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Last Movie Seen

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OldAle1
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Re: Last Movie Seen

#1761

Post by OldAle1 » December 21st, 2018, 4:24 pm

RedHawk10 wrote:
December 21st, 2018, 7:02 am
My third watch of Dead Man, this singular, haunting masterpiece, and I'm still amazed at how thematically dense it is. One of the few films I wouldn't hesitate to call genuinely brilliant.
:cheers: (l) :cheers: :D

I've probably seen it 20 times or so now, including 9 times first-run in 1996-7. Still my favorite western and the greatest film ever I think about the "American soul" - or maybe more generally the soul of the conqueror - which is pretty damn dark. And apart from the density which you mention, it's just an incredible aesthetic work, with the cinematography, art direction, editing and score all absolutely peak-level in all of cinema. I got the Criterion the moment it came out of course but still haven't gotten around to watching it again; one of my goals this next year might be to re-watch every film in my all-time top 10 again so I hope to do that and write up a real review of it - wish I still had the stuff I wrote when I saw it initially which I was rather happy with.

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#1762

Post by RedHawk10 » December 21st, 2018, 10:32 pm

Glad to see some love for it on here! I'd be very interested to read a review from you if you do get around to it, it's a movie that I feel like could be talked about for hours and hours without even coming close to covering all of the interesting stuff in it.

It's definitely very dark, but I find the film extremely beautiful as well. The ending, the scene with the fawn, the paper flowers segment, those are all overwhelming to me.

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#1763

Post by DareDaniel » January 2nd, 2019, 3:20 pm

Love Exposure (6th viewing) - Extended "THE TV-SHOW"

This is what I personally believe to be the best film of all time from my favourite director Sion Sono.

The story goes around religion, love, fetish and social standards and it all sums up in the best love story ever depicted in any movie. It's always so charming, funny and intelligent with such a crazy and beautiful ending. This has been my favourite movie for a decade as no other movie has had the same impact on me, even on a personal level. As such, this is the only movie in my book to deserve a ★★★★★ rating.

I can only thank my mother for being alive to watch this masterpiece.

On a side note, this is the first time I've seen the TV version. While it adds some key scenes that give a better understanding about Koike's feelings towards Yu and her plan to take more people into joining Church Zero, especially to anyone who's watching this movie for the first time, I absolutely deslike the fact that I had to watch the opening and ending credits of all episodes. Kinda breaks the flow of a movie that isn't meant to be seen in an episodic format. I obviously enjoyed a lot watching the new content, but the movie version is how it is meant to be seen.

I'm praying to the Hentai God to give us the 6 hour version one day.

10/10

First Man
There's enough information on the internet behind the moon landing and all the events and people related to it. I just wanna see the final sequence and this movie really made me go to the moon. Loved the music!
There's some human drama but it never gets boring. It felt enough to me.
8/10

One Cut of the Dead
Movies about making movies are just the best!
8/10

Blade Runner 2049
So beautiful, I like it even more than the original. Watched it twice this year.
9/10

May the Devil Take You
An indonesian Evil Dead. Fun stuff.
7/10

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#1764

Post by RedHawk10 » January 2nd, 2019, 10:32 pm

Love Exposure is one of the most perfectly paced movies I've ever seen, so I'm not sure I'd totally love the initial much longer cut, but I'd check it out if it ever did see the light of day because...how could I not?!

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#1765

Post by maxwelldeux » January 8th, 2019, 2:01 am

Last night I was feeling sad and grumpy (I just found out an old friend passed away), so I got in the right frame of mind to watch these two back-to-back:

Super Troopers 2 (2018)

I made my wife watch the first one not too long ago, and while she found parts of it funny, it wasn't really her type of humor overall. So I watched this while she was in the other room playing video games, frequently pausing it so I could explain to her the humor she couldn't get without looking at the screen (side benefit: annoying her as well). Not as good as the first, but still really enjoyable if you liked the first. Ample humor and a whole lot of making fun of Americans, including using Canadian stereotypes to make fun of Americans. The basic plot is that a small town in Canada on the border with Vermont was mis-classified and is actually part of the US. So the town is turning American, and the Super Troopers are put in charge of being the transition police force. Things like the accents (Canadian French accents - NOT French-Canadian; take an over-the-top French accent and overlay it with a stereotypical Canadian accent), the casting (Will Sasso as a Mountie with a French accent is hilarious), and stereotypes (Canadians making fun of the Americans for mispronouncing "sorry") all provided fodder for the humor. Recommended for non-sober people who liked the first.

The Big Lebowski (1998)

I was shocked to learn I didn't have a rating for this, so I do now. So much fun. I actually didn't like this movie until I saw it in the "proper" state - then it clicked. One of my favorites of the Coen bros.

