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pitchorneirda
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#19841

Post by pitchorneirda »

kongs_speech wrote: May 26th, 2021, 7:37 pm
Wonderful Rainbow wrote: May 26th, 2021, 1:51 pm A showcase of Baltic Modernist Cinema available here: https://vimeo.com/showcase/8500709
Are any of these official?
No, unfortunately. But a couple of these seem really interesting, I'll watch them anyway
"Art is like a fire, it is born from the very thing it burns" - Jean-Luc Godard
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#19842

Post by Wonderful Rainbow »

brokenface wrote: May 26th, 2021, 10:03 pm
Wonderful Rainbow wrote: May 26th, 2021, 1:51 pm A showcase of Baltic Modernist Cinema available here: https://vimeo.com/showcase/8500709
Great, thanks. any idea how long they will be available?
June 8. More info here http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/film_s ... ries/53494
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#19843

Post by brokenface »

cool thanks, I'll get on it. looks like there could be some real good stuff there.

--

on another note, had my first cinema trip of 2021 yesterday for Minari, which was lovely and the kind of film that really benefits from absorbing intimacy of cinema. Was a delight to be back :wub:
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#19844

Post by Ebbywebby »

Was playing around with Excel last night, learning how to plot graphs. Made a graph of all my ICM checks, year by year. Blue = total, red = features, green = shorts (45 min or less).

It's not news to me that the Lumieres went hog-wild in 1896 or that I strongly lean toward films of the late '60s and early '70s, but I'm freshly wondering why there was such a burst of watchable shorts in 1929. Oh, that's right...blame it on Miguel Ángel Álvarez. Also, why does 2010 stand alone as the only year since 1970 where I've seen more shorts than features? Hm.

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#19845

Post by kongs_speech »

Ebbywebby wrote: May 28th, 2021, 9:32 pm Was playing around with Excel last night, learning how to plot graphs. Made a graph of all my ICM checks, year by year. Blue = total, red = features, green = shorts (45 min or less).

It's not news to me that the Lumieres went hog-wild in 1896 or that I strongly lean toward films of the late '60s and early '70s, but I'm freshly wondering why there was such a burst of watchable shorts in 1929. Oh, that's right...blame it on Miguel Ángel Álvarez.

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#19846

Post by Torgo »

:D
Yup, they're both quite extreme.

I'm keeping an alt account on IMDb for shorts only, and even there I only rate ultrashort films if they bear some significance; I hate how they ruin all statistics otherwise, and they're rarely noteworthy anyway. My OCD can't do that, man.

The graph* for my short acc ratings is magnificent. Might be the best thing I've ever done filmwise.

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*Yes Lammetje I KNOW we have a thread for that
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#19847

Post by max-scl »

Torgo wrote: May 28th, 2021, 9:53 pm I'm keeping an alt account on IMDb for shorts only, and even there I only rate ultrashort films if they bear some significance; I hate how they ruin all statistics otherwise, and they're rarely noteworthy anyway. My OCD can't do that, man.
I've always wanted to do this for the exact same reasons. I have the extra account already but never made the migration of shorts. That people that have that one 1888 film in they graphs...I just don't get it...
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#19848

Post by Torgo »

I feel you. It also screws up all the genre distributions - as soon as I see people having rated like 1000 animated titles or 800 docs I'm " :huh: " for a moment, then see "2500 shorts" and it makes sense.
Not even to mention single series episodes. :pinch:

But hey, it's YOUR ACCOUNTS, you do as you please.

:unsure:
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#19849

Post by joachimt »

kongs_speech wrote: May 28th, 2021, 9:44 pm
Ebbywebby wrote: May 28th, 2021, 9:32 pm Was playing around with Excel last night, learning how to plot graphs. Made a graph of all my ICM checks, year by year. Blue = total, red = features, green = shorts (45 min or less).

