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the 2009 project

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the 2009 project

#81

Post by matthewscott8 » January 17th, 2018, 1:52 pm

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Up (2009 - Pete Docter, Bob Peterson)

OK I don't really like Pixar films, so I had avoided this like the plague but finally forced myself to watch it, given it's undoubtedly one of the most acclaimed films of the year.

The big highlight for me was Kevin the bird, who turns out to be female. Just thought Kevin had a pretty cool attitude, and I like that attitude is such an intrinsic thing that Kevin doesn't have to have any language ability for the character to be fully fleshed out.

There's a nice visual metaphor in the film for how destination is less important than journey, showed when Carl looks down into the cold and relentless waterfall and the barren rock surrounding it.

Techno collars leading to talking dogs is funny too.

The message about not letting the wrongs done to you (the hunter guy being told he was a fraud) turn you into a bad person is really important.

I think it could be quite a nice conversation starter with your children about life lessons. Also the little kid is really the moral compass, which is quite realistic too, kids are good at that, adults are good at inventing reasons for doing the wrong thing.

I really hate the whole computer generated look which is why I tend not to watch Pixar films. The whole conceit about the house floating away on balloons just isn't interesting to me either. It just all felt a bit thin. Probably a bit too grinchy to get carried away with this stuff, plus I don't like the start of the film, too emotionally manipulative for me, made me too sad, and the rest of the movie didn't balance it out. Watching movies for "normies" generally makes me feel a little desolate.
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#82

Post by matthewscott8 » January 30th, 2018, 12:32 pm

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The World (2009 - Takashi Makino)

A complete obscurity of the year, brought to my attention by a voracious film watcher of that era, lynchs. This 50 minute experimental film now has 8 votes on IMDb including mine. Mostly the film is black and white shots of water and clouds, albeit the film is shot at neckbreak angles and often in close up and with superimpositions so that much abstraction appears. The soundtrack is excellent and cosmic, and the images generally become so as well. It's soporific so it took me a lot of attempts to get through it, but I liked it so much it was worth it.

The shot I have posted here is of dimples in the water reflecting light, but it comes off as showing constellations, twinkling with urgency.
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#83

Post by matthewscott8 » January 30th, 2018, 12:33 pm

My watchlist is as below, it's not exhaustive, but has most stuff:
SpoilerShow
After Last Season - Mark Region
Altiplano - Peter Brosens, Jessica Hope Woodworth
An Education - Lone Scherfig
Between Two Worlds - Vimukthi Jayasundara
Border - Harutyun Khachatryan
Broken Embraces - Pedro Almodóvar
Café Noir - Sung-il Jung
Child of the Sun - Christopher Gozum
City of Life and Death - Chuan Lu
Contact High - Michael Glawogger
Coraline - Henry Selick - EDIT now seen
Dahlia - Shiho Kano
Dou niu / Cow - Hu Guan
Duplicity - Tony Gilroy - EDIT now seen
Everyone Else - Maren Ade
Everything Is Terrible: The Movie - "Everything Is Terrible"
Father of My Children - Mia Hansen-Løve
Final Flesh - Ike Sanders
Five Minutes of Heaven - Oliver Hirschbiegel
Gagma napiri - George Ovashvili
In the Beginning - Xavier Giannoli
Ivul - Andrew Kotting
I Travel Because I Have to, I Come Back Because I Love You - Karim Aïnouz, Marcelo Gomes
Kinatay - Brillante Ma. Mendoza
La danse - Frederick Wiseman
Letters to Father Jacob - Klaus Härö
Life During Wartime - Todd Solondz
Lost Persons Area - Caroline Strubbe
Lourdes - Jessica Hausner
Lowlands - Peter Thompson
Mao's Last Dancer - 8 Bruce Beresford
Mundane History - Anocha Suwichakornpong
Next Day Air - Benny Boom
Precious - Lee Daniels
Rapt - Lucas Belvaux
Room and a Half - Andrey Khrzhanovskiy
Sin Nombre - Cary Joji Fukunaga
Snow White and Russian Red - Xawery Zulawski
Survival of the Dead - George A. Romero - EDIT now seen
Symbol - Hitoshi Matsumoto
Terrorism Considered as One of the Fine Arts - Peter Whitehead
The Angels' Melancholia / Melancholie der Engel - Marian Dora
The Blood of Rebirth - Toshiaki Toyoda
The Box - Richard Kelly
The Happiest Girl in the World - Radu Jude
The Hole - Joe Dante
The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus - Terry Gilliam
The Maid - Sebastián Silva
The Milk of Sorrow - Claudia Llosa
The Reverse - Borys Lankosz
The Unloved - Samantha Morton
This Is It - Kenny Ortega
To Die Like a Man - João Pedro Rodrigues
Villalobos - Romuald Karmakar

