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Last Movie Seen

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Re: Last Movie Seen

#1841

Post by PeacefulAnarchy » May 2nd, 2019, 5:49 am

I watched The Wandering Earth, and finally China has achieved a perfectly formulaic Hollywood blockbuster film. This is a disaster movie on par with Armageddon or Independence Day, utterly ridiculous with a bit of cheesy sentiment, big explosions and manufactured dramatic moments. It's not anything really special or particularly interesting (besides seeing the usual US-centric tropes of these movies now become China-centric), but from a production perspective there's little particularly lacking compared from a US equivalent. I wonder if there'll be a point where something like this can become a hit around the world the way US blockbusters are.

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#1842

Post by fori » May 2nd, 2019, 6:06 am

PeacefulAnarchy wrote:
May 2nd, 2019, 5:49 am
I watched The Wandering Earth, and finally China has achieved a perfectly formulaic Hollywood blockbuster film. This is a disaster movie on par with Armageddon or Independence Day, utterly ridiculous with a bit of cheesy sentiment, big explosions and manufactured dramatic moments. It's not anything really special or particularly interesting (besides seeing the usual US-centric tropes of these movies now become China-centric), but from a production perspective there's little particularly lacking compared from a US equivalent. I wonder if there'll be a point where something like this can become a hit around the world the way US blockbusters are.
You can’t criticise this movie properly without watching in a minor Chinese city on the day of release (Spring Festival) in a packed “4D” cinema... it sucked. There have been a couple of these generic big budget nationalist embarrassments over the last few years that have absolutely crushed at the box office, and they often involve Wu Jing.

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#1843

Post by OldAle1 » May 2nd, 2019, 1:04 pm

Yeah I saw that a couple of months ago, absolutely execrable IMO. It did get a wider cinema release in the USA than other recent Chinese blockbusters I think, and played around here for a couple of weeks. Of course there's no commercial release to speak of for any of the great Chinese films from the last year, not that I'd particularly expect it, though in an only slightly more just cinematic world Ash Is Purest White could find a bit of an audience I think. But if Hollywood is only going to give us Avengers I guess we shouldn't expect anything better from anywhere else to show up in the suburban multiplexes, should we?

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#1844

Post by PirateJenny » May 8th, 2019, 9:13 am

Warning Sign - Hal Barwood (1985)

Hal Barwood's only feature and not a bad science fiction film at all. The premise of it is really basic bio hazard paranoai and escape. The horror part of it is minor and it's not particular suspenseful but it's well stylised from a director that worked on some of my favourite LucasArts games, this being the only feature he directed I would have liked to have seen more from him.

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#1845

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » May 8th, 2019, 12:32 pm

In The Mood For Love - Wong Kar-wai (2000)

TSPDT has it ranked as the number one film of this century. I disagree. But maybe I wasn't in the mood.

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#1846

Post by peeptoad » May 8th, 2019, 1:59 pm

Vampire Hunter D (1985) 8/10 never got around to watching that one back in the day and it was really good. Loved all the bizarre creatures, demons, werewolves, snake witches, etc.

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#1847

Post by Ebbywebby » May 8th, 2019, 7:18 pm

Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal wrote:
May 8th, 2019, 12:32 pm
In The Mood For Love - Wong Kar-wai (2000)

TSPDT has it ranked as the number one film of this century. I disagree. But maybe I wasn't in the mood.
The overwhelming adulation for this film wholly baffles me. TSPDT now suggests it's the 44th best film EVER MADE? Ludicrous.

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#1848

Post by cinewest » May 9th, 2019, 9:13 am

Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal wrote:
May 8th, 2019, 12:32 pm
In The Mood For Love - Wong Kar-wai (2000)

TSPDT has it ranked as the number one film of this century. I disagree. But maybe I wasn't in the mood.
Don't care whether TSPDT or anyone else has it on their list, I think it is a great film, and have seen it multiple times

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#1849

Post by maxwelldeux » May 11th, 2019, 8:05 pm

Wolf Creek (2005)

Well, I requested it at the beginning of April for the Australia challenge, and it just came into the library, so I watched it last night with Wife. First horror movie in a long while that has gotten me excited - I thought it did a great job at building tension and avoiding most of the annoying pitfalls of poorly-made slasher films. It also kept me on my toes, and while parts were predictable, I was wrong quite a bit. Lots of great scenery shots, too, and a pleasure to watch.

