Welcome to the ICM Forum. If you have an account but have trouble logging in, or have other questions, see THIS THREAD.
Podcast: Talking Images (Episode 16 released September 13th)
Polls: Romance (Results), 1951 (Results), 500<400 (Sep 23rd), 2008 (Oct 4th)
Challenges: Animation, Silent Era, Russia/USSR
Film of the Week: L'inhumaine, October nominations (Sep 25th)
World Cup S4: QF Schedule, Match QFB: India vs Greece (Sep 20th), Match QFC: Germany vs Italy (Oct 1st)

Last Movie Seen

Post Reply
User avatar
sebby
Posts: 6455
Joined: Jul 04, 2011
Contact:

Re: Last Movie Seen

#2201

Post by sebby » May 30th, 2020, 12:14 pm

Vast of Night was fun. Maybe a little homage-heavy and not without a few hiccups but I'm a big Bradbury/Twilight Zone fan so it worked for me. The frenetic pace and constant movement (I believe the story sprints along in real time) elicits a tension that reminded me oddly of Uncut Gems, but this one was much gentler on the nerves and not so palm-sweat inducing. Sound, camera, acting all good. Really well put together for such a low budget feature.

Minor gem.

User avatar
Kublai Khan
Posts: 1150
Joined: Nov 09, 2014
Location: Sarasota, FL
Contact:

#2202

Post by Kublai Khan » June 4th, 2020, 12:08 am

I watched Rocky IV for the first time. it's one of those movies that's so thoroughly ingrained in American pop culture and has been referenced/parodied/copied/etc.. so many times that I kinda thought I knew it.

Nothing prepared me for that weird robot. What the hell...
Owner of three platinums:
  • FilmTotaal top 100
  • IMDb's 1980s Top 50
  • IMDb's Animation Top 50

User avatar
Ebbywebby
Posts: 3449
Joined: Sep 10, 2012
Location: Orange County, CA
Contact:

#2203

Post by Ebbywebby » June 4th, 2020, 12:43 am

Kublai Khan wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 12:08 am
I watched Rocky IV for the first time.
The worst Rocky of all.

matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 1988
Joined: May 13, 2015
Contact:

#2204

Post by matthewscott8 » June 13th, 2020, 11:51 pm

Hehe, if anyone wants to say Showgirls is a unique movie, I give you back Sucker Punch!

User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1101
Joined: Feb 03, 2017
Contact:

#2205

Post by outdoorcats » June 20th, 2020, 9:17 am

I thought Da 5 Bloods was a messy but powerful film. It is definitely an example of a film that ends up amounting to more than the sum of its parts. It's far from Spike Lee's best but I'd put it in the top half of his catalog. I definitely agree with the general consensus that Delroy Lindo deserves awards recognition for his performance.

Curious what others here thought of it, though given some of the surprising twists and turns the story takes most discussion should probably be under spoiler tags.
Last edited by outdoorcats on June 20th, 2020, 9:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

Peter...is your social worker in that horse?

User avatar
Onderhond
Posts: 4849
Joined: Dec 23, 2012
Contact:

#2206

Post by Onderhond » June 20th, 2020, 9:25 am

My take
Spike Lee must've had a clear vision when he started this project, but I dearly hope it wasn't anything close to this devastating mess. Da 5 Bloods feels like a film that wanted to say a lot of important things, but ultimately it comes off as a very bad pastiche. Not once does Lee find the right tone for his film.

With four black veterans returning to Vietnam to honor their fallen friend, the film has a perfect setup to revisit the Vietnam War and tell it from a black perspective. Throw in some gold hunting plot for a little adventure and suspense, and you have all the ingredients for a great film. Why then did it feel like a bad comedy, something that holds the middle between a bad Apocalypse Now rip-off and a subpar jungle-set JCVD action flick.

Performances are poor, the action scenes are drab, the dramatic moments are laughable and the political inserts are completely overshadowed by the incompetence surrounding them. The entire film is such a big mess that it is actually quite amusing to watch (at least to see where it is going), but in the end if feels like Lee overreached tremendously and couldn't stop himself from falling flat on his face. This wasn't any good.
Big disappointment for me. 92% on RT ... well, you know what I think about film critics.