Including some shorts:

Anna - Rúnar Rúnarsson
Apocrypha - Andrey Zvyagintsev
Arena - João Salaviza
Boundary - Devin Horan
Cobra Mist - Emily Richardson
Crime Abismo Azul Remorso Físico - Edgar Pêra
Danse macabre - Pedro Pires
Incident by a Bank - Ruben Östlund
I apognosi tis Mimis - Elina Panik
Long Is The Way / Tá an Bealach Fada - Eoin Heaney
Lost in the Mountains - Sang-soo Hong
Still in Cosmos - Takashi Makino
The Pursuit of What Was - Ya-li Huang
Vita Nova - Vincent Meessen
Zum Vergleich - Harun Farocki
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#84

Post by matthewscott8 » February 11th, 2018, 5:05 pm

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A Town Called Panic / Panique au village (2009 - Stéphane Aubier & Vincent Patar)

This was absolutely delirious fun. It's about a village in an unknown location, and a house where, Indian, Cowboy and Cheval (a horse) live together. Indian and Cowboy want to buy Cheval a birthday present and at that point things start going completely wrong. It's hilarious and heartwarming and has lots of subtle messages about otherness. It's called panic because the anxiety levels build throughout the film, and go absolutely off the charts zany towards the end. This is clearly one of the greatest movies of 2009, and yet it was almost completely ignored by the critical establishment. In what appears to be a clinically insane move, a sequel from 2016, has yet to be released (IMDb lists a limited distribution in America, but a 2016 movie with 37 votes only likely only played in one cinema in the world).

Except for Cheval and his amour Madame Longrée, most of the characters appear to have taken speed, which just adds to the fun. Whilst I can understand why some of the avant-garde stuff I've uncovered got no traction with viewers in 2009, quite how this one was missed is absolutely baffling to me.

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#85

Post by 3eyes » February 11th, 2018, 6:03 pm

since my last post (don't know if mentioned yet)

Nanjing! Nanjing! /City of Life and Death
:run: STILL the Gaffer!

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#86

Post by lynchs » February 11th, 2018, 8:14 pm

You can't go wrong with Makino!

your attention span is the key to fully enjoy the experience! (that sound good? :blink: )

btw, 'The Blood of Rebirth' (Toshiaki Toyoda) is ******* insane and awesome! You'll love it!!

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#87

Post by lynchs » February 11th, 2018, 8:34 pm

Guess my avatar :teehee:
Spoiler: click to toggleShow
Tranquil (Takashi Makino, 2007, 20 min)

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#88

Post by matthewscott8 » February 12th, 2018, 4:29 pm

lynchs on Feb 11 2018, 01:34:42 PM wrote:Guess my avatar :teehee:
Spoiler: click to toggleShow
Tranquil (Takashi Makino, 2007, 20 min)
I recently got hold of his Cerulean Spectacles dvd, it has a pair of "Pulfrich effect 3D glasses". These are same as old style 3D glasses, but one lens is blue and one lens is clear. It has Tranquil on it, so I will report back. Will be interesting to see what it is like with and without the glasses.

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#89

Post by matthewscott8 » February 13th, 2018, 11:29 am

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Tenderness (2009 - Jon Polson)

A rather sombre and one-note film about a young serial killer who manages to escape trial as an adult on grounds of diminished responsibility, and gets released into the chicken coop again when he's 18. A semi-retired cop wants to get him back in custody and stop any more deaths. A young lady who doesn't think much of life hooks up with the serial killer. Brings to life a phrase I recently heard from a philosopher, when we look for romantic partners we look for, "familiar suffering".

The film is about people with meaningless lives, looking for a reason to get out of bed every day other than to continuously reflect on their pain.

Potentially for people who already read the novel, the poor editing is easily overlooked as they know what is going on anyway. Russell Crowe and Laura Dern signed up to the project, perhaps as the novel has received some quite favourable attention, but they don't bring much to it.

The film lacks any dramatic oomph, partly because the cop is a really nice guy who looks at Eric as a guy with a mental illness; and there's no animus back from Eric, simply because he lacks most human feelings. Although a few people did manage to get happy about Tenderness, it seemed to me like like a roughly-hewn film with no outstanding qualities.
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#90

Post by lynchs » February 13th, 2018, 3:07 pm

I'll be waiting :)

ps. never had the 3D curiosity, don't ask me why.