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#1850

Post by blocho » May 13th, 2019, 3:04 pm

https://www.icheckmovies.com/movies/meeting+gorbachev/

Last night, I saw Werner Herzog's new documentary about Gorbachev, and I am sad to report that I think it is the worst of the 18 Herzog movies I have seen. I would even put it below Cerrro Torre: Scream of Stone. And before I go further, I should add that I, like many, adore Werner both as a filmmaker and a public figure filled with delight and mischief.

The main problem is that Herzog's approach is essentially hagiographic. The greatness of Gorbachev is presumed at the outset of the movie and repeatedly reinforced with encomiums that a devoted government propagandist would hesitate to repeat. We are told that Gorbachev is absolutely genuine, connects easily with all people, is enormously hard-working and intelligent, never hesitates to do the right thing. Whether any of these statements is true is beside the point -- they are made with the blushing enthusiasm of a first crush and scarcely any evidence. Watching Herzog interview Gorbachev and provide narration in this movie is the first time I have seen him out of his depth. Werner's most endearing trait, his complex and deeply felt humanism, has led him in his career to seek misfits, zealots, and iconoclasts. Werner loves characters, both good and bad and especially when the two are mixed in one person. Elucidating the nature of these characters, whether fictional or real, is perhaps his greatest talent as a filmmaker. He has done so successfully with war veterans, police officers, feral children, conquistadors, and opera fanatics. Faced with a titanic figure of world history, he falls dreadfully short.

The movie provides two modes of narrative: historical clips graced with Werner's narration and segments from interviews between Herzog and Gorbachev. Though we are told that they met for three filmed interviews, almost everything we see comes from only one of these interviews. Herzog's questioning is practically useless. He could have asked the sort of questions that a historian might have (Why did you feel glasnost and perestroika were necessary? Did reforming the society of the Soviet Union lead inevitably to its downfall? Was there a way to save the USSR without destroying it?). He could have taken a more Herzogian approach (think of the time he asked a penguin biologist whether penguins ever go insane). Instead, he adopts the artless approach of the least talented news hacks -- he prods Gorbachev by mentioning things he did in his public career and waits for a response. Gorbachev seems naturally unforthcoming, but his reticence isn't helped by Herzog's interrogatory method. Oddly, Herzog does far better in an interview with a veteran German diplomat, though that occupies far less screen time.

There are a few grace notes here. The summary of the three successive state funerals of Brezhnev, Andropov, and Chernenko is mordantly funny. Similarly amusing is a typically Herzogian digression on garden slugs and Austrian news television. But it is telling that the most compelling moment of the movie, a visit by Gorbachev to his hometown, is taken from a different Gorbachev documentary, two decades old. Ultimately, Meeting Gorbachev teaches viewers little about history and even less about Gorbachev.

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#1851

Post by maxwelldeux » May 13th, 2019, 6:10 pm

That is a fascinating and surprising review... Kinda makes me want to watch it.

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#1852

Post by blocho » May 13th, 2019, 7:08 pm

maxwelldeux wrote:
May 13th, 2019, 6:10 pm
That is a fascinating and surprising review... Kinda makes me want to watch it.
I'm glad I could fascinate and surprise. If you do see it, I'd be eager to read your reactions.

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#1853

Post by mightysparks » May 13th, 2019, 11:13 pm

maxwelldeux wrote:
May 11th, 2019, 8:05 pm
Wolf Creek (2005)

Well, I requested it at the beginning of April for the Australia challenge, and it just came into the library, so I watched it last night with Wife. First horror movie in a long while that has gotten me excited - I thought it did a great job at building tension and avoiding most of the annoying pitfalls of poorly-made slasher films. It also kept me on my toes, and while parts were predictable, I was wrong quite a bit. Lots of great scenery shots, too, and a pleasure to watch.
I thought it was very good too and the sequel is decent. The sequel is a little more typical but what I really liked is that the main victim is male and well, acts like a victim. Back in the IMDb board days I remember so many posts being like ‘lol guy is so gay coz he cries’ and I was like wtf is wrong with people.
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#1854

