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#1601

Post by GruesomeTwosome » June 18th, 2018, 4:14 am

Just saw Hereditary, and I didn't find it to be up to the quality of the other highly praised, "highbrow horror" films of recent years like It Follows, The Babadook and The Witch. First hour and a half or so was quite good, but when it starts to get heavy into the supernatural stuff it kinda lost its way and was a bit goofy. Didn't find it too creepy either, I never got that feeling of constant, mounting dread like I did with, say, The Witch.
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#1602

Post by Good_Will_Harding » June 20th, 2018, 12:13 am

You didn't like the film as much as the rest of us? Off with his head! ;)

Nah, it's all good. I liked it a lot myself but definitely want to see it again soon before it gets booted out of theaters by the dinosaur hunting picture.

Here's some words I wrote for it, and if nothing else, I'm quite thankful that I can still be considered employable even when the opening lines of my latest piece are "Well, fuck." http://movieboozer.com/featured/heredit ... vie-review

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#1603

Post by Armoreska » June 20th, 2018, 8:58 pm

Antiporno got a 7 from me -finally another Sono I mostly enjoyed, following Jisatsu Circle (6ish)
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currently working thru such film lists (besides TV): 2010s bests, RW Fassbinder, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Luis Bunuel, Yasujiro Ozu, Eric Rohmer, Visual Effects nominees, kid-related stuff, great animes (mini-serie or feature), very 80s movies, 17+ sci-fi lists on watchlist, ENVIRO, remarkable Silent Films and Pre-Code (exploring 1925 atm) and every shorts and docu list I'm aware of and
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and "Gordon" Liu Chia-Hui/Liu Chia-Liang and Yuen Woo-ping and "Sammo" Hung Kam-bo

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#1604

Post by RedHawk10 » June 22nd, 2018, 8:48 am

^ I've still got to see that one, heard pretty much nothing but good things about it so far. Although I think Tokyo Tribe will be next for my Sono quest - it'll be my 10th film from him.

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#1605

Post by matthewscott8 » June 22nd, 2018, 5:55 pm

RedHawk10 on Jun 22 2018, 02:48:43 AM wrote:^ I've still got to see that one, heard pretty much nothing but good things about it so far. Although I think Tokyo Tribe will be next for my Sono quest - it'll be my 10th film from him.
Sono seems to be very versatile. I found Antiporno almost unwatchable. However The Whispering Star went straight into my top 10 movies of all time.

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#1606

Post by RedHawk10 » June 22nd, 2018, 9:34 pm

matthewscott8 on Jun 22 2018, 11:55:21 AM wrote:
RedHawk10 on Jun 22 2018, 02:48:43 AM wrote:^ I've still got to see that one, heard pretty much nothing but good things about it so far. Although I think Tokyo Tribe will be next for my Sono quest - it'll be my 10th film from him.
Sono seems to be very versatile. I found Antiporno almost unwatchable. However The Whispering Star went straight into my top 10 movies of all time.
Not seen The Whispering Star, but hearing that skyrockets my interest - you've got really interesting and unique taste in movies. Do you generally love Sono's work or is that film just a big outlier?
Last edited by RedHawk10 on June 22nd, 2018, 9:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#1607

Post by Good_Will_Harding » June 26th, 2018, 4:38 am

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Triassic Universe: Falling KingdUmb

Huh, well those were certainly some... choices....

In some ways, this is actually an improvement on the previous film - it's not simply a lazy, beat-for-beat retread of the original 1993 film, some interesting concepts and ideas are touched upon (albeit not remotely explored in any meaningful or creative fashion), and it's more visually inspired, with a number of creatively designed and nice looking images from time to time - but this is also worse in other ways, in that it continues some of the weaker elements from the first Jurassic World, i.e. the over-reliance on weightless, unconvincing CGI, the lame central bickering back and forth between Chris Pratt & Bryce Dallas Howard, cartoonish human villains, and the hamfisted "animal rights" allegory thrust upon the dinosaurs - which is pretty hokey and obvious to begin with, but becomes even more muddled when we spend half the runtime of the film meant to be scared of these creatures. Are we meant to feel empathy for them or see them as a terrifying threat that needs to be defeated? Ya' can't have it both ways!

