemingly not US: https://whatsonmubi.com/film/stump-the-guesser
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Onderhond
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#19524

Post by Onderhond »

weirdboy wrote: February 15th, 2021, 12:15 am I cannot get over Onderhond calling Casino Royal the worst Bond film where there are gems like Never Say Never Again and Moonraker in the running.


Not to mention You Only Live Twice wherein Sean Connery "successfully" passes for a native Japanese person in Japan.
2.5* - Moonraker
2.5* - You Only Live Twice
1.0* - Casino Royale.

I've completely missed Never Say Never Again, apparently that's from another studio though? Never saw the original Casino Royale either, for that very reason. Thanks for the heads-up! Anyway, the films you mentioned are infinitely more fun than the drudgery that was Casino Royale. Not to mention shorter (though still too long).
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St. Gloede
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#19525

Post by St. Gloede »

I did not see the Berlinale lineup shared here, really exciting set of films: https://deadline.com/2021/02/berlinale- ... 234692026/

Radu Jude (my favourite current director) will be premiering his new film, Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn, which seems to be jumping from his incredible stretch of films in conversation with history - excited to see what he will do here - and what a bizarre title.

Céline Sciamma will also be unveiling her latest, Petit Maman, with other works by Xavier Beauvois, Dominik Graf, Sang-soo Hong and many others.

I also spotted a new, smaller doc by Marcello as a special screening (not in the competition).
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#19526

Post by Onderhond »

Cheang Soi making a drama ... well well :D
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St. Gloede
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#19527

Post by St. Gloede »

Seems like Martin Scorsese would have been a good ICMF member, here's his new list of his 50 favourite British films - or more specifically 50 films he recommended to Edgar Wright:

https://faroutmagazine.co.uk/martin-sco ... ish-films/

The films:
Station Six Sahara (1963) – Dir. Seth Holt
Brief Ecstasy (1937) – dir. Edmond Gréville (also known as “Dangerous Secrets” in the U.S.)
The Halfway House (1944) – dir. Basil Dearden
Went the Day Well? (1942) – dir. Alberto de Almeida Cavalcanti
Nowhere To Go (1958) – Dir. Seth Holt
The Nanny (1965) – Dir. Seth Holt
Madonna of the Seven Moons (1945) – dir. Arthur Crabtree
The Man in Grey (1943) – dir. Leslie Arliss
So Long at the Fair (1950) – dir. Terence Fisher (known as The Black Curse in the U.S. sometimes)
Stolen Face (1952) – dir. Terence Fisher
Four Sided Triangle (1953) – dir. Terence Fisher
The Sound Barrier (1952) – dir. David Lean
This Happy Breed (1944) – dir. David Lean
Guns at Batasi (1964) – dir. John Guillermin
Green for Danger (1946) – dir. Sidney Gilliat
The Mind Benders (1963) – dir. Basil Dearden
To the Public Danger (1948) – dir. Terence Fisher
It Always Rains on Sunday (1947) – dir. Robert Hamer
A High Wind in Jamaica (1965) – dir. Alexander Mackendrick
The Queen of Spades (1949) – dir. Thorold Dickinson
Hue and Cry (1947) – dir. Charles Crichton
Pink String and Sealing Wax (1945) – dir. Robert Hamer
The Blue Lamp (1950) – dir. Basil Dearden.
The Good Die Young (1954) – dir. Lewis Gilbert
Mandy (1952) – dir. Alexander Mackendrick
Vampyres (1974) – José Ramón Larraz
Uncle Silas (1947) – known as The Inheritance in the U.S.
The Legend of Hell House (1973) – John Hough
Burn, Witch, Burn (1962) – Sidney Hayers (Night of the Eagle, UK title)
Flesh of the Fiends (1969) – dir. John Gilling
The Snorkel (1957) – dir. Guy Green
Scream of Fear (1960) – dir. Seth Holt (Taste of Fear, UK title)
These Are The Damned (1963) – dir. Joseph Losey
Plague Of The Zombies (1966) – dir. John Gilling
Quatermass and the Pit (1967) – dir. Roy Ward Baker
Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde – dir. Roy Ward Baker
The Devil Rides Out (1968) dir. – Terence Fisher
The Asphyx (1972) – dir. Peter Newbrook
Underground (1928) – dir. Anthony Asquith
Shooting Stars (1927) – dir. Anthony Asquith
Sapphire (1959)- dir. Basil Dearden.
Whistle And I’ll Come To You (1968) dir. – Jonathan Miller
Dead of Night (1945) – dir. Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Robert Hamer, Basil Dearden (anthology film)
The Enfield Haunting (2015) dir. – Kristoffer Nyholm
The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Pumpkin Eater (1964) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Innocents (1961) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Seventh Veil (1945) dir. – Compton Bennett
Yield To The Night (1956) dir. – J. Lee Thompson
I had not expected him to be such a fan of b-horror.
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Onderhond
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#19528

