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UK/Ireland Challenge (Official, March 2021)

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AB537
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#241

Post by AB537 »

51. Oliver Twist (David Lean, 1948) 7.5/10
52. Hellraiser (Clive Barker, 1987) 5/10
53. The Man in Grey (Leslie Arliss, 1943) 7/10 #ms8
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Lu-Chin
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#242

Post by Lu-Chin »

Spoiler
1. The Italian Job (1969) 7/10 UK
2. Performance (1970) 7/10 UK
3. The Ipcress File (1965) 8/10 UK
4. Orlando (1992) 8/10 UK
5. Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960) 8/10 UK
6. Bad Timing (1980) 8/10 UK
7. Billy Liar (1963) 7/10 UK
8. Walkabout (1971) 7/10 UK
9. Hobson's Choice (1954) 6/10 UK
10. I Know Where I'm Going! (1945) 5/10 Scotland
11. A Taste of Honey (1961) 7/10 UK
12. The Servant (1963) 8/10 UK
13. A Hard Day's Night (1964) 7/10 UK
14. Georgy Girl (1966) 7/10 UK
15. Ratcatcher (1999) 6/10 Scotland
16. The Selfish Giant (2013) 8/10 UK
17. Victim (1961) 8/10 UK
18. Priest (1994) 6/10 UK
19. Sons and Lovers (1960) 6/10 UK
20. Red Road (2006) 8/10 Scotland
21. The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962) 7/10 UK
22. Hell Is a City (1960) 7/10 UK
23. A Kind of Loving (1962) 8/10 UK
24. An Education (2009) 8/10 UK
25. Ravenous (1999) 6/10 UK
26. The Knack ...and How to Get It (1965) 6/10 UK
27. Ginger & Rosa (2012) 5/10 UK
28. Wuthering Heights (2011) 7/10 UK
29. The Quatermass Xperiment (1955) 7/10 UK #MS 51
30. Girl with Green Eyes (1964) 7/10 UK
31. Beat Girl (1960) 7/10 UK
32. Good Vibrations (2012) 5/10 UK
33. The Gold Diggers (1983) 4/10 UK
34. Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment (1966) 5/10 UK
35. Taste of Fear (1961) 7/10 UK #MS 32
36. Hue and Cry (1947) 5/10 UK #MS 21
37. The Entertainer (1960) 7/10 UK
38. The Secret Garden (1993) 6/10 UK
39. Look Back in Anger (1959) 7/10 UK
40. Dead of Night (1945) 8/10 UK #MS 42
41. Culloden (1964) 6/10 Scotland
42. It Always Rains on Sunday (1947) 6/10 UK #MS 18
43. Under the Skin (1997) 6/10 UK
44. The Innocents (1961) 8/10 UK #MS 44
45. Promising Young Woman (2020) 7/10 UK
46. The Blue Lamp (1950) 6/10 UK #MS 23
47. Kes (1969) 8/10 UK
48. Ripley's Game (2002) 7/10 UK
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RogerTheMovieManiac88
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#243

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 »

Trying to keep up somewhat with Sol, haha...

(Screenshots from the stark and vengeful 'Black '47' and from Jennifer Cunningham's experimental 'Factory', a video piece on industrialism and the history of seaweed production)

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10. R.A.F. (1935, John Betts) - 6.5 or 7/10 / UK (England)
11. To Make It Live: Mainie Jellett 1897-1944 (1990, Godfrey Graham; presented, written, produced by the well-intentioned but wordily stiff Bruce Arnold) - 5 or 5.5/10 / Ireland
12. Nora (2000, Pat Murphy) - 6/10 / Ireland | UK | Italy | Germany
13. The Hallow (2015, Corin Hardy) - 5.5/10 / Ireland | UK
14. Black '47 (2018, Lance Daly) - 8.5/10 / Ireland | Luxembourg | Belgium

A batch of shorts (1 point for Ireland):

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15.
Ireland in a Horse-Drawn Caravan (1974, no director credited) - 5.5/10 / Ireland / 6 minutes
Vet on the Rocks (1976, Bob Quinn) - 7/10 / Ireland / 27 minutes
Factory (2012, Jennifer Cunningham) - 8 or 8.5/10 / Ireland / 8 minutes
Prison Door (2015, Kevin McCann) - 7/10 / Ireland | UK / 10 minutes
Lisa O'Neill: Pothole in the Sky (2016, Jason Kearney) - 7/10 / Ireland / 4 minutes
Miah (2016, Daniel Corcoran) - 6 or 6.5/10 / Ireland / 17 minutes
Looking For (2019, Cian Desmond) - 7/10 / Ireland / 5 minutes
One Night in Space (2020, Glenn Marshall) - 7 or 7.5/10 / Ireland | UK (Northern Ireland) / 3 minutes

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Side challenge tally: IE - 13, NI - 1
Last edited by RogerTheMovieManiac88 on April 3rd, 2021, 4:42 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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peeptoad
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#244

Post by peeptoad »

40. The Duke of Burgundy (2014) 7
41. The Courier (2020) 8
42. Red Joan (2018) 6
oi!
1. Whiskey Galore! (1949) 7 Scotland
2. 24 Hour Party People (2002) 7
3. Sabotage (1936) 6
4. Gwen (2018) 7 Wales
5. I Know Where I'm Going! (1945) 5
6. The Nanny (1965) 7 #MS1
7. Bloody Sunday (2002) 8 Northern Ireland
8. Deep End (1970) 9
9. Went the Day Well? (1942) 8 #MS6
10. Rasputin the Mad Monk (1966) 6
11. Great Expectations (1946) 7
12. The Lady Vanishes (1938) 8
13. The Witches (1966) 6
14a. Listen to Britain (1942) 20min 6
14b. Little Favour (2013) 22min 6
14c. Elephant (1989) 39min 8
15. The Creeping Flesh (1973) 7
16. The Rainbow (1989) 5
17. Blackmail (1929) 7
18. Shopping (1994) 6
19. Seance on a Wet Afternoon (1964) 8
20. Citadel (2012) 7 Ireland
21.The Lodgers (2017) 6 Ireland
22. Attack the Block (2011) 6
23. Third Star (2010) 7
24. Rocks (2019) 8
25. In Which We Serve (1942) 6
26. Unlocked (2017) 5
27. Genevieve (1953) 6
28. '71 (2014) 7
29. The Bed Sitting Room (1969) 6
30. Wreckers (2011) 5
31. Pride (2014) 8+ Wales
32. Velvet Goldmine (1998) 9 (rewatch)
33. The Wind That Shakes the Barley (2006) 8 Ireland
34. Ladybird Ladybird (1994) 7
35. Frankenstein Created Woman (1967) 7
36. Scars of Dracula (1970) 5
37. The Italian Job (1969) 7
38. A Room for Romeo Brass (1999) 8
39. The Red Shoes (1948) 9
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Onderhond
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#245

Post by Onderhond »

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05. 2.5* - Infinitum: Subject Unknown by Matthew Butler-Hart (2021)

Time loops on the cheap. I guess this is the kind of film we'll see more often in the coming months, as this was shot during lockdown (which, if you pay attention, was pretty obvious from the way it was set up). A low-budget film with a limited cast and few character interactions. It's a brave attempt, but not a great film. I will admit that I'm a bit tired of the time loop premise, especially since the first halves of these films invariably hinge on repetition. The second part is usually where things get a bit more interesting and Infinitum is no exception, though by that time it gets there boredom might've already settled it. Performances aren't that strong, the cinematography looks a little cheap and the premise takes too long to get interesting. The second half is in fact a lot more fun, but the film never really rises above its limitations and with so many similar films out there, Infinitum fails to get itself noticed. Decent sci-fi filler though, if you're in the mood.