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#91

Post by matthewscott8 » February 22nd, 2018, 1:49 am

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Trypps #6 (Malobi) (2009 - Ben Russell)

This was fun to watch, a bunch of folks emerge from a house in a village in Suriname and go wandering wearing strange and unusual costumes, find their way to a village centre and start dancing ecstatically. It's strange and troubling but also feels sweet and celebratory. It feels like watching a leaf go down a stream, you cant guess what eddy might catch it or what rock it might stick to for a second. It stands alone as a shot but is also available as part of his Let Each One Go Where He May, a feature from the same year.

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#92

Post by matthewscott8 » February 25th, 2018, 7:35 pm

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Adventureland (2009 - Greg Mottola)

A coming of age tale set in a 3rd rate amusement park. A sort of dramedy, though exceptionally light on the laughs from where I was sat, and on the drama too come to think of it. Jesse Eisenberg plays James Brennan, a young man privileged in upbringing and looks, who learns about the dreary realities of life when a setback forces him to get a job at Adventureland. This dreary reality is represented through the metaphor of rigged games at Adventureland, and various run-ins and pratfalls. It is though a minor skirmish with reality, that comes with considerable benefits, and by the end he looked set to resume his existence in the VIP lounge and no doubt fall into complacent privileged middle age, instead of falling like Icarus into the oblivion of an ordinary hopeless life. No doubt it's one from the heart of the scriptwriter, but it was a chore to watch, and I had to take breaks every 20 minutes. The talk in the day was that it was mismarketed as something more bawdy/rompish and so it got bad viewer feedback. I was hoping to be able to positively reappraise it, but I just can't.
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#93

Post by matthewscott8 » February 25th, 2018, 7:36 pm

3eyes on Feb 11 2018, 11:03:05 AM wrote:since my last post (don't know if mentioned yet)

Nanjing! Nanjing! /City of Life and Death
on my watch list

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#94

Post by matthewscott8 » March 3rd, 2018, 12:09 pm

TemporaryOne-1 on IMDb is also fascinated by this year, and recently published this list https://www.imdb.com/list/ls023549911/

Is T11 on this forum too?

It's an amazing list, so many choices in common and he really has gone into huge depth on the year, not just regurgitating the critical darlings. 199 at the moment, maybe it's meant to be a top 200? Anyway has given me a lot of fodder!

EDIT: Sadly looks like T11 has been victim of the public lists going private bug
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#95

Post by brokenface » March 3rd, 2018, 12:30 pm

matthewscott8 on Feb 11 2018, 10:05:10 AM wrote:Image

A Town Called Panic / Panique au village (2009 - Stéphane Aubier & Vincent Patar)
This was fun. Note it was a TV series first a few years before the film. The episodes were all ~5 mins. Certainly worth checking out if you enjoyed the film. and personally I think it works a bit better in small blasts
In what appears to be a clinically insane move, a sequel from 2016, has yet to be released (IMDb lists a limited distribution in America, but a 2016 movie with 37 votes only likely only played in one cinema in the world).
don't think it looks like this was a 'true' sequel, rather a double bill of two shorts they made after the film:
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6066170/movieconnections/

--

on your watchlist, I'd say prioritise Broken Embraces, Symbol and Coraline :thumbsup:

Elsewhere add this to your watchlist: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1500703/
Interesting one that's very little seen, monty recommended this to me originally
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#96

Post by matthewscott8 » March 3rd, 2018, 4:01 pm

@Brokenface, added Cow in there, no idea how to see it though :(

Vicino alla Montagna / Near the Mountains (2009 - Flint Juventino Beppe)

So this was off the chain. This is basically the kind of film Dmitri Kirsanoff would make if you went back to the 1920s in your time machine and set him up with a digital camera and gave him some post-production lessons. This dialogue-less movie has a couple of naked young women exploring a sub-arctic forest near some mountains. It took me a little while to get into, partly because the opening has some text which was a little poorly written, and the guy isn't literary, and also just the shock of seeing something so old in style filmed with a digital camera, it really is like watching something by Kirsanoff or Epstein.

It really started to get on top of me though, some of the shots are really gorgeous. The director is also the composer of the music, which came off alternately as pastiches of Grieg or Debussy.

Reading some stuff the director has written he comes off as a bit nutty/chippy. He found some pretty cool images though. Couldn't find any way to get a screenshot in unfortunately, watched it on Amazon VOD.