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#1766

Post by ripleyreviews » January 9th, 2019, 7:38 pm

Watched Roma and Mid90s today. Wrote reviews on both flicks.

Mid90s 4/5 - great coming of age stylish cinema
Roma 5/5 - they don't make them like that anymore

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#1767

Post by Ivan0716 » January 10th, 2019, 11:06 pm

Cosmopolis (2012)

I knew this was a polarising one even among Cronenberg diehards, and I see a lot of people calling it boring and difficult to sit through, but I thought it was fucking hilarious and sat through the entire film with a grin on my face, did I somehow watch a different film by accident?

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#1768

Post by matthewscott8 » January 11th, 2019, 10:29 am

Ivan0716 wrote:
January 10th, 2019, 11:06 pm
Cosmopolis (2012)

I knew this was a polarising one even among Cronenberg diehards, and I see a lot of people calling it boring and difficult to sit through, but I thought it was fucking hilarious and sat through the entire film with a grin on my face, did I somehow watch a different film by accident?
I liked the film a lot, I didn't laugh all the way through it, but it was interesting for sure. I think the community of filmmakers is struggling to cope with polemicising modern life. It's starting to become quite normal for auteurs to make movies set in the 80s and 90s, simply because they haven't the ability to engage with life as it is now, von Trier is a good example. Many people just shut it out. Ebert's review of the movie is quite telling, I agree with everything he says, except he decided to respond as an ostrich
"Cosmopolis" is a flawlessly directed film about enigmatic people who speak in morose epigrams about vague universal principles they show no sign of understanding. Its characters are bloodless, their speech monotone. If there are people like this, I hope David Cronenberg's film is as close as I ever get to them. You couldn't pay me to see it again.
He simply doesn't want to know about modern life
the film and the novel both lack any trace of Joyce's humor and rich humanity. Here is a stark, forbidding portrait of the damned in a hell of their making.
he's referring to the fact that Cosmopolis is loosely inspired by Ulysses. He doesn't want to know though, why is a humanistic approach appropriate in detailing profoundly adrift and alienated people? Maybe that would help him to ignore the message. I don't think people exist like this in the sense, that, this is entirely unbelieavable as a documentary, what Cronenberg has done is make the internal external, which is his job. I categorise Cosmopolis with Mann's Miami Vice, people don't really want to know about the world and how it is now, they want fantasies. These movies engaged with the modern world and got the ostrich treatment. The decline of love seems an important subject, but again no-one wants to talk about that.

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#1769

Post by ripleyreviews » January 11th, 2019, 2:21 pm

True Grit (1969) 4/5 - John Wayne is a legend


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#1770

Post by matthewscott8 » January 11th, 2019, 2:46 pm

ripleyreviews wrote:
January 11th, 2019, 2:21 pm
True Grit (1969) 4/5 - John Wayne is a legend

I watched an interview with John Ford the other day. John Wayne started off as his Third Assistant Prop Man, then got promoted to second and finally first. He kinda liked the guy and gave him a screen test, the result after some minor roles was Stagecoach. The point is John Wayne wasn't an actor, he was a fantasist, he never played any role other than himself. All his parts were rewritten so that any action one of his characters took in a movie, no matter how unlikely, obstreperous or plain ridiculous, was ultimately justified. He stands out to me as the archetype of embarrassing patriarchy, everything organised around and subservient to a totem of himself, work, family, everything. And every one of the films he's in, to me it's dirtied by his presence. And if you look beyond the Ford films, at stuff like Green Berets, McQ, Big Jim McLain, you'll find him as an apologist for every conservative disaster of the 20th century, Vietnam, police acting above the law, and the HUAC witch hunting.

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#1771

Post by matthewscott8 » January 11th, 2019, 3:05 pm

And on a quick note I would say that a lot of this was Ford's fault, he turned Wayne into his creature, and finally a monster, Wayne was a regurgitator of Ford's flawed artistic vision of masculinity, he regurgitated it into toxic cold war nastiness. As Henry Fonda said of Ford, “Pappy was full of bullshit, but it was a delightful sort of bullshit.”
Last edited by matthewscott8 on January 11th, 2019, 7:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#1772

Post by peeptoad » January 11th, 2019, 3:52 pm

Le Dernier Combat (1983)
I've only seen about 30% of Besson's filmography, but this one is probably the best so far... at minimum it's the most unique.

