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The Film Lounge

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joachimt
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Re: The Film Lounge

#18921

Post by joachimt » February 20th, 2020, 11:51 am

filmbantha wrote:
February 20th, 2020, 8:56 am
Bab'Aziz cropped up on the icm most favourite list today and I'm curious to check it out as it's on youtube. However, it appears to be the third part of Nacer Khemir's desert trilogy. Can anyone who has seen all three advise if they are the continuation of a story or just linked thematically? I'm wondering if it would be best to start with the first entry in the trilogy? Thanks in advance. :thumbsup:
Here's an interesting topic for you
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#18922

Post by Pretentious Hipster » February 21st, 2020, 2:05 am

Wtf there's a new lebowski film. It's a spin-off, but still.

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#18923

Post by blocho » February 21st, 2020, 2:31 am

Pretentious Hipster wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 2:05 am
Wtf there's a new lebowski film. It's a spin-off, but still.
Both a spin-off and a remake of Les Valseuses!

8 year olds, dude.

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#18924

Post by mightysparks » February 25th, 2020, 4:25 pm

Came across this on Reddit earlier and have spent the last few hours watching and discussing most of this channel:

There’s a male perpetrator one too and a few other interesting videos on the channel (and a few pointless ones). His commentary is a bit simple and shallow but some interesting examples. The rape scene in Forty Days and Forty Nights has always really disturbed me. I saw it when I was like 11 or 12 and it really bothered me how she raped him and it was just brushed over, so I was happy they included it in this vid. I don’t think every example is necessarily problematic but there is some awful stuff in these.
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#18925

Post by Cinepolis » February 27th, 2020, 9:25 pm

Damn it, Windows deleted all my temporary files meaning my folder full of movies on youtube, vimeo and co. is gone. :verymad:



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#18928

Post by zuma » March 3rd, 2020, 7:08 pm

https://www.vox.com/world/2020/3/3/2115 ... ng-joon-ho

"But a few hundred miles east, Parasite and director Bong Joon-ho’s victory forced Japanese filmmakers and critics to reconsider the state of Japanese cinema — an industry that has arguably been in decline since the mid-20th century, when directors like Akira Kurosawa and Yasujirō Ozu transformed global cinema forever. "

I guess no one consulted Onderhond before writing this article. ;)

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#18929

Post by OldAle1 » March 3rd, 2020, 7:21 pm

zuma wrote:
March 3rd, 2020, 7:08 pm
https://www.vox.com/world/2020/3/3/2115 ... ng-joon-ho

"But a few hundred miles east, Parasite and director Bong Joon-ho’s victory forced Japanese filmmakers and critics to reconsider the state of Japanese cinema — an industry that has arguably been in decline since the mid-20th century, when directors like Akira Kurosawa and Yasujirō Ozu transformed global cinema forever. "

I guess no one consulted Onderhond before writing this article. ;)
Or most of us for that matter. I do think you *could* argue that Japanese cinema hit it's peak in the 50s - peak in terms of international recognition anyway - but even if that could be demonstrated as true that doesn't mean it's all decline since then. Peaks and valleys, like most national cinemas. You could argue that the US peaked in the classic era - say 1930-59 - but obviously the 70s is beloved by a lot of cinephiles. France peaked when? Pre-war with Renoir and Carne, or the New Wave?

Lazy writing it seems to me, but I guess people want it simple - Japan was great, Korea is now great, that kind of thing.

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#18930

Post by zuma » March 3rd, 2020, 7:29 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
March 3rd, 2020, 7:21 pm
zuma wrote:
March 3rd, 2020, 7:08 pm
https://www.vox.com/world/2020/3/3/2115 ... ng-joon-ho

"But a few hundred miles east, Parasite and director Bong Joon-ho’s victory forced Japanese filmmakers and critics to reconsider the state of Japanese cinema — an industry that has arguably been in decline since the mid-20th century, when directors like Akira Kurosawa and Yasujirō Ozu transformed global cinema forever. "

I guess no one consulted Onderhond before writing this article. ;)
Or most of us for that matter. I do think you *could* argue that Japanese cinema hit it's peak in the 50s - peak in terms of international recognition anyway - but even if that could be demonstrated as true that doesn't mean it's all decline since then. Peaks and valleys, like most national cinemas. You could argue that the US peaked in the classic era - say 1930-59 - but obviously the 70s is beloved by a lot of cinephiles. France peaked when? Pre-war with Renoir and Carne, or the New Wave?