UK Hun
01. 2.5* - Early Man by Nick Park
02. 2.5* - The Heiress by Chris Bell (2021)
03. 3.5* - Possum by Matthew Holness (2018)
04. 2.5* - Victor Frankenstein by Paul McGuigan (2015)
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sol
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#246

Post by sol »

Roger has motivated me to change my spoiler tag line. :shifty:
Just went you thought it was safe to stop watching Irish films...
1. Citadel (2012) Ireland
2. Mystics (2003) Ireland
3. Greta (2018) Ireland
4. Rat (2001) Ireland
5. Taffin (1988) Ireland
6. Stitches (2012) Ireland
7. The Stag (2013) Ireland
8. Red Mist (2008) Northern Ireland
9. Sea Fever (2019) Ireland
10. His House (2020) England
11. The Canal (2014) Ireland
12. Fractional (2011) Ireland
13. Eden Lake (2008) England
14. Belle (2013) Isle of Man
15. Gozo (2016) England
16. Rocks (2019) England
17. The Hallow (2015) Ireland
18. Get Duked! (2019) Scotland
19. Emma. (2020) England
20. Animals (2019) Ireland
21. Isolation (2005) Ireland
22. To Dream (2016) England
23. Grand Slam (1978) Wales
24. Crone Wood (2016) Ireland
25. Cherry Tree (2015) Ireland
26. Black Death (2010) England
27. Brackenmore (2016) Ireland
28. Rawhead Rex (1986) Ireland
29. French Exit. (2020) Ireland
30. Irish Destiny (1926) Ireland
31. Dream Demon (1988) England
32. Without Name (2016) Ireland
33. Extra Ordinary (2019) Ireland

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The plot is very coincidence-heavy and overly intricate here but the film maintains a light and offbeat tone throughout with both Maeve Higgins and Barry Ward delivering well in the lead roles. Ward is especially great as he becomes possessed by various individuals, including his wife at several key points. Intercut with various instructional videos by the famous spiritualist, the film comes with a pretty nifty style too - like a parody self-help video.
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sol
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#247

Post by sol »

Just went you thought it was safe to stop watching Irish films...
1. Citadel (2012) Ireland
2. Mystics (2003) Ireland
3. Greta (2018) Ireland
4. Rat (2001) Ireland
5. Taffin (1988) Ireland
6. Stitches (2012) Ireland
7. The Stag (2013) Ireland
8. Red Mist (2008) Northern Ireland
9. Sea Fever (2019) Ireland
10. His House (2020) England
11. The Canal (2014) Ireland
12. Fractional (2011) Ireland
13. Eden Lake (2008) England
14. Belle (2013) Isle of Man
15. Gozo (2016) England
16. Rocks (2019) England
17. The Hallow (2015) Ireland
18. Get Duked! (2019) Scotland
19. Emma. (2020) England
20. Animals (2019) Ireland
21. Isolation (2005) Ireland
22. To Dream (2016) England
23. Grand Slam (1978) Wales
24. Crone Wood (2016) Ireland
25. Cherry Tree (2015) Ireland
26. Black Death (2010) England
27. Brackenmore (2016) Ireland
28. Rawhead Rex (1986) Ireland
29. French Exit. (2020) Ireland
30. Irish Destiny (1926) Ireland
31. Dream Demon (1988) England
32. Without Name (2016) Ireland
33. Extra Ordinary (2019) Ireland
34. The Souvenir (2019) England

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The story here has some potential but the execution is too lethargic for its own good; the romantic connection between the pair is never well established and her insistence on supporting (rather than leaving) her boyfriend never makes sense. There is also so much of interest go on with the filmmaking angle -- including characters dissecting Psycho and Hitchcock knowing when to break convention -- that it feels like a missed opportunity to focus on the love angle.
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flavo5000
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#248

Post by flavo5000 »

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32. The Turn of the Screw (England, 2009)

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33. The Rolling Stones: Some Girls Live (England, 2011)

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34. Vampira a.k.a. Old Dracula (England, 1974)

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35. Citadel (Ireland, 2012)

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36. Red Road (Scotland, 2006)
Wot's All Dis Den
1. On a Clear Day (England/Scotland, 2005)
2. Tony (England, 2009)
3. School for Sex (England, 1969)
4. Play for Today: Red Shift (England, 1978)
5. The Mind of Mr. Soames (England, 1970)
6. My Name Is Joe (Scotland, 1998)
7a. Apaches (England, 1977)
7b. The Finishing Line (England, 1977)
7c. The Ash Tree (England, 1977)
8. The Secret Life of Words (Ireland, 2005)
9. Virgin Witch (England, 1972)
10. Heartless (England, 2009)
11. Elizabeth (England, 1998)
12. What the Peeper Saw (England, 1972)
13. A Taste of Honey (England, 1961)
14. The Beast in the Cellar (England, 1971)
15. I'm All Right Jack (England, 1959)
16. Goodbye Gemini (England, 1970)
17. Harry Price: Ghost Hunter (England, 2015)
18. The Starfish (England, 1952)
19. Nil by Mouth (England, 1997)
20. Anchoress (England, 1993)
21. Corruption (England, 1968)
22. Tower of Terror (England, 1941)
23. The Headless Ghost (England, 1959)
24. Brassed Off (England, 1996)
25-26. Escape Into Night (England, 1972)
27. The Souvenir (England, 2019)
28. Unearthly Stranger (England, 1963)
29. See No Evil (England, 1971)
30. First: The Official Film of the London 2012 Olympic Games (England, 2012)
31. Home Before Midnight (England, 1979)
32. The Turn of the Screw (England, 2009)
33. The Rolling Stones: Some Girls Live (England, 2011)
34. Vampira a.k.a. Old Dracula (England, 1974)
35. Citadel (Ireland, 2012)
36. Rd Road (Scotland, 2006)
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RogerTheMovieManiac88
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#249

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 »

One thing I was wondering about; does one need 80 minutes of shorts for one entry from a particular country, or does each short count as an entry for the bonus challenge?
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#250

Post by ChrisReynolds »

Previously watched...
1. Oliver Twist (Lean, 1948) 4341 checks, 6 official lists 7/10
2. Ivanhoe (Thorpe, 1952) 981 checks, 2 official lists 5/10
3. Robin Hood (Scott, 2010) 23467 checks, 1 official list 3/10
4. Ironclad (English, 2011) 1231 checks, 0 official lists Wales 4/10
5. Hunger (McQueen, 2008) 9015 checks, 6 official lists Northern Ireland 6/10
6. Omagh (Travis, 2004) 88 checks, 0 official lists Ireland 5/10
7. '71 (Demange, 2014) 1717 checks, 1 official list 7/10
Themes in British moviemaking: Geezers and Gangsters

