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the 2009 project

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the 2009 project

#1

Post by matthewscott8 » March 14th, 2017, 5:25 pm

2009 is another project I had been running on IMDb for a few years. I decided to try and do a deep dive on a particular year. 2009 is recent enough that you can still get hold of the movies, it can get a bit sketchy with availability of the obscure stuff if you go back a lot further, even with the use of forbidden sources :unsure: :blink: . I went to the cinema a lot in that year, including a couple of festivals, it was the peak of my watching, and I had a lot of personal stuff going on in my life ( :wub: (u) etc), so I've picked it and stuck with it.

What's the point?

I guess the way most years work is that a bunch of critics turn up at Cannes, Rotterdam, Venice etc and they decide which were the good films, from those viewings and their Hollywood viewings and you get some sort of cosy critical consensus and then Sight & Sound or Film Comment will produce a top 10 movies list for the year, and once you've seen all the ones on that, the Oscar winners, and movies by your favourite directors then you've "done" the year. I wanted to know if you dug deeper does the picture change a lot? Also just wanted to understand more the structure of film distribution and what a year in film looks like. One day there will be a presentation of my findings of sort, but it's still far off as I've got to carry on watching, and I'll carry on watching as long as I carry on finding good films.

:shoot: A Call To Arms!

So what films did you love from 2009, where are your top lists, what were the obscure gems, what stuff was overlooked. And more importantly are you man enough?

My top list for this year is in the first reply to this thread:

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#2

Post by matthewscott8 » March 14th, 2017, 5:25 pm

This is my list of 10/10 favourites for the year so far. It's less canonical than a year list usually looks, because a lot of the movies didn't get wide releases or didn't get touted by critics, and I wouldn't have watched most of them in the ordinary course of events. bold and red where the film has been seen for the first time during this thread's existence.

1. Amer (2009 - Helene Cattet & Bruno Forzani)
2. Mavro livadi / Black Field (2009 - Vardis Marinakis)
3. Man tänker sitt / One's own thoughts / Burrowing (2009 - Henrik Hellström, Fredrik Wenzel)
4. A Town Called Panic / Panique au village (2009 - Stéphane Aubier & Vincent Patar)
5. Redland (2009 - Asiel Norton)
6. Red Riding: In the Year of Our Lord 1974 (2009 - Julian Jarrold)
7. Hadewijch (2009 - Bruno Dumont)
8. Material (2009 - Thomas Heise)
9. Into The Unknown (2009 - Deimantas Narkevicius)
10. Impolex (2009 - Alex Ross Perry)
11. Bakjwi / Thirst (2009 - Chan-wook Park)
12. Melodiya dlya sharmanki / Melody for a Street Organ (2009 - Kira Muratova)
13. Bunny and the Bull (2009 - Paul King)
14. The Missing Person (2009 - Noah Buschel)
15. The Sound of Insects: Record of a Mummy (2009 - Peter Liechti)
16. 1 (2009 - Pater Sparrow)
17. Le roi de l'evasion / The King of Escape (2009 - Alain Guiraudie)
18. Io sono l'amore / I Am Love (2009 - Luca Guadagnino)
19. Ketamin - Hinter dem Licht / Ketamine - Behind the Light (2009 - Carsten Aschmann)
20. Yi ngoi / Accident (2009 - Soi Cheang)
21. A Single Man (2009 - Tom Ford)
22. Das Vaterspiel / Kill Daddy Good Night (2009 - Michael Glawogger)
23. De laatste dagen van Emma Blank / The Last Days of Emma Blank (2009 - Alex van Warmerdam)
24. Le herisson / The Hedgehog (2009 - Mona Achache)
25. Splice (2009 - Vincenzo Natali)
26. Tatarak / Sweet Rush (2009 - Andrzej Wajda)
27. General Orders No. 9 (2009 - Robert Persons)
28. Rabbit à la Berlin / Królik po berlinsku / Mauerhase (2009 - Bartosz Konopka)
29. Ruhr (2009 - James Benning)
30. Trash Humpers (2009 - Harmony Korine)
31. The Limits of Control (2009 - Jim Jarmusch)
32. Nothing Personal (2009 - Urszula Antoniak)
33. Triangle (2009 - Christopher Smith)
34. Fish Tank (2009 - Andrea Arnold)
Last edited by matthewscott8 on April 21st, 2019, 9:00 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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#3

Post by joachimt » March 14th, 2017, 5:52 pm

Judging on your list you already saw a lot more from that year than I did. I saw only 63 titles from 2009. Among my 8's and 9's the two with the lowest number of votes on IMDb are Shinboru and De laatste dagen van Emma Blank. Seen these already?
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#4

Post by Armoreska » March 14th, 2017, 6:12 pm

Gotta love dem movies a lot to give out 40 10's in one year. I've seen 1200 titles from 2009 and only one of them is a 10, Top Gear Bolivia Special (now that's highbrow).
After filtering out questionable stuff like episodes, I'm left with 44 rated 8 and 9.
The 9's are Watchmen, D9, Mary and Max, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Black Dynamite, The Yes Men Fix the World, and two Valve-related shorts: Escape from City-17: Part One and Meet the Spy.