All in all, it's about on par with the rest of the sequels from this franchise: a passable, competent two-plus hours of mindless entertainment with some individually impressive set-pieces (and a pretty rad villain theme for the spooky new dino du jour: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFD2LNxqgcY) that in no way comes close to matching the strengths of the original Jurassic Park whatsoever. I suppose of all the Jurassic sequels we've gotten, this one is by far the biggest "mixed bag" of the bunch, but I'd be lying if I said that didn't give me anything I felt was worthwhile. I just wish at least half of the effort put into the production design, effects, sound mixing, etc., went into the scripting and storytelling area:

Exec 1: "The Indoraptor is gonna look so badass silhouetted against the moon and then it's gonna do the doorknob thing with its big meaty claws, but to get into a little girl's bedroom to claw at her like Nosferatu and the music is gonna swell up and it's gonna look so fuggin RAD!"

Exec 2: "AW, sick! That's gonna look great, especially with the guy we got to direct. So who's the little girl and why is it after her?"

Exec 1:"...I'm sorry, what?"
Last edited by Good_Will_Harding on June 26th, 2018, 4:41 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#1608

Post by matthewscott8 » June 28th, 2018, 9:41 am

RedHawk10 on Jun 22 2018, 03:34:14 PM wrote:
matthewscott8 on Jun 22 2018, 11:55:21 AM wrote:
RedHawk10 on Jun 22 2018, 02:48:43 AM wrote:^ I've still got to see that one, heard pretty much nothing but good things about it so far. Although I think Tokyo Tribe will be next for my Sono quest - it'll be my 10th film from him.
Sono seems to be very versatile. I found Antiporno almost unwatchable. However The Whispering Star went straight into my top 10 movies of all time.
Not seen The Whispering Star, but hearing that skyrockets my interest - you've got really interesting and unique taste in movies. Do you generally love Sono's work or is that film just a big outlier?
Watching Sono's movies is a very up and down experience for me, Tokyo Tribe and Love Exposure are favourite movies of mine. But for every one of those I see one I hate, and Cold Fish I would possibly classify amongst the worst movies I have ever seen.

It's worth pointing out that The Whispering Star is slow, contemplative and compassionate, so Sono's tempo can definitely shift about.

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#1609

Post by blueboybob » July 4th, 2018, 5:09 pm

I dont knwo the thread for this so please forgive me.

I just watched "Death of a Cyclist" -- https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048394/
The premise is a couple who are in an affair hit a cyclist and kill him. They don't report it because they don't want their affair to be found out.

I swear there was an American remake (maybe an episode of a tv show?) but I can't find it by googling. Anyone know the AMERICAN version I am talking about?

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#1610

Post by brokenface » July 4th, 2018, 11:46 pm

blueboybob on Jul 4 2018, 11:09:28 AM wrote:I dont knwo the thread for this so please forgive me.

I just watched "Death of a Cyclist" -- https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048394/
The premise is a couple who are in an affair hit a cyclist and kill him. They don't report it because they don't want their affair to be found out.

I swear there was an American remake (maybe an episode of a tv show?) but I can't find it by googling. Anyone know the AMERICAN version I am talking about?
There was a Black Mirror with a hit and run of a cyclist?

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#1611

Post by RBG » July 6th, 2018, 4:07 am

3 billboards outside bumfuck trumpistan. a few decent actors lost in a horrible film
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#1612

Post by RedHawk10 » July 6th, 2018, 4:30 am

RBG on Jul 5 2018, 10:07:56 PM wrote:3 billboards outside bumfuck trumpistan. a few decent actors lost in a horrible film
Yeah, I did love one part though - the scene where Dixon attacks Red was a very well executed and moving portrayal of unhealthy, explosive grief. It's too bad pretty much everything else in the film had my eyes rolling.