Post by maxwelldeux » May 14th, 2019, 12:27 am

mightysparks wrote:
May 13th, 2019, 11:13 pm
maxwelldeux wrote:
May 11th, 2019, 8:05 pm
Wolf Creek (2005)

Well, I requested it at the beginning of April for the Australia challenge, and it just came into the library, so I watched it last night with Wife. First horror movie in a long while that has gotten me excited - I thought it did a great job at building tension and avoiding most of the annoying pitfalls of poorly-made slasher films. It also kept me on my toes, and while parts were predictable, I was wrong quite a bit. Lots of great scenery shots, too, and a pleasure to watch.
I thought it was very good too and the sequel is decent. The sequel is a little more typical but what I really liked is that the main victim is male and well, acts like a victim. Back in the IMDb board days I remember so many posts being like ‘lol guy is so gay coz he cries’ and I was like wtf is wrong with people.
That's an interesting perspective - I kinda had the opposite reaction (spoilering just in case)...
SpoilerShow
My initial reaction was "OF COURSE" the women are dead and the guy survived - but I did think that using that fact and framing him as an alleged killer put an interesting twist on the end of the film that I wasn't expecting.

But I didn't even notice that he was acting like a "victim" - it seemed perfectly natural and kept me in the film. I definitely notice when guys are absurdly inappropriately macho in films like this and don't act like real people, and that definitely takes me out of the experience. Like, you just got shot in the kneecap - you're gonna do more than grunt and limp. And the fact you found assholes on the old boards is exactly 0% surprising...

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#1855

Post by mightysparks » May 14th, 2019, 12:29 am

maxwelldeux wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 12:27 am
mightysparks wrote:
May 13th, 2019, 11:13 pm
maxwelldeux wrote:
May 11th, 2019, 8:05 pm
Wolf Creek (2005)

Well, I requested it at the beginning of April for the Australia challenge, and it just came into the library, so I watched it last night with Wife. First horror movie in a long while that has gotten me excited - I thought it did a great job at building tension and avoiding most of the annoying pitfalls of poorly-made slasher films. It also kept me on my toes, and while parts were predictable, I was wrong quite a bit. Lots of great scenery shots, too, and a pleasure to watch.
I thought it was very good too and the sequel is decent. The sequel is a little more typical but what I really liked is that the main victim is male and well, acts like a victim. Back in the IMDb board days I remember so many posts being like ‘lol guy is so gay coz he cries’ and I was like wtf is wrong with people.
That's an interesting perspective - I kinda had the opposite reaction (spoilering just in case)...
SpoilerShow
My initial reaction was "OF COURSE" the women are dead and the guy survived - but I did think that using that fact and framing him as an alleged killer put an interesting twist on the end of the film that I wasn't expecting.

But I didn't even notice that he was acting like a "victim" - it seemed perfectly natural and kept me in the film. I definitely notice when guys are absurdly inappropriately macho in films like this and don't act like real people, and that definitely takes me out of the experience. Like, you just got shot in the kneecap - you're gonna do more than grunt and limp. And the fact you found assholes on the old boards is exactly 0% surprising...
I meant in the sequel (different guy), but the guy in the first film definitely felt more 'natural' than the annoying macho guy. I think it was in Wolf Creek, but:
SpoilerShow
I liked the moment when the (girl?) runs away instead of helping her friend, but then I think she goes back but I liked that her first instinct was to just fecking ruuuuun.
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#1856

Post by maxwelldeux » May 14th, 2019, 12:41 am

mightysparks wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 12:29 am
maxwelldeux wrote:
May 14th, 2019, 12:27 am
mightysparks wrote:
May 13th, 2019, 11:13 pm


I thought it was very good too and the sequel is decent. The sequel is a little more typical but what I really liked is that the main victim is male and well, acts like a victim. Back in the IMDb board days I remember so many posts being like ‘lol guy is so gay coz he cries’ and I was like wtf is wrong with people.
That's an interesting perspective - I kinda had the opposite reaction (spoilering just in case)...
SpoilerShow
My initial reaction was "OF COURSE" the women are dead and the guy survived - but I did think that using that fact and framing him as an alleged killer put an interesting twist on the end of the film that I wasn't expecting.