Of the ones you listed I only really liked Fish Tank :sweat:
Last edited by Armoreska on March 14th, 2017, 6:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1434
and "Gordon" Liu Chia-Hui/Liu Chia-Liang and Yuen Woo-ping and "Sammo" Hung Kam-bo

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#5

Post by nimimerkillinen » March 14th, 2017, 6:15 pm

watched a bunch on festivals
might not like a bunch of these as much seen now

Man tänker sitt (2009)
Inglourious Basterds (2009)
Nothing Personal (2009)
Alle Anderen (2009)
Where the Wild Things Are (2009)
Enter the Void (2009)
Antichrist (2009)
Kynodontas (2009)
Lourdes (2009)
White Material (2009)
Un prophète (2009)
Das weiße Band - Eine deutsche Kindergeschichte (2009)
Coraline (2009)
Fish Tank (2009)e (2009 Documentary)
Hadewijch (2009)
The Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call - New Orleans (2009)
Star Trek (2009)
Madeo (2009)
Apan (2009)
Nord (2009)
Postia pappi Jaakobille (2009)
Det røde kapel (2009 Documentary)
Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009)
Mary and Max (2009)
Iztochni piesi (2009)
Tetsuo: The Bullet Man (2009)
Mammoth (2009)
Bakjwi (2009)
Océans (2009 Documentary)
The Road (2009)
Shinboru (2009)
Moon (2009)
Valhalla Rising (2009)
Politist, adjectiv (2009)
Watchmen (2009)
Harry Brown (2009)
Die Tür (2009)
Der Knochenmann (2009)
All Tomorrows Parties
Polytechnique (2009)
Vincere (2009)
Nymph (2009)
A Serious Man (2009)
Püha Tõnu kiusamine (2009)
Tales from the Golden Age (2009)
Amer (2009)
Trash Humpers (2009)
Deliver Us from Evil
Bruno
Russia 88
In the Loop

http://www.imdb.com/list/ls064357788/
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#6

Post by OldAle1 » March 14th, 2017, 6:17 pm

I believe the only films I've watched from that year since we discussed it last on IMDb are both La La Land connections - Ghosts of Girlfriends Past, which should only be seen by Emma Stone completists, people who actually like the most conventional of modern rom-coms, "Christmas Carol" completists, or mascochists; and Damien Chazelle's first film, Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench which got several quite negative comments on the CFB but which I liked quite a bit - it's very heavily influenced by the very early French New Wave, particularly I though Rohmer's early shorts and some of Godard's early work. A rough piece and suffering from very poor sound at times and certainly amateurish acting, but to my mind very charming and very much setting the scene for the director's next two films.

If you don't have my top 10 or 20 or whatever I posted months ago saved I can re-do that, and I've been re-doing some of my wantlists from recent years so perhaps I'll post that later as well. Gotta run now and see a movie, a flicker, a film, a show...
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#8

Post by Cynical Cinephile » March 14th, 2017, 6:52 pm

Armoreska on Mar 14 2017, 12:12:18 PM wrote:Gotta love dem movies a lot to give out 40 10's in one year. I've seen 1200 titles from 2009 and only one of them is a 10, Top Gear Bolivia Special (now that's highbrow).
After filtering out questionable stuff like episodes, I'm left with 44 rated 8 and 9.
The 9's are Watchmen, D9, Mary and Max, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Black Dynamite, The Yes Men Fix the World, and two Valve-related shorts: Escape from City-17: Part One and Meet the Spy.

Of the ones you listed I only really liked Fish Tank :sweat:
1200 from 2009 alone? (D:)

How many of those are feature length?
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#9

Post by cinephage » March 14th, 2017, 7:33 pm

I won't name the titles that already came out, so I will also recommend :

Yi ngoi, by Pou-Soi Cheang
Non ma fille, tu n'iras pas danser, by Christophe Honoré
Kasi az gorbehaye irani khabar nadareh, by Bahman Ghobadi
Welcome, by Philippe Lioret
A l'origine, by Xavier Giannoli
Les beaux gosses, by Riad Sattouf
Le bal des actrices, by Maiwenn
Kimssi pyoryugi, by Hae-jun Lee
Darbareye Elly, by Asghar Farhadi
Spread by David MacKenzie

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#10

Post by Armoreska » March 14th, 2017, 8:23 pm

Cynical Cinephile on Mar 14 2017, 12:52:41 PM wrote:
Armoreska on Mar 14 2017, 12:12:18 PM wrote:Gotta love dem movies a lot to give out 40 10's in one year. I've seen 1200 titles from 2009 and only one of them is a 10, Top Gear Bolivia Special (now that's highbrow).
After filtering out questionable stuff like episodes, I'm left with 44 rated 8 and 9.
The 9's are Watchmen, D9, Mary and Max, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Black Dynamite, The Yes Men Fix the World, and two Valve-related shorts: Escape from City-17: Part One and Meet the Spy.

