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Last Movie Seen

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peeptoad
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Re: Last Movie Seen

#1881

Post by peeptoad » May 31st, 2019, 1:12 pm

Kublai Khan wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 3:24 am
What a coincidence. I just watched Moonlight for the first time just the other day as well.

I think you're trying to jam the pieces together to see a different story than what the director intended. The story is about Chiron dealing with his homosexual identity in an environment and culture that is hyper toxic to it.
SpoilerShow
Mahershala Ali's character was the father figure to Chiron and taught him the ways of the street's culture. That he has to hide his vulnerabilities and never expose himself to danger (even down to whee to sit at a table). After Juan died, when Chiron was in high school, he did try to to experience a little vulnerability an closeness with his friend, only to have to backfire. So Chiron truly closes off and embraces all the lessons Juan taught him and he basically is living Juan's life instead of his own. He tells his friend that he's not been together with anyone else.

Basically..
The first part is Chiron learning from Juan that he has to suppress all vulnerabilities to survive.
The second part is Chiron having that lesson reinforced by him immediately being hurt (physically and emotionally) after a vulnerable moment.
The third part is a little ambiguous, I'll grant you that. I think Chiron is jarred into figuring out that just surviving isn't enough. He has no real deep connection with anyone and even his mom's tearful apologies don't really move him.
Hi Kublai Khan... thanks for your response. I respect your thoughts on my critique of the film, but I do think I had a grasp (at least in a general sense) of the intent of the director prior to viewing. Although complex in nature the story is actually rather simple (which isn't to say that I think the film is simplistic because I don't). I was expecting a coming-of-age type drama involving the character as you describe in a rather hostile world vs. the identity issues. It's the type of plot that I can usually connect with since those are issues that many people go through in one way or another while growing up and learning to navigate the world. Maybe there is a deeper component that I missed.
The first act had me intrigued, the second piece is where is started to falter slightly for the reasons I mentioned above (mainly the removal of one of the main characters with barely any acknowledgement) and I found it to be really predictable. That in and of itself is not a failure, but even with the predictions I was able to make accurately* nothing that happened resonated with me in any way. Best I can do is describe the film as a hollow shell of what really may have happened. By the third act I was really hoping for some adhesion to bring the entire film (all three sequences) together as a cohesive unit and it failed big time for me in that regard. I got nothing out of the final act... except that about 5 times I thought to myself, is this really the same character from the first two? That can't be him... he's way too much of a stereotype compared to the younger Chiron. Maybe that was the point that I missed. Maybe he was supposed to have evolved into a stereotype, but for me that has a strong cheapening effect for the entire piece. I can't imagine that was the intent, but maybe it was.
If this film hadn't won or been nom'd for so many awards, then I probably wouldn't be picking it apart to this extent. I'm trying to understand what about it made it loved by so many...maybe that's the real question I have.

*for example
SpoilerShow
the intimacy on the beach scene and the subsequent bullying episode at the school involving that same friend
Ebbywebby wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 5:20 am
Moonlight: There were three segments, and I liked each one less than the previous one. Not the right trajectory for a film. By the end, I was thinking, jeez, all that promise and he just turned into a stock character? Oh well.
Agree completely. And though I didn't touch on the adult Chiron being a stock character of sorts that's exactly how it came across to me... hence part of my disappointment and the reason why the third act is so weak imho. It was difficult for me to fathom that that character was even the same character from the previous two sequences. I think that's partly where my non-interlocking puzzle piece analogy came from.

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#1882

Post by Ivan0716 » May 31st, 2019, 10:09 pm

Sunset (László Nemes, 2018)
Rewatch, didn't think this would hold up on a second viewing, but I enjoyed it just as much as I did back in October, if not more so.

Watched it on my TV through Curzon Home Cinema, so I wasn't nearly as impressed with the technical side of things as last time(on a fresh 35mm print). It does mean less time spent admiring the film and more time trying to follow it - maybe that's why I was able to pick up a lot more on what was happening this time round. Even found myself laughing a few times(Judit Bardos' death stares; Irisz being the employee from hell). Still the most singular film I've seen from this decade, not one I would recommend blindly though.