It's not news to me that the Lumieres went hog-wild in 1896 or that I strongly lean toward films of the late '60s and early '70s, but I'm freshly wondering why there was such a burst of watchable shorts in 1929. Oh, that's right...blame it on Miguel Ángel Álvarez.

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Alvarez and Lumiere are a check whore's best friends ... if you can tolerate the tedium.
Don’t forget the Manaki brothers...... :rolleyes:
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#19850

Post by Ebbywebby »

Nobody is a worse torture for check whores than Rev. S.S. Jones.
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#19851

Post by OldAle1 »

This looks to be a pretty wild story:

https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-untol ... iefenstahl

Also, Somerset Maugham was involved. It was to be a remake of Riefenstahl's first film Da blaue Licht. Long article, I've only skimmed it so far, but another example of the "who thought this was a good idea...but...I kinda still wish I could see it" category.
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#19852

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 »

Wonderful Rainbow wrote: May 26th, 2021, 1:51 pm A showcase of Baltic Modernist Cinema available here: https://vimeo.com/showcase/8500709
'Madness' and 'Apple in the River' are the only two out of this selection that I've seen and both are distinctive, remarkable films.

I might rewatch those two. At least five of the remaining titles are ones I've been eager to see.

Thanks for pointing us towards this online showcase. Some great, under-heralded directors receiving much deserved highlighting!
Last edited by RogerTheMovieManiac88 on June 1st, 2021, 10:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
That's all, folks!
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#19853

Post by monk-time »

Wrath of Man (2021) was surprisingly decent. Well, as decent as a toxic masc fueled violence fest could be. Didn't expect Guy Ritchie to deliver what felt like a dumbed-down (= NOT incomprehensible) Nolanesque heist film. And it along with Promising Young Woman made me realize I want to see MORE revenge flicks.
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#19854

Post by mightysparks »

Finally managed to coerce my boyfriend into watching One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest with me (he’d never seen it). He (luckily) thought it was pretty great, especially Jack Nicholson’s performance, and was pretty surprised when I pointed out baby Danny DeVito and Christopher Lloyd to him.
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#19855

Post by maxwelldeux »

mightysparks wrote: June 1st, 2021, 4:35 pm Finally managed to coerce my boyfriend into watching One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest with me (he’d never seen it). He (luckily) thought it was pretty great, especially Jack Nicholson’s performance, and was pretty surprised when I pointed out baby Danny DeVito and Christopher Lloyd to him.
Wife was pretty shocked by those two in there as well. They're so cute!
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#19856

Post by beavis »

My last cinema visit was on 14-12-2020 when I saw Promising Young Woman the day before everything got in lock down again. Tomorrow cinema's are finally open again! Got reservations for Nomadland, De Slag om de Schelde, Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba: Demon Train Arc and Godzilla vs. Kong... Excited! Hope I'll get some sleep, have to be fit tomorrow ;)
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#19857

Post by St. Gloede »

Quentin Tarrantino:
“Most directors have horrible last movies. Usually their worst movies are their last movies.That’s the case for most of the Golden Age directors that ended up making their last movies in the late ’60s and the ’70s, then that ended up being the case for most of the New Hollywood directors who made their last movies in the late ’80s and the ’90s.”
Source: https://www.nme.com/news/film/quentin-t ... es-2955138

A couple of things on this one:

1. Which New Hollywood directors made their last films in the 80s (or 90s)?! Most of them are still making films, or were active this decade. I guess Arthur Penn? New Hollywood started in the late 60s, anyone who stopped directed in the 90s, would have had a shorter career than QT.