Post by Onderhond »

Scorsese and I together on a forum ... fireworks! Maybe we could do complementary lists though. Seems like he lost track of cinema after the 70s.
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St. Gloede
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#19529

Post by St. Gloede »

Onderhond wrote: February 15th, 2021, 12:17 pm Scorsese and I together on a forum ... fireworks! Maybe we could do complementary lists though. Seems like he lost track of cinema after the 70s.
:lol: :lol: :lol:

The true dynamic duo.
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#19530

Post by Lakigigar »

I bet Scorsese would hate his own movies, since he indeed seems to not know about cinema after the 1970's, but in Hugo it was clear he loves classic or even silent movies. He's also deeply religious and a moral person, so I bet he likes films with a very moralistic undertone, probably mostly a spiritual one.
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#19531

Post by Lakigigar »

I've also seen Martyrs. On paper I should've liked it, but I did not. Really surprised it's official and so well-aclaimed, and has a 7.1 rating on IMDb and 3.60* on MM which is very high (though it has a bias towards 00's movies, since it's userbase used to be much larger during the end of the 2000's.). I understand TSZDT and perhaps controversial/new cult. But TSPDT 21st century, like really???
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#19532

Post by pitchorneirda »

Lakigigar wrote: February 15th, 2021, 2:09 pm I've also seen Martyrs. On paper I should've liked it, but I did not. Really surprised it's official and so well-aclaimed, and has a 7.1 rating on IMDb and 3.60* on MM which is very high (though it has a bias towards 00's movies, since it's userbase used to be much larger during the end of the 2000's.). I understand TSZDT and perhaps controversial/new cult. But TSPDT 21st century, like really???
I don't think Martyrs is great but I found it "interesting" and that's the difference with other pure horror movies: it goes beyond the genre and drew a public who doesn't watch horror movies frequently (like me), hence the increased notoriety
"Art is like a fire, it is born from the very thing it burns" - Jean-Luc Godard
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St. Gloede
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#19533

Post by St. Gloede »

Hmmm, in general he does not exclude modern cinema, maybe the hangup is on the UK? :D