Of the ones you listed I only really liked Fish Tank :sweat:
1200 from 2009 alone? (D:)

How many of those are feature length?
no-no not many. 200 at most feature length. 2010 is 'my' year with 200-300

the least-voted feature-length 7-8/10 from 2009:
It Felt Like a Kiss
Krolik po berlinsku
Maimai Shinko to sennen no maho
Red vs. Blue: Recreation
Killer Bean Forever
RiP: A Remix Manifesto
(the already-mentioned) De laatste dagen van Emma Blank
Fish Story
Alle Anderen
American: The Bill Hicks Story
Amer (these are already way-voted so better stop)
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currently working towards a vegan/low waste world + thru such film lists (besides TV): 2010s bests, RW Fassbinder, Luis Bunuel, Yasujiro Ozu, Eric Rohmer, Visual Effects nominees, kid-related stuff, great animes (mini-serie or feature), very 80s movies, 17+ sci-fi lists on watchlist, ENVIRO, remarkable Silent Films and Pre-Code (exploring 1925 atm) and every shorts and docu list I'm aware of and
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1434
and "Gordon" Liu Chia-Hui/Liu Chia-Liang and Yuen Woo-ping and "Sammo" Hung Kam-bo

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#11

Post by matthewscott8 » March 14th, 2017, 11:46 pm

joachimt on Mar 14 2017, 11:52:53 AM wrote:Judging on your list you already saw a lot more from that year than I did. I saw only 63 titles from 2009. Among my 8's and 9's the two with the lowest number of votes on IMDb are Shinboru and De laatste dagen van Emma Blank. Seen these already?
hahaha you're rubbing it in for me, I had a ticket to see Emma Blank at the London film festival but I turned up at the wrong theatre due to a mistake on my festival planner :blink: no dvd with eng subs available from my investigations

Shimboru is on my dvd pile due to a recommendation from Gloede, may watch it this week.

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#12

Post by matthewscott8 » March 14th, 2017, 11:55 pm

Armoreska on Mar 14 2017, 12:12:18 PM wrote:Gotta love dem movies a lot to give out 40 10's in one year. I've seen 1200 titles from 2009 and only one of them is a 10, Top Gear Bolivia Special (now that's highbrow).
After filtering out questionable stuff like episodes, I'm left with 44 rated 8 and 9.
The 9's are Watchmen, D9, Mary and Max, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Black Dynamite, The Yes Men Fix the World, and two Valve-related shorts: Escape from City-17: Part One and Meet the Spy.

Of the ones you listed I only really liked Fish Tank :sweat:
Safe to say we have some very different taste as I don't like any of your 9s or 10, excepting the shorts which I haven't seen. Top Gear Boliviva special I have actually randomly seen, but I hate Top Gear. Was almost as big and divisive as Brexit when Clarkson was dumped by the BBC, no idea why though.

10/10 I consider "excellent", some folks have want to call a movie "perfect" to go 10/10. But yeah I tend to consider myself more carried away by movies than most fans on the net, unless they just don't wear their hearts on their sleeves. It's a big love affair for me.

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#13

Post by matthewscott8 » March 15th, 2017, 12:08 am

cinephage on Mar 14 2017, 01:33:07 PM wrote:I won't name the titles that already came out, so I will also recommend :

Yi ngoi, by Pou-Soi Cheang
Non ma fille, tu n'iras pas danser, by Christophe Honoré
Kasi az gorbehaye irani khabar nadareh, by Bahman Ghobadi
Welcome, by Philippe Lioret
A l'origine, by Xavier Giannoli
Les beaux gosses, by Riad Sattouf
Le bal des actrices, by Maiwenn
Kimssi pyoryugi, by Hae-jun Lee
Darbareye Elly, by Asghar Farhadi
Spread by David MacKenzie
Spread is an interesting one. I haven't thought about it for a couple of years. At the time I was disgusted, but thinking back I find it almost indescribably sad. Watched it in the same week as The Canyons, another movie portraying LA as a pit, liked Canyons more tbh. Tempted to rewatch Spread. A l'origine I have been looking for subs for a while. Some interesting leads there, a few I haven't seen.

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#14

Post by monty » March 15th, 2017, 12:15 am

Seen any of my suggestions, mat?