2. Most of the big golden aged directors did not go out too poorly. Looking at the biggest names, their last film and their IMDb rating, hmmm:

John Huston = The Dead (1987) 7.3
George Cukor = Rich and Famous (1981) 5.9 *OK, fair enough, but he made it past the treshhold
Billy Wilder = Buddy Buddy (1981) 6.5
Alfred Hitchcock = Family Plot (1976) 6.8
Elia Kazan = The Last Tycoon (1976) 6.3
Orson Welles = F for Fake (1973) 7.8 *Ignoring the films completed long after his death
Joseph L. Mankiewicz = Sleuth (1972) 8.0
Howard Hawks = Rio Lobo (1970) 6.8
William Wyler = The Liberation of L.B. Jones (1970) 6.8
John Ford = 7 Women (1966) 6.8
Frank Capra = Pocketful of Miracles (1961) 7.2
Michael Curtiz = The Comancheros (1960) 6.9

Sure, most of these are not considered among the directors best, but few are considered among their very worst.
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#19858

Post by OldAle1 »

That's just more QT bullshitting if you ask me. And if you go outside Hollywood, consider the last films of Sergio Leone, Andrei Tarkovsky, and Edward Yang - all of whom admittedly made few movies, and died relatively young, but still - their last films are all widely considered great works, in some cases on the level of their best. Ruiz' Mysteries of Lisbon, one of his last films and the last to be released in his lifetime (I think - Ruiz' chronology is tough to figure out) is quite often listed as his greatest work, and he was considerably older and more prolific than the three guys I mentioned first.

As to point 1, yeah, curious - most of those guys are still around. Sydney Pollack isn't, but his last film was in 2005 - and it has a higher IMDb rating than the previous two. So I really don't know where he's coming from other than up his own ass as usual.
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#19859

Post by brokenface »

beavis wrote: June 4th, 2021, 8:23 pm My last cinema visit was on 14-12-2020 when I saw Promising Young Woman the day before everything got in lock down again. Tomorrow cinema's are finally open again! Got reservations for Nomadland, De Slag om de Schelde, Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba: Demon Train Arc and Godzilla vs. Kong... Excited! Hope I'll get some sleep, have to be fit tomorrow ;)
:cheers: enjoy!
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#19860

Post by St. Gloede »

Yeah, there are several directors who went out in their prime. Hell, there are many who argue Sleuth, F for Fake and The Dead are their directors' finest.

While they died relatively young (late 50s) as well, Max Ophüls and Kenji Mizoguchi both died after a string of successes generally considered their best works. They made 25 and 96 feature films, respectively. And I'm sure we can quickly think of many more.

As for older directors, Bresson was 82 when he made L' argent.
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#19861

Post by brokenface »

St. Gloede wrote: June 4th, 2021, 9:48 pm Quentin Tarrantino:
“Most directors have horrible last movies. Usually their worst movies are their last movies.That’s the case for most of the Golden Age directors that ended up making their last movies in the late ’60s and the ’70s, then that ended up being the case for most of the New Hollywood directors who made their last movies in the late ’80s and the ’90s.”
Source: https://www.nme.com/news/film/quentin-t ... es-2955138

A couple of things on this one:

1. Which New Hollywood directors made their last films in the 80s (or 90s)?! Most of them are still making films, or were active this decade. I guess Arthur Penn? New Hollywood started in the late 60s, anyone who stopped directed in the 90s, would have had a shorter career than QT.
Hal Ashby, John Cassavetes, Michael Cimino, Elaine May?
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#19862

Post by St. Gloede »

brokenface wrote: June 4th, 2021, 11:31 pm
St. Gloede wrote: June 4th, 2021, 9:48 pm Quentin Tarrantino:
“Most directors have horrible last movies. Usually their worst movies are their last movies.That’s the case for most of the Golden Age directors that ended up making their last movies in the late ’60s and the ’70s, then that ended up being the case for most of the New Hollywood directors who made their last movies in the late ’80s and the ’90s.”
Source: https://www.nme.com/news/film/quentin-t ... es-2955138

A couple of things on this one:

1. Which New Hollywood directors made their last films in the 80s (or 90s)?! Most of them are still making films, or were active this decade. I guess Arthur Penn? New Hollywood started in the late 60s, anyone who stopped directed in the 90s, would have had a shorter career than QT.
Hal Ashby, John Cassavetes, Michael Cimino, Elaine May?
Those may actually be the people he's talking about as their final films were generally thought to be quite poor - though these are all people with shorter careers than QT.
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#19863

