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Last Movie Seen

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Re: Last Movie Seen

#1801

Post by Ivan0716 » February 23rd, 2019, 6:49 pm

Capernaum aka How to Stop Poverty by Sterilising Poor People (2018)
pointless rant about one of the most deplorable films I've seenShow
Fuck.This.Film

I had expected this to be your typical third world poverty porn made to please your typical prestige festival goers/award voters, with all the ridiculousness that a story like "a 12 year-old suing his parents for giving birth to him" has to offer. But never could I have imagined that it would seriously end with an explicit statement on how poor people just should not be allowed to procreate because their inability to raise children in the ideal conditions is somehow nobody's fault but their own, like, fucking seriously???? What a thoroughly disgusting film, the acclaim is baffling, I can't imagine it appealing to anyone other than shameless card-carrying eugenicists, or those who feel so far removed from its setting that no reaction other than "Awww poor kids" is possible. Yes, poor kids, for being exploited as the posterboys of the vile message this piece of shit film wants to send, a message the world does not fucking need with all the bullshit we got going on already.

I'm done with Nadine Labaki, hope more female directors will emerge from the Middle East in the near future so people can stop gushing over this one.

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#1802

Post by PirateJenny » February 24th, 2019, 1:38 pm

Detour

Watched with my brother last night, it's one of the greatest noirs and they're all I seem to want to watch so thought i'd show it to him.

9/10

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#1803

Post by PirateJenny » February 24th, 2019, 8:58 pm

The Thing from Another World

What could make a better popcorn flick than a goofy 1950s scifi with Hawks' wit and snappy dialogue, though it's definitely goofy.

6/10

I have another Hawks, Man's Favourite Sport lined up to watch in bed.

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#1804

Post by PirateJenny » February 26th, 2019, 11:56 am

Man's Favourite Sport was hilarious if a little dated in political correctness and anything with Mancini on the OST is a bonus.

7/10

24 Frames

Interesting enough dissection of a classic painting, but I preferred The Mill and the Cross which was slightly less contemplative.

5/10

Vox Lux

I wouldn't say it was bad, seen it compared to A Star Is Born that I'm yet to see. Overall, a bit maudlin especially in the wake of metoo.

4/10

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#1805

Post by PirateJenny » February 26th, 2019, 10:20 pm

Cry Freedom

This is the second apartheid movie I've seen recently, the other was The Forgiven.
I don't know why I choose them when it's an impossible political subject to challenge.

But as the Peter Gabriel song goes - Biko. Biko. You can blow out a candle but you can't blow out a fire.

3/10

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#1806

Post by PirateJenny » February 26th, 2019, 10:30 pm

[quote=
Last edited by PirateJenny on February 26th, 2019, 10:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#1807

Post by RBG » February 26th, 2019, 10:30 pm

i watched green book and i think i get it. tony lip made the story all about himself and his son wrote the script so of course it's a white saviour narrative and nothing about the actual don shirley and actual green book (which was barely mentioned). this racist goombah knew little richard and aretha? c'mon now. but once i heard mint julep i was hooked :P....err 2/10 waaay too predictable
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#1808

Post by MovieSchmuck » March 2nd, 2019, 4:04 am

Finally caught up to GET OUT. Great & creepy. The white family was a just a little overdrawn (I'm white & I would've been weirded out staying with them) but the whole racial subtext thing was OK for me. And his buddy! SO GOOD to hear the art of foul-mouthed swearing!

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#1809

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » March 2nd, 2019, 6:12 am

Watched Widows on Google Play last night. Daniel Kaluuya played a very convincing villain. It's worth checking out.

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#1810

Post by PirateJenny » March 2nd, 2019, 8:52 pm

Blind Date (1984)

Fairly average B movie techno thriller, with a few extra bonuses going for it for genre fans to notch up my rating - the Stan Myers OST is expectedly good and interesting cult plot concept. First I've seen from this director, so if it was a date it would be a maybe for next tine.

6/10

I rewatched Rope (1948) earlier today. I think about this film every now and again and although I don't think it could be called Hitchcock's best, i see it as Rear Window's little brother, it's a unique experiment.

6.5/10

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#1811

Post by PirateJenny » March 3rd, 2019, 9:24 pm

Hideaway (1995)

I haven;t read the Koontz story it was based on but this is another ordinary 90s thriller with a few things that make it more watchable, reasonable acting and a Godflesh cameo. Not great overall, and though I think this a lot, could have done with being edited to a shorter running time as there were some good scenes.