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8. Green Street / Hooligans (Alexander, 2005) 9785 checks, 1 official list
Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels took Tarantino's fast-talking and exciting style of gangster movies and mixed them with traditional British gangster narratives. It was such a huge hit that not only did a lot of British filmmakers want to jump on the bandwagon, but the National Lottery film fund became willing to put money towards them, leading to a lot of imitator films about hard-man cockney gangsters. This film came towards the end of this cycle, and like most of them is bad and morally bankrupt; portraying criminal gangs as admirable heroes and glorifying their violence, which director Lexi Alexander lovingly shows in slow motion with blood arcing across the screen. However, it's also full of absurdities which meant I could never take it seriously, with Elijah Wood completely unconvincing as a violence-loving hooligan and Charlie Hunnan doing one of the worst Cockney accents of all time, despite being English himself. Because of this silliness, frequent violence and plot twists, this was amusing enough not to dislike. Although this film doesn't have much going for it, it's popular enough with its target audience that it's on the IMDb top 50 best Sports movies list.
4/10

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9. RocknRolla (Ritchie, 2008) 11618 checks, 0 official lists
You know a trend is played out when the originator starts imitating themselves. This was Guy Ritchie's return to the cockney gangster well after several missteps, including the disastrous Madonna-vehicle Swept Away. Essentially this is the same film as Lock Stock and Snatch, with a collection of competing gangsters all after a MacGuffin (in this case, it's a painting). Although I enjoyed the first two, this is a much weaker version, with the characters boiled down to even thinner irritating stereotypes, and the complicated double-crossing relying heavily on coincidence. Guy Ritchie's flashy direction is present and correct with a lot of kinetic camera shots and bursts of frenetic action, and at least the cast seem like they're having fun. Although RocknRolla hit number 1 at the UK box office, it didn't see much of a profit, leading Ritchie to move his style to big budget action/fantasy projects, where the geezers and gangsters sometimes fit (Sherlock Holmes) and sometimes don't (King Arthur).
4/10

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Bing147
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#251

Post by Bing147 »

28. Topsy-Turvy (1999, Mike Leigh) United Kingdom
29. Ratcatcher (1999, Lynne Ramsay) Scotland
30. Kes (1969, Ken Loach) United Kindgdom
31. Brighton Rock (1948, John Boulting) United Kingdom
Last edited by Bing147 on March 23rd, 2021, 2:41 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Obgeoff
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#252

Post by Obgeoff »

5. The Selfish Giant (2013, Barnard) 8 England
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#253

Post by maxwelldeux »

Islands in the Stream
1. Kes (1969, UK)
2. Gregory's Girl (1980, Scotland)
3. Withnail & I (1987, UK)
4. You Were Never Really Here (2017, UK)
5. The Imposter (2012, UK)
6. Secrets & Lies (1996, UK)
7. Attack the Block (2011, UK)
8. Ratcatcher (1999, Scotland)
9. Local Hero (1983, Scotland)
10. Orlando (1992, UK)
11. Where Eagles Dare (1968, UK)
12. The Gold Diggers (1983, UK)
13. I Am Belfast (2015, Northern Ireland)
14. The Wild Geese (1978, UK) 4/10
This... did not age well. Didn't seem to be great at the time, either.

15. Escape to Athena (1979, UK) 6/10
Decent enough action film about an escape from a WW2 prison camp on a Greek island. Gorgeous aerial photography. But the person who had the idea of "You know who would be ideal to play the part of a German nazi guard whose first language is German? James Bond" should be shot.
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#254

Post by OldAle1 »

Tea and Crumpets and Whats that on the Telly?

1. Anti-Clock (Jane Arden/Jack Bond, 1979) UK (England)
2. The 39 Steps (Alfred Hitchcock, 1935) UK (England) (re-watch)
3. Easy Virtue (Alfred Hitchcock, 1928) UK (England)
4. The Farmer's Wife (Alfred Hitchcock, 1928) UK (England)

I re-watched Blackmail a few weeks back for the 1929 poll and thought, well, now's the time to catch up on the last few Hitches I haven't seen. And while these are hardly among his best they both turned out for me a little bit better than their reputations would have it, though I'm sort of out of the mood for this stuff now, and may not bother with going through any more of these early non-thrillers this month...

Easy Virtue does have something in common with the thriller genre though; it's a morality play about a divorcee trying to keep her "scandalous" background a secret when she finds herself in love again while on the French Riviera, hiding her name and past. This does have a certain amount of suspense, but it's mostly fairly obvious where it's going, at least if you know 1920s moral standards. I'm not sure Hitchcock has ever been called a feminist, but there are moments in many of his films where his gaze up women is that of a sympathetic, relatively progressive filmmaker who has little patience for the hypocrisies and judgements of the "beautiful people", and this film is full of them. Really nicely shot and with some very cool somewhat expressionist sets and shots, particularly in the early part of the film.

The Farmer's Wife is a broad comedy about, you guessed it. The farmer in question has in fact lost his wife to death, and years later wishes to marry again. His faithful and beautiful housekeeper helps him with finding and contacting three eligible possibilities, but there are problems with all of them and despite this being a 93-year-old romantic comedy, it comes to much the same ending a rom-com with this setup would close with in 2021. Still fairly amusing at times, and Lillian Hall-Davis is wonderful as Amarinta, the housekeeper.

5. The Cement Garden (Andrew Birkin, 1993) UK (England) (+France/Germany)

DTC. There were a lot of quirky British films that got stateside release in the early 90s; in fact if you had asked me at the time which country was making the best films, I probably would have replied that it was the country with Peter Greenaway, Derek Jarman, Sally Potter, Terence Davies and Bruce Robinson - seemed like there was something new and cool every month at least. Of course that might have been my own tastes, or what happened to show in Chicago, but I still remember that era as something of a golden age. This one I neve managed to see when new; not sure if it had much of a release but it had been on my to-see list for a long time. And it was worth the wait and didn't really disappoint, though I can't say it seems like a major favorite either. Teenagers Charlotte Gainsbourg and Andrew Robinson (supposed to be a year or two younger I guess) live with their two younger siblings and their mother in a very odd squarish house

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that to me looks like a foreboding face, in the middle of something like a wilderness of industrial waste, scrub grass, etc, seemingly miles from anything else. At first the film has a rather black comedy feel to it but it moves into more black and less comic as it goes along, as the children have to deal with tragedy - and Robinson has to deal with his unhealthy attraction to his sister, and his flights of imagination courtesy of a pulp sci-fi book that inhabits much of his imagination. This doesn't quite add up to much beyond the quirkiness and moodiness, but it's nicely shot and acted and has an unsettling feeling that I liked a lot.

6. Good-Time Girl (David MacDonald, 1948) UK (England)

So-so British noir very much in the juvenile delinquent-cautionary tale mode, courtesy as much to Muriel and Stanley Box, the screenwriter and producer as anyone else I'd imagine. I saw three of Muriel Box's films as director last year, and she was definitely much interested in the difficult place of underclass women in society, and that's the whole thing here, as we are introduced to one delinquent girl (Diana Dors, 17 and in her second credited role) who is being told the terrible story of another girl just like her and...flashback time! Another girl just like her (Jean Kent, who was much older than a teen but is reasonably convincing) gets sacked from her job for a misunderstanding, beaten up by her father, moves out and then gets tangled up with a slimy lodger living next door to her flat, and a harsh nightclub owner (Herbert Lom, as perfectly cast as could be), and things just go downhill to reform school and a life of crime. A great cast and some pretty terrific photography - a couple of shots are just *perfect* emblems of the noir style, cigarettes in the foreground with cops and crimes happening in the distance - but it just didn't quite add up for me. Reading some reviews now and thinking about it perhaps it just wasn't the right moment, it seems better than I remember. Eh, it happens.

