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Best Latin American Films of the Decade

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Best Latin American Films of the Decade

#1

Post by cinewest » July 30th, 2020, 3:12 am

This is a region often ignored by filmgoers, even though it has been pretty strong in the past 20 years. Mexican filmmakers like Inarritu, Cuaron, and Del Torro have made it big in Hollywood, along with a couple of great cinematographers (also from Mexico), but scant attention has been given to Central and South American films compared to other "foreign" regions.

Here is a pretty interesting list put together by ReMexcla (a Latino American publication), but perhaps you'd like to chime in with some of your own favorites not mentioned, here:
https://remezcla.com/lists/film/best-la ... lms-2010s/

And here's a longer list from Cinema Tropical: https://www.cinematropical.com/10-best-films

I've only seen about 15% of the longer list of 200+, and they were all worthwhile, at least 10 of which made my own top 100 of the 2010's (I also have 2-3 others from Latin America that didn’t show up on their long list).
Last edited by cinewest on July 31st, 2020, 5:43 am, edited 3 times in total.

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#2

Post by Cocoa » July 30th, 2020, 4:27 am

I wish I knew great films from the region to watch. I don't have faith in any list that has La Flor at #2 :( I love Poesía sin fin (2016) [Endless Poetry], La danza de la realidad (2013) [The Dance of Reality], and As Boas Maneiras (2017) [Good Manners] :wub:

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#3

Post by cinewest » July 30th, 2020, 4:44 am

Cocoa wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 4:27 am
I wish I knew great films from the region to watch. I don't have faith in any list that has La Flor at #2 :( I love Poesía sin fin (2016) [Endless Poetry], La danza de la realidad (2013) [The Dance of Reality], and As Boas Maneiras (2017) [Good Manners] :wub:
This list has a lot of variety, and you are not going to agree with all of them any more than you would a critic’s list of American films, or European list of Euro films.

I haven’t seen La Flor (which is experimental), but as I said, the 30+ I have seen have all been worthwhile, and some have been outstanding.

I also like the fact that this is a list made by 97 Latin American film programmers from the Americas and Europe, whereas most of the latin film recs. we generally see have been put together by people who aren’t Latinos.

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#4

Post by St. Gloede » July 30th, 2020, 12:47 pm

Surprisingly I have seen 6 of the top 8 on the latter list. The exceptions being La flor and Post Tenebras Lux. Neither of which I have any interest in, but the 6 i have seen are all good to great, with Jauja being one of my favourites of the decade. Not seen that many from the extended list and will definitely seek out more.

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#5

Post by cinewest » July 30th, 2020, 1:01 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 12:47 pm
Surprisingly I have seen 6 of the top 8 on the latter list. The exceptions being La flor and Post Tenebras Lux. Neither of which I have any interest in, but the 6 i have seen are all good to great, with Jauja being one of my favourites of the decade. Not seen that many from the extended list and will definitely seek out more.


Those are the most popular ones, but why no interest on post tenebras lux? I thought it was good enough to make my top 40 for the decade.

Most of the top 30 here are known internationally, but the rest are pretty obscure to the majority of cinephiles.
Last edited by cinewest on July 30th, 2020, 11:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#6

Post by Cocoa » July 30th, 2020, 2:51 pm

I've found four films on the first list that I have easy access to, so I'll work on the list today. I don't have high opinions of the list right now, but maybe that'll change...

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#7

Post by mjf314 » July 30th, 2020, 3:10 pm

cinewest wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 3:12 am
Here is a pretty interesting list put together by ReMexcla (a Latino American publication), but perhaps you'd like to chime in with some of your own favorites not mentioned, here:
https://remezcla.com/lists/film/best-la ... lms-2010s/

And here's a longer list from Cinema Tropical: https://www.cinematropical.com/10-best-films

I've only seen about 15% of the longer list of 200+, and they were all worthwhile, 13 of which made my own top 100 of the 2010's
The first list is a shorter version of the Cinema Tropical list.