Lazy writing it seems to me, but I guess people want it simple - Japan was great, Korea is now great, that kind of thing.
I cherry picked that quote to poke at Onderhond, but the real focus of the article says the funding and government support has disappeared in Japan.

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#18931

Post by OldAle1 » March 3rd, 2020, 7:35 pm

I guess I don't know enough about the Japanese industry - I always assumed that it was a more corporate thing, like the USA or India, with very little government money in the first place. I mean, they do have plenty of arthouse stuff that probably doesn't make money, always have, but it seems a more commercial film industry overall than, say, France. Well, I'll read the article for myself I guess.

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#18932

Post by Onderhond » March 3rd, 2020, 7:50 pm

Such a strange article.

It's not like South-Korean cinema has been taking the world by storm these past couple of years. There was the early 00 hype, but Japan was riding that wave too. The past 30 years Japan has had film makers like Kitano, Miike, Sono, Tsukamoto ... South-Korea has nothing like that. But yeah, it has the equivalent of K-Pop. Glitzy mainstream all-in-one please 'm all films.

The fact that the creative industry in Japan is struggling financially is true (and well documented), but if anything, that seems to drive creativity rather than work against it. Of course it sucks for the people working in the business, but audiences seem to benefit from it. But not if you want more Hollywood competitors of course. That's where Japan "fails".

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#18933

Post by mightysparks » March 4th, 2020, 12:45 am

In one of my classes, the lecturer was saying that South Korean cinema was good and about half the class was apparently really into SK because their films were so different and unique from English language films.. but I’ve always felt SK was the closest to Hollywood films of all the Asian countries for the reasons Onderhond mentions, and it was really strange. In the same class they talked about how terrible Chinese cinema was, so idk.
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#18934

Post by fori » March 4th, 2020, 1:04 am

Yeah what’s up with this article? Why not write it about Russia, a country which is actually struggling by some metrics, and can only produce a third of the features South Korea was making pre-Parasite? Japan has had plenty of hits remember Shoplifters?) and has consistently been one of the world’s most successful exporters of culture. Though many look at the 50s as a golden age, that is really only in terms of our contemporary reverence for that period. I don’t have to check anything to know that the Japanese film industry today must be many times larger than it was then. Also, can anyone honestly make the case that Ozu is more celebrated by the public at large than Death Note or Sword Art Online?

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#18935

Post by cinewest » March 4th, 2020, 5:37 am

OldAle1 wrote:
March 3rd, 2020, 7:21 pm
zuma wrote:
March 3rd, 2020, 7:08 pm
https://www.vox.com/world/2020/3/3/2115 ... ng-joon-ho

"But a few hundred miles east, Parasite and director Bong Joon-ho’s victory forced Japanese filmmakers and critics to reconsider the state of Japanese cinema — an industry that has arguably been in decline since the mid-20th century, when directors like Akira Kurosawa and Yasujirō Ozu transformed global cinema forever. "

I guess no one consulted Onderhond before writing this article. ;)
Or most of us for that matter. I do think you *could* argue that Japanese cinema hit it's peak in the 50s - peak in terms of international recognition anyway - but even if that could be demonstrated as true that doesn't mean it's all decline since then. Peaks and valleys, like most national cinemas. You could argue that the US peaked in the classic era - say 1930-59 - but obviously the 70s is beloved by a lot of cinephiles. France peaked when? Pre-war with Renoir and Carne, or the New Wave?

Lazy writing it seems to me, but I guess people want it simple - Japan was great, Korea is now great, that kind of thing.
What the author says may be an over generalization, but there is some truth in it. Pretty much everyone would agree that Japanese cinema was at its apex in the 50's and early 60's, and that South Korea's film Industry has been getting better and better over the past 20 years, with probably more stand outs in the 2010's than in any previous decade.