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#15

Post by matthewscott8 » March 15th, 2017, 12:33 am

monty on Mar 14 2017, 06:15:08 PM wrote:Seen any of my suggestions, mat?
Only Samson and Delilah. I did like that one quite a lot. Petition and Sweetgrass are high on my to see list. Lots of recommendations to explore too :)

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#16

Post by Onderhond » March 15th, 2017, 12:39 am

1. Redline
2. Cheuuat Gaawn Chim (The Meat Grinder)
3. Heaven's Door
4. Hottarake no Shima - Haruka to Maho no Kagami
5. Lang Zai Ji (The Warrior and the Wolf)
6. Metropia
7. Sodium Babies

Based on my 5* and 4.5* and titles not mentioned yet

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#17

Post by matthewscott8 » March 15th, 2017, 12:50 am

Onderhond on Mar 14 2017, 06:39:13 PM wrote:1. Redline
2. Cheuuat Gaawn Chim (The Meat Grinder)
3. Heaven's Door
4. Hottarake no Shima - Haruka to Maho no Kagami
5. Lang Zai Ji (The Warrior and the Wolf)
6. Metropia
7. Sodium Babies

Based on my 5* and 4.5* and titles not mentioned yet
Redline was very enjoyable, narrowly missed my top list. Soidum Babies looks cool.

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#18

Post by weirdboy » March 15th, 2017, 1:25 am

How about Everything is Terrible: The Movie?

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#19

Post by Good_Will_Harding » March 15th, 2017, 1:26 am

Some favorites roughly ordered, and I'll eliminate anything on your list, though I'm sure you've probably seen at least a few of these:

The White Ribbon
Mary & Max
The Hurt Locker (2009 by US release dates, but 2008 according to IMDB)
Where the Wild Things Are
Dogtooth
Sin Nombre
Funny People
Coraline
Up in the Air
Up

The Secret of Kelles
Mother
Air Doll
Around a Small Mountain
Mr. Nobody
Bright Star
I Am Love
In the Loop
Black Dynamite
Moon

A few of these I haven't seen since they came out, so maybe I should quest the year myself. ;)

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#20

Post by matthewscott8 » March 18th, 2017, 12:17 pm

Good_Will_Harding on Mar 14 2017, 07:26:49 PM wrote:Some favorites roughly ordered, and I'll eliminate anything on your list, though I'm sure you've probably seen at least a few of these:

The White Ribbon
Mary & Max
The Hurt Locker (2009 by US release dates, but 2008 according to IMDB)
Where the Wild Things Are
Dogtooth
Sin Nombre
Funny People
Coraline
Up in the Air
Up

The Secret of Kelles
Mother
Air Doll
Around a Small Mountain
Mr. Nobody
Bright Star
I Am Love
In the Loop
Black Dynamite
Moon

A few of these I haven't seen since they came out, so maybe I should quest the year myself. ;)
Yeah I've seen pretty much all of those. I haven't built up the courage to watch Up yet, I know it got a lot of acclaim but it just doesn't look like my cup of tea at all.

With Mr Nobody you can see that it was a passion project, I had mixed thoughts about it, I thought the plotting was quite immature, but then I guess I saw the whole movie as the paranoia dream of a teenage boy, and then it makes sense that the plotting is immature, becauuse it's coming from him. There is something absolutely remarkable about it, it's one of few films from the year that I've wanted to rewatch.

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#21

Post by matthewscott8 » March 18th, 2017, 12:56 pm

Image

Image

I watched Impolex (2009 - Alex Ross Perry) at 4am. This is one feature film that is on no top lists, I just found it by browsing a catalogue of 2009 movies. I don't think anyone really saw it back in the day, it's got 79 votes on IMDb. The director has since made a couple of more famous movies, Listen Up Philip and Queen of Earth.

I absolutely adored Impolex. It's an allegory about progression through life and the existential mistakes a guy makes, it's set in a forest somewhere in Europe at the end of World War II. A guy called Tyrone, dressed in US army uniform is looking for unexploded German rockets in this unending forest, searching on foot and off path. He runs into, variously, a lady who appears to be his girlfriend back stateside, a talking octopus, an AWOL stranger, and an explorer/pirate. He generally though just wants to get on with finding some rockets and getting them back to base. So it's kind of beautiful and sad, the forest is beautiful but it's sad because Tyrone is pursuing something irrelevant, when he should be doing beautiful things with his girlfriend.

It's a true Mumblecore movie, probably the first one I've seen where I've liked it enough to put it on my top list, though The Exploding Girl is either Mumblecore or post-Mumblecore depending on your view. It's a millenial cri de coeur.

Slant wrote a very very good positive review of the movie at the time, but don't seem to have managed to get anyone to see the movie http://www.slantmagazine.com/film/review/impolex
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#22

Post by RedHawk10 » March 18th, 2017, 1:53 pm

Thanks for the heads up on Impolex. I had never even heard of it before but it looks like something I might enjoy.