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#1613

Post by outdoorcats » July 9th, 2018, 1:17 am

Eight Hours Don't Make a Day by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, a restored print I saw in theaters. It was preceded by the Janus Films logo so it seems this will be a soon-to-be-announced Criterion title. At just under eight hours long, it is the longest film I've seen in one day, a little longer than previous record-holder Satantango (it was originally a miniseries broadcast on German television).

It is a spectacular film. Not for everyone. I can see many rolling their eyes at the politically didactic nature of many of the scenes, particularly the ones focusing on the factory laborers and their disputes with management. They wouldn't necessarily be wrong; at times, the character speak like they are reading manifestos to the audience. The force of the film's idealism, some of the most indelibly drawn characters in film history (Grandma and Gregor in particular), and Fassbinder's deftness with working-class melodrama, still carry this one to all-time greatness. If Dziga-Vertov-group-era Godard had been asked to creatively consult on a German remake of All in the Family, you might get something like this.

It's honestly a true discovery and one of the most passionately made films I've seen in some time, warts and all (parts of the film run longer than they should, and the characters' solution to freeing one woman from an abusive marriage is naive at best). You get the sense Fassbinder tried to pack all of the wisdom he had acquired so far in life (he was less than 30 when he made it) into this miniseries. That's a lot more than you can get out of watching 4-5 average films.

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#1614

Post by OldAle1 » July 9th, 2018, 1:53 pm

outdoorcats wrote:
July 9th, 2018, 1:17 am
Eight Hours Don't Make a Day by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, a restored print I saw in theaters. It was preceded by the Janus Films logo so it seems this will be a soon-to-be-announced Criterion title. At just under eight hours long, it is the longest film I've seen in one day, a little longer than previous record-holder Satantango (it was originally a miniseries broadcast on German television).

It is a spectacular film. Not for everyone. I can see many rolling their eyes at the politically didactic nature of many of the scenes, particularly the ones focusing on the factory laborers and their disputes with management. They wouldn't necessarily be wrong; at times, the character speak like they are reading manifestos to the audience. The force of the film's idealism, some of the most indelibly drawn characters in film history (Grandma and Gregor in particular), and Fassbinder's deftness with working-class melodrama, still carry this one to all-time greatness. If Dziga-Vertov-group-era Godard had been asked to creatively consult on a German remake of All in the Family, you might get something like this.

It's honestly a true discovery and one of the most passionately made films I've seen in some time, warts and all (parts of the film run longer than they should, and the characters' solution to freeing one woman from an abusive marriage is naive at best). You get the sense Fassbinder tried to pack all of the wisdom he had acquired so far in life (he was less than 30 when he made it) into this miniseries. That's a lot more than you can get out of watching 4-5 average films.
Sounds great, just up my alley. Funny, I've been thinking about Fassbinder for a few days, and trying to figure out whether I want to start going through his whole huge filmography soon - I've been pretty bad about sticking to a project but I think it's time to do a big director retrospective and RWF is one of the likely choices. This definitely increases my interest, though I might want to wait to see if that does in fact show up on Criterion. I've got almost everything else at this point.

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#1615

Post by flaiky » July 9th, 2018, 10:59 pm

I love RWF but have never heard of this one. Sounds great (and I see it stars one of the main actors from Berlin Alexanderplatz, plus Hanna Schygulla (l)) Something for the Christmas list.
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#1616

Post by funkybusiness » July 9th, 2018, 11:09 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
July 9th, 2018, 1:53 pm
outdoorcats wrote:
July 9th, 2018, 1:17 am
Eight Hours Don't Make a Day by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, a restored print I saw in theaters. It was preceded by the Janus Films logo so it seems this will be a soon-to-be-announced Criterion title. At just under eight hours long, it is the longest film I've seen in one day, a little longer than previous record-holder Satantango (it was originally a miniseries broadcast on German television).