He published his 35 favourite films 3 months ago, and there are 5 post-70s films on it, granted, with only BlacKkKlansman (2018) and Woman Is the Future of Man (2003) being from this century.
2001: A Space Odyssey – Stanley Kubrick, 1968.
8½ – Federico Fellini, 1963.
Ashes and Diamonds – Andrzej Wajda, 1958.
BlacKkKlansman – Spike Lee, 2018.
The Changeling – Peter Medak, 1980.
The Chess Players – Satyajit Ray, 1977.
Citizen Kane – Orson Welles, 1941.
Contempt – Jean-Luc Godard, 1963.
Dead of Night – Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Basil Dearden, Robert Hamer, 1945.
The Entity – Sidney J. Furie, 1982.
The Exorcist – William Friedkin, 1973.
The Haunting – Robert Wise, 1963.
The Innocents – Jack Clayton, 1961.
Isle of the Dead – Mark Robson, 1945.
Johnny Guitar – Nicholas Ray, 1954.
L’Atalante – Jean Vigo, 1934.
L’Avventura – Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960.
The Leopard – Luchino Visconti, 1963.
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp – Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger, 1943.
Moonrise – Frank Borzage, 1948.
Night of the Demon – Jacques Tourneur, 1957.
One Eyed Jacks – Marlon Brando, 1961.
Paisan – Roberto Rossellini, 1946.
Psycho – Alfred Hitchcock, 1960.
Rebel Without a Cause – Nicholas Ray, 1955.
The Red Shoes – Emeric Pressburger, Michael Powell, 1948.
The River – Jean Renoir, 1951.
Salvatore Giuliano – Francesco Rosi, 1962.
The Searchers – John Ford, 1956.
The Shining – Stanley Kubrick, 1980.
Touki Bouki – Djibril Diop Mambéty, 1973.
Ugetsu – Kenji Mizoguchi, 1953.
The Uninvited – Lewis Allen, 1944.
Vertigo – Alfred Hitchcock, 1958.
Woman Is the Future of Man – Hong Sang-soo, 2003.
Source: https://www.indiewire.com/gallery/marti ... ms-movies/
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#19534

Post by St. Gloede »

Oh, and once again, b-horror like The Entity, Night of the Demon, Isle of the Dead and The Changeling mix themselves in.

In fact, there are 11/35 horror films on this list:

The Changeling – Peter Medak, 1980.
Dead of Night – Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Basil Dearden, Robert Hamer, 1945.
The Entity – Sidney J. Furie, 1982.
The Exorcist – William Friedkin, 1973.
The Haunting – Robert Wise, 1963.
The Innocents – Jack Clayton, 1961.
Isle of the Dead – Mark Robson, 1945.
Night of the Demon – Jacques Tourneur, 1957.
Psycho – Alfred Hitchcock, 1960.
The Shining – Stanley Kubrick, 1980.
The Uninvited – Lewis Allen, 1944.

That's quite extraordinary given what he usually chooses to direct. Why have we not seen more horror films from Scorsese?
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#19535

Post by brokenface »

He's flirted with it, e.g. Shutter Island bears some influence of some of the above titles, as does Cape Fear.

but you can appreciate a style without necessarily wanting to make it yourself. He's never made a Western either but clearly likes them
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#19536

Post by tommy_leazaq »

My city is hosting a Film Festival this week, but due to lack of funds and lack of administrative staffs to fetch good films and general lack of film availability last year, all the scheduled films are completely unknown to me. Quick check in IMDb, LB rating reveal most of them are downright average only.

So, here is the list. If any of you have seen anything from it, please share it so that I can plan accordingly.

https://chennaifilmfest.com/18thciff/schedule/
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#19537

Post by St. Gloede »

The only big film I can spot there is Undone (it was on Sight & Sounds yearly best list. And many others). Personally, I didn't love it and it was quite underwhelming as a follow-up to Petzold's Oppressive Systems trilogy - but it is a very good, and well worth seeing if available for you (especially as many others loved it)

Only heard about 2 of the others (I think) and seen neither.
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#19538

Post by brokenface »

A White White Day I've seen, is quite good, quite grim Icelandic film.

Ones on my radar, probably from other festivals, but haven't seen:
Undine - Petzold is a reliably interesting director
Berlin Alexanderplatz - 3hr modern take. Intriguing but high risk if it doesn't work.
Quo Vadis Aida - about srebenica massacre. Would have to assume it's going to be heavy-going
Identifying Features - also sounds heavy, Mexican film about immigration/family separation
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#19539

Post by outdoorcats »

tommy_leazaq wrote: February 15th, 2021, 8:14 pm My city is hosting a Film Festival this week, but due to lack of funds and lack of administrative staffs to fetch good films and general lack of film availability last year, all the scheduled films are completely unknown to me. Quick check in IMDb, LB rating reveal most of them are downright average only.