5/10

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#1812

Post by MovieSchmuck » March 4th, 2019, 5:24 pm

AFRICAN QUEEN (1951)
First time on the big screen. Nice clean digital copy. I love to see the details you miss on TV - Bogart flubbing his lines, Katherine Hepburn cracking her head against something when she stands up, etc. And Africa in colour - how can you go wrong?

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#1813

Post by PirateJenny » March 5th, 2019, 12:42 am

So Dark The Night (1946)

Unusual noir acted with French accented English that starts whimsically with light music in the countryside before it turns darker, but by the time the plot twist came near the end, I felt like I'd missed something somewhere. Maybe one to rewatch.

6/10

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#1814

Post by Ivan0716 » March 6th, 2019, 5:43 pm

Das blaue Licht (1932, Leni Riefenstahl)
Stunning piece. Is it possible to watch this without thinking what her directorial career could have been? Surely one of the biggest what-ifs in cinematic history?

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#1815

Post by PirateJenny » March 6th, 2019, 7:25 pm

Suspiria (2018)

I'm a fan of the original so half expected something good but didn't finish it on first viewing. It was just boring, lost all of the italo of the original and just doesn't seem to work from the hour and half I saw.

n/a

La Luna (1979)

This was a masterpiece and probably the first 10/10 film I've seen for a while. Last film I saw that gave me the same kind of buzz was Butterfly (1982). Maybe more Jungian than a riposte to Freud as I've read elsewhere.

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#1816

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » March 7th, 2019, 9:17 am

The Old Man and the Gun. Redford's last movie so I had to watch it. Solid but not great.

There was a scene towards the end where the two legends Robert Redford and Sissy Spacek were walking side by side through a field. It felt profound.

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#1817

Post by mjf314 » March 13th, 2019, 5:10 am

I watched One Cut of the Dead yesterday, and I highly recommend. It's a zombie comedy film, and one of the best recent horror films imo. The critics think so too (it has a 100% RT score).

If I had to compare it to something, some parts reminded me of Why Don't You Play in Hell?, and some parts reminded me of Summer Time Machine Blues (although it's neither a yakuza film nor a time travel film).

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#1818

Post by PirateJenny » March 14th, 2019, 2:23 pm

Perfect Blue
Surreal anime, and to use a cliche, ahead of its time with the advent of social media and how easy it is to lose track of what's real and what isn't. Must see. Kept me gripped at each twist and turn.

8.5/10

Shadows
Cassavetes first directed feature, and another film that makes me say, can't believe I hadn't seen this before. I'm glad I did, powerful performances and a cracking jazzy score.

8/10

The Third Secret
British noirish thriller. I'm in the mood to rewatch it sometime, as I didn't find it in anyway bad but found the lead girl actor slightly overbearing first time round, and it's bloody depressing.

5/10

Subarnarekha
I have to be in the right mood to watch 2 hours of parallel cinema too. I think I was this film by Ritwik Ghatak was as beautiful and spiritually affective as the previous I'd seen, A Cloud Capped Star.

7/10

Pickup on South Street
Quirky noir with some great set pieces and as gritty as I'd expect from Sam Fuller. It was quite dense with lots of hooks so the story didn't always grip me though.

7/10

I might try to condense my next ones into films seen last week as my reviews are usually short.

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#1819

Post by GruesomeTwosome » March 14th, 2019, 3:40 pm

PirateJenny wrote:
March 14th, 2019, 2:23 pm
I might try to condense my next ones into films seen last week as my reviews are usually short.
Or feel free to post about your "films seen last week" in the weekly thread that the user sol starts every Sunday. This is the latest one, for example.

I watched Perfect Blue last year for the first time, a cinema viewing no less. Agree with your take, a very affecting film with ever-continuing relevance today.
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#1820

Post by PirateJenny » March 14th, 2019, 5:10 pm

GruesomeTwosome wrote:
March 14th, 2019, 3:40 pm
PirateJenny wrote:
March 14th, 2019, 2:23 pm
I might try to condense my next ones into films seen last week as my reviews are usually short.
Or feel free to post about your "films seen last week" in the weekly thread that the user sol starts every Sunday. This is the latest one, for example.