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#8

Post by cinewest » July 30th, 2020, 4:31 pm

mjf314 wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 3:10 pm
cinewest wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 3:12 am
Here is a pretty interesting list put together by ReMexcla (a Latino American publication), but perhaps you'd like to chime in with some of your own favorites not mentioned, here:
https://remezcla.com/lists/film/best-la ... lms-2010s/

And here's a longer list from Cinema Tropical: https://www.cinematropical.com/10-best-films

I've only seen about 15% of the longer list of 200+, and they were all worthwhile, 13 of which made my own top 100 of the 2010's
The first list is a shorter version of the Cinema Tropical list.
yes

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#9

Post by cinewest » July 30th, 2020, 4:34 pm

Cocoa wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 2:51 pm
I've found four films on the first list that I have easy access to, so I'll work on the list today. I don't have high opinions of the list right now, but maybe that'll change...
Did you take a look at the job description for each person who contributed?

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#10

Post by Cocoa » July 30th, 2020, 5:52 pm

If their taste in film is horrible, then their job is irrelevant. There are always people in the movie industry with terrible opinions and there are also usually people that will push for films made by their friends/colleagues or themselves.

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#11

Post by cinewest » July 30th, 2020, 11:36 pm

Cocoa wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 5:52 pm
If their taste in film is horrible, then their job is irrelevant. There are always people in the movie industry with terrible opinions and there are also usually people that will push for films made by their friends/colleagues or themselves.
These people are all programmers, and, yes, there are always programmers whose taste you may not agree with ( I am still upset about the challenge of programmers at the SF International a few years ago, and my interest in a festival I have been attending since the 80's has waned considerably), but in general they are knowledgable about the medium, and need to be considerate of the public who will attend their program.This poll also drew from a large group of people all over the world, so I'm guessing that variety of opinion is present (indicated by the more than 200 films listed in the results).

Another question to consider is why film goers in film forums (who are mostly white males of northern European descent) aren't attracted to films from Central and South America, or the Caribbean? My guess is that it has something to do with cultural differences, as much as the lack of publicity given films from this part of the world, as for at least the last 20-25 years there has been very rich offering, indeed one that has become richer and more diverse every year.

In fact, as I pointed out in my opening post, if you take a look at the Oscars over the past 10-15 years, you might notice that they have prominently featured 3 Mexican directors, and 2 Mexican cinematographers who have made the crossover to more commercial English language filmmaking, so quality is clearly not the issue.
Last edited by cinewest on July 31st, 2020, 4:45 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#12

Post by Cocoa » July 31st, 2020, 2:55 am

Welp, finished the four films I had planned and I probably won't actively work on the Cinema Tropical's Best Latin American Films 2010-2019 list. It's official on icm so I will probably still watch a few more throughout the year, but I haven't had much luck with the films I have watched. One huge favorite that made me feel like crying (l) , one incredibly huge dislike that I could spend hours writing about how awful it is (u) , and most of the rest are a bunch of films in the 4-6/10 range for me. I definitely don't share the same taste as some of the voters. I've only seen 26 films out of the 229, but if the stats continue to be the same, then I don't want to watch over 20 random films on the list in hopes of finding just one favorite. Most of the films I've watched had similar cinematography to each other (some black-and-white, some urban and suburban settings, and some wilderness settings), which is fine. However, a lot of the films tend to be on the longer side and the writing quality in the films tend to make the characters ordinary-and-boring (and dislikable in certain cases) instead of ordinary-and-likeable which is more needed for slice-of-life films that are about 2 hours or longer. I've only watched about 10% of the list, so it's always possible the list is good and I just haven't watched the amazing films yet (but the #2 on the list being a film I incredibly hate and I can go off on a huge tangent about so many awful things about the film, so I simply don't have high hopes for that list. If the film was at a placement like #16 or #28 or #54 or #106 then I would be more okay with the list). I'm hoping other lists on the region will pop up over the next few years for more recommendations that are closer to the types of films that I like. I have three favorite films from that region's decade and only one of those three films is on this list so there are definitely films out there that I expect to love that aren't on the list.