But I didn't even notice that he was acting like a "victim" - it seemed perfectly natural and kept me in the film. I definitely notice when guys are absurdly inappropriately macho in films like this and don't act like real people, and that definitely takes me out of the experience. Like, you just got shot in the kneecap - you're gonna do more than grunt and limp. And the fact you found assholes on the old boards is exactly 0% surprising...
I meant in the sequel (different guy), but the guy in the first film definitely felt more 'natural' than the annoying macho guy. I think it was in Wolf Creek, but:
SpoilerShow
I liked the moment when the (girl?) runs away instead of helping her friend, but then I think she goes back but I liked that her first instinct was to just fecking ruuuuun.
Yeah - that's pretty much why I liked the film. People actually made decisions that seemed reasonable. Not all of them were perfectly rational, but everything made sense, especially when you consider that they're scared shitless...

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#1857

Post by cinewest » May 14th, 2019, 2:50 pm

On the heels of the "Favorite films by a woman director" poll, I have just seen yet another small gem by a young woman filmmaker.

Two weeks ago it was a French / South Korean film, Yeo-haeng-ja, by Ounie Leconte (2009), a week ago it was I Am Not A Witch (2018), by Rungano Nyoni (a UK /Zambia co production), and tonight it was Guo Chun Tian (The Crossing, 2018), by Bai Xue.

The Crossing is from China, and reminded me of another outstanding film by another young woman director from China that I saw just a couple of months ago: Jia nian hua (Angels Wear White, 2017) by Vivian Qu.

I don't want to give too much away, but all of these films focus on "abandoned" girls either approaching or in adolescence who must learn how to survive in the world, and all of them have a naturalist style, though the two Chinese films flirt with being crime dramas, as well.

I might as well give another shout out to Vazante (Daniela Thomas, Brazil, 2017) which I recommended with some commentary about a month ago.

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#1858

Post by fori » May 15th, 2019, 11:47 am

Been meaning to see this one. I didn’t fall in love with Angels Wear White, though it was definitely enjoyable. China is definitely in a boom at the moment, and you’re perfectly perched to appreciate it.

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#1859

Post by cinewest » May 15th, 2019, 12:01 pm

fori wrote:
May 15th, 2019, 11:47 am
Been meaning to see this one. I didn’t fall in love with Angels Wear White, though it was definitely enjoyable. China is definitely in a boom at the moment, and you’re perfectly perched to appreciate it.
Of the ones I listed, Vazante is probably the most accomplished, but then all of the other filmmakers are fairly new to feature filmmaking, and each impressed me in that context, not only by creating some very memorable images and sequences, but by demonstrating a nice grasp of the medium, and the ability to handle inexperienced actors, as well as layer their narratives

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#1860

Post by RedHawk10 » May 16th, 2019, 8:08 pm

Beyond the Valley of the Dolls - would've been even better if it was like 10 minutes shorter. Some of the best dialogue and editing I've seen in a movie all year.

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#1861

Post by albajos » May 16th, 2019, 9:53 pm

In the last two days I've seen all Doris Day's official checks (minus one that I had seen before) and basically. If she doesn't sing, and doesn't play a girl-that-need-no-man that still ends up with a man then I actually like them. In the romance movies there is not much chemistry between the leads, particularly the two with Rock Hudson.

So the best one was actually one she played supporting in. Storm Warning (1951) with Ronald Reagan. The best movie about the Klan i have seen.

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#1862

Post by PeacefulAnarchy » May 16th, 2019, 9:56 pm

albajos wrote:
May 16th, 2019, 9:53 pm
If she doesn't sing, and doesn't play a girl-that-need-no-man that still ends up with a man then I actually like them.
Which ones does that leave?

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#1863

Post by albajos » May 16th, 2019, 10:05 pm

Last sentence. She was already married from the beginning in that one.

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#1864

Post by PeacefulAnarchy » May 16th, 2019, 10:13 pm

albajos wrote:
May 16th, 2019, 10:05 pm
Last sentence. She was already married from the beginning in that one.
Oh, is that the only one? I should have guessed.