User avatar
Ebbywebby
Posts: 3449
Joined: Sep 10, 2012
Location: Orange County, CA
Contact:

#2207

Post by Ebbywebby » June 22nd, 2020, 10:30 pm



Great! Deserves more than 18 checks.

User avatar
peeptoad
Posts: 2258
Joined: Feb 04, 2017
Contact:

#2208

Post by peeptoad » June 23rd, 2020, 1:24 pm

The Connection 1961. Fantastic.

matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 1988
Joined: May 13, 2015
Contact:

#2209

Post by matthewscott8 » June 23rd, 2020, 4:00 pm

Monsieur Verdoux (1947 - Charles Chaplin) Quite unbelievably good, so many stultifying films being made in that era, to see the most magnificent rose blossoming amongst the charnel, well, that is Monsieur Verdoux. Straight into my top 10, and could get the ultimate accolade at some point.

Jean-Marie Straub has good taste, I was compelled to watch this when I saw he had it as his first second and third favourite film.

matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 1988
Joined: May 13, 2015
Contact:

#2210

Post by matthewscott8 » June 23rd, 2020, 4:57 pm

Ebbywebby wrote:
June 22nd, 2020, 10:30 pm


Great! Deserves more than 18 checks.
very cool!

User avatar
Reflect
Posts: 512
Joined: Feb 06, 2017
Contact:

#2211

Post by Reflect » July 12th, 2020, 5:06 am

matthewscott8 wrote:
June 23rd, 2020, 4:00 pm
Monsieur Verdoux (1947 - Charles Chaplin) Quite unbelievably good, so many stultifying films being made in that era, to see the most magnificent rose blossoming amongst the charnel, well, that is Monsieur Verdoux. Straight into my top 10, and could get the ultimate accolade at some point.

Jean-Marie Straub has good taste, I was compelled to watch this when I saw he had it as his first second and third favourite film.
Glad you loved this, it's a really fantastic and intelligent work. One of Chaplin's best, which is saying something.

User avatar
Reflect
Posts: 512
Joined: Feb 06, 2017
Contact:

#2212

Post by Reflect » July 13th, 2020, 1:53 am

Went on a short Brakhage marathon. Night Music was very movingly beautiful.

matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 1988
Joined: May 13, 2015
Contact:

#2213

Post by matthewscott8 » July 24th, 2020, 9:05 am

Wasn't expecting Children of Men to be so good, and ridiculously prescient. Feels like it is a film made in 2020.

User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1101
Joined: Feb 03, 2017
Contact:

#2214

Post by outdoorcats » July 24th, 2020, 12:37 pm

It's one of the best films of the Noughts, IMO! I would put Y tu mama tambien up there as well.

Peter...is your social worker in that horse?

blocho
Donator
Posts: 3491
Joined: Jul 20, 2014
Contact:

#2215

Post by blocho » July 25th, 2020, 5:52 pm

I love Children of Men.

I read the original novel last summer and was interested to learn how different the movie is from it.

Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi
Posts: 11742
Joined: May 29, 2011
Contact:

#2216

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » August 7th, 2020, 8:47 pm

Cargo-200 (Gruz-200) (Balabanov, 2007) -- Holy moly! Jesus Aloisius Christ on a flaming pogo stick! This film! It's a live hand grenade tossed right in the middle of the audience! Having seen long ago Balabanov's Brother and Of Freaks and Men, I thought I more or less knew -- and didn't really care for -- Balabanov, and I wasn't really in a hurry to see his later films (as evidenced by my arriving at the Gruz-200 party 13 years late). This was actually a really good thing, as I went into this movie knowing and expecting just about nothing -- and it's a film just waiting for unsuspecting viewers. It's a movie that takes that creeping "Waaait, just where is this film going??" feeling, throws it into a car trunk, drives it to the beach, and then throws it off a cliff.