So, here is the list. If any of you have seen anything from it, please share it so that I can plan accordingly.

https://chennaifilmfest.com/18thciff/schedule/
I wouldn't rely on IMDb ratings; because of small voting pools, newer film festival films tend to have extremely low averages.

I've seen two of the films - Undine was an unusual take from Petzold, in that it has elements of romantic comedy, but by the end felt very Petzold-ian (if you haven't seen any of his films think: extremely precise and controlled cinematography, subtly eerie/unsettling moods, and haunting/ambigious endings). It's my "least favorite" of his, but I still thought it was very good. It's just that his other films I've seen set an unreasonably high bar.

The other is Apples, a film I can pretty whole-heartedly recommend. Though I wish it has a better ending, it's only because the rest of the film is so good. It's an absurd, deadpan, surrealist film in the vein of Dogtooth or The Lobster, but sweeter. The idea of the film is that sudden total amnesia starts sweeping through Greece, affecting large numbers of people. The protagonist falls victim to it, and because he was found with no identification and no one comes to look for him, he's enrolled in a government program to help him start a new life from scratch and do a series of activities to re-assimilate him into society. A lot of this is used to poke fun at what's considered "normal" socially acceptable behavior. It's also gorgeously shot throughout, full of shots you could freeze and hang on a wall.

Another film on that list I haven't seen, but definitely heard a lot of: Identifying Features, a Mexican film about a mother looking for her missing son, has gotten a lot of critical acclaim recently.

edit - Didn't realize there were multiple pages. I've also heard good things about A White, White Day and Farewell Amor.

Beyond that, if you can afford it, I recommend just jumping in and watching a bunch of films knowing as little as possible. Sure, many of them could be disappointing, but there's few better feelings as a film fan than getting completely surprised by a new favorite that you just watch randomly. If you can even get one of those it's totally worth it.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
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#19540

Post by Ebbywebby »

Ebbywebby wrote: February 14th, 2021, 7:48 pm
I already watched the new Yanthimos short "Nimic." Now I'm into "Eccentricities of a Blonde-Haired Girl." If I really go nuts with it, I'll also finish "Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania," "Tarr Bela: I Used to Be a Filmmaker" and something by Zanussi ("Illumination" or "Family Life"?) today. But I may burn out on watching that much.
Before MUBI went dry, I ended up seeing:

"Nimic" (Yanthimos)
"Eccentricities of a Blonde-Haired Girl" (de Oliveira)
"Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania" (Mekas)
"The Illumination" (Zanussi)
"Psychomagic: A Healing Art" (Jodorowsky...I forgot about this film until a friend told me HE was streaming it)

"Psychomagic" is seriously bizarre...wow, still only 20 checks even though it's dated 2019. If you've ever yearned to see a roomful of naked women squatting over canvases fingerpainting self-portraits with their menstrual blood, look no further.

Had a lot of trouble with buffering lags. My Internet connection is not so great, but I suspect it was more because the site wasn't used to having so much traffic. And for some reason, "Illumination" gave me a lot less trouble than the other three features.

Didn't get to the Bela Tarr doc.
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#19541

Post by tommy_leazaq »

Thank you guys for your valuable inputs on the festival. Will surely look into the films you have suggested.
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#19542

Post by tommy_leazaq »

outdoorcats wrote: February 15th, 2021, 9:58 pm
tommy_leazaq wrote: February 15th, 2021, 8:14 pm My city is hosting a Film Festival this week, but due to lack of funds and lack of administrative staffs to fetch good films and general lack of film availability last year, all the scheduled films are completely unknown to me. Quick check in IMDb, LB rating reveal most of them are downright average only.

So, here is the list. If any of you have seen anything from it, please share it so that I can plan accordingly.

https://chennaifilmfest.com/18thciff/schedule/
I wouldn't rely on IMDb ratings; because of small voting pools, newer film festival films tend to have extremely low averages.

I've seen two of the films - Undine was an unusual take from Petzold, in that it has elements of romantic comedy, but by the end felt very Petzold-ian (if you haven't seen any of his films think: extremely precise and controlled cinematography, subtly eerie/unsettling moods, and haunting/ambigious endings). It's my "least favorite" of his, but I still thought it was very good. It's just that his other films I've seen set an unreasonably high bar.