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#97

Post by cinewest » March 6th, 2018, 2:23 am

matthewscott8 on Jan 30 2018, 05:33:08 AM wrote:My watchlist is as below, it's not exhaustive, but has most stuff:

Adventureland - Greg Mottola
After Last Season - Mark Region
Altiplano - Peter Brosens, Jessica Hope Woodworth
An Education - Lone Scherfig
Between Two Worlds - Vimukthi Jayasundara
Blood of Rebirth / Yomigaeri no chi - Toshiaki Toyoda
Border - Harutyun Khachatryan
Broken Embraces - Pedro Almodóvar
Café Noir - Sung-il Jung
Child of the Sun - Christopher Gozum
City of Life and Death - Chuan Lu
Contact High - Michael Glawogger
Coraline - Henry Selick
Dahlia - Shiho Kano
Dou niu / Cow - Hu Guan
Duplicity - Tony Gilroy
Everyone Else - Maren Ade
Everything Is Terrible: The Movie - "Everything Is Terrible"
Father of My Children - Mia Hansen-Løve
Final Flesh - Ike Sanders
Five Minutes of Heaven - Oliver Hirschbiegel
Gagma napiri - George Ovashvili
In the Beginning - Xavier Giannoli
Ivul - Andrew Kotting
I Travel Because I Have to, I Come Back Because I Love You - Karim Aïnouz, Marcelo Gomes
Kinatay - Brillante Ma. Mendoza
La danse - Frederick Wiseman
Letters to Father Jacob - Klaus Härö
Life During Wartime - Todd Solondz
Lost Persons Area - Caroline Strubbe
Lourdes - Jessica Hausner
Lowlands - Peter Thompson
Mao's Last Dancer - 8 Bruce Beresford
Mundane History - Anocha Suwichakornpong
Next Day Air - Benny Boom
Precious - Lee Daniels
Rapt - Lucas Belvaux
Room and a Half - Andrey Khrzhanovskiy
Sin Nombre - Cary Joji Fukunaga
Snow White and Russian Red - Xawery Zulawski
Survival of the Dead - George A. Romero
Symbol - Hitoshi Matsumoto
Terrorism Considered as One of the Fine Arts - Peter Whitehead
The Angels' Melancholia / Melancholie der Engel - Marian Dora
The Blood of Rebirth - Toshiaki Toyoda
The Box - Richard Kelly
The Happiest Girl in the World - Radu Jude
The Hole - Joe Dante
The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus - Terry Gilliam
The Maid - Sebastián Silva
The Milk of Sorrow - Claudia Llosa
The Reverse - Borys Lankosz
The Unloved - Samantha Morton
This Is It - Kenny Ortega
To Die Like a Man - João Pedro Rodrigues
Villalobos - Romuald Karmakar

Including some shorts:

Anna - Rúnar Rúnarsson
Apocrypha - Andrey Zvyagintsev
Arena - João Salaviza
Boundary - Devin Horan
Cobra Mist - Emily Richardson
Crime Abismo Azul Remorso Físico - Edgar Pêra
Danse macabre - Pedro Pires
Incident by a Bank - Ruben Östlund
I apognosi tis Mimis - Elina Panik
Long Is The Way / Tá an Bealach Fada - Eoin Heaney
Lost in the Mountains - Sang-soo Hong
Still in Cosmos - Takashi Makino
The Pursuit of What Was - Ya-li Huang
Vita Nova - Vincent Meessen
Zum Vergleich - Harun Farocki
Have seen about 10 on your list, and have another 10 on my "to see" list.
Here are the highlights for me:

Liked An Education a lot. A very solid drama about coming into adulthood with standout performances, especially from Carey Mulligan in the lead. Nice atmosphere, as well.

I also liked Broken Embraces, and though it seems to be one of people's least favorites by almodovar in the last 20 years, I think it's among his best.

Everyone Else- I love discovering good directors I am unfamiliar with, and Marne Ade definitely has talent (Toni Erdmann earned her a lot more pub. Last year). This is a dogma style relationship drama that catalogs the nature of a couple over the course of a vacation together.

All 3 of these are in my top 20 for 2009.

As for those that disappointed me, Mao's Last Dancer is at the top of my list, though I thought Sin Nombre also fell short of the mark, despite a strong beginning.

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#98

Post by OldAle1 » May 4th, 2018, 3:54 pm

OK so I watched another 2009 film last night; I could have sworn that I learned about it on this thread but I'm not seeing it nor am I finding anything under the search. Hmmm. Anyway I must have had a reason because I requested it through the library, and it had to come from another library and it took a few weeks. I must be getting some form of dementia, I really can't remember why I wanted to see this.

