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Onderhond
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#2361

Post by Onderhond »

Not really the last one, but a film that might be interesting for people who liked Cronenberg's Possessor: Come True. I had some very personal issues with it that prevented it from becoming a personal fav, but stylish visuals, a super atmospheric synth-based soundtrack, some nice little mindfuck touches and slow but deliberate pacing make this a film worth chasing.
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#2362

Post by kongs_speech »

I'm watching The Trial of Chicago 7. This is so god damn boring.
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#2363

Post by Ebbywebby »

https://vimeo.com/89855433

It's ridiculous that I'm only the second to check this. This is wonderful. And just 3.5 minutes long.
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#2364

Post by joachimt »

kongs_speech wrote: April 11th, 2021, 10:14 pm I'm watching The Trial of Chicago 7. This is so god damn boring.
Watched it recently. Really enjoyed it. ;)
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#2365

Post by Tim2460 »

Ebbywebby wrote: April 11th, 2021, 11:13 pm https://vimeo.com/89855433

It's ridiculous that I'm only the second to check this. This is wonderful. And just 3.5 minutes long.
Thx Ebby :cheers:
That was ... intense :poshclap:
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#2366

Post by Pretentious Hipster »

The Grand Bizarre is an abstract film that almost rivals one of the best entries of the genre. Haven't completely figured out the narrative of it yet, but it begins to show quilts in a more abstract sense, and then shows scenes of them being created, and there's always the theme of travel (the train shots with the quilt changing each frame was mindblowing). I assume the theme would be about how materials connects with all of us? Either way it's fantastic.
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#2367

Post by kongs_speech »

I'm blown away by Da 5 Bloods. That's on par with Apocalypse Now and The Deer Hunter. It's astonishing. The Academy fucked up.
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#2368

Post by peeptoad »

Bacurau. Booyah, this was good.
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#2369

Post by OldAle1 »

I watched Mulan (1998) last night; seems like every year I watch one of the unseen Disney "animated classics" for the animation challenge - because one is all I can stomach. I LOVE the first five Disney films, at least like everything else up through the early 60s, and have mixed feelings about the stuff from Jungle Book on to the late 80s. Then came The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast, both of which I liked initially and like even more now - and which I have to credit with getting me at least a little more interested in animation back when they came out. But everything in the "renaissance" era apart from those two has... pretty much sucked IMO. This is the last of the traditionally-animated ones from the 90s that I had left to see and while there were some moments here and there that were ok, and the animation was as always fairly impressive (if you like Disney that is - I increasingly feel that most of their films from any given era look pretty similar, and this is more noticeable and more problematic as we get closer to the present), but all in all I continue to get more irritated with their cultural mishmashes and the use of very modern comic relief (in this case Eddie Murphy in particular) and dialogue in general, which serve to take me right out of any story or setting (in this case medieval China) that isn't the present. What makes most of the films up through Beauty work much better IMO is that they tend to be either fairy tales or children's fantasies, or modern-set stories, and they always feel more tonally consistent, and less like they're pandering very specifically to a certain age bracket in the here-and-now; a lot of these later films have jokes and attitudes that will be incomprehensible to future generations, which is not the case for something like Bambi or even a lesser 60s film like 101 Dalmatians. And the need to have half a dozen songs in every one of the films even when totally inappropriate, and to turn tragic or more complex stories into happy kiddie fodder.

I now really understand what a coworker of mine meant back in 1988 when he used the word "bambified" about modern American animated films (and Spielberg et al). This seems to be one of the better-regarded Disney films of it's era too, which kind of mystifies me. Then again all of those films are beloved and most of them were instantly beloved; do people just lose all critical faculties when they see the magic castle and Tinkerbell at the beginning of a film, or is this just one of those areas where I'm a grouch, and can't put myself in a 6-year-old's shoes?
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#2370

Post by outdoorcats »

peeptoad wrote: April 14th, 2021, 12:21 pm Bacurau. Booyah, this was good.
So good.

@kong - It wasn't amazing. Aaron Sorkin either needs to actually develop some kind of style as a director or just let someone else direct his scripts. He shoots everything like it's an episode of The West Wing. But for those completely unfamiliar with the trial, it's not a horrible basic history lesson (albeit a Hollywoodized one that conflates events, dates and characters for dramatic effect). For those wanting a more historically accurate deep dive into the trial, there's an audiobook of the trial transcripts with a full voice cast including J.K. Simmons, Jeff Daniels, John Hawkes and Corey Stoll.

@OldAle - I haven't seen any Disney films in many years, though I have fond memories of Mulan. It perhaps doesn't have the artistry or grace of classic period Disney, but I'd argue it's more likely to hold a young kid's attention than something like Bambi. I had a copy of Bambi as a kid and remember not being able to pay attention to it. To this day I only remember "that" scene and couldn't tell you what it's about or anything else about it.