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#1773

Post by Gershwin » January 11th, 2019, 4:44 pm

Ah, so I'm not the only one who's very sceptical about John Wayne? Good to know. :)
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#1774

Post by peeptoad » January 11th, 2019, 4:59 pm

Gershwin wrote:
January 11th, 2019, 4:44 pm
Ah, so I'm not the only one who's very sceptical about John Wayne? Good to know. :)
Nope, not the only one. :)

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#1775

Post by Armoreska » January 13th, 2019, 5:48 pm

I was surprised that Viridiana wasn't a weirdiana at all. Only moderately subversive, and not a far cry from Bun's earlier movies. Hoping for much more from Exterminador!
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currently working thru such film lists (besides TV): 2010s bests, RW Fassbinder, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Luis Bunuel, Yasujiro Ozu, Eric Rohmer, Visual Effects nominees, kid-related stuff, great animes (mini-serie or feature), very 80s movies, 17+ sci-fi lists on watchlist, ENVIRO, remarkable Silent Films and Pre-Code (exploring 1925 atm) and every shorts and docu list I'm aware of and
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1434
and "Gordon" Liu Chia-Hui/Liu Chia-Liang and Yuen Woo-ping and "Sammo" Hung Kam-bo

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#1776

Post by Ivan0716 » January 13th, 2019, 6:16 pm

Moderately subversive:
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#1777

Post by flaiky » January 14th, 2019, 12:39 am

Has anyone else seen Free Solo? Jesus, my palms were so sweaty with anxiety that by end of the film they were actually WRINKLY.

Thoroughly gripping stuff, though I very much agree with beasterne's ICM comment: "Great cinematography and fascinating story, but my god this man is out of his mind. I've got a bad feeling that 10 years from now watching this movie will be like watching Grizzly Man."
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#1778

Post by GruesomeTwosome » January 15th, 2019, 5:10 pm

flaiky wrote:
January 14th, 2019, 12:39 am
Has anyone else seen Free Solo? Jesus, my palms were so sweaty with anxiety that by end of the film they were actually WRINKLY.

Thoroughly gripping stuff, though I very much agree with beasterne's ICM comment: "Great cinematography and fascinating story, but my god this man is out of his mind. I've got a bad feeling that 10 years from now watching this movie will be like watching Grizzly Man."
I see that it's from the same people who directed/produced Meru (2015), which I liked a lot (have you seen that one, flaiky?). I'll have to check this out.
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#1779

Post by Coryn » January 15th, 2019, 5:53 pm

I have a hard time loving Kurosawa, I do see the importance of his film and the influence they had on cinema but I didn't watch a single movie until now that I would re-watch. Only watched his most famous though.
[*][*][*][*][*] Masterpiece
[*][*][*][*] Very good
[*][*][*] Good
[*][*] Okay
[*] Bad

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#1780

Post by Kublai Khan » January 15th, 2019, 9:40 pm

I watched "The Bleeding Edge", a documentary on Netflix about the medical device industry. It's pretty one-sided in that it follows an sympathizes with the victims, but that generally happens when the corporations don't feel that they will get fair coverage (aka good publicity). Still, it does expose some eye-opening policies about how the FDA streamlines approval with minimal research.

A little uneven focus (Essure gets the most attention), and a little too much emotional manipulation (the hispanic woman who loses her kids) makes this documentary marginally good.

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#1781

Post by blocho » January 16th, 2019, 1:30 am

The Commuter (2018)

I didn't realize from previews that the movie takes place on the Metro North's Hudson line, a train route I've traveled dozens of times over the years. The movie ends at Beacon station, which I was at just last week. There were some small absurdities like the train making local stops in Manhattan or going from Yankees Stadium to Dobbs Ferry in about two minutes. Of course, the whole thing was actually filmed in England, for some reason. And the movie studiously avoids using the name Metro North (would they have had to pay MTA or something?)

Anyway, I've said it before, but I don't mind saying it again: there's nothing as consistent as a Liam Neeson action movie. At this point, we've had Liam on a train, Liam on a plane, Liam versus wolves, Liam's daughter gets kidnapped, Liam's daughter gets kidnapped again, Liam's daughter doesn't get kidnapped but it's somehow related to all the other times she did, Liam (as a drunk) versus Ed Harris, and Liam (sober) versus some general New York lowlifes. What's next? I'd say Liam in a submarine, but we had K-19, although that admittedly was before his midlife reinvention as an action star. Liam in a prison? Liam in some sort of Running Man or Hunger Games or Death Race 2000 scenario? Liam in outer space? Whatever it is, I'll take it. I could keep watching these movies forever.

About that midlife reinvention--I've long thought that it was generally understood though unsaid that Neeson became an action star as a reaction to his wife's tragic death. He dealt with his pain by taking out his rage on an endless succession of cinematic bad guys. I want a journalistic deep dive into that transformation because I think it's (no joke) one of the most compelling actor reinventions I've ever seen. Instead, most of the press on Neeson is about his longtime (and weirdly strident) feelings about New York's horse carriage industry. Well, such are the mysteries of life.