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#1865

Post by flaiky » May 18th, 2019, 1:18 pm

Madeline's Madeline has jumped straight into my top 3 for 2018, I absolutely loved it. Anything I try and write sounds wanky and doesn't do it justice, but in short: I'm amazed at how masterfully the experimental elements are used to enrich it as a compelling character study. Truly bold and exciting cinema, and goddamn Helena Howard's performance is amazing. Anyone else a fan?
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#1866

Post by fori » May 18th, 2019, 10:21 pm

flaiky wrote:
May 18th, 2019, 1:18 pm
Madeline's Madeline has jumped straight into my top 3 for 2018, I absolutely loved it. Anything I try and write sounds wanky and doesn't do it justice, but in short: I'm amazed at how masterfully the experimental elements are used to enrich it as a compelling character study. Truly bold and exciting cinema, and goddamn Helena Howard's performance is amazing. Anyone else a fan?
Didn’t enjoy it that much as I didn’t find the “experimental” elements to be innovative in any way. Most critically though, the core point that the narrative labors so heavily about exploitation of mental illness for art seems to also apply to the film itself.

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#1867

Post by flaiky » May 18th, 2019, 11:21 pm

fori wrote:
May 18th, 2019, 10:21 pm
Most critically though, the core point that the narrative labors so heavily about exploitation of mental illness for art seems to also apply to the film itself.
How could Decker explore the issue without including mental illness in the film? Does including it automatically make it exploitative? I thought it was dealt with respectfully and yes, for a purpose.
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#1868

Post by fori » May 19th, 2019, 12:49 am

flaiky wrote:
May 18th, 2019, 11:21 pm
fori wrote:
May 18th, 2019, 10:21 pm
Most critically though, the core point that the narrative labors so heavily about exploitation of mental illness for art seems to also apply to the film itself.
How could Decker explore the issue without including mental illness in the film? Does including it automatically make it exploitative? I thought it was dealt with respectfully and yes, for a purpose.
My objection is specifically to the “experimental” attempts to project psychosis onto the screen. The disconnect between this and the narrative focus derailed the whole thing I felt. Don’t really feel like arguing about it though, I saw it 9 months ago.

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#1869

Post by OldAle1 » May 19th, 2019, 2:01 am

flaiky wrote:
May 18th, 2019, 1:18 pm
Madeline's Madeline has jumped straight into my top 3 for 2018, I absolutely loved it. Anything I try and write sounds wanky and doesn't do it justice, but in short: I'm amazed at how masterfully the experimental elements are used to enrich it as a compelling character study. Truly bold and exciting cinema, and goddamn Helena Howard's performance is amazing. Anyone else a fan?
Didn't like it as much as you but it's one of those films that has stuck with me and which I didn't rate higher primarily because I wasn't sure what I was seeing, or what I was getting out of what I was seeing. Completely agree about Helena Howard, and Miranda July and Molly Parker were just about as great.

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#1870

Post by Ivan0716 » May 19th, 2019, 3:30 am

Madeline's Madeline is Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice in film form. I appreciate what it tries to do much more than the film itself. Also, The Other Side of the Underneath did it better half a century ago.

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#1871

Post by flaiky » May 19th, 2019, 3:01 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
May 19th, 2019, 2:01 am
Didn't like it as much as you but it's one of those films that has stuck with me and which I didn't rate higher primarily because I wasn't sure what I was seeing, or what I was getting out of what I was seeing. Completely agree about Helena Howard, and Miranda July and Molly Parker were just about as great.
I could understand it being impenetrable: all too often, creative cinema ends up sacrificing a full emotional investment so I've definitely been there before. But for me, this was one of those rare and satisfying experiences where the potential of the medium is fully utilised to enhance that connection and probe the themes. I was totally tuned into its wavelength.

I just read this Ty Burr review and I think it captures it pretty perfectly:
SpoilerShow
“Madeline’s Madeline” looks like an experimental movie only because it’s told through the eyes of an experimental human being: a teenage girl struggling with mental illness while flowering angrily, impetuously, and vibrantly into herself.

The film, written and directed by Josephine Decker and starring a remarkable newcomer named Helena Howard, is a stunner — one of the best films of the year, if also one of the hardest to initially get your head around. The early scenes seem willfully impenetrable, with the cinematography refusing to settle on a focal plane and the sound mix dripping with random clinks and whispers. Upping the anxiety quotient, the tightly interlocked a cappella harmonies of the vocal group Roomful of Teeth swerve in and out of the soundtrack like a chorus of cicadas.

This is cinema as vertigo, not so much directed as choreographed and collaged. It’s also an accurate approximation of how the world appears to 16-year-old Madeline (Howard).