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#2371

Post by kongs_speech »

peeptoad wrote: April 14th, 2021, 12:21 pm Bacurau. Booyah, this was good.
Glad you finally got to see it and dug it! :cheers:
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#2372

Post by Onderhond »

At a loss for words, so I'll just share the trailer.

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#2373

Post by peeptoad »

outdoorcats wrote: April 14th, 2021, 6:36 pm
peeptoad wrote: April 14th, 2021, 12:21 pm Bacurau. Booyah, this was good.
So good.
It really was. Fantastic. And I'm glad I went in knowing next to nothing about it (as per my usual).
kongs_speech wrote: April 14th, 2021, 7:49 pm
peeptoad wrote: April 14th, 2021, 12:21 pm Bacurau. Booyah, this was good.
Glad you finally got to see it and dug it! :cheers:
My library managed to get one copy in circulation. Now I have to buy it since I loved it so much... don't mess with Bacurau!!!
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#2374

Post by Onderhond »

Though I rarely care about plot (holes), I was watching The Invisible Man (1933) this morning and was completely baffled by the train incident. So much in fact that I think I might be missing something. For the people who haven't see it yet, I'll describe the scene in spoilers, but does anyone know what the hell was going on there?
Spoiler
So the invisible man want to kill a bunch of people on a train, enters a cabin and activates a track switch ... but why is that thing on the side of a mountain? The train plummets to its demise, but who would install a track switch there? What function does it have? Anyone? It seems too random to be an actual plot hole, so maybe it's some history thing I'm missing?
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#2375

Post by blocho »

I watched The Blind Side (2009) last night, which is OK for a sports movie because most sports movies are terrible. Although it's not really a sports movie -- it's really more of a coming-of-age story and family drama. But by any non-sports standard, it's bad, certainly far worse than the Michael Lewis book it's based on. Anyway, what I really want to share is the following image which appears for only one second during a sequence about the protagonist's academic struggles:

Image

Yikes! Waterloo wasn't in Germany! Forget for a second that a high school history test in the US would never have such detailed questions about the Hundred Days. I'm really wondering whether this is merely poor prop design or a very subtle dig at the history teacher, who is not portrayed as a sympathetic character (in which case it's excellent prop design, though I think very, very few viewers would notice).
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#2376

Post by DareDaniel »



My new love in japanese cinema. :wub:
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#2377

Post by Onderhond »

Haha, that one has been getting some serious flack (a man directing lesbian scenes!). Super excited to see a Hiroki film appearing on Netflix though. Haven't seen it yet (runtime's a bit long for casual viewing), but I'll get around to it in the near future.
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#2378

Post by St. Gloede »

Babardeala cu bucluc sau porno balamuc / Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn (2021, Radu Jude)

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Radical in both form and content, Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn opens with literal porn - or rather, a graphic sex tape, which will set the form for everything that follows. The real question is however far more scathing: What is indecent - this tape, or society itself?

The film is constructed in 3 clear acts, each presented with bright pink title cards and mischievous music.

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But do not be fooled.

While BLB certainly qualifies as a dark comedy, its jokes come with punches to the gut, genuine distress and existential claustrophobia as the seams of modern society is deconstructed in all its vileness. Frankly, it does not even need to be lampooned - simply showing real footage - such as a congregation singing fascist songs, is all it takes - though mixing this footage with that of genitalia, Mussolini calendars (how many do you need for a single year) ...

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... and other grossly subversive elements - such as presenting us with a nativity scene - along with the trivia that during 1943 Romanian troops executed thousands of Jews and Roma in great haste so that the soldiers could go back to celebrating the birth of Christ. Though - lampooned it is, all the same.

There is a clear human angle - as Emi - a respected teacher - risks losing her job after her sex tape is discovered - but really, the Romania that exists around her feels like a much clearer "protagonist" - almost like the landscapes in Aguirre - and this is almost all act 1 is. Emi, usually alone on the streets - surrounded by ads and decay. We can feel Bucharest, and it's people - the busy streets, the rudeness and lack of empathy. In a way, Bad Luck Banging or Loony porn can feel like a gleeful trick to lure unexpected viewers into a stern, off-putting history lesson and societal critique. Its austere look at streets during Covid, with minimal dialogue, as we simultaneously feel Emi's dread for the upcoming parents meeting - and the dread of the busy Bucharest is already alienating to many, and then: act 2: which can only be described as an associative essay. The text says Christmas - the content says genocide.

"Oh, the land of the free where I can beat anyone I want"

This section is compiled of anecdotes, dictionary entries, statistics, archival footage, genitalia, fascism, military oppression, sarcasm, brutality - each little entry with its own label - and each filling in a piece of Romanian history and present.