It is a spectacular film. Not for everyone. I can see many rolling their eyes at the politically didactic nature of many of the scenes, particularly the ones focusing on the factory laborers and their disputes with management. They wouldn't necessarily be wrong; at times, the character speak like they are reading manifestos to the audience. The force of the film's idealism, some of the most indelibly drawn characters in film history (Grandma and Gregor in particular), and Fassbinder's deftness with working-class melodrama, still carry this one to all-time greatness. If Dziga-Vertov-group-era Godard had been asked to creatively consult on a German remake of All in the Family, you might get something like this.

It's honestly a true discovery and one of the most passionately made films I've seen in some time, warts and all (parts of the film run longer than they should, and the characters' solution to freeing one woman from an abusive marriage is naive at best). You get the sense Fassbinder tried to pack all of the wisdom he had acquired so far in life (he was less than 30 when he made it) into this miniseries. That's a lot more than you can get out of watching 4-5 average films.
Sounds great, just up my alley. Funny, I've been thinking about Fassbinder for a few days, and trying to figure out whether I want to start going through his whole huge filmography soon - I've been pretty bad about sticking to a project but I think it's time to do a big director retrospective and RWF is one of the likely choices. This definitely increases my interest, though I might want to wait to see if that does in fact show up on Criterion. I've got almost everything else at this point.
I know it's early but I would be down for a retrospective of Fassbinder for September (german challenge) if you (or any one else) is interested. We used to do director filmography challenges all the time (although those were for a number of directors at a time and not completely analogous to what I'm suggesting here but), we could probably set up a thread for discussion.

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#1617

Post by OldAle1 » July 9th, 2018, 11:27 pm

A possibility, but I can't guarantee anything at this point. I had been leaning towards re-watching all of Lang''s silent films that month but it seems too far away at the moment to say.

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#1618

Post by funkybusiness » July 9th, 2018, 11:31 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
July 9th, 2018, 11:27 pm
A possibility, but I can't guarantee anything at this point. I had been leaning towards re-watching all of Lang''s silent films that month but it seems too far away at the moment to say.
Sure, lemme know as we get closer to September.

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#1619

Post by outdoorcats » July 9th, 2018, 11:50 pm

I'd definitely recommend Eight Hours Don't Make a Day to both OldAle1 and flaiky. I'll add that I don't think there's any need to watch it all at once as I saw it; it was presented in its original 5 episode format so could easily be broken up over a week or so - unlike, say, Satantango, which pretty much needs to be watched all at once to get the intended experience.

I doubt I'd be a major contributor to the possible upcoming RWF quest, but if such a quest came about I'd probably watch 2-3 films in addition to the ones I've seen.

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#1620

Post by mightysparks » July 10th, 2018, 8:46 am

I was really surprised by how good A Quiet Place was. When I first heard about it, the plot immediately interested me, but I assumed it would end up being something really generic where they'd loudly whisper to each other the whole time, and be as lacking in tension as Don't Breathe, so I just forgot about it. But nope, it stuck to its guns and kept faithful to the idea of 'sound' the whole way, building great tension and not wasting time with explanations. The last 30 minutes started to lose me, just becoming too contrived and the previously smart characters suddenly became dumb horror movie characters, and some cheap jump scares.
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Why does the dad always have to die? Ugh. Also the pregnancy thing, I thought wow they are stupid for getting pregnant and how the hell did they have quiet enough sex that the monster didn't hear? Maybe in the water, I guess. I thought they were dumb for not aborting it but imagined the birth coming and them immediately having to kill the baby to stop it from screaming. I was disappointed it didn't go that way, and the opening scene seemed to promise something more dark, so I was also annoyed that it played it safe at the end.