7. Sapphire (Basil Dearden, 1959) UK (England)

DTC. Basil Dearden was a name I only knew vaguely for many years, as one of those British directors who had a decent rep, but never quite made it to international star status like Lean or Reed, let alone Hitchcock. It seems the world of criticism is catching up to him though just as I am learning more about him and seeing more of his still-underrated work. On the basis of films like this one, Victim and Pool of London, it seems he was interested in the social milieu and how that led to crime and punishment, as much as the crimes or black hearts of individual men and women, and here he manages to make a racially-tinged police procedural/late noir (in color) that does as good a job as any from this period I've seen from anywhere of showing the nuances of racial animus and feelings - everybody in this film has an opinion about it, but they are all slightly different from each other, and they all seem to make sense in the context of the quick brushtroke characterizations most of the characters receive. A young woman has been murdered - found in a park in London, but not killed there, and the police on the scene led by Chief Inspector Hazard (Nigel Patrick) conclude very quickly that she was killed somewhere else and brought there. They manage to identify her fairly quickly and start interviewing those who knew her starting with her boyfriend David (Paul Massie), but when they contact her brother, a doctor working in Scotland, they find out that he's black - and that the girl, his full sister, was passing for white. This raises all kinds of further complications as it turns out that she was resented by many black former friends who she'd dropped, and that there might be racial hatred involved in her killing on the part of one or more white people perhaps connected to David (who never really seems like the killer, though he's painted as such). This is a little too schematic at times but it works on the whole and is a welcome serious and thoughtful look at race that tries to do justice to as many points of view as possible, all within the constraints of an otherwise fairly typical cops and criminals pic.

8. Orlando (Sally Potter, 1992) (re-watch) UK (England) + a bunch of other countries
9. The Man Who Cried (Sally Potter, 2000) UK (England) + France

I saw Orlando when it came out in the cinema, and remember liking it but not loving it (had it rated 7); I've since gotten to really like Sally Potter's work overall so it was long overdue time to revisit. And I got quite a bit more out of it this time, or perhaps I should say the things I (dimly) remembered not liking bothered me less - Billy Zane's sort of exaggerated romance-novel-book-cover American character near the end of the film, and the general feeling of, how to put it, disconnection through much of the film. It's a film of discrete scenes, beautifully composed and often still or tableaux-like shots that gradually, almost imperceptibly, becomes more "natural" and human-scale even as our main character - Tilda Swinton in the performance that deservedly brought her to more mainstream attention - passes through the centuries. Only at the end of the film does she feel truly alive and we the audience can revel in her finally accepting herself and casting off many of the sorrows of the past. I haven't read the book by Virginia Woolf which I've seen described as a satire, but the film doesn't really play up the social criticism very strongly apart from perhaps a certain mockery of an encrusted aristocracy so divorced from reality that nobody seems to notice - or care - that Orlando has lived for centuries without aging but with a (magical) sex change, except insofar as it impacts his/her ownership of an estate. In any case it's very enjoyable and in the end rather moving, though I still prefer the earlier Thriller and The Gold Diggers.

The Man Who Cried has been on my to-see list since it came out; a friend long-ago in Chicago went into raptures over it, and saw it I believe half a dozen times in the cinema, and I had one conversation with her about it and I can't forget how she seemed to go to another place, into raptures. But I never saw it - I lived in Vermont by that time and if it played at all near me, it only did so for a week I'm sure, and I missed it, and finally just got around to it. Needless to say my expectations were high, and unfortunately it didn't really live up to them at all, though I didn't dislike it. The cinematography of Sacha Vierny alone - though it's over-dark in the DVD transfer, and alas there doesn't seem to be an HD version available - makes it worthy; this was the last film from the man who photographed much of the best work of Alain Resnais and Peter Greenaway and he still had a touch with color and texture that few could match. The story is one of those sweeping epic/romantic type things about a young woman (Christina Ricci, somewhat miscast I think) who has grown up in the UK before WWII, the daughter of Jewish refugees from Russia who came during the pogroms after WWI, and is now with an opera troupe in Italy along with her older Russian friend (Cate Blanchett) and an awful, smarmy Italian tenor (John Turturro); she falls for a handsome gypsy horseman (Johnny Depp) and struggles to survive as the war threatens and laws against both Jews and gypsies start coming down. Blanchett is really good, and got some awards consideration - she brings most of what little humor there is to this fairly melodramatic piece, and we also have old vets Oleg Yankovsky and Harry Dean Stanton on board, but it just doesn't come together - feels way too short for one thing at 100 minutes to properly build it's story and give resonance to all the characters and their places in history, and in the end it was... worth seeing for me, overall, but not something that worked on my emotions as I thought it might.

10. Tiger Bay (J. Lee Thompson, 1959) UK (England)

DTC. More Brit-noir, sort of anyway. Hayley Mills in her film debut (OK she was in a film in 1947 as an infant if that counts) at 12 plays Gillie, a tomboy who sees a murder but is fascinated with the killer (Horst Buchholz), a Polish seaman who kills his ex-girlfriend (with a gun she had) in her apartment during an argument. Gillie lives with an aunt she doesn't get along with in a crumbling tenement in Cardiff near the sea and fantasizes about cops and robbers, cowboys and Indians and such, and isn't necessarily used to telling the truth or cooperating with adults, something the Superintendent on the case (Hayley's father John Mills) recognizes but can't do much about, she being a minor and claiming to not know anything about the crime. This is well done and pretty suspenseful, and has a nicely pessimistic feel throughout - everybody is trapped in some way here in this poor town with few jobs and little to do. It certainly has some of those moments of "oh, no kid is really that clever or self-assured" that tend to afflict most adventure films with adolescent protagonists, but Hayley is good enough to keep such thoughts to a minimum, and the rest of the cast is fine as well, though John Mills' part is fairly ordinary - seems like he was maybe hired mostly to help out and be around his daughter, or perhaps to lend the film a big name. Excellent location photography, mostly in the Cardiff area.