And then: act 3 - the climax - as the mock-trial commences - as lude and disgusting as you could expect - or frankly, more so - with prejudices being laid bare, and the crime of having had a sex tape leaked being equalled to teaching the Jewish/Mossad propaganda known as the holocaust. It is a ludicrous socially distanced farce - all in mask - that brings back associations from the essay - while bringing uncomfortable overtones and personal clashes to an extreme intensity - all through dialogue.

I am unsure of the degree of mainstream success a work of this form and content can achieve - though it is perhaps less austere than Uppercase Print (2020), and closer to I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians (2018) - which was far more effective in bringing modern Romania to face its Fascist past - however - Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn is certainly the most "present" film Jude has made in years - and its issues - and landscape - focused squarely on the present - including the backdrop of Covid-2019 - where his films from Aferim! have been mainly concerned with history and how it relates to the present - with stark echos - his latest film is perhaps more so about the present and how it is a product of its past - while also centring in on current reality and prejudices on their own - and laying them bare.

While not his greatest work to date, the Golden Bear win does make it his most acclaimed, and his return to the present is anything but a step back. Rude continues to show that he is one of the most exciting and daring directors working today - and his added International success will hopefully mean a greater number of film buffs will explore his extraordinary back-catalogue.

9/10
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#2379

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

blocho wrote: April 17th, 2021, 4:22 am I watched The Blind Side (2009) last night, which is OK for a sports movie because most sports movies are terrible. Although it's not really a sports movie -- it's really more of a coming-of-age story and family drama. But by any non-sports standard, it's bad, certainly far worse than the Michael Lewis book it's based on. Anyway, what I really want to share is the following image which appears for only one second during a sequence about the protagonist's academic struggles:

Image

Yikes! Waterloo wasn't in Germany! Forget for a second that a high school history test in the US would never have such detailed questions about the Hundred Days. I'm really wondering whether this is merely poor prop design or a very subtle dig at the history teacher, who is not portrayed as a sympathetic character (in which case it's excellent prop design, though I think very, very few viewers would notice).
Indeed, all choices are wrong. Everybody knows Waterloo is in Sweden, why else would ABBA make a song about it? :rolleyes:
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#2380

Post by blocho »

Lonewolf2003 wrote: April 19th, 2021, 5:03 pm Indeed, all choices are wrong. Everybody knows Waterloo is in Sweden, why else would ABBA make a song about it? :rolleyes:
I'd never heard that song before. And you know what, it's pretty good. I'm guessing it's pretty rare for big pop bands to do songs about 19th century battles.
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#2381

Post by OldAle1 »

blocho wrote: April 20th, 2021, 4:44 am
Lonewolf2003 wrote: April 19th, 2021, 5:03 pm Indeed, all choices are wrong. Everybody knows Waterloo is in Sweden, why else would ABBA make a song about it? :rolleyes:
I'd never heard that song before. And you know what, it's pretty good. I'm guessing it's pretty rare for big pop bands to do songs about 19th century battles.
Probably not all that common, no, but I don't know about "rare". This came to mind pretty quickly

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#2382

Post by blocho »

Good stuff. Though he's hardly a pop star, in college I became very interested in the Civil War music recreated by Bobby Horton (no relation to Johnny, from what I can tell). Check it out:

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#2383

Post by matthewscott8 »

blocho wrote: April 17th, 2021, 4:22 am I watched The Blind Side (2009) last night, which is OK for a sports movie because most sports movies are terrible. Although it's not really a sports movie -- it's really more of a coming-of-age story and family drama. But by any non-sports standard, it's bad, certainly far worse than the Michael Lewis book it's based on. Anyway, what I really want to share is the following image which appears for only one second during a sequence about the protagonist's academic struggles:

Image

Yikes! Waterloo wasn't in Germany! Forget for a second that a high school history test in the US would never have such detailed questions about the Hundred Days. I'm really wondering whether this is merely poor prop design or a very subtle dig at the history teacher, who is not portrayed as a sympathetic character (in which case it's excellent prop design, though I think very, very few viewers would notice).
Badly designed test, 1st question the answer is c even if you never studied the subject, answer is more detailed than the others. Also the question mark at the end of #2 is unwarranted as it's an imperative, unless it's intended to mock the student taking the test.
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#2384

Post by blocho »

matthewscott8 wrote: April 30th, 2021, 4:02 pm Badly designed test, 1st question the answer is c even if you never studied the subject, answer is more detailed than the others. Also the question mark at the end of #2 is unwarranted as it's an imperative, unless it's intended to mock the student taking the test.
Totally. I think that's why it got my attention, especially as a former teacher, because it's a horribly designed test. The second question is a case in point: there are too many ways to answer it. Incidentally, there's no way an American high school history test would be this detailed about the Hundred Days Campaign. I wonder if European high school tests would be so detailed.
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#2385