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#1883

Post by Kublai Khan » May 31st, 2019, 10:58 pm

peeptoad wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 1:12 pm
Hi Kublai Khan... thanks for your response. I respect your thoughts on my critique of the film, but I do think I had a grasp (at least in a general sense) of the intent of the director prior to viewing. Although complex in nature the story is actually rather simple (which isn't to say that I think the film is simplistic because I don't). I was expecting a coming-of-age type drama involving the character as you describe in a rather hostile world vs. the identity issues. It's the type of plot that I can usually connect with since those are issues that many people go through in one way or another while growing up and learning to navigate the world. Maybe there is a deeper component that I missed.
The first act had me intrigued, the second piece is where is started to falter slightly for the reasons I mentioned above (mainly the removal of one of the main characters with barely any acknowledgement) and I found it to be really predictable. That in and of itself is not a failure, but even with the predictions I was able to make accurately* nothing that happened resonated with me in any way. Best I can do is describe the film as a hollow shell of what really may have happened. By the third act I was really hoping for some adhesion to bring the entire film (all three sequences) together as a cohesive unit and it failed big time for me in that regard. I got nothing out of the final act... except that about 5 times I thought to myself, is this really the same character from the first two? That can't be him... he's way too much of a stereotype compared to the younger Chiron. Maybe that was the point that I missed. Maybe he was supposed to have evolved into a stereotype, but for me that has a strong cheapening effect for the entire piece. I can't imagine that was the intent, but maybe it was.
If this film hadn't won or been nom'd for so many awards, then I probably wouldn't be picking it apart to this extent. I'm trying to understand what about it made it loved by so many...maybe that's the real question I have.

*for example
SpoilerShow
the intimacy on the beach scene and the subsequent bullying episode at the school involving that same friend
Hmm. I think you're right. I think Chiron realizes that becoming a stereotype was just a security blanket and that he hadn't grown as person. It does also ties back to the first segment in which his friend wrestles him to make sure he's "tough".

I thought it was pretty good. I enjoyed the tragedy of it all. I think it's possible you just went in with really high and misguided expectations. It's not really a complex drama, it's more of just a rumination on how things are, and shot pretty beautifully at that.

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#1884

Post by Rainy Red Carpet » June 15th, 2019, 7:05 am

Acute Misfortune. The trailer was better than the film.
Money talks and bullshit walks.

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#1885

Post by SkilledLunatic » June 28th, 2019, 2:22 pm

I just recently saw Toy Story 4. Everyone had been praising it and I loved the series so far - although I did think number 3 was the perfect bookend for the story.

The animation is absolutely gorgeous, as we come to expect, the voice acting and characters are great and funny but somehow it all felt hollow. I can’t put my finger on it but something just felt off. Lifeless. Maybe I’m just too cynical nowadays...

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#1886

Post by Ebbywebby » June 28th, 2019, 7:23 pm

"The Dead Don't Die" is Jarmusch's worst film. I figured it only could be a trolling "Fuck you, see how stupid these movies are?" to the zombie-film industry, but then I looked up a few Jarmusch interviews and he's actually serious about it. Raving about his love for George Romero and the like. And then he stressed the film's undercurrent of social commentary about fracking, consumerism, MAGA, etc. but, really, he just parroted "Dawn of the Dead"'s concept without adding any fresh wrinkles. Sorry to say, seeing Tom Waits in a far-out role is about the only good reason to see this.

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#1887

Post by OldAle1 » June 28th, 2019, 8:55 pm

Ebbywebby wrote:
June 28th, 2019, 7:23 pm
"The Dead Don't Die" is Jarmusch's worst film. I figured it only could be a trolling "Fuck you, see how stupid these movies are?" to the zombie-film industry, but then I looked up a few Jarmusch interviews and he's actually serious about it. Raving about his love for George Romero and the like. And then he stressed the film's undercurrent of social commentary about fracking, consumerism, MAGA, etc. but, really, he just parroted "Dawn of the Dead"'s concept without adding any fresh wrinkles. Sorry to say, seeing Tom Waits in a far-out role is about the only good reason to see this.
I think I liked it more than you, but I basically agree. I might say that Night on Earth was weaker, but I haven't seen that since it came out - really need to re-watch all of JJ's pre-Dead Man work at this point. I was entertained by the new one for the most part, but it definitely felt like a lark and an excuse for him to just work with all of his favorite actors and not have to put too much work into anything.

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#1888

Post by matthewscott8 » July 7th, 2019, 7:25 pm

Midsommar (2019 - Ari Aster)

I think this is the first time I've watched a movie and felt really sick in my stomach afterwards, like having to think about holding it down. It's vile and intoxicating, troublingly misandristic and unhinged. But I wouldn't have missed it for the world. My arms are shaking now and the whole world feels weird and fucked up. I saw a creepy comment on the cinema notice board after coming out "Yes, all men, you are the sun" (they invite public comments and have little cards and pens). Then I saw some random little shrine made of flowers walking home which freaked me out.

I guess this is one of the reasons to go to the cinema, a good old shake up.

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#1889

Post by Coryn » July 10th, 2019, 11:16 am

Mr. Nobody (2009) *****

What a gem. This one blew me totally away. Fun that it is Belgian as well. It went from Sci fi to romance to mystery back to romance and somehow it all worked and fell together.

Even if the story is not for you, the visuals are amazing. Every shot is beautiful. I can see myself rewatching this a dozen times in my life.
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#1890

Post by chrispeddler » Yesterday, 11:56 am

I've watched Shaft 2 on Netflix. So far so good. It's more about family than focusing on shaft himself. I'm entertained though.

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