Post by Onderhond »

St. Gloede wrote: June 4th, 2021, 9:48 pm Looking at the biggest names, their last film and their IMDb rating, hmmm:
Insight from someone who doesn't really care for these directors and mostly knows their films because of general cinephile popularity: I recognize none of them (apart from Sleuth). So while their scores may be decent, I think QT might be referencing their general obscurity?
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#19864

Post by St. Gloede »

Onderhond wrote: June 5th, 2021, 8:12 am
St. Gloede wrote: June 4th, 2021, 9:48 pm Looking at the biggest names, their last film and their IMDb rating, hmmm:
Insight from someone who doesn't really care for these directors and mostly knows their films because of general cinephile popularity: I recognize none of them (apart from Sleuth). So while their scores may be decent, I think QT might be referencing their general obscurity?
Could be, but he seems to be talking about quality. 3 are even on TSPDT:

F for Fake (245)
The Dead (452)
7 Women (784)

(Sleuth is not, but it is of probably the most famous/mainstream film on the list, probably followed by Family Plot - but essentially everything Hitchcock did in Hollywood save Mr and Mrs Smith is generally famous).

A few may be relatively obscure, especially compared to their biggest works, but in most cases they at the very least were fairly mainstream. Rio Lobo in particular is one of those John Wayne films that are always on TV. In most cases, their more obscure and/or less liked work by the directors were made at earlier points in their careers. Kazan and Wilder being the notable exceptions (with Welles just being consistent, and Huston doing a weird mix of hits and misses in his last few decades).
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#19865

Post by Knaldskalle »

F for Fake is obscure? I saw it on TV as a kid and loved it!
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#19866

Post by weirdboy »

Knaldskalle wrote: June 5th, 2021, 6:44 pm F for Fake is obscure? I saw it on TV as a kid and loved it!
F for Fake is obscure next to Citizen Kane.
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#19867

Post by Pretentious Hipster »

I really enjoy films that deconstruct a genre, or tropes. I thought of 3 examples, and am wondering if anyone here could figure out some more. Hopefully ones I've yet to see.

Shura [Demons]: Deconstruction of the Jidaigeki genre. Takes the samurai revenge kind of plot, and emphasize on multiple aspects to show just how dangerous, and even scary, it could be. Emphasis is mostly placed on the horror/gore aspect.

Universal Soldier: Day of Reckoning: Does the same stuff as Shura, but make it a deconstruction of hammy 80s action movies. Having Dolph Lundgren act in a hammy villain way and a film where its style is reminiscent of Noe and Refn (who unfortunately I'm not too into), but in a horror/gore tone makes it so surreal.

Showgirls: Deconstruction of not only the journey into Hollywood life, but one of Hollywood films itself. Takes many of the tropes, and increases them to such an extreme to show how absurd those concepts are in the first place. The mostly unintentional bad acting (I think Kyle MacLachlan and Gina Gershon knew what they were doing) helped with some of those tropes. I noticed on rateyourmusic that the rating for it increased by almost 1/5 in the past few years. It seems that finally people are starting to realize that this film is actually genius.
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#19868

Post by outdoorcats »

Seppuku (aka Harakiri) was also a deconstruction of jidai-gecki films, albeit more political (with its left-wing take on samurai honor codes and the feudal system). You can definitely also apply your comments on Showgirls to most of Verhoeven's Hollywood films.

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#19869

Post by dirty_score »

Venice: "Dune will open the film festival"

Cannes: "Hold my beer"

‘F9’ Is Cannes Film Festival’s Mystery Blockbuster
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#19870

Post by kongs_speech »

dirty_score wrote: June 7th, 2021, 4:01 pm Venice: "Dune will open the film festival"

Cannes: "Hold my beer"

‘F9’ Is Cannes Film Festival’s Mystery Blockbuster
I'll spare you all from seeing a gif of the guy projectile vomiting in The Meaning of Life, but that's my reaction. :yucky:
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#19871

Post by zuma »

I don't get it. Is Cannes debuting F9 supposed to be a funny compared to Dune? Is the joke that Venice is highlighting a crap film and Cannes topped it with a worse film?
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#19872

Post by Onderhond »

I think it's about the invasion of Hollywood in arthouse film fests. With Dune having "some" standing, while F&F being the bottom of the barrel for fans of these fests?