Anyway it's Unmade Beds, a British film set/filmed in London from the Argentinian-born Alexis Dos Santos, and it's a relatively plotless portrait of a bunch of young people, many of whom live in this huge loft or warehouse or something and spend all their time at clubs, drinking, fucking. And they all seem to be from different places - our main two characters are Axl, a young Spanish man looking for his father who he believes is an Englishman in London, and Vera, a French woman who works in a book store. Apart from Axl's little subplot the film is as aimless - at least initially - as it's characters, though it does eventually work in some themes about the randomness of connections, taking life a day at a time, not giving up on love, taking chances, etc. It's filmed mostly in closeups, a lot of handheld work, beautiful saturated colors, and I enjoyed the vibe to a certain extent though it didn't really add up to much overall for me. It seems very much a film of the moment but questioning that moment - my favorite part was the random encounter that Vera has where she and the guy deliberately try to learn nothing about each other and meet again without using cellphones, texting, etc - just the old fashioned "you name the place, I'll name the time". It's kind of cute in the context of this world full of people from all over interacting in a mammoth city.

I guess worth seeing but I can't be enthusiastic about it, though I wanted to be; this is exactly the kind of narrative that I often love, I just don't love this particular one.
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#99

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » May 4th, 2018, 4:27 pm

matthewscott8 on Mar 3 2018, 09:01:12 AM wrote:Vicino alla Montagna / Near the Mountains (2009 - Flint Juventino Beppe)

So this was off the chain. This is basically the kind of film Dmitri Kirsanoff would make if you went back to the 1920s in your time machine and set him up with a digital camera and gave him some post-production lessons. This dialogue-less movie has a couple of naked young women exploring a sub-arctic forest near some mountains. It took me a little while to get into, partly because the opening has some text which was a little poorly written, and the guy isn't literary, and also just the shock of seeing something so old in style filmed with a digital camera, it really is like watching something by Kirsanoff or Epstein.

It really started to get on top of me though, some of the shots are really gorgeous. The director is also the composer of the music, which came off alternately as pastiches of Grieg or Debussy.

Reading some stuff the director has written he comes off as a bit nutty/chippy. He found some pretty cool images though. Couldn't find any way to get a screenshot in unfortunately, watched it on Amazon VOD.
I like the sound of this. Glad to find out about it, Matt!

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That's all, folks!

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#100

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » May 5th, 2018, 8:06 am

Jane Campion's Bright Star comes recommended if you haven't seen it yet.
not everything is fish, but fish are teeming everywhere

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#101

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » May 5th, 2018, 12:57 pm

Films I watched in the past year that I haven't seen mentioned yet:

Sense of Architecture (Heinz Emigholz)
Petropolis: Aerial Perspectives on the Alberta Tar Sands (Peter Mettler)
&#3626;&#3623;&#3619;&#3619;&#3588;&#3660;&#3610;&#3657;&#3634;&#3609;&#3609;&#3634; / [font=Curlz MT]A[/font][font=Comic Sans MS]GRARIAN[/font] [font=Monotype Corsiva]U[/font][font=Comic Sans MS]TOPIA[/font] (Uruphong Raksasad)
&#34676;&#34678;&#22827;&#20154; / Madame Butterfly (Tsai Ming-Liang) [moyen metrage]
La femme-squelette (Sarah Van den Boom) [short]
Wound Footage (Thorsten Fleisch) [short]

And a few from my watchlist:

Goodbye Pyongyang (Sona, the Other Myself) (Yang Yong-hi)
Go Get Some Rosemary (Josh & Benny Safdie)
El último verano de la Boyita / The Last Summer of La Boyita (Julia Solomonoff)
Jestem twój / I am Yours (Mariusz Grzegorzek)
Staten Island (James DeMonaco)
White Lightnin' (Dominic Murphy)
The Death of Alice Blue (Park Bench)
dream realityImage
LETTERBOXD | MUBI | IMDb | tumblr.

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#102

Post by matthewscott8 » May 7th, 2018, 5:04 pm

Perception de Ambiguity on May 5 2018, 06:57:37 AM wrote:Films I watched in the past year that I haven't seen mentioned yet:

Sense of Architecture (Heinz Emigholz)
Petropolis: Aerial Perspectives on the Alberta Tar Sands (Peter Mettler)
&#3626;&#3623;&#3619;&#3619;&#3588;&#3660;&#3610;&#3657;&#3634;&#3609;&#3609;&#3634; / [font=Curlz MT]A[/font][font=Comic Sans MS]GRARIAN[/font] [font=Monotype Corsiva]U[/font][font=Comic Sans MS]TOPIA[/font] (Uruphong Raksasad)
&#34676;&#34678;&#22827;&#20154; / Madame Butterfly (Tsai Ming-Liang) [moyen metrage]
La femme-squelette (Sarah Van den Boom) [short]
Wound Footage (Thorsten Fleisch) [short]

And a few from my watchlist:

Goodbye Pyongyang (Sona, the Other Myself) (Yang Yong-hi)
Go Get Some Rosemary (Josh & Benny Safdie)
El último verano de la Boyita / The Last Summer of La Boyita (Julia Solomonoff)
Jestem twój / I am Yours (Mariusz Grzegorzek)
Staten Island (James DeMonaco)
White Lightnin' (Dominic Murphy)
The Death of Alice Blue (Park Bench)
Petropolis is pretty stark. It's about time for a rewatch. Sense Of Architecture I noted on Kasparius' top 1000 films the other day and so that is a forthcoming watch. Thanks for the other recommendations. Room and a Half is next on the list. Been a bit slow going recently due to pesky inquietude stopping me from getting much done.
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#103

Post by matthewscott8 » November 3rd, 2018, 10:06 pm

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Mic Macs à Tire-Larigot / Micmacs (2009 - Jean-Pierre Jeunet)

This really took me by surprise, a charming movie about a gang of misfits who help a man called Bazil get revenge on two armaments manufacturers who have supplied weapons that have blighted his life in two separate incidents. It's barmy and beautiful. Heaps of feelgood factor.

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#104

Post by matthewscott8 » November 4th, 2018, 12:22 am

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Survival of the Dead (2009 - George Romero)

Woeful blank of the dead franchise extension. Tries to bring a western feel to the series. Theme is about what we could achieve if we all worked together instead of fighting each other. Also has some rather obvious criticisms of the internet. Has a really weird feel to it. Writing is absolutely terrible in points, in terms of plot, character development and dialogue.

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#105

Post by matthewscott8 » November 11th, 2018, 11:35 am

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Coraline (2009- Henry Selick

I enjoyed watching this one a lot more that I thought I would. It's a story of a young only child who moves with mum and dad to the countryside. She feels some ennui and then discovers a secret passageway to a world where eveything is better... or so it seems. A lot of fun and very well animated. Close to a new favourite, and think I may get it as a present for my niece.

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#106

Post by matthewscott8 » November 11th, 2018, 5:51 pm

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Duplicity (2009 - Tony Gilroy)

Whimsical corporate spy movie that has its sexy moments and the occasional thrill. In terms of a realistic grasp of the corporate world it doesn't get much closer than something like The Husucker Proxy. A main issue is that corporate espionage isn't actually interesting. I guess if you watch it with your other half you probably get laid after.
Last edited by matthewscott8 on November 11th, 2018, 8:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#107

Post by OldAle1 » November 11th, 2018, 6:00 pm

There was somebody on IMDb, I think a Film General regular, who absolutely *HATED* Coraline, that's really all I remember about that film, the extreme vituperation of this person toward it. Haven't seen it myself, some interest I guess but it seems like one of those films that I'll probably never actually get around to.

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#108

Post by matthewscott8 » November 11th, 2018, 9:04 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
November 11th, 2018, 6:00 pm
There was somebody on IMDb, I think a Film General regular, who absolutely *HATED* Coraline, that's really all I remember about that film, the extreme vituperation of this person toward it. Haven't seen it myself, some interest I guess but it seems like one of those films that I'll probably never actually get around to.
Haha, my only memory of The Lion King is you ranting about it. You would be hard pressed to put it in a list of must see films, although it was defo worthwhile

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#109

Post by Onderhond » November 11th, 2018, 9:14 pm

Some very nice movies here. Coraline, MicMacs and A Town Called Panic are all personal favorites. I knew I gave a list already, but here's an expanded one if you still need some inspiration: https://www.onderhond.com/movies?filter=2009

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#110

Post by matthewscott8 » November 12th, 2018, 8:18 pm

Onderhond wrote:
November 11th, 2018, 9:14 pm
Some very nice movies here. Coraline, MicMacs and A Town Called Panic are all personal favorites. I knew I gave a list already, but here's an expanded one if you still need some inspiration: https://www.onderhond.com/movies?filter=2009
Thanks, this is useful. I think you are slightly more into kinetics and hyperstylisation than me! I had forgotten that Crank 2 was 2009. I will have to see this as it's my duty, but with trepidation as I think it will gross me out. Although I did get something out of the original.

I had Enter The Void at #1 for a long time. I'm fairly convinced from looking at the films of his I've watched (including this one) that he's a homophobe, and this clouds my view of it considerably. Redline I like a lot but it didn't feel overall like it had a sense of meaning.

Tetsuo the Bullet Man and Symbol are on my dvd pile so watch this space!

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#111

Post by Onderhond » November 12th, 2018, 8:31 pm

Haha, if you want some subtler films, I recommend Heaven's Door and Warrior and the Wolf.