I literally don't want to say too much because I'd want anyone who hasn't seen it to have the same blindsided experience I did, but at the same time I'm curious to hear from those who have seen it. At the crucial thematic focal point of the film, there's a pointed (but never identified) reference to Ivan Karamazov, and I suspect this is a movie that would get Dostoevsky's hopes up before utterly horrifying even him. We go through such nihilistic (and *scathingly* anti-Soviet) darkness, that the very ending feels like a grim parody of Dostoevsky. And it feels as if Russia not only of the last 100 years, but of the last millennium, is being put through the meat grinder. Then when we're stunned at what we've just seen, the director just throws down the camera and walks away, like a sudden visual mic drop.
Last edited by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi on August 8th, 2020, 12:17 am, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 11190
Joined: May 06, 2011
Contact:

#2217

Post by St. Gloede » August 7th, 2020, 11:07 pm

I was sure I had seen Of Freaks and Men, but I hadn't. Nor this. Nor Brat ... What am I waiting for?!

Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi
Posts: 11742
Joined: May 29, 2011
Contact:

#2218

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » August 7th, 2020, 11:14 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 11:07 pm
I was sure I had seen Of Freaks and Men, but I hadn't. Nor this. Nor Brat ... What am I waiting for?!
Brother I thought was OK. I really disliked Of Freaks and Men. But this was a bombshell. But definitely not for everyone. And I think that the more familiar one is with Russian history and culture, the more impactful it is (not that I am an expert -- I'm not Russian -- but I'm well familiar).

User avatar
OldAle1
Donator
Posts: 4820
Joined: Feb 09, 2017
Location: Dairyland, USA
Contact:

#2219

Post by OldAle1 » August 7th, 2020, 11:20 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
August 7th, 2020, 11:07 pm
I was sure I had seen Of Freaks and Men, but I hadn't. Nor this. Nor Brat ... What am I waiting for?!
Dude even I've seen Brat. Get with the program! What, you hate Russia or something? They're the world's Best Buddy!

User avatar
adwest
Posts: 12
Joined: Aug 13, 2020
Contact:

#2220

Post by adwest » August 16th, 2020, 7:49 pm

Watched Days of Heaven last night, known for the cinematography, which was undeniably incredible. Coming from the world of written stories where words are the medium, I'm am really starting to dig that it's not always the case with film. Other than the voice-over of the pubescent young girl throughout, I would call this movie "dialogue poor" but it didn't mean I couldn't completely understand and relate to the characters. I think the characters and their story will stay in my mind for a long time, which is always how I know I've experienced a great story. I will say, I did once read a book by a screenwriter who argued voice-over narration is often lazy film making. While that's debatable (and probably has been debated on this very forum), I don't think that was the case with this movie. The narration came from an interesting, childlike source and I don't think the story could have been conveyed so beautifully otherwise. So, I gave it 9 out of 10 on my movie tracker app.

p.s. pre-gerbil stories Richard Gere was some eye candy for sure.

User avatar
Onderhond
Posts: 4849
Joined: Dec 23, 2012
Contact:

#2221

Post by Onderhond » August 21st, 2020, 9:14 pm

Watched Lady Bird and The Bling Ring back to back today. Not really with intent, but they're a very interesting combo. While very different in execution, they both coming of age films, but in a very different sitting, with very different characters. I'm not surprised Lady Bird is the film that appealed to film fans the most, personally I'm on the Bling Ring side. Gerwig's film had such drab and uninteresting characters and bland drama. Also felt much older (which is not too surprising if you see the kind of person Gerwig is).

The verdict is 2.0* vs 3.5*, Coppola finally wins.

User avatar
Tim2460
Posts: 2514
Joined: Oct 01, 2018
Location: Dijon, France
Contact:

#2222

Post by Tim2460 » August 25th, 2020, 5:34 pm

Sitted at the Tenet 'Avant première' in vo with my daughter! :party:

User avatar
Tim2460
Posts: 2514
Joined: Oct 01, 2018
Location: Dijon, France
Contact:

#2223

Post by Tim2460 » August 25th, 2020, 8:48 pm

Hmmm it was.... Very complicated.
The 2 of us got only 80% of the film I guess. Will need several rewatch.