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#23

Post by cinewest » March 21st, 2017, 3:03 pm

Reading through the posts it mostly looks like a celebration of most obscure films of 2009, so I'll start by listing my favourites among those:

In my Top Dozen
The White Meadows (Rasoulof)- 9.5
The Wind Journeys (Ciro Guerra, director of Embrace The Serpent)- 9
The Time That Remains (Elia Suleiman)- 8.5
Everyone Else (Maren Ade, director of Toni Erdmann)- 8+

HM
Southern District (Bolivia)
Alamar (Mexico)
The Man Next Door (Argentina)

my other favourites of the year:Top dozen
The White Ribbon-10
Antichrist
Dogtooth
Mr. Nobody
Broken Embraces
I Am Love
A Serious Man
About Elly- 8+

Rest of my top 20
White Material
Capitalism, A Love Story
An Education
A Prophet
Enter The Void
Valhalla Rising
Precious
In The Loop

I liked Fish Tank, and Map Of The Sounds Of Tokyo, but not enough to crack my top 20. Didn't care for The Limits Of Control.Your list, and the lists of others have given me plenty to investigate, though, so it's a worthy project on that basis alone :D
I think what may also be clear is how many very good films simply fade into obscurity every year, especially those not made in English.
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#24

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » March 22nd, 2017, 10:10 am

Some of my favorites and greats from 2009:

The White Ribbon (Michael Haneke) - 10
Antichrist (LvT) - 9+
A Serious Man (Coens) - 9+
A Single Man (Tom Ford) - 9
White Material (Claire Denis) - 8+
Amer (Cattet & Forzani) - 8+
Dogtooth (Yorgos Lanthimos) - 8
Like You Know It All (Sang Soo Hong) - 8
Phantoms of Nabua (Weerasethakul, short) - 8
Letters to Uncle Boonmee (Weerasethakul, short) - 8

Some other stuff that could be of your interest, Matthew:
Soul Kitchen (Fatih Akin)
Les Herbes Folles (Alain Resnais)
I Killed My Mother (Xavier Dolan)
Plastic Bag (Ramin Bahrani, short) - mostly good because of Herzog's narration!
The Cat Piano (Gibson & White, short) - mostly good because of Nick Cave's narration!
My Son, My Son What Have Ye Done (Werner Herzog)
London River (Rachid Bouchareb)

Of yours there's a lot of stuff I haven't seen but I'm interested in, and a lot of stuff I simply haven't heard of before...

1. Amer (2009 - Helene Cattet & Bruno Forzani) - see above
4. Hadewijch (2009 - Bruno Dumont) - I really like Dumont, so of course this one is of interest
9. Bakjwi / Thirst (2009 - Chan-wook Park) - interested
10. Melodiya dlya sharmanki / Melody for a Street Organ (2009 - Kira Muratova) - I liked Asthenichesky Syndrome, so I'm interested
12. Fish Tank (2009 - Andrea Arnold) - interested
16. Darbareye Elly / About Elly (2009 - Asghar Farhadi) - interested, got it
18. A Single Man (2009 - Tom Ford) - see above
25. Trash Humpers (2009 - Harmony Korine) - I generally like Korine, so I'm interested
26. The Limits of Control (2009 - Jim Jarmusch) - 6+
27. Enter The Void (2009 - Gaspar Noe) - 6+
31. Visage / Face (2009 - Tsai Ming-Liang) - probably the 2009 film I'm most dying to see... The only one of Tsai's features I still haven't gotten around to; I'm a big big fan!
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#25

Post by matthewscott8 » March 25th, 2017, 12:52 pm

Image

I watched The Darkness of Day (2009 - Jay Rosenblatt). This is a moyen metrage (26 minutes), made of found footage, film discarded by schools in America when video came along (much easier for teach to shove a vhs cassette tape in than hook up a projector). Its subject is suicide. I found it a little difficult, because suicide is to me a word that encompasses several psychological phenomena, making a film about them all together is a bit strained. For example you could kill yourself because you have a medical problem, i.e. unmanageable physical pain, or you could kill yourself because you believed there was an afterlife, and you wanted to go there, and then you could be so psychologically hurt and heart-broken that you simple cease to want to exist, the people in each category have little in common with one another. The film shoves these all into 28 minutes. Some of the footage directly relates to educational films related to suicide, some is of things like close ups of billowing forest fires, used as a visual representation of a soul on fire.

I will need to see this one a few more times before I come to a firm stance on it.
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#26

Post by lynchs » March 25th, 2017, 5:17 pm

Logorama matthew, Logorama is the master key to enter in 2009!

PS. I know you have seen it and dislike it, but try again :P

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#27

Post by sheikofhyrule » March 25th, 2017, 10:30 pm

Top rated:
Daybreakers
An Education
Up

Overlooked (and for the LGBT crowd):
Make the Yuletide Gay

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#28

Post by matthewscott8 » March 26th, 2017, 11:04 am

popups on Mar 25 2017, 11:17:48 AM wrote:Logorama matthew, Logorama is the master key to enter in 2009!

PS. I know you have seen it and dislike it, but try again :P
the love songs in it are nice.

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#29

Post by lynchs » April 2nd, 2017, 11:29 pm

indeed.

btw, Redland (2009) was a great find, thank you! Seen 'cause' of you, I wasn't impressed at first and I thought the guy had seen too many Malick/Sokurov or (insert another famous director) but then was an immersive experience.