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#112

Post by matthewscott8 » November 21st, 2018, 6:50 pm

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Vengeance (2009 - Johnnie To)

Onderhond's one line tag that it will hit the spot for Johnnie To fans, is likely correct, as the movie has interesting signature set pieces, it didn't hang together for me though. Vengeance is about a Frenchman who travels to Hong Kong and Macau to avenge the murder of his daughter's family. The Memento-like riff is that he is losing his memory and so needs to take photos of people to remind himself who they are. It takes a long time before the filmmakers find a way to use this idea creatively, and then they use it really badly. What's annoying is that the movie doesn't need the memory loss lead at all, the whole movie still would work well if the guy was compos mentis, you still have a fish-out-of-water lead character, and you still have lots of material about loyalty and brotherhood.

Bloodthirsty vengeance is obviously a really bad idea, and so if you're going to make it the theme of a movie, you need either a strongly pulpy feel to the movie, or you need really stupid characters; maybe make it a samurai movie, as the sort of moral codes that existed centuries ago would make sense of the characters and their motivations here. As it is, this movie just doesn't make sense. Some of the narrative conceits are weak, like how the lead character comes across some assassins for hire randomly in his hotel. The movie also had really bad CGI, you could see the blood spurts each time someone got shot were amateurish.

I ended up being pretty annoyed, it just felt like someone had torn a first draft script from a scriptwriter's hands and just started shooting with it. Johnny Hallyday (rest in peace), is a picture of pain, but because he's been worn down by age and strife, not because he's acting it, there's nothing expressive about what he's doing in this movie. It comes across like he's involved so that the movie still got co-production money. According to Roger Ebert he was a last minute substitution for Alain Delon.

I won't deny that the movie has effective moments, the set piece at the barbecue spot at night is really good, although even that has a really stupid moment (improbable boomeranging Frisbee). I've recently watched Takashi Miike's Black Society Trilogy, and this effort from Johnnie To is absolutely light years behind those excellent movies in terms of quality. Somehow this was accepted in competition at Cannes in 2009.
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#113

Post by GruesomeTwosome » November 21st, 2018, 7:25 pm

matthewscott8 wrote:
November 11th, 2018, 5:51 pm
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Duplicity (2009 - Tony Gilroy)

Whimsical corporate spy movie that has its sexy moments and the occasional thrill. In terms of a realistic grasp of the corporate world it doesn't get much closer than something like The Husucker Proxy. A main issue is that corporate espionage isn't actually interesting. I guess if you watch it with your other half you probably get laid after.
You're right that corporate espionage is typically a dull subject for a film, but two films came to mind that do something more interesting with the subject, and they both happen to be from 2002: Demonlover (Olivier Assayas) and Cypher (Vincenzo Natali). Per ICM, it looks like you've seen Cypher already but not Demonlover. I much preferred Demonlover anyway, it might be up your alley.
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#114

Post by matthewscott8 » November 21st, 2018, 8:04 pm

You're right that corporate espionage is typically a dull subject for a film, but two films came to mind that do something more interesting with the subject, and they both happen to be from 2002: Demonlover (Olivier Assayas) and Cypher (Vincenzo Natali). Per ICM, it looks like you've seen Cypher already but not Demonlover. I much preferred Demonlover anyway, it might be up your alley.
I'm ok with it in a sci-fi context like the examples you mention, two other examples would be Inception and New Rose Hotel, both of which I liked. I really love Assayas' films, haven't seen Demonlover yet, but another underrated film of his I love is Boarding Gate, so Demonlover is definitely on the priority list. I have a lot of trouble understanding how he makes genre stuff like this and also more clean cut arthouse films. I would love to hear him talk about his multiple personality disorder!!!!

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#115

Post by GruesomeTwosome » November 21st, 2018, 9:04 pm

New Rose Hotel, yeah, that's one I've wanted to see for a while. Never even heard of Assayas' Boarding Gate, sounds promising, and with Kim Gordon of Sonic Youth in the cast (SY did the music for Demonlover, by the way) and scored by Brian Eno. Watchlisted.
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#116

Post by ralch » November 21st, 2018, 11:08 pm

I've seen far too few from 2009.
Some favorites:

9/10
The Invisible Frame — Cynthia Beatt
The Man Next Door / El hombre de al lado — Mariano Cohn, Gastón Duprat

8/10
An Education — Lone Scherfig
Julie and Julia — Nora Ephron
The Milk of Sorrow / La teta asustada — Claudia Llosa
Partly Cloudy — Peter Sohn (short)
Where the Wild Things Are — Spike Jonze