I watched Perfect Blue last year for the first time, a cinema viewing no less. Agree with your take, a very affecting film with ever-continuing relevance today.
Cinema viewings are so rare for me, especially where I've recently moved house to in the middle of nowhere.
Have noted those threads now. :D

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#1821

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » March 22nd, 2019, 11:38 pm

Aus Dem Nichts aka In the Fade, d Fatih Akin (2017).

Topical story about a woman who seeks justice when her husband and son are murdered by neo Nazis. It was much better than some of the mixed reviews led me to believe it would be. They really nailed the ending.

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#1822

Post by matthewscott8 » March 25th, 2019, 10:28 am

I watched The Bridges at Toko-Ri last night. Mostly because the main character in Resnais' Wild Grass was nostalgic for it.

I really enjoyed it and have to say it's far better than its obscure reputation suggests. It's a Korean war movie starring William Holden (as a pilot called Brubaker), but it's also very human.

There's a superbly tender moment when on leave in Japan. Brubaker has hired out some onsen to bathe with his family, his wife and 2 daughters (naked). There are two pools, and a mistake means a mirror image Japanese family arrives and takes the other pool. Brubaker is initially highly alarmed but it turns into a very tender moment as the two families bathe side by side. It is one of the most intimate scenes I have found in cinema and also gently anti racist.

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#1823

Post by PirateJenny » March 26th, 2019, 12:16 pm

American Madness (Capra)

There's a run on the bank but he (Walter Huston) also suspects his wife might be cheating on him. That is until it unravels into a feel good movie done very well.

8/10

Yoshiwara (Ophuls)

Average at best. However, I think worth watching as a curiosity of Ophuls going oriental.

5/10

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#1824

Post by RBG » March 28th, 2019, 2:55 am

uchida's mad fox -- i've waited six years to watch this film -- god bless the internet. the film is a wild mix of styles, from kabuki and puppets to animation, with colors to rival gate of hell. weird movie fans check this out ♥

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#1825

Post by matthewscott8 » April 1st, 2019, 1:17 pm

The Unknown Girl (2016 - Jean-Pierre Dardenne, Luc Dardenne)

Saw this on the weekend completely by random, it was just about to start on BBC4 when I was channel flicking. Has had a slow afterburn since then, intensifying. Feel a bit overwhelmed this morning. There is some hope for a cinema of morality it seems.

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#1826

Post by Coryn » April 1st, 2019, 4:39 pm

Anyone else really liked 'Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie (1972)' but hated 'Le fantôme de la liberté (1974)' ?

They seem like such similar films directed both Luis Bunuel but for some reason I couldn't stand 'The Phantom of Liberty' and had to shut it off midway.

Am I missing something? Are these movies not similar at all or am I going nuts ?
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#1827

Post by maxwelldeux » April 1st, 2019, 4:50 pm

Coryn wrote:
April 1st, 2019, 4:39 pm
Anyone else really liked 'Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie (1972)' but hated 'Le fantôme de la liberté (1974)' ?

They seem like such similar films directed both Luis Bunuel but for some reason I couldn't stand 'The Phantom of Liberty' and had to shut it off midway.

Am I missing something? Are these movies not similar at all or am I going nuts ?
I haven't seen Phantom, but I did like Discrete Charm. Bunuel is very hit-and-miss with me, so I'd say it's very possible to like one and hate the other. :shrug:

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#1828

Post by PeacefulAnarchy » April 1st, 2019, 5:36 pm

Coryn wrote:
April 1st, 2019, 4:39 pm
Anyone else really liked 'Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie (1972)' but hated 'Le fantôme de la liberté (1974)' ?

They seem like such similar films directed both Luis Bunuel but for some reason I couldn't stand 'The Phantom of Liberty' and had to shut it off midway.

Am I missing something? Are these movies not similar at all or am I going nuts ?
They are very similar, but they have different structures so I guess if that was the issue it's not that surprising, though still a bit since they do have a lot in common, more than with other Buñuels. Phantom is much more haphazard and less preoccupied with characters or narrative structure. That can definitely make it less engaging, though it also means you don't really know what you missed in the second half you shut off. I guess it depends on what you liked/disliked about them. I liked Phantom more and I'm not really sure why, but I did enjoy both.