As for the U.S. and France, unlike just about everywhere else, these two cinema rich countries have had at least a couple of peak points. French cinema was very strong before WW2, and then it resurged again in the 50's and early 60's, morphing from classical French noir into creative vitality of the French New Wave. I think that the U.S. film industry also peaked in the 50's, but then had a revisionist genre period in the 70's that on the balance probably produced more top notch American films than at any other time (at least for my taste). I would say that the current decade is also showing some signs of life, with the import of foreign filmmakers and a new generation of American born indie filmmakers (with more women and African Americans playing a large part) who have more cinematic ideas than those from the last couple of decades.

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#18936

Post by fori » March 4th, 2020, 5:48 am

cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 5:37 am
What the author says may be an over generalization, but there is some truth in it. Pretty much everyone would agree that Japanese cinema was at its apex in the 50's and early 60's, and that South Korea's film Industry has been getting better and better over the past 20 years, with probably more stand outs in the 2010's than in any previous decade.
I beg to differ, I certainly don’t agree with that statement. Even though you’ve covered a lot of ground by stretching into the early 60s, I think you’ll find that your preferences aren’t universal. Even among those who discard newer Japanese movies, there are many who prefer the New Wave, experimental film & genre madness of the 60s & 70s to the serene dramas et al of the 50s.

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#18937

Post by Onderhond » March 4th, 2020, 6:36 am

cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 5:37 am
South Korea's film Industry has been getting better and better over the past 20 years, with probably more stand outs in the 2010's than in any previous decade.

Huh?

South-Korea, much like the other East-Asian countries, saw a big push during the late 90s, which spilled over in the 00s, with a lot of international attention to boot. That wined down again during the 10s, with only the occasional film making a splash, mostly by directors who established themselves during the peak years.

I'm definitely not the most versed in SK cinema, but even Parasite shows very little progress compared to those SK films made 20 years ago. I truly wonder if you'd find many people who would put the 10s before the 00s in terms of quality.

As for Japanese cinema, it's hard to gauge since I wasn't around during the 50s or 60s, but somehow I do have a hard time seeing much mainstream support for films of Ozu back then. Maybe they had a little arthouse bubble going on then. I guess we'll know how we are going to look back at the Japanese cinema of the 00s in 20 or 30 years.

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#18938

Post by cinewest » March 4th, 2020, 8:06 am

Onderhond wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 6:36 am
cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 5:37 am
South Korea's film Industry has been getting better and better over the past 20 years, with probably more stand outs in the 2010's than in any previous decade.

Huh?

South-Korea, much like the other East-Asian countries, saw a big push during the late 90s, which spilled over in the 00s, with a lot of international attention to boot. That wined down again during the 10s, with only the occasional film making a splash, mostly by directors who established themselves during the peak years.

I'm definitely not the most versed in SK cinema, but even Parasite shows very little progress compared to those SK films made 20 years ago. I truly wonder if you'd find many people who would put the 10s before the 00s in terms of quality.

As for Japanese cinema, it's hard to gauge since I wasn't around during the 50s or 60s, but somehow I do have a hard time seeing much mainstream support for films of Ozu back then. Maybe they had a little arthouse bubble going on then. I guess we'll know how we are going to look back at the Japanese cinema of the 00s in 20 or 30 years.
The generation of South Korean filmmakers I am referring to all made their first real international splashes about 20-25 years ago, but have continued to mature as filmmakers, and have done their best work this decade, whether we are talking about Lee Chang-dong, Bong Joon-ho, Park Chan-Wook, or Hong Sang-soo. Kim Ki-duk may have lost his touch, but the others I mentioned are all doing better work.

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#18939

Post by Onderhond » March 4th, 2020, 8:32 am

cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 8:06 am
but have continued to mature as filmmakers, and have done their best work this decade, whether we are talking about Lee Chang-dong, Bong Joon-ho, Park Chan-Wook, or Hong Sang-soo.
That's very debatable.

But I think it's more telling that very few SK directors have joined the international forum in the past 10 years. And the ones that remained from earlier decades may have matured and refined their output, but they haven't much diverted from their earlier work. SK cinema hasn't changed much this past 10 years and you're honestly the first one I've seen making a case that the 10s are better than the 00s for SK cinema.