Also I thought, how had nobody come up with the frequency thing earlier? They had enough time to print newspapers and stuff, and they knew it had great hearing, so it seemed pretty clear its weakness would be something loud.
But even though it gets a bit dumb at the end, it's a really great atmospheric, tension-ridden horror film that really makes use of silence and sound in an interesting way.
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#1621

Post by OldAle1 » July 14th, 2018, 5:19 pm

So I went to Incredibles 2 the other day and was...pretty underwhelmed, in the final analysis. I should mention that I only saw the original film once, when it came out, and while I remember liking it I don't remember a lot of details, and I haven't really thought too much about giving it another viewing, though I might now. And that was the first Brad Bird film I saw - I only caught up to The Iron Giant last year which is easily my favorite. And that's an instructive film to compare - perhaps the first film in this now-series is as well but again, don't remember it enough - because it really shows the director's obsession with, even fetishization perhaps, of the period when he was a little kid. He was born in 1957, and while The Iron Giant takes place quite specifically in that time period (I think it's '57 but don't quote me), this new film is merely full of references, technology, design, but doesn't take place in any specific period. And while I love the look of the piece, by the second half I was starting to wonder if it had any point - just as the villain of the film doesn't seem to have any reason for existing and being villainous other than in the most typical, rudimentary, supervillain way. "I hate supers because I blame them for xxx", that's it. Sigh. How tiresome. And what's disappointing about this is that in the first half of the film it really looked like there was going to be some attempt at getting into the nuts and bolts of "the superhero problem" - what to do with these uncontrollable mutants? It really seemed like Bird was heading toward the kind of political complexity to match the complexity of superhero daily life, which he does a much better job with, Mr. Incredible having a hell of a time dealing with being a house-husband while Elasti-Girl gets the glory. #MeToo of course, but that too doesn't' go as far as it could in the second half.

It's really too bad. There are some really nice sequences, I love the theme songs at the end, the overall design, and there was a moment in the middle, where E-G is going after who she thinks is the real bad guy when it gets into a sort of cartoon-noir look that I just loved. I'd really love to see Bird make a different kind of film - probably not animated and perhaps not even fantastic - that dealt with that period in American history that he so loves, the end of noir and Eisenhower and the 50s, the beginning of spy movies and Camelot, mid-century modern giving way to the Swinging 60s, pastels, etc. His concept of "Mad Men" on the big screen, perhaps, or something akin to Joe Dante's Matinee. Here it's all pretty cool and smooth, but it just doesn't add up to anything beyond shallow entertainment - and it certainly seemed to promise more than that for a while. Sigh.

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#1622

Post by outdoorcats » July 14th, 2018, 6:36 pm

I haven't seen Incredibles 2, but did you ever see Zootopia? Interesting noir influence on that one.

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#1623

Post by OldAle1 » July 14th, 2018, 8:27 pm

Zootopia is probably my favorite American animated film of this decade so far and yeah, lots of noir elements there - and a much better, more consistent political/social tone that is superbly integrated with the narrative and the more kid-friendly elements. I think this one was trying for that but it just didn't gel IMO.

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#1624

Post by RedHawk10 » July 14th, 2018, 11:13 pm

I rewatched The Forbidden Room.

yeahhhhh I'm going to go ahead and say this is my favorite movie of the current decade

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#1625

Post by outdoorcats » July 15th, 2018, 1:50 am

I'm not even the biggest Guy Maddin fan (I like him, I guess?) but it's pretty great. But I'm a sucker for any film with the Saragossa Manuscript "stories within stories within stories" template.

If you like it then I'd recommend Peter Tscherkassky's short The Exquisite Corpus. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yx9llnX1bjY) NSFW It has a similar sort of vibe to it in my opinion, though I can't exactly put into words what that vibe is.