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#30

Post by matthewscott8 » April 3rd, 2017, 8:10 am

popups on Apr 2 2017, 05:29:36 PM wrote:indeed.

btw, Redland (2009) was a great find, thank you! Seen 'cause' of you, I wasn't impressed at first and I thought the guy had seen too many Malick/Sokurov or (insert another famous director) but then was an immersive experience.
Thanks, glad you liked it. The first scene is quite upsetting and offputting, which will not have helped the film's chances of better distribution. Like you say though you do get dragged in.

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#31

Post by matthewscott8 » April 3rd, 2017, 8:22 am

Image

Got District 9 (2009 - Neill Blomkamp) "out of the way". It was a good action movie, genuinely exciting. It also had some ability to tug at my heart chords as well. It's probably the first film I've seen using mostly ersatz found footage type shooting that didn't annoy me, it's a very hard game to pull off. Themes of xenophobia are handled very nicely. Some of it reminded me of Palestine, the Israeli politicians complain about anarchy in Palestine after they've spent quite a lot of time destroying the infrastructure there. It's a good movie and I could see how it would get in folks' lists but it's missing out on mine, probably due to me not being very interested by the human characters (although Wikus' pathetic romanticism can be quite touching), or caring much about the body horror and action sequences, which are juvenile.
Last edited by matthewscott8 on October 2nd, 2017, 4:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#32

Post by matthewscott8 » April 8th, 2017, 11:14 am

Image

Watched The Hedgehog / Le herisson (2009 - Mona Achache) this morning. This was a particularly fine movie that was overlooked back on release. Another good example of a film I very much enjoyed that I would not have watched unless I did this project and was being a bit more open minded. Everything looks beautiful to me after watching the film. It's about a young girl who lives in an Art Nouveau apartment with her wealthy family. She strikes up a relationship with a Japanese man who moves into an apartment upstairs and also with Renée who works as the building concierge. All three are lovely people who find companionship in one another. There are moments of darkness in the movie, Paloma plans to commit suicide in order to avoid becoming what life has in store for her, she does not want to become compromised, cynical, manipulative, selfish and barren. But she is no emo, her creativity and passion are absolutely dazzling, and the movie plays beautiful up tempo music when she is drawing or creating something. Despite moment of darkness, the film is somewhat of a beautiful fantasy, three people enjoying the companionship of each other, they are not looking for what they can get out of each other, they are simply content for the other person to be present. This is very beautiful.

One of the themes of the investigation into 2009 is that cinema by women directors was largely ignored, despiting the quality.

There is a lovely analogy in the film about chess and go. I remembered being shocked one day when I read the etymology of checkmate, Persian for the king is dead (shah mat). The movie points out that Chess is about killing the opposition, whereas Go is about living, building a life, with a companion. It is a very exquisite and leisurely watch, and I recommend it to everyone.
Last edited by matthewscott8 on October 2nd, 2017, 4:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#33

Post by OldAle1 » April 8th, 2017, 8:03 pm

matthewscott8 on Apr 8 2017, 05:14:23 AM wrote:Watched The Hedgehog / Le hérisson (2009 - Mona Achache) this morning. This was a particularly fine movie that was overlooked back on release. Another good example of a film I very much enjoyed that I would not have watched unless I did this project and was being a bit more open minded. Everything looks beautiful to me after watching the film. It's about a young girl who lives in an Art Nouveau apartment with her wealthy family. She strikes up a relationship with a Japanese man who moves into an apartment upstairs and also with Renée who works as the building concierge. All three are lovely people who find companionship in one another. There are moments of darkness in the movie, Paloma plans to commit suicide in order to become what life has in store for her, she does not want to become compromised, cynical, manipulative, selfish and barren. But she is no emo, her creativity and passion are absolutely dazzling, and the movie plays beautiful up tempo music when she is drawing or creating something. Despite moment of darkness, the film is somewhat of a beautiful fantasy, three people enjoying the companionship of each other, they are not looking for what they can get out of each other, they are simply content for the other person to be present. This is very beautiful.

One of the theme of the investigation into 2009 is that cinema by women directors was largely ignored, despiting the quality.

There is a lovely analogy in the film about chess and go. I remembered being shocked one day when I read the etymology of checkmate, Persian for the king is dead (shah mat). The movie points out that Chess is about killing the opposition, whereas Go is about living, building a life, with a companion. It is a very exquisite and leisurely watch, and I recommend it to everyone.
This one looks pretty good to me, have to put it on the list at least. I'm glad to see you continuing this - a couple of general comments, if I haven't made them before:

* your comment in the OP about how the "worthwhile" films get decided is interesting and I think largely true - a combination of awards, critics' lists, and even to some extent box office. I do think that over time - and this may be less important now due to the internet - the obscurities do tend to rise to the top more, and while there are still only a certain number of films that will be very famous from any given year, there are trends that aren't spotted right away that become evident years and decades later, and so we have rediscoveries and new insights after the fact. A case in point - when I was doing my 1966 poll one of the things that really amazed me was just how many great (and looked-to-be-great, I sure didn't see them all) films there were from Eastern Europe; not just Czechoslovakia, which was probably obvious to most halfway serious cineastes, but Poland, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Romania - probably Bulgaria as well though I haven't looked into it. Point is that it took years for those cinemas to get better known and those individual films to surface, apart from Closely Watched Trains which attained fame right away. And you can point to any year and find examples like these. So the "deep" view on a more recent year is especially valuable, because we're still in the process of figuring out what "the cinema of 2009" is to a much greater extent than, say, 1966 or 1925.