Also the fact that Ki-duk "lost his touch" is more popular conjecture than serious film critique.

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#18940

Post by St. Gloede » March 4th, 2020, 8:38 am

The question wasn't regarding progress or change in style as much as critical and/or cinephile appreciation and acclaim.

However, even with Parasite breaking into the Hollywood mainstream in a way no other non-English language film ever has, I struggle to see South Korea as the new cinematic power.

As far as I have seen there has been a clear decline of interest and acclaim of SK cinema since "peaking" in the 00s. I think most of us can remember just how much of the conversation South Korea dominated, with Chan-wook Park, and to a slightly lesser extent, Ki-duk Kim especially being embraced by mainstream cinephiles as being on the shortlist of director of the decade.

This had a very abrupt stop last decade, and while we can clearly make the case that they are climbing up to where they were, I would like to examine the evidence of the key South Korean directors as they, well, either abandoned shit or became recluses.

Let us start with Joon-ho Bong. In the 00s he directed 4 films, most prominently Memories of Murder and The Host. All 4 were South Korean. In the 10s Bong directed only 1 clearly South Korean film, at the very, very end: Parasite, the very spark of this conversation. The first 7 years of the decade only saw in Hollywood film Snowpiercer, and then in 2017 it was followed by Okja, a co-production with Tilda Swinton and Jake Gyllenhaal in major roles. In other words we are talking 4 vs. 1.5, and more than half the decade left as blank.

Let's then jump to Chan-wook Park. He too jumped ship, and only made 1 South Korean film, the hugely popular "The Handmaiden". However, this was not until 2016. He too went to America and made 1 film "Stoker", leaving the first 6 years of South Korean cinema blank and promptly left to make "The Little Drummer Girl".

What did he do in the 00s? The entire Vengeance trilogy and JSA, all 4 of which regular film buffs could not shut up about. He also did the slightly less popular I'm a Robot but That's Ok and Thirst - 6 in total.

So, what about "the Kims"? 

Let us start with Jee-woon Kim first, as sadly he is now more relevant. LIke his copatriots he jumped ship, went to Hollywood, though he did make I Saw the Devil first, released in 2010, and as such has one film in the early 10s. He did not return to South Korean cinema until 2016 with the, again, relatively popular Age of Shadows, which he followed up with the completely forgotten Inrang ... Compare this to the 00s when he made 3 quite popular successes (A Tale of Two Sisters, A Bittersweet Life and The Good, the Bad and the Weird).

Ki-duk Kim on the other hand, the ones highly acclaimed master had a mental breakdown in the late 00s, tried to re-emerge in the 10s, with a couple of successes in the beginning, and then faded to complete obscurity.
 
The good news is that Shang-dong Lee stayed consistent in output and country affiliation. He makes 2 films per decade, and both receive acclaim. The only issue here is that his two films were released in 2010 and the second in 2018. 

Looking at these 5 directors we see that there was essentially see an extreme hole in the early 10s, and all of them, except Ki-duk Kim returning to production in the mid-late 10s.

The only critical darling (though not as accessible to the mainstream as the above) that is an exception is Sang-soo Hong. He actually produced more South Korean films in the 10s than he did in the 00s: 12-13 vs 7. He also left Korea to make 1-2 films in France, but this clearly did not impact his output in the least.

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#18941

Post by Onderhond » March 4th, 2020, 8:50 am

Wouldn't call it "proof" because of the rather small scope, but I looked at the SK TOP25 on MovieMeter (Dutch demographic, but with an above-average interest in modern cinema, especially compared to more typical cinephile fora) and the results there are quite telling:

https://www.moviemeter.nl/list/country/KOR
90s - 01
00s - 16
10s - 08 (5 of which are 2010-2011)

Would be nice to see how such lists would pan out on sites like IMDb and Letterboxd I guess.

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#18942

Post by St. Gloede » March 4th, 2020, 9:32 am

I decided to do a more mathematical enquiry, as this question related to popularity/exposure in the film world.

To do so, I compared the 2000s and 2010s on two IMDb metrics.