Straka
Posts: 366
Joined: Jun 20, 2011
Contact:

#2224

Post by Straka » August 27th, 2020, 12:16 pm

I didn't think Tenet was that complicated, spy movie with a fun science fiction element. Typical Nolan actually, I enjoyed it a lot. I watched it at a cinema where they showed it from a 70 mm print. I will rewatch it digitally soon, I am curious to know if it makes any difference to me.

User avatar
PeacefulAnarchy
Moderator
Posts: 24822
Joined: May 08, 2011
Contact:

#2225

Post by PeacefulAnarchy » August 28th, 2020, 6:24 am

I watched Hamilton, first film in over a month, it was something. It's not bad, exactly, it's just that there are so many weird things to focus on that the parts that are probably good were not at the forefront. It's pretty much the embodiment of the kind of musical I dislike where everything is sung, but I think being literally a filmed play helped in this regard because the artificiality of the sets and acting flipped expectations to the point where instead of thinking of it as a film with characters singing for no reason it was just a musical production that happened to have an underlying narrative of sorts. So plus one for engaging musical performance. The lyricism of the music is a mixed bag, though, with every witty line matched with lines where words rhyme with themselves.

But back to being a filmed play, there is incredibly little artistry in the filming, a handful of shots were nice, but I think that's pure happenstance because there are twice as many shots where you get a sense there could have been a nice shot but they chose a bad angle with bad framing. Mostly though, it's just a bunch of slightly too close midrange shots that show about 2/3 of the stage so that you focus on what they want you to focus on but never lose sight that this is all happening on a stage. There's very little camera movement, just a few very light zooms and a lot of (deftly seamless, if mostly unnecessary) cuts. I'm pretty sure this is worse than if they had just set up a single centered front facing camera with perfect framing of the stage and just left it there for the two and a half hours.

I said above that the fact that you never lose sight of this being a staged show helped me get over my issues with this type of musical, but I'm not sure that it's actually in favor of this being a better movie, only in being more palatable for me personally. I spent half the time just thinking about the odd staging and filming with the singing as a soundtrack for those thoughts, interrupted by thoughts like "I can tell this guy is waiting for his cue" or "I wonder if that was intentional" or "this guy playing the king of England is literally spitting while singing I can see the spittle, this is really fucking weird." It's a format full of distractions. The audience is also disconcerting, hearing people laugh or clap in the middle of scenes feels kind of uncanny. It's obviously genuine and from a "this is a literal filming of a stage production" it makes sense and even enhances that aspect, but it pushes things slightly away from "watch this musical" and into "watch this performance of this musical," a middle ground between performance and documentary that doesn't feel quite right.

So what was I thinking about the other half of the time? How fucking weird the entire premise of this bio-musical with a twist is. So this is a telling of history but the twist is that it's modern with the language and the diverse cast, but I just kept wondering "why is this even a story you want to tell" and "does this really reframe history, or does it just further entrench the white landowner mythological deification of the founding fathers." This purports to be a celebration of Hamilton, but the feeling I got is that Hamilton the person kind of sucked, and so did these other people. Except that I never got the sense the film was in on that perspective other than a few jabs at Jefferson. For the most part it presents the US revolution as noble, the entire establishment of the US as conflicted but good, and despite the random jabs at the lack of equality for women and minorities it didn't actually say much about this aspect of history. It is, at its core, a celebration of the US and all its foundation myths, dirtied just a little bit so it feels more down to earth and relatable but without ever seriously exposing its real political warts, only a few personal ones. Maybe I don't "get it" or maybe it's because I'm not from the US, or maybe I'm reading it perfectly and I was just wrong for thinking it would be a bit more finger in the eye rather than pat on the back.

The music and general creativity are probably the main appeal here, and while imperfect the music is fine, even catchy at times. But it's just so hard to focus on it when both the surface above it and the ground underneath it raise so many questions.

galimx
Posts: 7
Joined: Aug 15, 2020
Contact:

#2226

Post by galimx » September 1st, 2020, 3:53 pm

Weighed But Found Wanting by Lino Brocka. Need to dive more into filipino cinema.