The other is Apples, a film I can pretty whole-heartedly recommend. Though I wish it has a better ending, it's only because the rest of the film is so good. It's an absurd, deadpan, surrealist film in the vein of Dogtooth or The Lobster, but sweeter. The idea of the film is that sudden total amnesia starts sweeping through Greece, affecting large numbers of people. The protagonist falls victim to it, and because he was found with no identification and no one comes to look for him, he's enrolled in a government program to help him start a new life from scratch and do a series of activities to re-assimilate him into society. A lot of this is used to poke fun at what's considered "normal" socially acceptable behavior. It's also gorgeously shot throughout, full of shots you could freeze and hang on a wall.

Another film on that list I haven't seen, but definitely heard a lot of: Identifying Features, a Mexican film about a mother looking for her missing son, has gotten a lot of critical acclaim recently.

edit - Didn't realize there were multiple pages. I've also heard good things about A White, White Day and Farewell Amor.

Beyond that, if you can afford it, I recommend just jumping in and watching a bunch of films knowing as little as possible. Sure, many of them could be disappointing, but there's few better feelings as a film fan than getting completely surprised by a new favorite that you just watch randomly. If you can even get one of those it's totally worth it.
Thanks for the eloborate details. Yes, I havent seen any Petzold film. Your description seems very interesting. Will surely check more from him. And yeah, Blind dates with Festival films is something I do. As you said it wont be rewarding always but found many gems through it myself.
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#19543

Post by Cippenham »

St. Gloede wrote: February 15th, 2021, 12:10 pm Seems like Martin Scorsese would have been a good ICMF member, here's his new list of his 50 favourite British films - or more specifically 50 films he recommended to Edgar Wright:

https://faroutmagazine.co.uk/martin-sco ... ish-films/

The films:
Station Six Sahara (1963) – Dir. Seth Holt
Brief Ecstasy (1937) – dir. Edmond Gréville (also known as “Dangerous Secrets” in the U.S.)
The Halfway House (1944) – dir. Basil Dearden
Went the Day Well? (1942) – dir. Alberto de Almeida Cavalcanti
Nowhere To Go (1958) – Dir. Seth Holt
The Nanny (1965) – Dir. Seth Holt
Madonna of the Seven Moons (1945) – dir. Arthur Crabtree
The Man in Grey (1943) – dir. Leslie Arliss
So Long at the Fair (1950) – dir. Terence Fisher (known as The Black Curse in the U.S. sometimes)
Stolen Face (1952) – dir. Terence Fisher
Four Sided Triangle (1953) – dir. Terence Fisher
The Sound Barrier (1952) – dir. David Lean
This Happy Breed (1944) – dir. David Lean
Guns at Batasi (1964) – dir. John Guillermin
Green for Danger (1946) – dir. Sidney Gilliat
The Mind Benders (1963) – dir. Basil Dearden
To the Public Danger (1948) – dir. Terence Fisher
It Always Rains on Sunday (1947) – dir. Robert Hamer
A High Wind in Jamaica (1965) – dir. Alexander Mackendrick
The Queen of Spades (1949) – dir. Thorold Dickinson
Hue and Cry (1947) – dir. Charles Crichton
Pink String and Sealing Wax (1945) – dir. Robert Hamer
The Blue Lamp (1950) – dir. Basil Dearden.
The Good Die Young (1954) – dir. Lewis Gilbert
Mandy (1952) – dir. Alexander Mackendrick
Vampyres (1974) – José Ramón Larraz
Uncle Silas (1947) – known as The Inheritance in the U.S.
The Legend of Hell House (1973) – John Hough
Burn, Witch, Burn (1962) – Sidney Hayers (Night of the Eagle, UK title)
Flesh of the Fiends (1969) – dir. John Gilling
The Snorkel (1957) – dir. Guy Green
Scream of Fear (1960) – dir. Seth Holt (Taste of Fear, UK title)
These Are The Damned (1963) – dir. Joseph Losey
Plague Of The Zombies (1966) – dir. John Gilling
Quatermass and the Pit (1967) – dir. Roy Ward Baker
Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde – dir. Roy Ward Baker
The Devil Rides Out (1968) dir. – Terence Fisher
The Asphyx (1972) – dir. Peter Newbrook
Underground (1928) – dir. Anthony Asquith
Shooting Stars (1927) – dir. Anthony Asquith
Sapphire (1959)- dir. Basil Dearden.
Whistle And I’ll Come To You (1968) dir. – Jonathan Miller
Dead of Night (1945) – dir. Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Robert Hamer, Basil Dearden (anthology film)
The Enfield Haunting (2015) dir. – Kristoffer Nyholm
The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Pumpkin Eater (1964) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Innocents (1961) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Seventh Veil (1945) dir. – Compton Bennett
Yield To The Night (1956) dir. – J. Lee Thompson
I had not expected him to be such a fan of b-horror.
Added as a list. https://www.icheckmovies.com/lists/mart ... cippenham/
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#19544