1. How Many Films Were Exposed to a Larger Audience
2. How the Films Compared in Terms of IMDb ratings

IMDb votes

100k+
2000s: 2
2010s: 3

50k+
2000s: 8
2010s: 6

20k+
2000s: 18
2010s: 9

10k+
2000s: 25
2010s: 19

5k+
2000s: 43
2010s: 46

First of all, very interesting numbers.

It is worth noting that the most voted films were Old Boy (482k) and Parasite (292k) respectively, and that, as 2019 is still recent, we can expand Parasite to still grow quite a bit.

Of course, comparing two decades like this has issues, ie. older films have been able to collect votes longer, while newer films are more likely to be seen by the younger demographic, and of course, we can expect it to be a little while before 2019 has stabilized. Still, the numbers tell a clear story, which is that:

South Korea had more films receiving high-level exposure in the 00s, while there has been a slightly larger amount of semi-notable work in the 10s.

P.S. The numbers would also have looked different if the cut-off was 6k:
2000s: 38
2010s: 35

This may in other words just be a question of newer films making it to a slightly higher threshold, rather than anything else.

IMDb ratings - Looking at the films with 5k:

8+:
2000s: 9
2010s: 4

7.5+:
2000s: 24
2010s: 17

7+:
2000s: 40
2010s: 37

6.9 and down:
2000s: 6
2010s: 9

(and let's remember that the 00s were competing with 3 less films)

Conclusion:
The numbers tell the same story. In the 2000s more South Korean films broke big and got higher ratings, with the numbers becoming more comparable as we reach less impressive vote counts and ratings.

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#18943

Post by St. Gloede » March 4th, 2020, 9:33 am

Onderhond wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 8:50 am
Wouldn't call it "proof" because of the rather small scope, but I looked at the SK TOP25 on MovieMeter (Dutch demographic, but with an above-average interest in modern cinema, especially compared to more typical cinephile fora) and the results there are quite telling:

https://www.moviemeter.nl/list/country/KOR
90s - 01
00s - 16
10s - 08 (5 of which are 2010-2011)

Would be nice to see how such lists would pan out on sites like IMDb and Letterboxd I guess.
Extremely telling indeed.

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#18944

Post by fori » March 4th, 2020, 1:29 pm

https://www.icheckmovies.com/movies/dingjunshan/ Is a lost film BUT... I have been to a place in Beijing called “The Old Cinema Cafe” which was the first movie theatre in China (I think) and they have a small but detailed exhibit explaining the history of the film including the background to its creation, the history of the film (which was projected in that very building), the content of the film and some stills from the film and photographs of the making of. Could this constitute a check?

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#18945

Post by cinewest » March 4th, 2020, 1:59 pm

Onderhond wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 8:32 am
cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 8:06 am
but have continued to mature as filmmakers, and have done their best work this decade, whether we are talking about Lee Chang-dong, Bong Joon-ho, Park Chan-Wook, or Hong Sang-soo.
That's very debatable.

But I think it's more telling that very few SK directors have joined the international forum in the past 10 years. And the ones that remained from earlier decades may have matured and refined their output, but they haven't much diverted from their earlier work. SK cinema hasn't changed much this past 10 years and you're honestly the first one I've seen making a case that the 10s are better than the 00s for SK cinema.

Also the fact that Ki-duk "lost his touch" is more popular conjecture than serious film critique.
Yes, I would agree that the "movement" we are discussing began in the late 90's, early 00's, and that no new South Korean filmmaker(s) has really stepped up to "re-vitalize" what this group began a decade or so before (no dis meant to Ki-duk, who was my favorite Korean filmmaker of the bunch). My point simply rests with the amount of international attention they have all received this past decade. Two have been invited to make films in English, one has had a remake of one of his films made, and they have all won their highest accolades for very recent films, whether we are talking about Right Now, Wrong Then, Ah-Ga-ssi, Beoning, or Parasite.