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#13

Post by Angel Glez » July 31st, 2020, 9:48 am

cinewest wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 11:36 pm
Cocoa wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 5:52 pm
If their taste in film is horrible, then their job is irrelevant. There are always people in the movie industry with terrible opinions and there are also usually people that will push for films made by their friends/colleagues or themselves.
These people are all programmers, and, yes, there are always programmers whose taste you may not agree with ( I am still upset about the challenge of programmers at the SF International a few years ago, and my interest in a festival I have been attending since the 80's has waned considerably), but in general they are knowledgable about the medium, and need to be considerate of the public who will attend their program.This poll also drew from a large group of people all over the world, so I'm guessing that variety of opinion is present (indicated by the more than 200 films listed in the results).
You are both right. The people polled are Film Festival Programmers, that's good, therefore the poll is valuable. But they are only programmers -no professionals, no critics, no archivists, no historians, no reviewers, no distributors, no lecturers- so the poll is biased. Obviously CT was looking for a certain type of cinema (let's say globalized art house), but the cinephile does not live by that kind of movies only.

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#14

Post by cinewest » July 31st, 2020, 10:28 am

Angel Glez wrote:
July 31st, 2020, 9:48 am
cinewest wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 11:36 pm
Cocoa wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 5:52 pm
If their taste in film is horrible, then their job is irrelevant. There are always people in the movie industry with terrible opinions and there are also usually people that will push for films made by their friends/colleagues or themselves.
These people are all programmers, and, yes, there are always programmers whose taste you may not agree with ( I am still upset about the challenge of programmers at the SF International a few years ago, and my interest in a festival I have been attending since the 80's has waned considerably), but in general they are knowledgable about the medium, and need to be considerate of the public who will attend their program.This poll also drew from a large group of people all over the world, so I'm guessing that variety of opinion is present (indicated by the more than 200 films listed in the results).
You are both right. The people polled are Film Festival Programmers, that's good, therefore the poll is valuable. But they are only programmers -no professionals, no critics, no archivists, no historians, no reviewers, no distributors, no lecturers- so the poll is biased. Obviously CT was looking for a certain type of cinema (let's say globalized art house), but the cinephile does not live by that kind of movies only.
I've seen more than 30 of the films on the long list, and I wouldn't describe most as "art house," though in general all "foreign" cinema tends to be classified as such. I would say that most of the films from the list that I saw are more comparable to hollywood indie fare, which would seem to be in most cinephile's wheelhouse.

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#15

Post by St. Gloede » July 31st, 2020, 4:55 pm

cinewest wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 1:01 pm
Those are the most popular ones, but why no interest on post tenebras lux? I thought it was good enough to make my top 40 for the decade.
Simple, I don't like Reygades. ;)

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#16

Post by cinewest » July 31st, 2020, 11:58 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
July 31st, 2020, 4:55 pm
cinewest wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 1:01 pm
Those are the most popular ones, but why no interest on post tenebras lux? I thought it was good enough to make my top 40 for the decade.
Simple, I don't like Reygades. ;)
A little surprised by your answer, Saint, since I consider you to be one of the most open-minded and adventurous cinephiles on board, here. Obviously, you have your reasons, but I am also pretty sure you have changed your mind about filmmakers before (which is why I find the abject dismissal so strange), just as I have.

I can't say that I have loved every Reygades film I have seen (so far it's 2 against 2, though I have read interesting things about his newest), but I count Silent Light and Post Tenebras Lux among my top 50's of the past 2 decades, and I am not one who takes to every "art house" filmmaker that appears (in fact there are quite a few I don't really care for, though I try to keep an open mind about trying them again).

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#17

Post by St. Gloede » August 2nd, 2020, 1:09 pm

cinewest wrote:
July 31st, 2020, 11:58 pm
St. Gloede wrote:
July 31st, 2020, 4:55 pm
cinewest wrote:
July 30th, 2020, 1:01 pm
Those are the most popular ones, but why no interest on post tenebras lux? I thought it was good enough to make my top 40 for the decade.
Simple, I don't like Reygades. ;)
A little surprised by your answer, Saint, since I consider you to be one of the most open-minded and adventurous cinephiles on board, here. Obviously, you have your reasons, but I am also pretty sure you have changed your mind about filmmakers before (which is why I find the abject dismissal so strange), just as I have.