Post by St. Gloede »

Brilliant work, Cipp!
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#19545

Post by brokenface »

Wonder if that Enfield Haunting is an error and should be The Haunting 1963. Miniseries from 2015 seems out of kilter with rest of list and The Haunting is one of his favourites from the other list that's missing
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#19546

Post by Cippenham »

Could be, the source says Enfield Haunting but has no dates, so I believe it is The Haunting so have changed it. Even so I have only seen 22 so would like to see at least the official ones not seen.
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#19547

Post by Cippenham »

https://planetradio.co.uk/podcasts/the- ... n/2039974/

This is a podcast of a conversation over three hours between Tarantino and Edgar Wright
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#19548

Post by frbrown »

Cippenham wrote: February 16th, 2021, 10:48 am
St. Gloede wrote: February 15th, 2021, 12:10 pm Seems like Martin Scorsese would have been a good ICMF member, here's his new list of his 50 favourite British films - or more specifically 50 films he recommended to Edgar Wright:

https://faroutmagazine.co.uk/martin-sco ... ish-films/

The films:
Station Six Sahara (1963) – Dir. Seth Holt
Brief Ecstasy (1937) – dir. Edmond Gréville (also known as “Dangerous Secrets” in the U.S.)
The Halfway House (1944) – dir. Basil Dearden
Went the Day Well? (1942) – dir. Alberto de Almeida Cavalcanti
Nowhere To Go (1958) – Dir. Seth Holt
The Nanny (1965) – Dir. Seth Holt
Madonna of the Seven Moons (1945) – dir. Arthur Crabtree
The Man in Grey (1943) – dir. Leslie Arliss
So Long at the Fair (1950) – dir. Terence Fisher (known as The Black Curse in the U.S. sometimes)
Stolen Face (1952) – dir. Terence Fisher
Four Sided Triangle (1953) – dir. Terence Fisher
The Sound Barrier (1952) – dir. David Lean
This Happy Breed (1944) – dir. David Lean
Guns at Batasi (1964) – dir. John Guillermin
Green for Danger (1946) – dir. Sidney Gilliat
The Mind Benders (1963) – dir. Basil Dearden
To the Public Danger (1948) – dir. Terence Fisher
It Always Rains on Sunday (1947) – dir. Robert Hamer
A High Wind in Jamaica (1965) – dir. Alexander Mackendrick
The Queen of Spades (1949) – dir. Thorold Dickinson
Hue and Cry (1947) – dir. Charles Crichton
Pink String and Sealing Wax (1945) – dir. Robert Hamer
The Blue Lamp (1950) – dir. Basil Dearden.
The Good Die Young (1954) – dir. Lewis Gilbert
Mandy (1952) – dir. Alexander Mackendrick
Vampyres (1974) – José Ramón Larraz
Uncle Silas (1947) – known as The Inheritance in the U.S.
The Legend of Hell House (1973) – John Hough
Burn, Witch, Burn (1962) – Sidney Hayers (Night of the Eagle, UK title)
Flesh of the Fiends (1969) – dir. John Gilling
The Snorkel (1957) – dir. Guy Green
Scream of Fear (1960) – dir. Seth Holt (Taste of Fear, UK title)
These Are The Damned (1963) – dir. Joseph Losey
Plague Of The Zombies (1966) – dir. John Gilling
Quatermass and the Pit (1967) – dir. Roy Ward Baker
Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde – dir. Roy Ward Baker
The Devil Rides Out (1968) dir. – Terence Fisher
The Asphyx (1972) – dir. Peter Newbrook
Underground (1928) – dir. Anthony Asquith
Shooting Stars (1927) – dir. Anthony Asquith
Sapphire (1959)- dir. Basil Dearden.
Whistle And I’ll Come To You (1968) dir. – Jonathan Miller
Dead of Night (1945) – dir. Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Robert Hamer, Basil Dearden (anthology film)
The Enfield Haunting (2015) dir. – Kristoffer Nyholm
The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Pumpkin Eater (1964) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Innocents (1961) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Seventh Veil (1945) dir. – Compton Bennett
Yield To The Night (1956) dir. – J. Lee Thompson
I had not expected him to be such a fan of b-horror.
Added as a list. https://www.icheckmovies.com/lists/mart ... cippenham/
Thanks, Cipp!