11. Song of the Sea (Tomm Moore, 2014) Ireland/UK/bunch of other countries

DTC. Watched on St Patrick's Day - it was this or The Quiet Man and this won out, though I'm not sure it's the better film. It's a pretty solid animation based on old Irish mythology, about a Selkie (seal-woman) who marries a lighthouse keeper, and the adventures their daughter (also a Selkie) and son have several years later, after she's gone away (presumed dead, but I think most adults watching this will guess where things are headed) and the children's grandmother has decided they can't live in the lighthouse anymore. I don't have any particular feeling for Irish traditions or myths, and no Irish blood that I know of, but I did know a bit of this legend, and it all felt a little too familiar and played out in a pretty predictable way. Still the animation - very consciously 2D for the most part and cartoonish in a particular way that grew on me - the music, and the voice work is all top-notch, and it was certainly well worth seeing if not something I'm likely to remember for long. Maybe I will watch it again next time I see my brother - who does for some reason have an obsession with Ireland, and whose ex-wife is part-Irish - and his kids. I think they're just the age for it now and may have finally outgrown Frozen and The Little Mermaid for a while.
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#255

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

Sorry lads, I’ve been real busy with work, the debut poll and personal stuff, so haven’t been able to keep this as up to date as I liked. I really hope to do another update tomorrow, or at least Wednesday.
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#256

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

RogerTheMovieManiac88 wrote: March 22nd, 2021, 4:36 pm One thing I was wondering about; does one need 80 minutes of shorts for one entry from a particular country, or does each short count as an entry for the bonus challenge?
Good question. My first instinct is the later; every short count as an entry.
But this might give too much advantage to short watchers. So if there is enough support I’m also open to needing 80 min (or at least 41 of those 80) needed from a country to count.
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#257

Post by AB537 »

54-57. Shetland season 3 (BBC One, 2016) 8/10 ... 61 minutes carried over ... #Scotland
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#258

Post by Kublai Khan »

Bally Jerry, pranged his kite right in the how's-your-father; hairy blighter, dicky-birded, feathered back on his sammy, took a waspy, flip…
1. The Nest (Sean Durkin-2020) United Kingdom/Canada (190 checks)
2. The Land Before Time (Don Bluth-1988) Ireland/USA (21,688 checks)
3. The Miracle (Michel Carré-1912) United Kingdom/Germany (5 checks)
4. Brief Encounter (David Lean-1945) United Kingdom (7,888 checks)
5. Doctor Who Season 18, Episodes 5-8 "Meglos (Parts 1-4)" (Terence Dudley-1980) United Kingdom (88min)
6. On Her Majesty's Secret Service (Peter R. Hunt-1969) United Kingdom/Switzerland (9,341 checks)
7. Having You (Sam Hoare-2013) United Kingdom (36 checks)
8. Lessons of Darkness (Werner Herzog-1992) United Kingdom/France/Germany (1,278 checks)
8. Sexy Beast (Jonathan Glazer-2000) United Kingdom/Spain (6,367 checks)
9. Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde (Roy Ward Baker-1971) United Kingdom (430 checks) MS#36
10. David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet (Alastair Fothergill, Keith Scholey, Jonathan Hughes-2020) United Kingdom (481 checks)
11. His House (Remi Weekes-2020) United Kingdom (564 checks)
12. Peeping Tom (Michael Powell-1960) United Kingdom (7,531 checks)
13. Zardoz (John Boorman-1974) United Kingdom/USA/Ireland (2,051 checks)

I'd heard about this bizarrely bad movie starring a post-Bond Sean Connery and I was low-key delighted to see it fit this challenge. What a strange mush of a film. Actually, I appreciate that this was made and seen through to the end and released. What a brilliant accomplishment. It's the perfect visual encapsulation of a stoned college student explaining their idea of spiritual relationships to you.
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#259

Post by Knaldskalle »

2. The Mouse That Roared (Arnold. 1959). Another fine comedy from the UK. Peter Sellers in multiple roles.

Carry On... Watching
1. Carry On... Up the Khyber (Thomas, 1968).
2. The Mouse That Roared (Arnold. 1959).
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#260

Post by sol »

Lonewolf2003 wrote: March 22nd, 2021, 11:15 pm
RogerTheMovieManiac88 wrote: March 22nd, 2021, 4:36 pm One thing I was wondering about; does one need 80 minutes of shorts for one entry from a particular country, or does each short count as an entry for the bonus challenge?
Good question. My first instinct is the later; every short count as an entry.
But this might give too much advantage to short watchers. So if there is enough support I’m also open to needing 80 min (or at least 41 of those 80) needed from a country to count.
You're right. That would give too much advantage to short watches. Let's go with the 41 minute suggestion. B)
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#261

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 »

I think I'll pretty much only be viewing short films from the Republic and Northern Ireland. I could just provide a breakdown of minutes watched at challenge end. I rather agree with Sol here.
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#262

Post by peeptoad »

43. Jabberwocky (1977) 6
44. The Disappearance of Alice Creed (2009) 8 Isle of Man
oi!
1. Whiskey Galore! (1949) 7 Scotland
2. 24 Hour Party People (2002) 7
3. Sabotage (1936) 6
4. Gwen (2018) 7 Wales
5. I Know Where I'm Going! (1945) 5
6. The Nanny (1965) 7 #MS1
7. Bloody Sunday (2002) 8 Northern Ireland
8. Deep End (1970) 9
9. Went the Day Well? (1942) 8 #MS6
10. Rasputin the Mad Monk (1966) 6
11. Great Expectations (1946) 7
12. The Lady Vanishes (1938) 8
13. The Witches (1966) 6
14a. Listen to Britain (1942) 20min 6
14b. Little Favour (2013) 22min 6
14c. Elephant (1989) 39min 8
15. The Creeping Flesh (1973) 7
16. The Rainbow (1989) 5
17. Blackmail (1929) 7
18. Shopping (1994) 6
19. Seance on a Wet Afternoon (1964) 8
20. Citadel (2012) 7 Ireland
21.The Lodgers (2017) 6 Ireland
22. Attack the Block (2011) 6
23. Third Star (2010) 7
24. Rocks (2019) 8
25. In Which We Serve (1942) 6
26. Unlocked (2017) 5
27. Genevieve (1953) 6
28. '71 (2014) 7
29. The Bed Sitting Room (1969) 6
30. Wreckers (2011) 5
31. Pride (2014) 8+ Wales
32. Velvet Goldmine (1998) 9 (rewatch)
33. The Wind That Shakes the Barley (2006) 8 Ireland
34. Ladybird Ladybird (1994) 7
35. Frankenstein Created Woman (1967) 7
36. Scars of Dracula (1970) 5
37. The Italian Job (1969) 7
38. A Room for Romeo Brass (1999) 8
39. The Red Shoes (1948) 9
40. The Duke of Burgundy (2014) 7
41. The Courier (2020) 8
42. Red Joan (2018) 6
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#263

Post by Ebbywebby »

Spoiler
1. Cucumber Castle (1970)...curious but awful Bee Gees vehicle. Long before their disco phase, of course. I can't believe I was the first to check it.
2. Leo the Last (1970)...really frustrating film. Initially fits in well with simultaneous social satires by folks like Hal Ashby, Milos Forman and Robert Altman, and then it goes really, really over the top in the final half-hour. No saving it.
3. Play for Today: The Long Distance Piano Player (1970). I never knew about this until I came across it in the recently created "Psychedelic Celluloid" list. Being a major lover of early Kinks, I HAD to see a film starring Ray Davies in his prime. IMDb page says it's 80 minutes, but it was actually 61 and I don't think it was edited. It wasn't so good, but I was excited to find it online. A quiet, melancholy guy (being quiet saved Ray from doing much acting) with a loving wife is trying to break the record for marathon piano-playing. He's intending to play for four days straight. And he has a sleazy manager promoting the event, but no one cares. Ray does sing one little song in the middle, though the credits indicate he didn't do all the piano-playing.
4a. Les Bicyclettes de Belsize (1968, 29 minutes)...cute romantic, musical short with little or no dialogue a la "Umbrellas of Cherbourg." I've been obsessed with this song ever since:

4b. Grave New World (1972, 29 minutes): promotional film for the same-named Strawbs album. I love Jethro Tull and Fairport Convention from that era, but this group just doesn't quite get there for me. [YouTube]
4c. Dolly Story (1968, 25 minutes): documentary about swinging London, with a lecherous emphasis on the young "dollies." There's a solid music clip of Chris Farlowe singing the Stones' "Out of Time," and Sammy Davis Jr. inexplicably pops up for a second. Some interesting footage of the young Vidal Sassoon working in his salon. [YouTube]
5. Little Malcolm and His Struggle Against the Eunuchs (1974)...unusual film, very play-like with only five speaking parts. George Harrison produced. Easily the most ballsy, masculine performance I've seen from the usually wispy John Hurt. He's an expelled art student who recruits three pliable friends to launch a fascist political party called The Party of the Dynamic Erection. They vow to take over the world, but it's all just a posturing game and the story seems designed to take the wind out of impotent, armchair revolutionaries who are all talk and no action. It's also an incel film before its time. Arguably, David Warner gets more good lines in a supporting performance than Hurt does as the lead. But I had trouble deciphering the accents at times -- the sound quality was less than ideal. Directed by Stuart Cooper, better known for "Overlord" (1975). This was on my watchlist, and I would have watched it in the near future regardless of any challenge.
6. All My Loving (1968)...55-minute film made for British TV tries to figure out what's happenin' with today's music and comes off a bit square. There are plenty of interview clips with big names like Paul McCartney, Jimi Hendrix, Eric Burdon, Donovan and Pete Townshend, but it's not easy to tell whether it's exclusive to the film or just recycled from elsewhere. Adds a solid dose of live Cream footage.
7. Home Sweet Home (1982)...early Mike Leigh film for the BBC. About three postmen and their women.
8. Who's Who (1979)...even earlier Mike Leigh. About stockbrokers. Both of these Leigh films already were on my watchlist but, in hindsight, "Who's Who" wasn't really a must-see. Not impressive.
9. Jamaica Inn (1939)...off the top of my head, I can't think of a Hitchcock film except "Topaz" than I enjoyed less than this one.
10. Christine (1987)...Alan Clarke project for the BBC, just 52 minutes. About a circle of bland teenagers who are casually hooked on heroin.
11. Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde (1971)...the title is self-explanatory. Why, oh why, did I think this movie starred Oliver Reed?? I was eager to see Reed cavorting in drag. I should have directly checked the cast listing. Instead it's a no-name actor as Jekyll, and "Sister Hyde" is played by a separate actress (Martine Beswick, who had been in a couple of James Bond films). I almost bailed out of the film altogether, but I managed to finish it. Barely. How a story like this could be presented with such a complete lack of self-awareness and humor, I'll never know. Lousy. It's not even sexy, though Beswick contributes a quick breast flash in one scene. At least it had Hammer's typically good cinematography, costumes and sets.
12. Henry V (1944)...I'm pretty sure this one counts as a UK film. Strange...I was really enjoying most of it, but it suddenly turned into a crashing bore in the final 25 minutes of denouement. I don't know whether to blame Shakespeare or the adaptation's editing.
shorts, with three minutes of carryover from the first set
13a. Paradigm (1970, 10 minutes): experimental short designed to show the ravages of age on the mind. One actor portrays an aging person throughout his lifespan, speaking in a nonsense language that has appearances of being erudite. [Ubu Film]
13b. Death May Be Your Santa Claus (1969, 36 minutes though IMDb/ICM says it's 50). Wanted to like this more than I did. The film follows a young Black militant, but it's more about vignettes than a linear story. The psych-rock score by the Second Hand is initially interesting but turns a bit unwelcome by the end. [rarefilmm]
13c. Experience (1968, 29 minutes)...early film about Jimi Hendrix. Has more atmosphere than insight. I'm really just the second to check this?
13d. Stanley Pickle (2010, 11 minutes)...It's on YouTube. I wish the story was a quarter as good as the visual imagination and effects. This completes another set of shorts, with six minutes extra.
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#264

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 »

(Screenshots from 'The Levelling', 'Portrait of Dublin' and 'The Rooster, the Crocodile and the Night Sky')

16. The Playboys (1992, Gillies MacKinnon) - 5 or 5.5/10 / USA | Ireland | UK
17. Derek Mahon: The Poetry Nonsense (2009, Roger Greene) - 6/10 / Ireland
18. Honeytrap (2014, Rebecca Johnson) - 6/10 / UK (England)
19. The Levelling (2016, Hope Dickson Leach) - 9/10 / UK (England)
20. Andie The Great (2018, David Laurence, Josh Romyn) - 4.5 or 5/10 / Ireland | Canada

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A batch of shorts (2 points for Ireland):

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21-22.
Sally Sallies Forth (1928, Frances Lascot) - 6/10 / UK (England) / 27 minutes
The Polite Burglar (1929, Sadie Andrews) - 5/10 / UK (England) / 9 minutes
Portrait of Dublin (1952, Liam Ó Laoghaire) - 7 or 7.5/10 / Ireland / 17 minutes
Blessed Fruit (1999, Orla Walsh) - 6.5 or 7/10 / Ireland (*incorrectly tagged with UK on IMDb*) / 16 minutes
Atlantic (2008, Conor Ferguson) - 7/10 / Ireland / 4 minutes
The Rooster, the Crocodile and the Night Sky (2008, Pádraig Fagan) - 8 or 8.5/10 / Ireland / 7 minutes
Trolley Boy (2009, Teemu Auersalo) - 6.5 or 7/10 / Ireland / 4 minutes
Through the Night (2010, Lee Cronin) - 5 or 5.5/10 / Ireland / 11 minutes
The Song of Amergin / Duan Amhairghine (2016, Dónal Ó Céilleachair) - 7.5/10 / Ireland / 6 minutes
The Overcoat (2018, Meelis Arulepp, Sean Mullen) - 6/10 / Ireland | Estonia / 30 minutes
Innocent Boy (2020, John Connors) - 6.5 or 7/10 / Ireland / 15 minutes
Kelly (2020, Solène Guichard) - 7/10 / Ireland | UK (Northern Ireland) / 7 minutes
Karen Meets Brian (Coronavirus Comedy) (2021, Roddy B. Murray) - 5.5 or 6/10 / Ireland / 7 minutes

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Side challenge tally: IE - 18, NI - 1
Last edited by RogerTheMovieManiac88 on March 26th, 2021, 1:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#265

Post by Melvelet »

1. This Sporting Life 1963 8/10
2. The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner 1962 8/10
3. Alice in Wonderland 1966 7/10
I expected it to be high but it was more stoned. Still cool, slower than I would have thought with that DVD cover and the short runtime

4. Darling 1965 7/10
Current recommendation: Monday (2000)


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#266

Post by flavo5000 »