I can't say that I have loved every Reygades film I have seen (so far it's 2 against 2, though I have read interesting things about his newest), but I count Silent Light and Post Tenebras Lux among my top 50's of the past 2 decades, and I am not one who takes to every "art house" filmmaker that appears (in fact there are quite a few I don't really care for, though I try to keep an open mind about trying them again).
If it helps I'm quite surprised by your reply as your reply as well. :lol:

There are an endless amount of films, and, given my opinion of him as a filmmaker I will not prioritise another Reygades anytime soon (unless something changes my mind). Having no interest in it at present owever doesn't mean I'll never be interested. It is a noted film so at some point I will get around to it.

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#18

Post by mjf314 » Yesterday, 2:47 pm

@St. Gloede: Why no interest in La flor? Are you not a fan of the director?

I haven't seen La flor, but I liked Extraordinary Stories.

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#19

Post by St. Gloede » Yesterday, 4:15 pm

mjf314 wrote:
Yesterday, 2:47 pm
@St. Gloede: Why no interest in La flor? Are you not a fan of the director?

I haven't seen La flor, but I liked Extraordinary Stories.
13 hours and 28 minutes.

That kind of investment is extreme, especially for a film with mixed reception. I did read the feature on it in Sight and Sound, and it sounded like a semi-interesting experiment/troll, I did not get the sense that it was a magnificent work. I may hear/see views that make me excited at a later time, but I would either need to be convinced I would love it, or see it as a piece of extreme importance to dedicate that kind of time to any work.

Just to be clear with both this and Lux - not having any interest in prioritising these films does not mean there will never be interest, or that I will never see them - I likely will. In the case of Lux I will probably catch it sometime over the next decade or two, for La Flor I'm not sure - I may never see it.

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#20

Post by max-scl » Yesterday, 6:34 pm

Angel Glez wrote:
July 31st, 2020, 9:48 am

You are both right. The people polled are Film Festival Programmers, that's good, therefore the poll is valuable. But they are only programmers -no professionals, no critics, no archivists, no historians, no reviewers, no distributors, no lecturers- so the poll is biased. Obviously CT was looking for a certain type of cinema (let's say globalized art house), but the cinephile does not live by that kind of movies only.
The people polled are also critics (many critics whose names I recognize are there), but like many critics they also work as programmers, and show up there as such.

More generally, I agree that the list has a bias towards certain type of movies. But you know what, those are the films that are made in Latin America.
Low budgets leads to certain type of movies I think. At least in my country, there is practically no commercial movies, 80% of movies made are looking to have recognition in festivals around the globe, not locally. And festivals want certain types of Latin American films.A lot of movies are coporduced too, with European money. Europeans have certain idea of what Latin America films should be, and that is also reflected on what gets financed.
More money is pouring from streaming giants and now I feel more commercial films are getting made, to be seen in Netflix for instance.
There is still some space for more "Hollywoodean" films in the list. I know more of Argentina and from there, you can find Wild Tales, El Clan, El ángel, for instance. Good fun movies.

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#21

Post by cinewest » Today, 2:14 am

max-scl wrote:
Yesterday, 6:34 pm
Angel Glez wrote:
July 31st, 2020, 9:48 am

You are both right. The people polled are Film Festival Programmers, that's good, therefore the poll is valuable. But they are only programmers -no professionals, no critics, no archivists, no historians, no reviewers, no distributors, no lecturers- so the poll is biased. Obviously CT was looking for a certain type of cinema (let's say globalized art house), but the cinephile does not live by that kind of movies only.
The people polled are also critics (many critics whose names I recognize are there), but like many critics they also work as programmers, and show up there as such.

More generally, I agree that the list has a bias towards certain type of movies. But you know what, those are the films that are made in Latin America.
Low budgets leads to certain type of movies I think. At least in my country, there is practically no commercial movies, 80% of movies made are looking to have recognition in festivals around the globe, not locally. And festivals want certain types of Latin American films.A lot of movies are coporduced too, with European money. Europeans have certain idea of what Latin America films should be, and that is also reflected on what gets financed.
More money is pouring from streaming giants and now I feel more commercial films are getting made, to be seen in Netflix for instance.
There is still some space for more "Hollywoodean" films in the list. I know more of Argentina and from there, you can find Wild Tales, El Clan, El ángel, for instance. Good fun movies.
Are you from Argentina? I know about at least one other poster from Latin America around here and am curious about the point of view of cinephiles there (granted, the countries / cultures are all distinct, but there are certain things that bind and differentiate the point of view there from North America and Europe.