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#1626

Post by RedHawk10 » July 15th, 2018, 2:10 am

outdoorcats wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 1:50 am
I'm not even the biggest Guy Maddin fan (I like him, I guess?) but it's pretty great. But I'm a sucker for any film with the Saragossa Manuscript "stories within stories within stories" template.

If you like it then I'd recommend Peter Tscherkassky's short The Exquisite Corpus. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yx9llnX1bjY) NSFW It has a similar sort of vibe to it in my opinion, though I can't exactly put into words what that vibe is.
Thanks for the recommendation!

Yeah, one of my other favorites from this decade is kind of similar in that regard - Mysteries of Lisbon.

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#1627

Post by outdoorcats » July 15th, 2018, 2:35 am

Mysteries of Lisbon is nothing to shrug at. Amazing film.

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#1628

Post by cinewest » July 15th, 2018, 3:49 am

RedHawk10 wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 2:10 am
outdoorcats wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 1:50 am
I'm not even the biggest Guy Maddin fan (I like him, I guess?) but it's pretty great. But I'm a sucker for any film with the Saragossa Manuscript "stories within stories within stories" template.

If you like it then I'd recommend Peter Tscherkassky's short The Exquisite Corpus. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yx9llnX1bjY) NSFW It has a similar sort of vibe to it in my opinion, though I can't exactly put into words what that vibe is.
Thanks for the recommendation!

Yeah, one of my other favorites from this decade is kind of similar in that regard - Mysteries of Lisbon.
What about Madin's Keyhole, or Ruiz's Night Across The Street? Other vastly underrated films that involve elliptic narratives, and stories within stories, as well as rumination on the construction of narrative are Sex & Lucia, and Before The Rain.

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#1629

Post by RedHawk10 » July 15th, 2018, 4:15 am

I plan to see both! The other two you mentioned I haven't heard of but will check out.

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#1630

Post by cinewest » July 15th, 2018, 5:41 am

Sex & Lucia and Before The Rain are not as experimental, but both create interesting narrative structures and are two of my favorite films from the mid 90's to early 00's.

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#1631

Post by Gershwin » July 16th, 2018, 11:00 am

cinewest wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 5:41 am
Sex & Lucia and Before The Rain are not as experimental, but both create interesting narrative structures and are two of my favorite films from the mid 90's to early 00's.
Sounds like I should see Before the Rain. I love Sex & Lucia.
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Though the latter to a somewhat lesser extent than the former.
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#1632

Post by cinewest » July 16th, 2018, 4:10 pm

Gershwin wrote:
July 16th, 2018, 11:00 am
cinewest wrote:
July 15th, 2018, 5:41 am
Sex & Lucia and Before The Rain are not as experimental, but both create interesting narrative structures and are two of my favorite films from the mid 90's to early 00's.
Sounds like I should see Before the Rain. I love Sex & Lucia.
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Though the latter to a somewhat lesser extent than the former.
We seem to have similar taste in movies, at least more crossover film likes than usual.

That said, Before the Rain is very different subject wise than Sex & Lucia (it's about the kinds of religious conflicts that seem to bring out the worst in humanity)

Another very inventive film that is made up of stories and explores narrative is my favorite of the past decade: Holy Motors

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#1633

Post by joachimt » July 23rd, 2018, 7:39 pm

Just watched my first Johnnie To movie and I must say I wasn't impressed by it at all. Some forum members recommended me The Mission to start with. I did appreciate the filming style, but the story was completely uninteresting. I didn't get more out of it than some bodyguards and some others shooting at each other throughout the whole movie. Add some terrible music and it was almost a dislike for me. 5/10
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#1634

Post by Ivan0716 » July 24th, 2018, 12:43 pm

joachimt wrote:
July 23rd, 2018, 7:39 pm
Just watched my first Johnnie To movie and I must say I wasn't impressed by it at all. Some forum members recommended me The Mission to start with. I did appreciate the filming style, but the story was completely uninteresting. I didn't get more out of it than some bodyguards and some others shooting at each other throughout the whole movie. Add some terrible music and it was almost a dislike for me. 5/10
I would have recommended Exiled or even PTU as a starting point, The Mission just hasn’t aged very well, I think a lot people (me included) overrate it a bit because it was somewhat of a milestone in his filmography. Mind you though, To has never been much of a story teller, his best films are all about the meticulous set-pieces and the distinctive style which is clearly influenced by spaghetti westerns and Melville’s crime thrillers.