The girl lives in working class/boho New York City with her mother, Regina (performance artist Miranda July), who’s at the end of her tether when the movie opens. The screenplay, co-written by Donna Di Novelli, smuggles in hints of psychiatric hospitalizations in the past and medications running low in the present. The neighbor boys think Madeline is some kind of freak: the girl with the supernova hair who says weird things and who toggles between gentleness and rage.

Regina is grateful the girl can spend the summer enrolled in an avant-garde dance-theater troupe run by an enthusiastic and pretentious mother hen named Evangeline (Molly Parker). So Madeline has, in effect, two mothers to choose from, and one of the underlying dramas of “Madeline’s Madeline” is which (if either) has the girl’s best interests at heart. (A father is mentioned once but never seen and not remotely germane; the power dynamics this movie explores are strictly female.)

Her other issues aside, Madeline is as rebellious as her age demands, burning with a life force and a sexuality she has no idea how to channel. The intuitive genius of Howard’s performance is that it’s up to the older women — and us — to separate the strands of normal adolescent pushback from the ones that flash danger.

And because Decker keeps us tied to the mast of Madeline’s senses and sensibilities, it’s easy to feel the mother is clinging too tightly or to miss how avidly the teacher gloms onto the girl’s illness as fodder for a new performance piece. Where’s the line between art and exploitation? Decker cheats a bit by giving us glimpses of the troupe’s increasingly appalled dancers and backstage personnel; as it takes climactic shape, “Madeline’s Madeline” becomes very nearly a comedy about a lost girl finding her community while performing a sort of necessary matricide.

Those final 20 minutes are among the most electrifying filmmaking I’ve seen this year, as the stylistic sound and fury of Decker’s approach — the chaos of Madeline’s perceptions — suddenly finds shape and purpose and rhythm. The theatrical uprising swallows up the heroine in a groove of ecstasy and acceptance, and the pulse of energy, of pure adrenaline joy, lifts all boats, including ours.

It’s a cinematic and dramatic high, in other words, and it’s the nature of highs that they often prove illusory. You may be thinking about the film’s final shot for days; you may never be able to tell if and where reality shades into fantasy, or how many of those teeming harmonies Madeline hears come from outside her own head. In a way I’ve never before seen done onscreen, “Madeline’s Madeline” fuses triumph and tragedy until the two feel strong and indistinguishable.
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#1872

Post by Rainy Red Carpet » May 21st, 2019, 10:31 am

70s double feature

The Friends of Eddie Coyle d Peter Yates (1973): Quientessential 70s film. Muscle cars, gritty bars and streets brimming with pre-gentrified character. Typical Peter Boyle film from that decade. Loved it.

Hardcore, d Paul Schrader (1979)
Another gritty 70s movie ( with Peter Boyle) choc full of dive bars and seedy sex clubs that reminded me a lot of Cassavetes' The Killing of a Chinese Bookie. Bugger the 50s diners bring back the seedy 70s bars.
:cheers:

Not as intense as TFOEC but t's worth watching for the Big Dick Blaque scene alone.
Money talks and bullshit walks.

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Ebbywebby
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#1873

Post by Ebbywebby » May 23rd, 2019, 10:50 am

I recorded "Dry Summer" off TCM yesterday and saw it tonight. My first film from the official Turkish list!! Now the Bollywood list is the only one where I'm shut out.

Started off slow, but the second half was much better. Reminded me a bit -- both visually and thematically -- of Saura's "La Caza" (1966), which I saw not so long ago.

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peeptoad
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#1874

Post by peeptoad » May 24th, 2019, 12:30 pm

Loft (1985)
Not nearly as good as Der Fan, and the dubbing was terrible (not sure there is a subbed version of this available), but the setting and the soundtrack worked for me. Schmidt is quite good with music in the films of his I've seen so far.

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Ivan0716
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#1875

Post by Ivan0716 » May 24th, 2019, 8:01 pm

peeptoad wrote:
May 24th, 2019, 12:30 pm
Loft (1985)
Not nearly as good as Der Fan, and the dubbing was terrible (not sure there is a subbed version of this available), but the setting and the soundtrack worked for me. Schmidt is quite good with music in the films of his I've seen so far.
I'm about 95% sure I watched a German version, so it should be out there. I loved the set design too. It was actually quite enjoyable up until the last 30 minutes or so, when Schmidt decided to document his EVERY thought in the form of monologues, it just annoyed me to no end.