Are cinephiles where you are from as heavily influenced by American films as elsewhere, and is there at least some kind of inerest to the contrary that is culturally, even artistically more specific?

I think that Wild Tales is a very good example of the "popular" film that is both culturally specific as it is "cross cultural," and fully expect the director to be working in Hollywood before long he isn"t already. Haven't seen El Angel, but I have found some of the other "popular" Argentine films, like El Clan tend to look and feel very old-fashioned, which while perhaps "culturally Argentine" doesn't translate as well as it does in an Argentine arthouse film like La Nina Santa, which seems to play off of that.

Any thoughts?

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#22

Post by max-scl » Today, 3:11 am

cinewest wrote:
Today, 2:14 am
max-scl wrote:
Yesterday, 6:34 pm
Angel Glez wrote:
July 31st, 2020, 9:48 am

You are both right. The people polled are Film Festival Programmers, that's good, therefore the poll is valuable. But they are only programmers -no professionals, no critics, no archivists, no historians, no reviewers, no distributors, no lecturers- so the poll is biased. Obviously CT was looking for a certain type of cinema (let's say globalized art house), but the cinephile does not live by that kind of movies only.
The people polled are also critics (many critics whose names I recognize are there), but like many critics they also work as programmers, and show up there as such.

More generally, I agree that the list has a bias towards certain type of movies. But you know what, those are the films that are made in Latin America.
Low budgets leads to certain type of movies I think. At least in my country, there is practically no commercial movies, 80% of movies made are looking to have recognition in festivals around the globe, not locally. And festivals want certain types of Latin American films.A lot of movies are coporduced too, with European money. Europeans have certain idea of what Latin America films should be, and that is also reflected on what gets financed.
More money is pouring from streaming giants and now I feel more commercial films are getting made, to be seen in Netflix for instance.
There is still some space for more "Hollywoodean" films in the list. I know more of Argentina and from there, you can find Wild Tales, El Clan, El ángel, for instance. Good fun movies.
Are you from Argentina? I know about at least one other poster from Latin America around here and am curious about the point of view of cinephiles there (granted, the countries / cultures are all distinct, but there are certain things that bind and differentiate the point of view there from North America and Europe.

Are cinephiles where you are from as heavily influenced by American films as elsewhere, and is there at least some kind of inerest to the contrary that is culturally, even artistically more specific?

I think that Wild Tales is a very good example of the "popular" film that is both culturally specific as it is "cross cultural," and fully expect the director to be working in Hollywood before long he isn"t already. Haven't seen El Angel, but I have found some of the other "popular" Argentine films, like El Clan tend to look and feel very old-fashioned, which while perhaps "culturally Argentine" doesn't translate as well as it does in an Argentine arthouse film like La Nina Santa, which seems to play off of that.

Any thoughts?
From Chile, but I watch a lot of Argentine cinema. (I feel the Argentines make a lot of movies that could be Chilean, but that aren't made here)

People here love American Hollywood cinema of course, in Chile nobody goes to watch Chilean movies in the cinema, save for ocassional exceptions. (with Covid19 a free streaming service of chilean cinema has exploded thou).
In Argentina there is an actual industry and a lot of variety in output, movies like the ones I mentioned were all huge box office successes, they always have 2 or 3 movies that compete with American cinema.
Cinephiles are like anywhere else I think in how they relate to American films. Those are the films that educated a lot of older cinephiles and are revisited by the new ones. And also the same criticism you hear anywhere about popcorn movies or other negative aspects of American cinema are also present. (with a slight touch of anti-imperialist resentment)

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#23

Post by cinewest » Today, 4:24 am

max-scl wrote:
Today, 3:11 am
cinewest wrote:
Today, 2:14 am
max-scl wrote:
Yesterday, 6:34 pm


The people polled are also critics (many critics whose names I recognize are there), but like many critics they also work as programmers, and show up there as such.