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#1635

Post by RedHawk10 » July 25th, 2018, 11:44 pm

I am really surprised at how solid A Nightmare on Elm Street 2 is on a second viewing. While I would still agree with my younger self that the first and third film are stronger, this one actually kind of works if you look at it from the perspective of Krueger serving as a demonic amalgam of the confused and scared feelings that result from repressing your sexuality from society and (most significantly) yourself. It's weighed down by the typical stretches of bad writing found in most every '80s slasher out there, but still...it's not bad. Not bad at all.

I've always had a bit of a soft spot for these movies, as Freddy reminds me of an imaginary figure I used to have recurring nightmares about as a little kid. They hold up though - or the first three do anyway, which are a pretty damn solid trio of horror flicks.

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#1636

Post by maxwelldeux » July 26th, 2018, 5:35 am

Last night, in a rather non-sober state, I watched Vaxxed: From Cover-Up to Catastrophe. My brain at the time thought it might be fun to watch something so abundantly stupid and wrong that it might be amusing.

I was wrong.

It wasn't fun because the documentary was actually reasonably well made, making a lot of sense and telling a story. It made some pretty persuasive arguments and had enough data in there to make it seem scientific. Couple that with some impressive job titles, and you end up with a disturbingly convincing film.

Except it's not. It's a really fucking dangerous film.

The arguments there are based heavily in appeals to authority (e.g., degrees and job titles) and statistics without enough detail, with the underlying assumption of a deep conspiracy. The appeals to authority (a classic logical fallacy) are persuasive, unless you know anything about higher education and how borderline morons can still make their way through a PhD program. The statistics are mind-boggling, until you pose the fundamental questions they aren't answering, or until you realize the statistical trickery you can use to make tiny effects seem huge. The conspiracy is fun, but it ultimately fails the "how many people had to know?" test.

Honestly, the initial premise that started this whole thing is entirely reasonable, and something I could even support. Basically, MMR is 3 vaccines in 1 - but there might be an increased risk in autism delivering that way, vs. delivering the three vaccines individually. Fine - let's test that. But it went WAY too far, calling for stupid things (e.g., testing whether vaccines are safe, with the overtly implied assumption that autism is WAY worse than death, becoming crippled, etc.).

But on the plus side, the lone comment on this film on ICM is fucking hilarious, so go upvote that.

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#1637

Post by 1859 » July 27th, 2018, 2:45 am

maxwelldeux wrote:
July 26th, 2018, 5:35 am
But on the plus side, the lone comment on this film on ICM is fucking hilarious, so go upvote that.
I did, it's worth it.

I'm proud to say i never watched any antivaxxer nor flat earthers video so far, btw.

I just finished Weekend (2010) and i think it was just beautiful :wub:

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#1638

Post by RedHawk10 » July 28th, 2018, 10:20 pm

Keyhole (2011, Maddin) - 9/10

Maddin continues to hugely impress me. One of his better films and a new favorite for me as well.

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#1639

Post by matthewscott8 » July 30th, 2018, 1:04 pm

outdoorcats wrote:
July 9th, 2018, 1:17 am
Eight Hours Don't Make a Day by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, a restored print I saw in theaters. It was preceded by the Janus Films logo so it seems this will be a soon-to-be-announced Criterion title. At just under eight hours long, it is the longest film I've seen in one day, a little longer than previous record-holder Satantango (it was originally a miniseries broadcast on German television).