* As far as women directors - sadly this is an area that seems pretty static and unmoving, still. I just looked at the last two years, and I have 8 films (so far) that I rated 8-10 that were directed by women; it's a small number compared to the number I've seen directed by men, but the average is noticeably better. But not one of those 8 films got a significant commercial release in the USA - Maggie's Plan was the closest, with $3.35 million at the box office. To be fair, Toni Erdmann was one of the best-received films of the year internationally and did make over $10 million worldwide, but this is still a pittance compared to "arthouse" films with similar marketing or audiences directed by men, i.e. Moonlight and Manchester by the Sea. There have certainly been a few very successful films made by women in the last few years but the vast majority of them are Hollywood schlock; serious films that aren't parts of series or franchises or aimed at kids are a hard sell to begin with these days but at least a certain percentage of such films with male directors do make it to some level of commercial viability - not so with essentially anything directed by women, at least here in the USA.

#OscarsSoFemale ?
Here's to the fools who dream.

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#34

Post by cinewest » April 9th, 2017, 11:04 am

Regarding films made by women in 2009, I have 3 in my top 20:

Everyone Else (Maren Ade)
White Material (Claire Denis)
An Education (Lone Scherig)

As for making sense of the film landscape, and what has received attention over the past 20+ years, that has been decided by the most powerful influences, starting with the producers and distributors, with some influence from various critics, and other taste determiners for popular, as well as "art house" fare.

And while there may be more access to more films than ever before, so too are there more films of all kinds coming from every place in the world, to a point where seeing (much less learning about) every film of interest and quality is nearly impossible (which is why a project like this one for 2009 can probably continue for an indeterminable time), even if one gives up a deep exploration of other years, past, present, and future.

Because time doesn't stop, and there are always new films on the horizon that claim our attention, as well as so many acclaimed films from the past that most of us haven't yet seen, many many high quality films simply fall through the cracks, and the less and less mainstream they are, the more likely for this to be true (unless the filmmaker is among the chosen princes of arthouse cinema).

Even if one explores a given year thoroughly, as 2009 is being done, here, a consensus about the quality of these "unsung" films can never be reached if only because the taste of those few who can see them is no doubt somewhat different (it is much easier to agree on a film with more mainstream qualities).

I guess what I'm saying is that I have my doubts that the film landscape of 2009 (even in the future) will be perceived in a much different way than it already is, or at least not because of many "film discoveries."
If anything the difference of perception will stem from the historical context that evolves around it, as much as from the future culture that is doing the perceiving.
Last edited by cinewest on April 10th, 2017, 3:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#35

Post by matthewscott8 » April 10th, 2017, 1:38 pm

cinewest on Apr 9 2017, 05:04:15 AM wrote:Regarding films made by women in 2009, I have 3 in my top 20:

Everyone Else (Maren Ade)
White Material (Claire Denis)
An Education (Lone Scherig)

As for making sense of the film landscape, and what has received attention over the past 20+ years, that has been decided by the most powerful influences, starting with the producers and distributors, with some influence from various critics, and other taste determiners for popular, as well as "art house" fare.

And while there may be more access to more films than ever before, so too are there more films of all kinds coming from every place in the world, to a point where seeing (much less learning about) every film of interest and quality is nearly impossible (which is why a project like this one for 2009 can probably continue for an indeterminable time), even if one gives up a deep exploration of other years, past, present, and future.

Because time doesn't stop, and there are always new films on the horizon that claim our attention, as well as so many acclaimed films from the past that most of us haven't yet seen, many many high quality films simply fall through the cracks, and the less and less mainstream they are, the more likely for this to be true (unless the filmmaker is among the chosen princes of arthouse cinema).

Even if one explores a given year thoroughly, as 2009 is being done, here, a consensus about the quality of these "unsung" films can never be reached if only because the taste of those few who can see them is no doubt somewhat different (it is much easier to agree on a film with more mainstream qualities).

I guess what I'm saying is that I have my doubts that the film landscape of 2009, even in the future, will be perceived in a much way than it already is, or at least not because of many "film discoveries."
If anything the difference of perception will stem from the historical context that evolves around it, as much as from the future culture that is doing the perceiving.
Certainly you are right that anyone who is voluntarily going to try and to a proper delve into 2009 or a particular year, by definition isn't going to have mainstream tastes, and will find different "gems" than a person who was a la MST3K, imprisoned in a cinema and forced to watch films from a year. But I think that whoever is doing it will likely discover some of the same things, i.e. films from certain territories are ignored, regardless of whether they are popcorn/cheesecake/arthouse.