More generally, I agree that the list has a bias towards certain type of movies. But you know what, those are the films that are made in Latin America.
Low budgets leads to certain type of movies I think. At least in my country, there is practically no commercial movies, 80% of movies made are looking to have recognition in festivals around the globe, not locally. And festivals want certain types of Latin American films.A lot of movies are coporduced too, with European money. Europeans have certain idea of what Latin America films should be, and that is also reflected on what gets financed.
More money is pouring from streaming giants and now I feel more commercial films are getting made, to be seen in Netflix for instance.
There is still some space for more "Hollywoodean" films in the list. I know more of Argentina and from there, you can find Wild Tales, El Clan, El ángel, for instance. Good fun movies.
Are you from Argentina? I know about at least one other poster from Latin America around here and am curious about the point of view of cinephiles there (granted, the countries / cultures are all distinct, but there are certain things that bind and differentiate the point of view there from North America and Europe.

Are cinephiles where you are from as heavily influenced by American films as elsewhere, and is there at least some kind of inerest to the contrary that is culturally, even artistically more specific?

I think that Wild Tales is a very good example of the "popular" film that is both culturally specific as it is "cross cultural," and fully expect the director to be working in Hollywood before long he isn"t already. Haven't seen El Angel, but I have found some of the other "popular" Argentine films, like El Clan tend to look and feel very old-fashioned, which while perhaps "culturally Argentine" doesn't translate as well as it does in an Argentine arthouse film like La Nina Santa, which seems to play off of that.

Any thoughts?
From Chile, but I watch a lot of Argentine cinema. (I feel the Argentines make a lot of movies that could be Chilean, but that aren't made here)

People here love American Hollywood cinema of course, in Chile nobody goes to watch Chilean movies in the cinema, save for ocassional exceptions. (with Covid19 a free streaming service of chilean cinema has exploded thou).
In Argentina there is an actual industry and a lot of variety in output, movies like the ones I mentioned were all huge box office successes, they always have 2 or 3 movies that compete with American cinema.
Cinephiles are like anywhere else I think in how they relate to American films. Those are the films that educated a lot of older cinephiles and are revisited by the new ones. And also the same criticism you hear anywhere about popcorn movies or other negative aspects of American cinema are also present. (with a slight touch of anti-imperialist resentment)
I almost came to Chile or Argentina after I lived in Brazil for a couple of years (actually speak much better Spanish tan Portuguese), but I decided to return to the U.S. (funny now I have been in China for 5 years), and Chile also seems to have a pretty solid film industry at the moment

Funny, I went to school (even made a couple of student films) with a guy from Chile (Jaime Aguilar) who went back in the early 90's (after the fall of Pinochet) and made commercials there before dying rather young. Many of the Chilean films I have seen remind me of Argentine films in various ways. Somehow, the look and feel, and even the thematic reference points seem to have something in common.

What I found in Brazil (and Costa Rica- I know a couple of Costa Rican filmmakers, as well- where I lived for a couple of years in the early 90's) is that the mainstream audience really laps up American cinema and knows very little about their own, but that the more artistic, more political crowd definitely carries the "resentment" you have mentioned, and aren't so caught up in the gloss of features with a much higher budget. When I lived in Brazil, I used to go to an art center all the time to attend film festivals, and got to see a lot of interesting contemporary stuff from Argentina and Brazil.

I was still in Brazil when Kleber Mendonca Filho came out with O Som Au Redor, and my more bohemian friends there all got very excited about it. Back when I was living in Costa Rica, I had a similar experience with a friend from there (he studied film in Cuba) who was very into Latin Cinema. In fact, I can still remember watching Eliseo Subiela's Al Lado Oscuro Del Corazon with him on VHS at the time, and heading over to the National University to attend a film series (that's where I first saw the Mexican film Cabeza de Vaca that I tout every year in various polls on these boards).