Kind Hearts and Coronets needs to be added; it's missing from Gloede's post, but it's included in the source list. That will make it an even 50 films.
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#19549

Post by St. Gloede »

Good spot, frbrown.
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#19550

Post by Cippenham »

Ok added. Still not sure about The Haunting.
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#19551

Post by Cippenham »

That podcast discussion includes the list. Tarantino and Wright worked on the list. Scorsese also mentioned The along Good Friday apparently when he spoke to Wright.
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#19552

Post by Cippenham »

Listened to Podcast , not all yet but so far it was the Enfield Haunting miniseries but also the lists written missed the original Quatermass film and The Pool of London. Other films are discussed on the podcast but not on list as not from Scorsese
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#19553

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St. Gloede wrote: February 15th, 2021, 12:10 pm Seems like Martin Scorsese would have been a good ICMF member, here's his new list of his 50 favourite British films - or more specifically 50 films he recommended to Edgar Wright:

https://faroutmagazine.co.uk/martin-sco ... ish-films/
a long list of horror films
The films:
Station Six Sahara (1963) – Dir. Seth Holt
Brief Ecstasy (1937) – dir. Edmond Gréville (also known as “Dangerous Secrets” in the U.S.)
The Halfway House (1944) – dir. Basil Dearden
Went the Day Well? (1942) – dir. Alberto de Almeida Cavalcanti
Nowhere To Go (1958) – Dir. Seth Holt
The Nanny (1965) – Dir. Seth Holt
Madonna of the Seven Moons (1945) – dir. Arthur Crabtree
The Man in Grey (1943) – dir. Leslie Arliss
So Long at the Fair (1950) – dir. Terence Fisher (known as The Black Curse in the U.S. sometimes)
Stolen Face (1952) – dir. Terence Fisher
Four Sided Triangle (1953) – dir. Terence Fisher
The Sound Barrier (1952) – dir. David Lean
This Happy Breed (1944) – dir. David Lean
Guns at Batasi (1964) – dir. John Guillermin
Green for Danger (1946) – dir. Sidney Gilliat
The Mind Benders (1963) – dir. Basil Dearden
To the Public Danger (1948) – dir. Terence Fisher
It Always Rains on Sunday (1947) – dir. Robert Hamer
A High Wind in Jamaica (1965) – dir. Alexander Mackendrick
The Queen of Spades (1949) – dir. Thorold Dickinson
Hue and Cry (1947) – dir. Charles Crichton
Pink String and Sealing Wax (1945) – dir. Robert Hamer
The Blue Lamp (1950) – dir. Basil Dearden.
The Good Die Young (1954) – dir. Lewis Gilbert
Mandy (1952) – dir. Alexander Mackendrick
Vampyres (1974) – José Ramón Larraz
Uncle Silas (1947) – known as The Inheritance in the U.S.
The Legend of Hell House (1973) – John Hough
Burn, Witch, Burn (1962) – Sidney Hayers (Night of the Eagle, UK title)
Flesh of the Fiends (1969) – dir. John Gilling
The Snorkel (1957) – dir. Guy Green
Scream of Fear (1960) – dir. Seth Holt (Taste of Fear, UK title)
These Are The Damned (1963) – dir. Joseph Losey
Plague Of The Zombies (1966) – dir. John Gilling
Quatermass and the Pit (1967) – dir. Roy Ward Baker
Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde – dir. Roy Ward Baker
The Devil Rides Out (1968) dir. – Terence Fisher