A big aim of the project I guess is to be a divertissement for the denizens of the ICM forum. It will be hard to fail at that aim, even if more lofty aims fail.

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#36

Post by cinewest » April 10th, 2017, 3:19 pm

I totally applaud the project if only because it strikes me as interesting research, as well as journey- an investigation and exploration that is my kind of thing, even if I am not sure what can be gleaned from the posted results apart from some personal satisfaction.

I think we already know that most films being made these days are getting ignored because they are not commercial enough for one reason or another. We also already know that English language "popcorn" movies dominate movie theaters almost all over the world, and that the typical moviegoer prefers to watch knockoffs of the same kind of stuff outside the theater.
If you don't want your film to become an obscurity, follow these basic rules:
1) Make it in English'
2) follow a typical film structure, and don't get too artsy or experimental unless you are sleeping with enough important arthouse critics

For the last two decades (until recently), apart from getting theatrical distribution, a film's other main commercial avenue was through dvd distribution, or very rare TV sales. But, in the last few years the internet, and other producers/distributors/venues like amazon and netflix have opened up new channels, and at least for the moment it has meant greater diversification in the marketplace, though the offerings are already becoming more mainstream, every day.

I would be interested in what more the OP discovers about the film landscape in 2009, and what it says about the nature and culture of cinema in contemporary times for starters, particularly in terms of what exists outside of mainstream cinema.
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#37

Post by Eve-Lang-El-Coup » April 19th, 2017, 10:30 am

Here are the latest movies I watched from 2009

The Hedgehog: A young girl befriends her neighbours while obsessing over death.
The Cove (Documentary): A bunch of activists try to save the Dolphin population in Japan.
Lola: Two grandmothers doing it for themselves and their family on opposite sides of a recent murder.
Son of Babylon: A grandmother travels around Iraq looking for Ibrahim, her son with her grandon.

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#38

Post by 3eyes » April 19th, 2017, 1:55 pm

Ashkan, angoshtar-e motebarek va dastan-haye digar / Ashkan, the charmed ring and other stories (Iran)
Celda 211 / Cell 211 (Spain)
London River (UK)
Madeo / Mother (S Korea)
Moon (US)
Mr. Nobody (Internat’l)
Postia pappi Jaakobille / Letters to Father Jacob (Finland)
La teta asustada / The milk of sorrow (Spain/Peru)
3 idiots (India)
Triage (Ireland)
Upperdog (Norway)
:run: STILL the Gaffer!

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#39

Post by OldAle1 » April 20th, 2017, 2:47 pm

OK, I've got an add to my own top list for the year and another film for your consideration, Keshtar haye sepid / The White Meadows (Mohammad Rasoulof). I watched it now because it's on DTC and I wanted to see at least some of the Iranian films nominated, and I'm glad I did - this is just about as good as the other Rasoulof film I've seen, Dast-neveshtehaa nemisoosand / Manuscripts Don't Burn (2013). The later film is angry agitprop deep down though it has other stuff going on as well; this is a completely different animal, an obscure mystical fantasy of sorts that I'm really going to need to think more about and read more about to get a handle on. The ending reminded me in a strange sense of Jauja, where it seemingly transitions from one "world" to another which reflects on the earlier part of the film in a way that made me completely re-evaluate what I'd been watching for 90 minutes.

Hope this gets seen by other DTC-ers and a wider audience (someday).
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#40

Post by matthewscott8 » April 21st, 2017, 9:27 am

OldAle1 on Apr 20 2017, 08:47:41 AM wrote:OK, I've got an add to my own top list for the year and another film for your consideration, Keshtar haye sepid / The White Meadows (Mohammad Rasoulof). I watched it now because it's on DTC and I wanted to see at least some of the Iranian films nominated, and I'm glad I did - this is just about as good as the other Rasoulof film I've seen, Dast-neveshtehaa nemisoosand / Manuscripts Don't Burn (2013). The later film is angry agitprop deep down though it has other stuff going on as well; this is a completely different animal, an obscure mystical fantasy of sorts that I'm really going to need to think more about and read more about to get a handle on. The ending reminded me in a strange sense of Jauja, where it seemingly transitions from one "world" to another which reflects on the earlier part of the film in a way that made me completely re-evaluate what I'd been watching for 90 minutes.

Hope this gets seen by other DTC-ers and a wider audience (someday).
Haha, ;) I actually recommended this one to you about a year ago on the 2009 FG thread as I know you like your films Iranian. It's a fine film indeed, I like the comparison to Jauja. I actually thought this one was deeply political, I guess in that part of the world men deal with their uncontrollable lust by making it the problem of women, and scapegoating literally comes from that area of the world, as well as completely Draconian levels of punishment. In terms of levels of agitprop, the tears collection for the well off guy, must break through the top of the agitpropometer. It probably should be on my list really.

No surprise that the director was jailed for this movie.
Last edited by matthewscott8 on April 21st, 2017, 9:28 am, edited 1 time in total.

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