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#24

Post by beavis » Today, 6:08 am

I've seen 9 of the top 10, only missing Tempestad; and La vida Util because of a tie. I've seen 73/229 overall making me rank #10 on the list on ICM. I was surprised about the high placing of Arabia, but otherwise it seems like the usual suspects in that top10. Love Post Tenebras Lux, strong dislike for La Flor (that certainly was wasted time, frustratingly so). Zama, Jauja and El abrazo de la serpiente deserve their International "hit" status, even though they are the kind of hermetic movies that would never win over any mainstream viewer.

my own favorites:

Argentina:
El Auge del Humano (2016)
Leones (2012)
Noche (2013)
Los Salvajes (2012)
Adiós Entusiasmo (2017)
La Idea de un Lago (2016)
Jauja (2014)
Kékszakállú (2016)
Zama (2017)

Brazil:
Boi Neon (2015)
Era Uma Vez Eu, Verônica (2012)
O Homem das Multidões (2013)
A Vida Invisível (2019)
Aquarius (2016)
Bacurau (2019)
Café com Canela (2017)
Ex Isto (2016)
Girimunho (2011)
Praia do Futuro (2014)
Sudoeste (2012)

Chile:
La Casa Lobo (2018)
Rey (2017)
Vendrá la Muerte y Tendrá Tus Ojos (2019)
Verano (2011)

Colombia:
El Abrazo de la Serpiente (2015)
Monos (2019)
Tantas Almas (2019)
La Tierra y la Sombra (2015)

Costa Rica:
El Sonido de Las Cosas (2016)

Cuba:
La Piscina (2011)
La Obra del Siglo (2015)

Dominican Republic:
Jean Gentil (2010)
Cocote (2017)

Mexico:
Post Tenebras Lux (2012)
Club Sándwich (2013)
Nuestro Tiempo (2018)
Roma (2018)
Vuelven (2017)
Güeros (2014)
Halley (2012)
Heli (2013)

Paraguay:
La Última Tierra (2016)

Venezuela:
Desde Allá (2015)

some notable movies that I found dissapointing or just plain bad:
As Boas Maneiras (2017)
Abrir Puertas y Ventanas (2011)
Ema (2019)
Corta (2012)
Sueño en Otro Idioma (2017) (this one is so bad, that it is unbelievable how much love it is getting, truly amazingly awful)
La Flor (2018)

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#25

Post by cinewest » Today, 7:49 am

Agree with you about Sueno en Otro Idioma (on the negative side), and about Post Tenebras Lux, Roma, Gueros, El Abrazo de la Serpiente, Boi Neon, Era Uma Vez Eu Veronica, Acquarius, Zama, and Jauja on the positive side.

Am also interested in a few of those you have mentioned (El Auge De Humano, Los Salvajes, Monos, Tantas Almas, La Tierra y La Sombra, La CAsa Lobo, Rey, O Homem das Multidões, Jean Gentile, Cocote, Nuestro Tiempo, Heli, and La Piscina, a few of which I didn't know about before you cited them).

Colombian cinema seems on the rise at the moment and I am very interested in the 3 I haven't seen from there.

As for those you didn't mention that I would include among my favorites:

Nostalgia De La Luz and El Boton De Nacar
O Som Au Redor
Relatos Salvajes
Miss Bala
Los Perros
La Noche De Enfrente

And a couple not on the list called Vazante, and Casa Grande.

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#26

Post by beavis » Today, 8:09 am

cinewest wrote:
Today, 7:49 am
Colombian cinema seems on the rise at the moment and I am very interested in the 3 I haven't seen from there.

As for those you didn't mention that I would include among my favorites:

Nostalgia De La Luz and El Boton De Nacar
O Som Au Redor
Relatos Salvajes
Miss Bala
Los Perros
La Noche De Enfrente

And a couple not on the list called Vazante, and Casa Grande.
yeah, some great new directors coming from Colombia!

From your recs: I've seen half of them, and they are good indeed (but not on a favorite level for me). Still to see Miss Bala, Los Perros, La Noche De Enfrente and Casa Grande. Very much looking forward to the Ruiz one, of course, also have got Miss Bala on DVD for years now (not really my genre, but heard very good things). The other two I didn't know yet, will check them out! I think I need to see (even) more Mexican cinema in general. Very much looking forward to Museo that has been mentioned as a possible ICM-FF candidate. Also somewhat behind on Chilean cinema. Still have to see "No" and anything by Andrés Wood.