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#18946

Post by cinewest » March 4th, 2020, 1:59 pm

double post

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#18947

Post by Onderhond » March 4th, 2020, 2:16 pm

cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 1:59 pm
Two have been invited to make films in English
Usually a sign that local cinema isn't doing too well, no? You saw the same with HK directors, many of them moved to the USA after their local cinema collapsed in the '94-'05 era.
cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 1:59 pm
one has had a remake of one of his films made
A '00 film, not a '10 film. And it completely bombed (though unrelated).
cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 1:59 pm
and they have all won their highest accolades for very recent films, whether we are talking about Right Now, Wrong Then, Ah-Ga-ssi, Beoning, or Parasite.
Again, extremely debatable. Not familiar with Hong so can't comment, Parasite is a clear case of course. They other two ... I'd say their 00s films received more acclaim. What stats are you using for this statement?

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#18948

Post by cinewest » March 4th, 2020, 3:12 pm

Onderhond wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 2:16 pm
cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 1:59 pm
Two have been invited to make films in English
Usually a sign that local cinema isn't doing too well, no? You saw the same with HK directors, many of them moved to the USA after their local cinema collapsed in the '94-'05 era.
cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 1:59 pm
one has had a remake of one of his films made
A '00 film, not a '10 film. And it completely bombed (though unrelated).
cinewest wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 1:59 pm
and they have all won their highest accolades for very recent films, whether we are talking about Right Now, Wrong Then, Ah-Ga-ssi, Beoning, or Parasite.
Again, extremely debatable. Not familiar with Hong so can't comment, Parasite is a clear case of course. They other two ... I'd say their 00s films received more acclaim. What stats are you using for this statement?
1. no. It's a sign that the filmmakers (there is another that St. Gloede included in his writeup) caught the attention of Hollywood, just like various other foreign filmmakers who seem to have what it takes.
2. I noted this simply to point out the attention that has been given to South Korean filmmakers / films this past decade.
3. Just look at the critical responses and awards that both films have received.

The discussion is getting way off point, though. Here is my original comment:
"South Korea's film Industry has been getting better and better over the past 20 years, with probably more stand outs in the 2010's than in any previous decade."

As you and others should be able to see, the thrust of what I said has to do with the rise in South Korea's film Industry over the past 20 years, which includes the 00's, and I have already acknowledged that the filmmakers in question (we could include those in ST. Gloede's post, as well) made their first big splashes roughly 20 years ago, and have essentially been riding the same wave, as they have culled their craft.

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#18949

Post by Onderhond » March 4th, 2020, 3:28 pm

Yes, but we don't seem to agree that is has been rising for 20 years. It rose in the late 90s, peaked in the 00s, then slumped in the 10s.

I mean, are the Ghost in the Shell + Godzilla + Death Note remakes/US adaptations a sign that Japanese cinema in the 10s has been doing great? And how is Hollywood an indicator of directors who "have what it takes"? All I've seen is commercial and critical decline for SK cinema this past decade. The same curve Japanese cinema has been following (with the exact same characteristics: some directors survived, of which some have won their biggest prize in the past couple of years and very few were added on the international forum). Some rare bright spots just highlight the lack of a wider canon of films supporting the global interest in these markets.

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#18950

Post by cinewest » March 4th, 2020, 3:38 pm

Onderhond wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 3:28 pm
Yes, but we don't seem to agree that is has been rising for 20 years. It rose in the late 90s, peaked in the 00s, then slumped in the 10s.

I mean, are the Ghost in the Shell + Godzilla + Death Note remakes/US adaptations a sign that Japanese cinema in the 10s has been doing great? And how is Hollywood an indicator of directors who "have what it takes"? All I've seen is commercial and critical decline for SK cinema this past decade. The same curve Japanese cinema has been following (with the exact same characteristics: some directors survived, of which some have won their biggest prize in the past couple of years and very few were added on the international forum). Some rare bright spots just highlight the lack of a wider canon of films supporting the global interest in these markets.
Whether South Korean cinema peaked in the 00's or 2010's is immaterial to my central point, though I would maintain that some of the most celebrated South Korean films of all time have been made in the past 5 years (actually), and that the invitation to make films in America this past decade is further proof of how celebrated Korean filmmakers have been very recently

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#18951

Post by St. Gloede » March 4th, 2020, 6:18 pm

Just to chime in on the last point that it is absolutely correct, the last 4-5 years saw all the core directors (sans Ki-duk Kim) seeing great success for their SK work.