I leave, as always, with the greatest work of cinema that Liam Neesons was not involved with:
http://www.cc.com/video-clips/xwnjlx/ke ... uncensored

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#1782

Post by funkybusiness » January 16th, 2019, 1:34 am

oooh man now I want Liam Neeson to star in a young adult action tetralogy. Not in the Donald Sutherland old bad guy role, but in the Jennifer Lawrence/Harry Potter role.

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#1783

Post by blocho » January 16th, 2019, 1:43 pm

So, does that mean that Liam is playing a teenager or that the hero of the young adult action series is a 65-year-old Irishman?

Some more ideas: Liam in a Mad Max wasteland, Liam in a skyscraper, Liam in a cage-fighting tournament, Liam in the jungle.

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#1784

Post by Armoreska » January 16th, 2019, 2:55 pm

Ivan0716 wrote:
January 13th, 2019, 6:16 pm
Moderately subversive:
Image
:shrug: Nice recreation? Doesn't mean much to me.
Image
currently working thru such film lists (besides TV): 2010s bests, RW Fassbinder, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Luis Bunuel, Yasujiro Ozu, Eric Rohmer, Visual Effects nominees, kid-related stuff, great animes (mini-serie or feature), very 80s movies, 17+ sci-fi lists on watchlist, ENVIRO, remarkable Silent Films and Pre-Code (exploring 1925 atm) and every shorts and docu list I'm aware of and
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1434
and "Gordon" Liu Chia-Hui/Liu Chia-Liang and Yuen Woo-ping and "Sammo" Hung Kam-bo

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#1785

Post by Onderhond » January 16th, 2019, 3:01 pm

Ivan0716 wrote:
January 13th, 2019, 6:16 pm
Moderately subversive:
Image
Table for 26!

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#1786

Post by funkybusiness » January 17th, 2019, 12:19 am

blocho wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 1:43 pm
So, does that mean that Liam is playing a teenager or that the hero of the young adult action series is a 65-year-old Irishman?

Some more ideas: Liam in a Mad Max wasteland, Liam in a skyscraper, Liam in a cage-fighting tournament, Liam in the jungle.
yes! to all of it! I want Action Liam for the next several decades. perhaps we can wait until he's 116 so he can be something of a teenager again.

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#1787

Post by Good_Will_Harding » Today, 3:21 am

Image

Glass (2019 - M Night Shyamalan)

Sooooooo yeah, that was a lot to take in.

Right off the top, I did like this one, albeit not really as much as Unbreakable or Split, though I would have no trouble recommending this to people who at least enjoyed those two, since anyone with at least a general familiarity with the previous films should find plenty to appreciate here. Of the three, it's certainly the most ambitious and probably the most accessible to wider audiences (apart from the conclusion, but that's a whole other discussion for another day) and while on the whole I felt this did a pretty good job of balancing the two different tones and subject matters of its predecessors, the result was admittedly a tad clunky at times. But I guess that comes with the territory when trying to deconstruct something as massive as the current superhero craze and attempting to scale it down considerably. On that front, I'd say this is one of the most vital and refreshing live action "superhero" films I've seen in quite some time, not least of all because it actually takes risks and has real consequences for its characters and story-line.
SpoilerShow
Trying to be as spoiler-free as I can, but this film actually goes places and takes chances that other contemporary comic book films either merely hint at or will obviously undo in future installments. I'm most curious to see how the crowd who Avengers: Infinity War "risky" and "subversive" will take to this one's conclusion.
Also, as I've mentioned around here before, I work at a mental health facility similar to the one portrayed in this film (the main center where the majority of this takes place was actually filmed in a real building that's just a thirty minute drive from where I work), and I saw this with two of my coworkers; so all three of us got a huge kick out of how poorly run the whole place was, and how everyone there would be pretty easily fired in no time at all. But hey, the needs of the plot outweigh the needs of the logic. We also saw this in IMAX for some reason (typically a neat experience but it rarely justifies the insane pricing - also I'm deaf now). While this is indeed a very nice looking, well shot film and color is used effectively on both an aesthetic and symbolic front, I can't honestly say this was deserving of the format. Perhaps the push for IMAX is part of the overall commentary on the current bloated state of blockbuster superhero fare, I dunno.

7-8/10. At the very least, this was more interesting and effective than a majority of the more awards-friendly offerings I've seen from the last couple of months. The same way that The Visit was a tongue-in-cheek but affectionate send-up of the found footage horror craze, this treads similar ground with the modern comic book superhero formulas, and regardless of its faults, I'm thankful that at least something is trying to take a more measured, thoughtful look at the whole phenomenon.

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#1788

Post by matthewscott8 » Today, 3:27 pm

I loved Unbreakable and found Split quite hard to bear due to the luridness of the content. I worry that Glass will be simply an endurance test! Regardless I am almost certain to go see it.

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