I hope it wins :D
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#19873

Post by OldAle1 »

Meh. I don't know the history of the Venice Fest at all, but Cannes has featured Hollywood blockbusters as openers/closers/etc several times in the past, notably E.T. in 1982. Nothing new here, although picking the 9th film in a franchise widely regarded as pure schlock is perhaps setting the bar a little lower than usual.
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#19874

Post by Onderhond »

OldAle1 wrote: June 7th, 2021, 9:24 pm widely regarded as pure schlock is perhaps setting the bar a little lower than usual.
Kind of a poster child franchise for POC making oodles of money though ...
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#19875

Post by OldAle1 »

Onderhond wrote: June 7th, 2021, 9:49 pm
OldAle1 wrote: June 7th, 2021, 9:24 pm widely regarded as pure schlock is perhaps setting the bar a little lower than usual.
Kind of a poster child franchise for POC making oodles of money though ...
True, and that may be why they picked it. I've actually seen all of the series (shoot me) and the diversity of the cast(s) was actually kind of notable when it began - it deserves some props for that, and for not touting it's own "progressive" attitudes like they were being the Spike Lees of action films. But that only gets you so far and I don't know that it's why the series has continued to rake in the gigantic box office it does.
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#19876

Post by Onderhond »

I've seen most of them too and they've been getting progressively better, so I understand why they keep making money.
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#19877

Post by OldAle1 »

Onderhond wrote: June 7th, 2021, 10:24 pm I've seen most of them too and they've been getting progressively better, so I understand why they keep making money.
For me they've all been about the same, in the "ok" range, except for Tokyo Drift and the last one, both of which I thought were pretty bad. Only paid money to see a couple of them, which says something for me since I'll pay to see all kinds of crap :lol: There are always some fun actors in them, the storytelling and direction are typically competent enough, and the action is of a pretty high caliber even if I'm not that fond of modern, glossy $200 million action most of the time - but as the series has gotten away from it's car-centered roots and gotten more and more outlandish, I'm less interested. It's more like Mission: Impossible now except with a much larger cast and there are enough of those kinds of films, whereas car-centered action films are much rarer than they used to be. Well, there are real-world racing films but those don't interest me too much for some reason.
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#19878

Post by Knaldskalle »

I don't get it. It's supposed to "premiere" at Cannes (July 6-17) but opens in the US on June 25 and has already made $250 million in Box Office, mostly from China. Does "premiere" no longer mean what it means?
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#19879

Post by Torgo »

I don't get that either. Well.

Speaking of "premieres":
https://www.avclub.com/the-lost-george- ... 1847055876
"The Amusement Park is a different story. Shot back in 1973, shelved just as long ago, and only recently rediscovered and restored, this “lost” entry in the Pittsburgh filmmaker’s esteemed oeuvre is pure polemic, every frame of its scraggly 16mm footage designed to communicate the way that modern society ignores, abuses, and abandons the elderly. Lest anyone miss that message, the film literally opens with a direct address to the audience: “Remember, as you watch the film: One day, you will be old.”"

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt9270362/ The Amusement Park (2019) (1973, resp.)
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#19880

Post by hurluberlu »

Knaldskalle wrote: June 9th, 2021, 2:33 pm I don't get it. It's supposed to "premiere" at Cannes (July 6-17) but opens in the US on June 25 and has already made $250 million in Box Office, mostly from China. Does "premiere" no longer mean what it means?
Première in France only, they typically say world première if that is the case (like Da Vinci Code and some others in the past, opening Cannes). Clearly a second choice.
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