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#1829

Post by MovieSchmuck » April 5th, 2019, 4:47 pm

All The Brothers Were Valiant (1953 dir. Richard Thorpe).

Surprised how good this old-fashioned sea yarn was. Robert Taylor goes to sea with his new bride on a boat once commanded by his scapegrace younger brother (Stewart Granger doing his twinkle-in-the-eye thing), who's vanished in the Pacific isles. The usual cannibals, pirates & exotic maidens ensue. Hardly great art, but I quite liked it.

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#1830

Post by PirateJenny » April 5th, 2019, 9:39 pm

Faces Places (Varda) is on NetFlix for UK viewers.
Such a sweet documentary style.

8/10

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#1831

Post by maxwelldeux » April 7th, 2019, 2:22 am

My last 24 hours or so in film have been weird...

Started off with The Little Hours. Your typical medieval sex comedy. Basically, you know that scene from Holy Grail where he stumbles into the convent full of lusty nuns? Expand that scene to a 90m script, and about 70% of your writing is done. Followed that up with the heartwarming story of Uncle Nick, a semi-functional alcoholic desperate to sleep with his 20-year-old step-niece at Christmas Eve dinner. A DARK comedy, but it had its moments. This morning, I woke up to Straw Dogs, a Sam Peckinpah-directed rape/revenge story. Lightened the mood with a classic noir They Live By Night. Then popped right into Catch-22, a wandering acid-trip of an anti-war movie and deserving of its place on the 366 Weird Movies list.

Now I'm going to go watch something oppressively lighthearted.

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#1832

Post by mightysparks » April 7th, 2019, 2:35 am

Coryn wrote:
April 1st, 2019, 4:39 pm
Anyone else really liked 'Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie (1972)' but hated 'Le fantôme de la liberté (1974)' ?

They seem like such similar films directed both Luis Bunuel but for some reason I couldn't stand 'The Phantom of Liberty' and had to shut it off midway.

Am I missing something? Are these movies not similar at all or am I going nuts ?
I didn't like Bourgeoisie and loved Phantom, so I guess it's not that weird :P
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#1833

Post by Ebbywebby » April 20th, 2019, 7:43 pm

Three nights ago, I saw Kaurismaki's "La Vie de Boheme." The next feature I saw was the King Vidor silent "La Boheme" (last night). And the link didn't occur to me until I was already underway in "La Boheme." :) Pure coincidence. "La Vie de Boheme" had been on my watchlist for awhile, and I had recently recorded the silent film off TCM. Too weird.

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#1834

Post by hania » April 22nd, 2019, 1:42 am

Last movie I see was Up. I'm a not a big fan of animated movies but when I watched this film, I fell in love with the main character. I had no idea that an animated character can depict emotional drama and relationship in this way.

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#1835

Post by maxwelldeux » April 22nd, 2019, 3:53 am

hania wrote:
April 22nd, 2019, 1:42 am
Last movie I see was Up. I'm a not a big fan of animated movies but when I watched this film, I fell in love with the main character. I had no idea that an animated character can depict emotional drama and relationship in this way.
My wife didn't like Up, and I accused her of having no soul. And this is still an argument we have occasionally 6.5 years of marriage later...

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#1836

Post by fori » April 25th, 2019, 12:06 pm

I just watched Arc Light, and it was excellent. Tackles so many key social issues (and ones of particular interest to me at that) with admirable focus, sustains a uniquely emotive and precisely fluctuating tone, and employs the language of the medium in a sophisticated way.

RIP Zhang Junzhao

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#1837

Post by Kublai Khan » April 25th, 2019, 3:41 pm

I watched the 2016 Jason Bourne. My takeaway was that Matt Damon is looking way to old to be the solo action star. His face is getting too pudgy.

Also, most of the criticism is correct in that it's pretty uninspired throughout, but the Vegas car stuff was good.

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#1838

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » April 26th, 2019, 2:06 pm

Just finished Harry Dean Stanton's last film Lucky. It's essential viewing. Better still David Lynch is in it too and the man can act.


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#1839

Post by flaiky » April 26th, 2019, 6:13 pm

You just reminded me how much I wanted to see that. Yup, off to find a copy.
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#1840

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » April 27th, 2019, 6:26 am

I followed it up with Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction. It's a 2014 documentary which turned out to be a good double with Lucky, because through watching it I discovered that parts of Lucky were autobiographical. Both films are on Google Play.

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