The Asphyx (1972) – dir. Peter Newbrook
Underground (1928) – dir. Anthony Asquith
Shooting Stars (1927) – dir. Anthony Asquith
Sapphire (1959)- dir. Basil Dearden.
Whistle And I’ll Come To You (1968) dir. – Jonathan Miller
Dead of Night (1945) – dir. Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Robert Hamer, Basil Dearden (anthology film)
The Enfield Haunting (2015) dir. – Kristoffer Nyholm
The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Pumpkin Eater (1964) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Innocents (1961) – dir. Jack Clayton
The Seventh Veil (1945) dir. – Compton Bennett
Yield To The Night (1956) dir. – J. Lee Thompson
I had not expected him to be such a fan of b-horror.
More like Scorsese's favorite 50 British films in a particular genre they were discussing, which he thought Edgar Wright may not have already seen.
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#19554

Post by Cippenham »

Not all horror
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#19555

Post by JW1996 »

If we are talking about Marins Scorese's favorite films, I think it's worth checking the favorite list by Quentin Tarantino!
Well, I think Quentin Tarantino is a Legend, so I'm biased.
The list contains 30 movies, but I will list here the top 10:
1. Apocalypse Now (1979)
2. Audition (1999)
3. The Bad News Bears (1976)
4. Battle Royale (2000)
5. Boogie Nights (1997)
6. Carrie (1976)
7. Dazed and Confused (1993)
8. Dogville (2003)
9. Enter the Void (2009)
10. Fight Club (1999)

Oh, I love also to play movies trivia.
You can play a great movie quiz here.
You can find the full movie list above here:
https://www.imdb.com/list/ls048001285/
Last edited by JW1996 on February 20th, 2021, 10:29 am, edited 3 times in total.
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#19556

Post by weirdboy »

Is JW1966 QT's alternate ICM Forums account?


I realize the original must be Monty.
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#19557

Post by Cippenham »

Edgar Wright and Tarantino also mention the following
The Night my Number came up 1955 Beat Girl 1960 murder Without crime 1950 The Saint in London 1939
Action in Arabia 1944 Johnny nobody 1961 The idol 1966
Waterloo Road 1945 Passport to Shame 1958 The Flesh is Weak 1957
The Pleasure Girls 1965 Strongroom 1962
The Yellow Balloon 1953 Kinjite forbidden subjects 1989
No Trees in the Street 1959 Bitter Harvest 1963 That Kind of Girl 1963
The Beauty Jungle 1964
Italian films made in London apparently What have you done to Solange and A lizard in a Woman’s Skin and All the colours of the dark
Death Wish 3

They then try to remember the director of Pink Cadillac 1989- who knows without checking?
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#19558

Post by Cippenham »

A lot of the above are on no official lists
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#19559

Post by St. Gloede »

I looked up Pink Cadillac, and while I remember seeing it in the shops, looking at the name of the director it rings no bells whatsoever.
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#19560

Post by Cippenham »

That is why it’s a tough quiz question. He is still alive at 91 and was a stunt co ordinator and only directed 3 Clint Eastwood films
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