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peeptoad
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#1876

Post by peeptoad » May 24th, 2019, 8:37 pm

Ivan0716 wrote:
May 24th, 2019, 8:01 pm
peeptoad wrote:
May 24th, 2019, 12:30 pm
Loft (1985)
Not nearly as good as Der Fan, and the dubbing was terrible (not sure there is a subbed version of this available), but the setting and the soundtrack worked for me. Schmidt is quite good with music in the films of his I've seen so far.
I'm about 95% sure I watched a German version, so it should be out there. I loved the set design too. It was actually quite enjoyable up until the last 30 minutes or so, when Schmidt decided to document his EVERY thought in the form of monologues, it just annoyed me to no end.
Thanks, I'll keep an eye out for the German version. The English dub was scathing at times, so I'd like to give it another go without it if possible.

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jal90
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#1877

Post by jal90 » May 26th, 2019, 10:44 am

Unknown blonde (Hobart Henley, 1934) - A fun and cynical take on divorce that is entertaining to see through with a few troubling elements (some rough moments of acting mainly) and not much to write home about, but it was a nice watch that had its moments of poignancy. Also the transitions.

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peeptoad
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#1878

Post by peeptoad » May 30th, 2019, 12:49 pm

Moonlight (2016)
This won best picture? I was unimpressed. The acting was good and Mahershala Ali was very easily the best thing about the film for me. His
SpoilerShow
off-screen death
was badly hazed over though, as were most of the other interesting aspects of the plot. The third section didn't match at all with the first two (which were infinitely stronger, but still not stellar) and I feel like, by film's end, I knew nothing about the characters and, as result, had no emotional feelings or empathy towards them at all.
What I felt like I watched was a series of disconnected/disjointed clips from someone's life that were thrown together in chronological sequence, but didn't fit together in a convincing manner (like jamming puzzle pieces that are close, but don't interlock properly). Add to that the feeling that some major life events for the main protagonist were hazed over and only vaguely alluded to (if ever) later on in the film. It was almost as if the "difficult to film/less tangible elements" were skipped and only marginally referenced later, which made it a very weak view for me. I also forcasted almost evrything that happened, so this is not novel ground we are treading here.
The disjointed/hazed over quality of Moonlight reminded me of another film that it has virtually nothing in common with : The Lion King 1994. I felt the exact same way about that one as I did at the conclusion of Midnight. Simba "grew up" but we never got to see it... never knew who that character was except in a very superficial way
Now, having said that- the acting I felt was quite good and, visually, the film was nice to look at. The color scheme was interesting. I guess I'm curious what most others seemed to have loved about it since those really were the only two things that stood out to me in any way. :shrug:

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Kublai Khan
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#1879

Post by Kublai Khan » May 31st, 2019, 3:24 am

What a coincidence. I just watched Moonlight for the first time just the other day as well.

I think you're trying to jam the pieces together to see a different story than what the director intended. The story is about Chiron dealing with his homosexual identity in an environment and culture that is hyper toxic to it.
SpoilerShow
Mahershala Ali's character was the father figure to Chiron and taught him the ways of the street's culture. That he has to hide his vulnerabilities and never expose himself to danger (even down to whee to sit at a table). After Juan died, when Chiron was in high school, he did try to to experience a little vulnerability an closeness with his friend, only to have to backfire. So Chiron truly closes off and embraces all the lessons Juan taught him and he basically is living Juan's life instead of his own. He tells his friend that he's not been together with anyone else.

Basically..
The first part is Chiron learning from Juan that he has to suppress all vulnerabilities to survive.
The second part is Chiron having that lesson reinforced by him immediately being hurt (physically and emotionally) after a vulnerable moment.
The third part is a little ambiguous, I'll grant you that. I think Chiron is jarred into figuring out that just surviving isn't enough. He has no real deep connection with anyone and even his mom's tearful apologies don't really move him.

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#1880

Post by Ebbywebby » May 31st, 2019, 5:20 am

Moonlight: There were three segments, and I liked each one less than the previous one. Not the right trajectory for a film. By the end, I was thinking, jeez, all that promise and he just turned into a stock character? Oh well.

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