(In all cases, with the 1 exception of Parasite, I think we can clearly point to at least 1 previous work of equal or greater acclaim, but that is rather secondary)

The question of the next generation of SK directors is an interesting one though.

There were many films by directors outside of the core behind the films with high vote counts and high ratings from the 2010s. I will look into them later to see if I can find a few standouts that may just have passed us all by.

(Where is Ebossert when you need him? FG reference, saw hundreds of SK films).

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#18952

Post by Onderhond » March 4th, 2020, 6:43 pm

If you're looking new SK names with a certain mainstream/critical clout, Sang-ho Yeon is a 10s director that garnered some international interest these past couple of years.

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#18953

Post by St. Gloede » March 4th, 2020, 8:16 pm

There are actually quite a few South Korean directors primarily notable for last decade that may be of interest (based on ratings):

Hoon-jung Park
Hong-jin Na
Hun Jang
Jong-bin Yoon
WooSuk Yang
Han-min Kim
Seong-hun Kim
-
Seung-wan Ryoo
Hyeong-Cheol Kang
Dong-hyuk Hwang
Chang-min Choo
Dong-hoon Choi

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#18954

Post by joachimt » March 4th, 2020, 9:08 pm

fori wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 1:29 pm
https://www.icheckmovies.com/movies/dingjunshan/ Is a lost film BUT... I have been to a place in Beijing called “The Old Cinema Cafe” which was the first movie theatre in China (I think) and they have a small but detailed exhibit explaining the history of the film including the background to its creation, the history of the film (which was projected in that very building), the content of the film and some stills from the film and photographs of the making of. Could this constitute a check?
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#18955

Post by GruesomeTwosome » March 4th, 2020, 11:15 pm

The upcoming James Bond film, No Time to Die, has its release pushed back from April to November amid concerns about how coronavirus could negatively affect cinema-going worldwide. Will be interesting to see if other upcoming major films follow suit.
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#18956

Post by Pretentious Hipster » March 4th, 2020, 11:28 pm

Doesn't it have like a 1% fatality rate? Way to completely overblow this.

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#18957

Post by GruesomeTwosome » March 4th, 2020, 11:50 pm

Pretentious Hipster wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 11:28 pm
Doesn't it have like a 1% fatality rate? Way to completely overblow this.
Yeah, but they’re banking on that overreaction from the public if enough people really do refrain from going to the cinema while the coronavirus hysteria rages on. It’s obviously about box office concerns, not actual concern about public health.
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#18958

Post by outdoorcats » March 5th, 2020, 2:10 am

2%, meaning one out of every 50 people who get the disease will die. Overblown? :shrug: If it becomes as widespread as the flu this year things are going to be pretty bad.

edit - The global morality rate actually just rose to 3.4% according to the World Health Organization. Though some suspect it is actually much lower because there are a lot of milder cases not being diagnosed.

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#18959

Post by tommy_leazaq » March 5th, 2020, 6:16 am

Seems, the Bond film didnt want to lose China's Box office collection

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#18960

Post by cinewest » March 5th, 2020, 1:18 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
March 4th, 2020, 6:18 pm
Just to chime in on the last point that it is absolutely correct, the last 4-5 years saw all the core directors (sans Ki-duk Kim) seeing great success for their SK work.

(In all cases, with the 1 exception of Parasite, I think we can clearly point to at least 1 previous work of equal or greater acclaim, but that is rather secondary)

The question of the next generation of SK directors is an interesting one though.

There were many films by directors outside of the core behind the films with high vote counts and high ratings from the 2010s. I will look into them later to see if I can find a few standouts that may just have passed us all by.

(Where is Ebossert when you need him? FG reference, saw hundreds of SK films).
Here are a couple of lists featuring contemporary South Korean cinema:

https://www.highonfilms.com/the-best-korean-movies/

http://www.modernkoreancinema.com/2019/ ... 2010s.html

I actually forgot about Pieta (2012), by Kim Ki-duk, which I liked a lot
Last edited by cinewest on March 5th, 2020, 1:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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