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the 2009 project

matthewscott8
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Re: the 2009 project

#121

Post by matthewscott8 » January 27th, 2019, 1:28 pm

Image

Rabbit à la Berlin / Królik po berlinsku / Mauerhase (2009 - Bartosz Konopka)

I got lucky again :thumbsup: This one is a surreal documentary about the Berlin Wall, and the rabbits that lived in the zone between the two stretches of the wall. It also dips in and out of using this metaphorically to describe the situation of people affected by the Wall at the time. The style is mostly archive footage with narration, and eerie music that adds to the surreal atmosphere, although there are alsosome interviews, often with guards who worked on the wall. As anyone who has watched Watership Down will know, rabbits are very evocative and they are a potent symbol. They are social animals and also vulnerable and oppressed.

It has a haunting quality and is one of the best documentaries I've ever seen. Runtime is 50 minutes.

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#122

Post by matthewscott8 » February 17th, 2019, 6:17 pm

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Man tänker sitt / One's own thoughts / Burrowing (2009 - Henrik Hellström, Fredrik Wenzel)

Oh wow I struck the motherlode, truly one of the best films I've ever seen. Thanks to nimimerkillinen who chose this as best of 2009 in the ten decennia back thread, forcing me to watch it.

Burrowing I thought was a quite poor title, so I went with the translation from Swedish of "One's own thoughts". This is a contemplative slow cinema piece following some boys and men who live on the same housing estate in Sweden, which is also surrounded by marshy moss-laden forest. The location seems picked very carefully to contrast the unnaturalness of the manicured lawns and banality of the tidy shrubs compared to the forest. A young, probably autistic, boy narrates, using a mixture of Thoreau quotes and observations about his neighbours. von Trier is an obviously major influence.

All of these men prefer their own company to being a part of their community, with its demands on their behaviour. They have different amounts of money and social capital, but mostly find community negative and all at some stage go wandering in the primeval forest.

It is one of the best looking films I've seen with excellent genuinely original camerawork and an amazing sacred soundtrack. The soundtrack is by Erik Enocksson and is on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOEJcwJON7I, it's one of those unfairnesses of distribution, 49 likes and 0 dislikes, probably very few will ever hear it.

It is currently rated 5.9/10 on IMDb, a completely absurd rating.

Good review on Screen Daily: https://www.screendaily.com/features/bu ... 39.article
Last edited by matthewscott8 on February 19th, 2019, 3:22 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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OldAle1
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#123

Post by OldAle1 » February 17th, 2019, 6:27 pm

I dunno, do I trust you or do I trust one of our other resident geniuses?

A rubbish film with a rubbish soundtrack

- monty

matthewscott8
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#124

Post by matthewscott8 » February 17th, 2019, 6:37 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
February 17th, 2019, 6:27 pm
I dunno, do I trust you or do I trust one of our other resident geniuses?

A rubbish film with a rubbish soundtrack

- monty
Hehe, I laughed out loud when I read that. If I can checkbait you, it's on "FLM's Best Swedish Films of All Time", so official (list chosen by Swedish academics and critics). It's only 76 minutes long so maybe the Dr Pepper line could help, "What's the worst that can happen?".

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#125

Post by OldAle1 » February 17th, 2019, 6:59 pm

A rec from you is much more enticing than official checkdom, any day.

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St. Gloede
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#126

Post by St. Gloede » February 20th, 2019, 11:51 pm

Burrowing was not on my radar at all, but it looks and sounds amazing, adding it to the top of my 2009 watchlist - and I'm looking forward to the rubbish soundtrack.