It is a spectacular film. Not for everyone. I can see many rolling their eyes at the politically didactic nature of many of the scenes, particularly the ones focusing on the factory laborers and their disputes with management. They wouldn't necessarily be wrong; at times, the character speak like they are reading manifestos to the audience. The force of the film's idealism, some of the most indelibly drawn characters in film history (Grandma and Gregor in particular), and Fassbinder's deftness with working-class melodrama, still carry this one to all-time greatness. If Dziga-Vertov-group-era Godard had been asked to creatively consult on a German remake of All in the Family, you might get something like this.

It's honestly a true discovery and one of the most passionately made films I've seen in some time, warts and all (parts of the film run longer than they should, and the characters' solution to freeing one woman from an abusive marriage is naive at best). You get the sense Fassbinder tried to pack all of the wisdom he had acquired so far in life (he was less than 30 when he made it) into this miniseries. That's a lot more than you can get out of watching 4-5 average films.
I watched this on the weekend, all 8 hours in a single day at my local cinema. Arrow films have already put this out on Blu-ray FYI, very pristine Blu-ray. I think the filmmakers tried exceptionally hard to stop the film being dogmatic, there are no quotes from Marx, Fanon, Marcuse etc. They don't talk in isms at all. I think a lot of the things the workers in the film are trying to achieve are sensible, and largely actually have been achieved now in Western Europe. Also fwiw the casual public violence to women and children is now a thing of the past in Western Europe, or at least heavily diminished.

Filmmakers usually don't understand industry/factories/offices, mostly they have had no contact with them (Roger Corman is actually one of the few who has a clue), despite this there is relatively little naivete from Fassbinder. The main example that you could chalk up to naivete was the bit where the machinists request to self-organise. The management then set a realistic target and then the workers get paid half the excess savings in man hours if they meet it. There is absolutely no reason at all why the management would set the target realistically, it would definitely be set as a stretch target. Also the guy in the white coat, Volkmar Gross, he would have been fired as part of this, he would have been the one doing all the planning, and if the crews themselves can do this there is no point in him being there.

The main point the movie is trying to get across is the idea, enunciated by Hannah Schygulla's character Marion, to quote from memory, "I can't quite get rid of the idea that when we are working, we are only partially working for ourselves". That is perfectly true, and doesn't of necessity lead to revolution, but it could lead to people negotiating a better share of the Marxist "Mehrwert", or surplus value. So I think you could say this is kind of watered down Marxism, it's saying get educated, it's saying understand what's happening to the surplus value you create, and organise together, but it's not saying, hand over the means of production to the workers, or put everyone who doesn't agree with you in front of a firing squad. In fact the main word I would use to describe the movie is "sweet". One of the, I would say, intentional ironies of this piece is that Marion (as the person who angelically delivers this summation of the machinists experiences) appears to spend most of her time at work idling, chatting, even lolling about, a worker can definitely exploit a corporation as well as being exploited!!! Fassbinder makes this very explicit when a customer politely complains about having waited at the counter for half an hour to talk to Marion and Irmgard.

Also in an anti-Marxist way there is explicit criticism of the idea of relying on the state, and I would say that it's not just that you can't rely on the corrupt capitalist state, it's a film about human relations, and emphasises that there is a distance between the state and the individual which destroys compassion. There's a strong theme of libertarianism in the movie essentially.

Watching 8 hours of it was definitely not an ordeal, the movie really involves you, and is big-hearted. I will write up a big review of it at some point this week, and think of a thread to post it in. Re: Godard, I think he's way too much of a snob to have made something like 8 hours don't make a day.

I definitely agree that the film is in the "all time greatness" category and was a little astonished that I've only just found out about it.

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#1640

Post by matthewscott8 » July 30th, 2018, 1:09 pm

Also fyi Criterion announced the release of 8 Hours Don't Make A Day a week after your post. https://www.criterion.com/films/29400-e ... make-a-day

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