User avatar
Ebbywebby
Posts: 3449
Joined: Sep 10, 2012
Location: Orange County, CA
Contact:

#2227

Post by Ebbywebby » September 1st, 2020, 9:42 pm

Lino Brocka has something like 35 films where IMDb/ICM have no posted runtimes for them. Too many, considering he's an important filmmaker.

PirateJenny
Posts: 435
Joined: Feb 21, 2019
Contact:

#2228

Post by PirateJenny » September 5th, 2020, 8:54 pm

A Woman Under The Influence

It’s probably been 15 or more years since I last saw this. I’d previously rated it as one of my favourite films. So tonight at my sisters we had a choice, she’d got bored of watching Band of Brothers by the fifth episode, brother ln law wanted to watch The Long Goodbye but I said no lets watch a John Cassavetes film as they’re renowned for their acting. Said AWUTI was a good place to start. All I got from it this time though was a lot of ‘funny faces’ from Gena Rowlands and a lot of SIT DOWN, SHUT UP from Peter Falk. Felt a little embarrassed I’d recommended it. It’s funny how tastes change but this has dropped off my favourites.

eutow
Posts: 6
Joined: Aug 25, 2020
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
Contact:

#2229

Post by eutow » September 10th, 2020, 10:31 pm

The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, or, more accurately - Every Man For Himself and God Against All, by Werner Herzog
Herzog doesn't seem to be my cup of tea (didn't enjoy Fitzcarraldo a whole lot either). It is certainly intelligent, but it lacks that something... for one, it feels very unpleasant, ugly for the sake of ugliness. And the whole is very loose, and most importantly the ideas feel rather predictable - here's a bit of Rousseau, here's a bit of pessimism... the "zeroth level of human" is a character frequently used to express ideas in very blatant ways (Frankenstein, Crusoe), and it just feels disingenuous. The society that Kaspar is trying to adapt to can be seen as absurd, yet it is still populated by humans, who Kaspar has something in common with - so his absolute rejection of religion comes off as forced. Where did religion come from, if not from humans?
It was certainly interesting most of the time after the first section, i.e. when Kaspar starts adapting to the society, however. Just not building towards something that pushes boundaries, at least in my case. My favourite shot is from the beginning, of a silent field of grass moving like the sea, moved by the gusts of wind, with a chilling statement.
Guess I should try one of his documentaries now, for a change.
PirateJenny wrote:
September 5th, 2020, 8:54 pm
A Woman Under The Influence

It’s probably been 15 or more years since I last saw this. I’d previously rated it as one of my favourite films. So tonight at my sisters we had a choice, she’d got bored of watching Band of Brothers by the fifth episode, brother ln law wanted to watch The Long Goodbye but I said no lets watch a John Cassavetes film as they’re renowned for their acting. Said AWUTI was a good place to start. All I got from it this time though was a lot of ‘funny faces’ from Gena Rowlands and a lot of SIT DOWN, SHUT UP from Peter Falk. Felt a little embarrassed I’d recommended it. It’s funny how tastes change but this has dropped off my favourites.
I found it extremely difficult to watch. It might depend on your mood a lot, I for example was in a somewhat troubled time mentally and I'm sure it fueled my discomfort.

User avatar
peeptoad
Posts: 2258
Joined: Feb 04, 2017
Contact:

#2230

Post by peeptoad » September 12th, 2020, 1:02 pm

Chugyeokja (2008) 9/10
Hong-jin Na is 2/2 so far.

User avatar
AdamH
Site Admin
Posts: 12569
Joined: May 05, 2011
Contact:

#2231

Post by AdamH » September 16th, 2020, 5:52 pm

Catch-22 (1970) 7/10

Pretty faithful adaptation of the novel, which made it pretty fun to watch and see the actors' interpretations of the characters.

User avatar
yllow
Posts: 76
Joined: Dec 10, 2018
Contact:

#2232

Post by yllow » September 16th, 2020, 10:48 pm

Yes that’s a good adaptation.

Post Reply