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#27

Post by cinewest » Today, 9:57 am

beavis wrote:
Today, 8:09 am
cinewest wrote:
Today, 7:49 am
Colombian cinema seems on the rise at the moment and I am very interested in the 3 I haven't seen from there.

As for those you didn't mention that I would include among my favorites:

Nostalgia De La Luz and El Boton De Nacar
O Som Au Redor
Relatos Salvajes
Miss Bala
Los Perros
La Noche De Enfrente

And a couple not on the list called Vazante, and Casa Grande.
yeah, some great new directors coming from Colombia!

From your recs: I've seen half of them, and they are good indeed (but not on a favorite level for me). Still to see Miss Bala, Los Perros, La Noche De Enfrente and Casa Grande. Very much looking forward to the Ruiz one, of course, also have got Miss Bala on DVD for years now (not really my genre, but heard very good things). The other two I didn't know yet, will check them out! I think I need to see (even) more Mexican cinema in general. Very much looking forward to Museo that has been mentioned as a possible ICM-FF candidate. Also somewhat behind on Chilean cinema. Still have to see "No" and anything by Andrés Wood.
Miss Bala is on one level stylized like a genre film, but It catches something going on in Mexico, as well as for young women there, that elevates it substantially in my eyes as a metaphor. It also plays a bit like Scorsese's After Hours, but I won't say more about that.

Thought O Som Au Redor is also brilliant in the way that it creates a modern metaphor for Brazil's Colonial past that still has such presence today. Case Grande touches as well on some of these themes in exploring the life of an upper class family.

I also absolutely loved Relatos Salvajes, which plays with so many issues and behaviours that are alive and well in Latin culture, and two of the episodes made me laugh about as I hard as I have at the cinema.

Guzman's two personal documentaries delving into Chile's past traumas are also amazing to me.

Los Perros caught me by surprise. Yet another very good rising female filmmaker from Latin America (there are quite a few these days), and this is another films that taps into the shadow of the Pinochet years, as well as the blind ignorance (a least feigned) that persists among the upper classes (La Mujer Sin Cabeza would make for a good comparison piece)

As for La Noche de Enfrente, it's one of my favorites by Ruiz, but I think I am one of the few that feel that way. It is autobiographical, and very Latin, stylistically, but if you like his brand of Magical Realism it should appeal.

Another one not on the list that I forgot to mention is Tambien La Lluvia, which examines a film shoot taking place in the Bolivian Highlands, and also explores the colonial legacy of Latin America.

Am also interested in Museo, and in hearing more about Reygades' newest film, which you are so passionate about, but which so few critics have toasted.

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#28

Post by beavis » Today, 10:27 am

Because Reygadas casts himself and his wife in Nuestro Tiempo, I've seen a lot of critics getting stuck on that, calling it some kind of ego-cinema. It has got so much to offer though that it would be great disservice to describe it like that. And that is even besides Reygadas's clear mastery of the form, of time and so on.

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#29

Post by cinewest » Today, 12:36 pm

beavis wrote:
Today, 10:27 am
Because Reygadas casts himself and his wife in Nuestro Tiempo, I've seen a lot of critics getting stuck on that, calling it some kind of ego-cinema. It has got so much to offer though that it would be great disservice to describe it like that. And that is even besides Reygadas's clear mastery of the form, of time and so on.
Seems to be more than that (people either seem to love or hate his films, mostly the latter here, but I agree that he clearly knows what he is doing and seems to be at the peak of his powers), though I have deliberately stayed away from reading too much about it, as it is one of the few films from last year that I have really looking forward to.

Just did a little review of my "to see" list for films made 2017-2019, and there are a total of 89 I have bookmarked (with 140 seen so far from this period, half of which are from 2017), of which 23 are from Latin America somewhere (have only seen 10 from this region during this period, so far). And while this may speak to a variety of things (my own particular interests, as well as the lack of availability of films from that region), I think it is also a testament to the rising quality of cinema there.

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