Post by matthewscott8 »

blocho wrote: April 30th, 2021, 8:49 pm
matthewscott8 wrote: April 30th, 2021, 4:02 pm Badly designed test, 1st question the answer is c even if you never studied the subject, answer is more detailed than the others. Also the question mark at the end of #2 is unwarranted as it's an imperative, unless it's intended to mock the student taking the test.
Totally. I think that's why it got my attention, especially as a former teacher, because it's a horribly designed test. The second question is a case in point: there are too many ways to answer it. Incidentally, there's no way an American high school history test would be this detailed about the Hundred Days Campaign. I wonder if European high school tests would be so detailed.
I'm not sure, when I did history in the UK we wouldn't have had a multiple choice test, multiple choice tests your passive memory not your active memory. I would have had the question asked without any prompts. Real life you either know the answer or you don't. Also this kind of test is kinda superfluous, in reality you want to teach students something meaningful. I would be wanting to talk to them about the danger of one's idealism failing. Napoleon was meant to be a revolutionary but ended up a military dictator.
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#2386

Post by matthewscott8 »

Fell in love with cinema again today 🥰

A special day / una giornata particolare (1977 - Ettore Scola)

Didn't think cinema had that emotional range and coherence
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#2387

Post by St. Gloede »

matthewscott8 wrote: May 31st, 2021, 10:57 pm Fell in love with cinema again today 🥰

A special day / una giornata particolare (1977 - Ettore Scola)

Didn't think cinema had that emotional range and coherence
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#2388

Post by GruesomeTwosome »

matthewscott8 wrote: May 31st, 2021, 10:57 pm Fell in love with cinema again today 🥰

A special day / una giornata particolare (1977 - Ettore Scola)

Didn't think cinema had that emotional range and coherence
...meanwhile, while you were watching that I saw Albert Pyun’s Nemesis (1992) yesterday. So, you know...same experience. ;)
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#2389

Post by matthewscott8 »

GruesomeTwosome wrote: June 1st, 2021, 5:28 pm
matthewscott8 wrote: May 31st, 2021, 10:57 pm Fell in love with cinema again today 🥰

A special day / una giornata particolare (1977 - Ettore Scola)

Didn't think cinema had that emotional range and coherence
...meanwhile, while you were watching that I saw Albert Pyun’s Nemesis (1992) yesterday. So, you know...same experience. ;)
I actually quite liked Nemesis hehe. Definitely different registers of cinema though!!!!!! Got Adrenalin and Cyborg from Pyun in my top lists :)
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#2390

Post by matthewscott8 »

I really got a kick from the 2014 remake of The Gambler with Mark Wahlberg. Is that bad taste? :D :D :D :D I really liked it anyway. :wub:
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#2391

Post by OldAle1 »

Went to my first post-pandemic (if that's where we are) movie in the cinema! It's been 15+ months for me, and it was about time. Alas my choices were poor - In the Heights and Quiet Place 2 were the only other possibilities, really, but I ended up picking

Cruella in part because it's likely to leave theaters soonest

Good:
* cast was mostly fine. Emma (Stone) I'm not so sure about - her Cruella wasn't nasty enough, her Estella perhaps not nice enough; I think this was mostly the screenplay's fault but overall, while she holds the screen, I don't necessarily buy her completely in these roles. Joel Fry and Paul Walter Hauser as her companions in crime were both fun; the latter seems to be trying to channel Bob Hoskins, mostly fairly well. Another film alas with Mark Strong not really getting to do as much as he could, rather wasted - but all of this is made up for with the INCREDIBLE Emma Thompson performance as The Baroness; were this a late-year release I feel confident that she would be getting heavy awards love. There's just a moment where she's walking down a line of her subordinates and criticizing them where she just says "oh and you're fired" in just the perfect way. Really this is one of the best comic-villain roles I've ever seen.

* reasonably amusing at times, and competently directed I guess.

* it looked nice - period (mid-70s) ambiance was reasonably palpable, and well, the costumes, this is a film that kind of lives and dies with it's costumes, and they didn't disappoint.

Bad:
* a mess of a screenplay that couldn't decide how to make Cruella both a villain and likable at the same time, and that had to hit too many unnecessary and silly plot points (I don't think anybody will have trouble guessing the relationship between the two Emmas pretty early on) and drags things out way too long. This was probably 1/2 hour longer than it should have been.

* terrible overuse of pop songs to highlight every fucking moment of the film. There are filmmakers that can do this right - Scorsese sometimes, Woody Allen sometimes - but this just felt like lazy underlining of every comic or emotional bit.

Overall just enjoyable enough for me to say thumbs up over down. Just.
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