7/10
Alma — Rodrigo Blaas (short)
Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans — Werner Herzog
Broken Embraces / Los abrazos rotos — Pedro Almodóvar
Danse macabre — Pedro Pires (short)
Everyone Else / Alle Anderen — Maren Ade
The Girlfriend Experience — Steven Soderbergh
A Letter to Uncle Boonmee — Apichatpong Weerasethakul (short)
Logorama — François Alaux, Hervé de Crécy, Ludovic Houplain (short)
The Maid / La nana — Sebastián Silva
The Ones and the Others / Los unos y los otros — Juanchi González (short)
Phantoms of Nabua — Apichatpong Weerasethakul (short)
A Serious Man — Joel & Ethan Coen
Teclopolis — Javier Mrad, Javier Salazar (short)

6/10
Drag Me to Hell — Sam Raimi
Hands Solo — William Mager (short)
Orfanato de cafres — William Rosario Cruz
Sightseeing / Excursiones — Ezequiel Acuña
Tetro — Francis Ford Coppola
To Die Like a Man / Morrer Como Um Homem — João Pedro Rodrigues

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#117

Post by matthewscott8 » December 2nd, 2018, 11:25 am

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The Girlfriend Experience (2009 - Steven Soderbergh)

The hardest thing to work out about the movie is, what did I just watch? It's not an erotic movie, or attempting to be. It's not even really about prostitution. It felt like it was a movie that captured a zeitgeist (New York 2008). Everyone you see in the movie is on a hustle, not just Chelsea, who sells The Girlfriend Experience for money. Her clients have their hustles as well, even the inventive street musicians we meet, they're also on the hustle. They wanna make some big money, they want to buy things when they have the big money. They want to buy alcohol, artworks, sex, and even friendship (Chris, Chelsea's boyfriend gets taken all expenses to Vegas by his personal training client).

The most important thing though is no-one have any say in their lives except themselves. My life to live, to quote the Godard title that loosely inspires this film. I think this is illustrated neatly by an argument Chelsea and Chris have, Chelsea is jeopardising her relationship with Chris, because of a client she met who happens to have a favourable birthday (important in her pseudo-astrological theory of personality). Chris starts shouting at her about how this "personology" might not be the best way to run her life. Although her belief is baseless and demonstrably ludicrous (you could find a serial killer or other deplorable born on every day of the year), the most important thing to her is that he has raised his voice. The overall tone in the movie is one of avoidance.

The movie actually has some really good dialogue, and seems much better than it has been reviewed in general. It was a chore to watch though.

EDIT: I watched Sex, Lies, and Videotape recently, which gave me an inkling at what Sodey might have been aiming for here, e.g. doesn't care about the GFC at all, is only interested in exploring relationships, this is really pale fire compared with SLV.

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#118

Post by matthewscott8 » January 3rd, 2019, 3:00 pm

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Cell 211 / Celda 211 (2009 - Daniel Monzón)

This was a popular film of the year, winner of Spain's Goya award and with a high IMDb rating of 7.8/10. Its main strength is the performance of Luis Tosar (character pictured above), who plays Malamadre, hard man, and top dog prisoner. He really portrays alpha superbly. The film is about a prison riot and its resolution. The unusual ingredient is Juan, a keen prison officer visting the prison just before his first day, who has to try and stay alive during the riot. The film has some liberal characteristics, and shows how poorly prisoners are treated, without shying away from the fact that many of them would quite happily cut you into pieces. This is a well made, high budget movie, with a pretty reasonable script. Whilst being hard to criticise, it lacked a wow factor for me and there was not much character development outside of Juan.

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#119

Post by matthewscott8 » January 6th, 2019, 12:29 pm

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Ticho nad oblakmi / Silence Above the Clouds (2009 - Silence Above the Clouds)

This is a Slovakian film almost entirely consisting of shots of mountain landscapes amongst the clouds. This was an obscure one in 2009, only 11 votes including mine on IMDb. The concept was promising to me, but I couldn't get interested in the execution. The mix of colours is not nice at most times, and a lot of the experimental work they do with superimpositions, contrast adjustments, and time lapse don't really work. The music is really poor generic easy listening. Actually the film shouldn't have music at all, all sound does is despoil the images. They do some printing of sentences and words on the screen at some points, which come off as pseudo-profound, cheaply done and low skilled. It would have been nice to see what Werner Herzog could have done with a project like this, in the style of The Wild Blue Yonder. Whilst the movie had its moments of fugliness, it did occasionally creeep up on me with some great imagery. Although it you are above cloud cover in the mountains finding great imagery shouldn't be tricky.
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#120

Post by matthewscott8 » January 14th, 2019, 2:25 pm

I decided to come up with a bitesize target for 2019, so this is an IMDb list of 25 of my highest priority watches for 2009. I will try and see all these in 2009. That doesn't mean I will exclusively watch these films but I did think it was worth having a goal that wasn't scarily large, basically a watch every fortnight.

https://www.imdb.com/list/ls041227238/

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