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#127

Post by prodigalgodson » Yesterday, 2:26 am

Ah I forgot about your interest in 2009 Matt. Definitely a good year for movies. My top 20 more or less in order:

Like You Know It All (Hong Sangsoo) - I believe the first film of his I saw, opened my eyes to some new shit; an all-time favorite
A Serious Man (Ethan and Joel Coen) - as funny and ambitious as underground comedies get
The Hangover (Todd Phillips) - as funny and ambitious as mainstream comedies get
Valhalla Rising (Nicholas Winding Refn) - my favorite Refn
Phantoms of Nabua (Apichatpong Weerasethakul) - pure unfiltered Joe
Bluebeard (Catherine Breillat) - my favorite Breillat
Trash Humpers (Harmony Korine) - my favorite Korine
The Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call - New Orleans (Werner Herzog) - Herzog and Cage is a legendary collab
The Limits of Control (Jim Jarmusch) - the first Jarmusch I saw in a theater, fascinating hypnotic stuff
Mother (Bong Joon-ho) - one of Bong's most overlooked, brilliant slice-of-life crime stuff
Inglourious Basterds (Quentin Tarantino) - my favorite Tarantino
Hadewijch (Bruno Dumont) - disturbing, haunting Dumont that called to mind some of my favorite directors
Juntos (Nicolas Pereda) - slice of life done just right
The White Ribbon (Michael Haneke) - in retrospect seems a bit overrated, though I loved it at the time
My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done (Werner Herzog) - loved it at the time but it didn't make as lasting an impression on me as many of his others, still an impressively odd, creepy movie
In the Loop (Armando Iannucci) - funny, biting stuff
A Woman, a Gun, and a Noodle Shop (Zhang Yimou) - well-crafted, clever stuff, underrated neonoir
Antichrist (Lars von Trier) - my favorite von Trier
Ne change rien (Pedro Costa) - oddly the only Costa I've seen but I thought it was a great hypnotic take on the music doc, nice to see in a theater
Enter the Void (Gaspar Noe) - nutty, stimulating stuff

Shouts out on the artsy side also to Moon, Still Raining, Still Dreaming, Ghost Algebra, Wild Grass, Lost in the Mountains, and Dogtooth, and on the fun side to Fantastic Mr. Fox, Up, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Sherlock Holmes, Fish Story, Solomon Kane, and Watchmen.

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#128

Post by matthewscott8 » Yesterday, 2:42 pm

prodigalgodson wrote:
Yesterday, 2:26 am
Ah I forgot about your interest in 2009 Matt. Definitely a good year for movies. My top 20 more or less in order:

Hadewijch (Bruno Dumont) - disturbing, haunting Dumont that called to mind some of my favorite directors
The White Ribbon (Michael Haneke) - in retrospect seems a bit overrated, though I loved it at the time
My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done (Werner Herzog) - loved it at the time but it didn't make as lasting an impression on me as many of his others, still an impressively odd, creepy movie
A Woman, a Gun, and a Noodle Shop (Zhang Yimou) - well-crafted, clever stuff, underrated neonoir
Heeeeeeeeeeeeeeeyyyyyyy! Good to see you man! I've seen most of the ones you mentioned now. I bought the dvd for A Woman, A Gun, and a Noodle Shop years ago when you mentioned your list on my IMDb thread, I'll see if I can't finally check it out on the weekend. Hadewijch felt very Bressonian to me (over used adjective). Agree with My Son, My Son, it spoke to me a lot on first viewing but has faded in the mind. One for rewatch.

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#129

Post by peeptoad » Yesterday, 2:51 pm

matthewscott8 wrote:
January 27th, 2019, 1:28 pm

Rabbit à la Berlin / Królik po berlinsku / Mauerhase (2009 - Bartosz Konopka)

I got lucky again :thumbsup: This one is a surreal documentary about the Berlin Wall, and the rabbits that lived in the zone between the two stretches of the wall. It also dips in and out of using this metaphorically to describe the situation of people affected by the Wall at the time. The style is mostly archive footage with narration, and eerie music that adds to the surreal atmosphere, although there are alsosome interviews, often with guards who worked on the wall. As anyone who has watched Watership Down will know, rabbits are very evocative and they are a potent symbol. They are social animals and also vulnerable and oppressed.

It has a haunting quality and is one of the best documentaries I've ever seen. Runtime is 50 minutes.
I really liked this one as well. I watched it last year for the German challenge. I loved some of the close up shots of the rabbits and the photography overall. It's a pretty unique doc imho.
And I have 52 films on my watch list from 2009... a lot of work to do!

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