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37-38. Safe House Season 2: The Crow E1-4 (England, 2014)
Wot's All Dis Den
1. On a Clear Day (England/Scotland, 2005)
2. Tony (England, 2009)
3. School for Sex (England, 1969)
4. Play for Today: Red Shift (England, 1978)
5. The Mind of Mr. Soames (England, 1970)
6. My Name Is Joe (Scotland, 1998)
7a. Apaches (England, 1977)
7b. The Finishing Line (England, 1977)
7c. The Ash Tree (England, 1977)
8. The Secret Life of Words (Ireland, 2005)
9. Virgin Witch (England, 1972)
10. Heartless (England, 2009)
11. Elizabeth (England, 1998)
12. What the Peeper Saw (England, 1972)
13. A Taste of Honey (England, 1961)
14. The Beast in the Cellar (England, 1971)
15. I'm All Right Jack (England, 1959)
16. Goodbye Gemini (England, 1970)
17. Harry Price: Ghost Hunter (England, 2015)
18. The Starfish (England, 1952)
19. Nil by Mouth (England, 1997)
20. Anchoress (England, 1993)
21. Corruption (England, 1968)
22. Tower of Terror (England, 1941)
23. The Headless Ghost (England, 1959)
24. Brassed Off (England, 1996)
25-26. Escape Into Night (England, 1972)
27. The Souvenir (England, 2019)
28. Unearthly Stranger (England, 1963)
29. See No Evil (England, 1971)
30. First: The Official Film of the London 2012 Olympic Games (England, 2012)
31. Home Before Midnight (England, 1979)
32. The Turn of the Screw (England, 2009)
33. The Rolling Stones: Some Girls Live (England, 2011)
34. Vampira a.k.a. Old Dracula (England, 1974)
35. Citadel (Ireland, 2012)
36. Red Road (Scotland, 2006)
37-38. Safe House Season 2: The Crow E1-4 (2014)
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#267

Post by sol »

Ugh. These last two female-directed films from England have been disappointing. :yucky: Back to reliable ol' Ireland tomorrow. :sweat:
Just went you thought it was safe to stop watching Irish films...
1. Citadel (2012) Ireland
2. Mystics (2003) Ireland
3. Greta (2018) Ireland
4. Rat (2001) Ireland
5. Taffin (1988) Ireland
6. Stitches (2012) Ireland
7. The Stag (2013) Ireland
8. Red Mist (2008) Northern Ireland
9. Sea Fever (2019) Ireland
10. His House (2020) England
11. The Canal (2014) Ireland
12. Fractional (2011) Ireland
13. Eden Lake (2008) England
14. Belle (2013) Isle of Man
15. Gozo (2016) England
16. Rocks (2019) England
17. The Hallow (2015) Ireland
18. Get Duked! (2019) Scotland
19. Emma. (2020) England
20. Animals (2019) Ireland
21. Isolation (2005) Ireland
22. To Dream (2016) England
23. Grand Slam (1978) Wales
24. Crone Wood (2016) Ireland
25. Cherry Tree (2015) Ireland
26. Black Death (2010) England
27. Brackenmore (2016) Ireland
28. Rawhead Rex (1986) Ireland
29. French Exit. (2020) Ireland
30. Irish Destiny (1926) Ireland
31. Dream Demon (1988) England
32. Without Name (2016) Ireland
33. Extra Ordinary (2019) Ireland
34. The Souvenir (2019) England
35. The Riot Club (2014) England

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While this sounds a bit like The Wolf of Wall Street with the university elite club members all going by the belief that money can buy their way out of anything, this is nowhere near as fun or involving as that. The biggest issue is that all of the characters are arrogant jerks without an iota of Leo's charisma; they also tend to mumble their lines, leading to a near intolerable first half. The second half (with a sobering dinner party) is a noticeable improvement.
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#268

Post by hurluberlu »

12. Promising Young Woman (Emerald Fennell, 2020) 5-
13. High Fidelity (Stephen Frears, 2000) [Rewatch] 7+ (=)
Spoiler
1. The Death of Stalin (Armando Iannucci, 2017) 8
2. Stan & Ollie (Jon S. Baird, 2018) 7+
3. The End of the Affair (Neil Jordan, 1999) 8-
4. Educating Rita (Lewis Gilbert, 1983) 7-
5. Denial (Mick Jackson, 2016) 6
6. T2 Trainspotting (Danny Boyle, 2017) 7-
7. Loving Vincent (Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, 2017) 6
8. Darkest Hour (Joe Wright, 2017) 7+
9. Tiny Giants 3D (Mark Brownlow, 2014) 7-
10. Mary Queen of Scots (Josie Rourke, 2018) 7
11. The Wife (Björn Runge, 2017) 6
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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#269

Post by Bing147 »

32. The Knack …and How to Get It (1965, Richard Lester) United Kingdom
33. The Italian Job (1969, Peter Collinson) United Kingdom
34. Kingsman: The Secret Service (2014, Matthew Vaughn) United Kingdom
Last edited by Bing147 on March 24th, 2021, 2:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#270

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

sol wrote: March 23rd, 2021, 8:24 am
Lonewolf2003 wrote: March 22nd, 2021, 11:15 pm
RogerTheMovieManiac88 wrote: March 22nd, 2021, 4:36 pm One thing I was wondering about; does one need 80 minutes of shorts for one entry from a particular country, or does each short count as an entry for the bonus challenge?
Good question. My first instinct is the later; every short count as an entry.
But this might give too much advantage to short watchers. So if there is enough support I’m also open to needing 80 min (or at least 41 of those 80) needed from a country to count.
You're right. That would give too much advantage to short watches. Let's go with the 41 minute suggestion. B)
Okay we will go with that!
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#271

Post by Ebbywebby »

Spoiler
1. Cucumber Castle (1970)...curious but awful Bee Gees vehicle. Long before their disco phase, of course. I can't believe I was the first to check it.
2. Leo the Last (1970)...really frustrating film. Initially fits in well with simultaneous social satires by folks like Hal Ashby, Milos Forman and Robert Altman, and then it goes really, really over the top in the final half-hour. No saving it.
3. Play for Today: The Long Distance Piano Player (1970). I never knew about this until I came across it in the recently created "Psychedelic Celluloid" list. Being a major lover of early Kinks, I HAD to see a film starring Ray Davies in his prime. IMDb page says it's 80 minutes, but it was actually 61 and I don't think it was edited. It wasn't so good, but I was excited to find it online. A quiet, melancholy guy (being quiet saved Ray from doing much acting) with a loving wife is trying to break the record for marathon piano-playing. He's intending to play for four days straight. And he has a sleazy manager promoting the event, but no one cares. Ray does sing one little song in the middle, though the credits indicate he didn't do all the piano-playing.
4a. Les Bicyclettes de Belsize (1968, 29 minutes)...cute romantic, musical short with little or no dialogue a la "Umbrellas of Cherbourg." I've been obsessed with this song ever since:

4b. Grave New World (1972, 29 minutes): promotional film for the same-named Strawbs album. I love Jethro Tull and Fairport Convention from that era, but this group just doesn't quite get there for me. [YouTube]
4c. Dolly Story (1968, 25 minutes): documentary about swinging London, with a lecherous emphasis on the young "dollies." There's a solid music clip of Chris Farlowe singing the Stones' "Out of Time," and Sammy Davis Jr. inexplicably pops up for a second. Some interesting footage of the young Vidal Sassoon working in his salon. [YouTube]
5. Little Malcolm and His Struggle Against the Eunuchs (1974)...unusual film, very play-like with only five speaking parts. George Harrison produced. Easily the most ballsy, masculine performance I've seen from the usually wispy John Hurt. He's an expelled art student who recruits three pliable friends to launch a fascist political party called The Party of the Dynamic Erection. They vow to take over the world, but it's all just a posturing game and the story seems designed to take the wind out of impotent, armchair revolutionaries who are all talk and no action. It's also an incel film before its time. Arguably, David Warner gets more good lines in a supporting performance than Hurt does as the lead. But I had trouble deciphering the accents at times -- the sound quality was less than ideal. Directed by Stuart Cooper, better known for "Overlord" (1975). This was on my watchlist, and I would have watched it in the near future regardless of any challenge.
6. All My Loving (1968)...55-minute film made for British TV tries to figure out what's happenin' with today's music and comes off a bit square. There are plenty of interview clips with big names like Paul McCartney, Jimi Hendrix, Eric Burdon, Donovan and Pete Townshend, but it's not easy to tell whether it's exclusive to the film or just recycled from elsewhere. Adds a solid dose of live Cream footage.
7. Home Sweet Home (1982)...early Mike Leigh film for the BBC. About three postmen and their women.
8. Who's Who (1979)...even earlier Mike Leigh. About stockbrokers. Both of these Leigh films already were on my watchlist but, in hindsight, "Who's Who" wasn't really a must-see. Not impressive.
9. Jamaica Inn (1939)...off the top of my head, I can't think of a Hitchcock film except "Topaz" than I enjoyed less than this one.
10. Christine (1987)...Alan Clarke project for the BBC, just 52 minutes. About a circle of bland teenagers who are casually hooked on heroin.
11. Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde (1971)...the title is self-explanatory. Why, oh why, did I think this movie starred Oliver Reed?? I was eager to see Reed cavorting in drag. I should have directly checked the cast listing. Instead it's a no-name actor as Jekyll, and "Sister Hyde" is played by a separate actress (Martine Beswick, who had been in a couple of James Bond films). I almost bailed out of the film altogether, but I managed to finish it. Barely. How a story like this could be presented with such a complete lack of self-awareness and humor, I'll never know. Lousy. It's not even sexy, though Beswick contributes a quick breast flash in one scene. At least it had Hammer's typically good cinematography, costumes and sets.
12. Henry V (1944)...I'm pretty sure this one counts as a UK film. Strange...I was really enjoying most of it, but it suddenly turned into a crashing bore in the final 25 minutes of denouement. I don't know whether to blame Shakespeare or the adaptation's editing.
shorts, with three minutes of carryover from the first set
13a. Paradigm (1970, 10 minutes): experimental short designed to show the ravages of age on the mind. One actor portrays an aging person throughout his lifespan, speaking in a nonsense language that has appearances of being erudite. [Ubu Film]
13b. Death May Be Your Santa Claus (1969, 36 minutes though IMDb/ICM says it's 50). Wanted to like this more than I did. The film follows a young Black militant, but it's more about vignettes than a linear story. The psych-rock score by the Second Hand is initially interesting but turns a bit unwelcome by the end. [rarefilmm]
13c. Experience (1968, 29 minutes)...early film about Jimi Hendrix. Has more atmosphere than insight. I'm really just the second to check this?
13d. Stanley Pickle (2010, 11 minutes)...It's on YouTube. I wish the story was a quarter as good as the visual imagination and effects. This completes another set of shorts, with nine minutes extra.
shorts, with nine minutes carryover
14a. Next (1990, 5 minutes)
14b. The Pearce Sisters (2007, 9 minutes)
14c. The Black Dog (1987, 18 minutes)
14d. Over (2015, 14 minutes)
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#272

Post by sol »

Just went you thought it was safe to stop watching Irish films...
1. Citadel (2012) Ireland
2. Mystics (2003) Ireland
3. Greta (2018) Ireland
4. Rat (2001) Ireland
5. Taffin (1988) Ireland
6. Stitches (2012) Ireland
7. The Stag (2013) Ireland
8. Red Mist (2008) Northern Ireland
9. Sea Fever (2019) Ireland
10. His House (2020) England
11. The Canal (2014) Ireland
12. Fractional (2011) Ireland
13. Eden Lake (2008) England
14. Belle (2013) Isle of Man
15. Gozo (2016) England
16. Rocks (2019) England
17. The Hallow (2015) Ireland
18. Get Duked! (2019) Scotland
19. Emma. (2020) England
20. Animals (2019) Ireland
21. Isolation (2005) Ireland
22. To Dream (2016) England
23. Grand Slam (1978) Wales
24. Crone Wood (2016) Ireland
25. Cherry Tree (2015) Ireland
26. Black Death (2010) England
27. Brackenmore (2016) Ireland
28. Rawhead Rex (1986) Ireland
29. French Exit. (2020) Ireland
30. Irish Destiny (1926) Ireland
31. Dream Demon (1988) England
32. Without Name (2016) Ireland
33. Extra Ordinary (2019) Ireland
34. The Souvenir (2019) England
35. The Riot Club (2014) England
36. From the Dark (2014) Ireland

Image

This has a decent enough premise (deadly creature that is allergic to light) with the protagonists constantly scrambling to find various light sources to defend themselves. Things grow repetitive before the end though since there is no attempt to explain what the creature is or what drives it. Niamh Algar is pretty fine either way in the lead role - though it is often hard to see what she is doing since, if true to the title, most of the film seems very dark.
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#273

Post by ororama »

14-21. Father Brown: The Oracle of the Dog (1974) * 52 min.
Father Brown: The Hammer of God (1974) 51 min.
Father Brown: The Curse of the Golden Cross (1974) * 51 min.
Father Brown: The Eye of Apollo (1974) * 51 min.
Father Brown: The Three Tools of Death (1974) * 52 min.
Father Brown: The Mirror of the Magistrate (1974) * 52 min.
Father Brown: The Dagger with Wings (1974) * 51 min.
Father Brown: The Actor and the Alibi (1974) * 51 min.
Father Brown: The Quick One (1974) * 51 min.
Father Brown: The Man with Two Beards (1974) * 51 min.
Father Brown: The Head of Caesar (1974) * 51 min.
Father Brown: The Arrow of Heaven (1974) * 51 min.
Father Brown: The Secret Garden (1974) * 51 min. UK-England
22. Blue Black Permanent (1992) * 86 min. UK-Scotland

I am not a fan of Kenneth More, and when I watched the first episode of the Father Brown series a few months ago, I didn't feel inspired to finish the rest. Once I got used to his interpretation, I enjoyed the series a lot more than I expected.  

Blue Black Permanent was Margaret Tait's only feature film, a reflection on the relationship between a photographer and her mother, a poet who may have committed suicide, and it made me wish that Tait had made more features.
Spoiler
1. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) 100 min. UK-England
2. Shrooms (2007) * 88 min.  Ireland
3. Freakdog (2008) * 85 min.  UK-Northern Ireland
4. The Plague of the Zombies (1966) 90 min.  UK-England  #MS34
5. The Limehouse Golem (2016) * 109 min.  UK-England
6. The Reptile (1966) 90 min.  UK-England
7. Virgin Witch (1972) * 89 min.  UK-England
8. Inspector George Gently: The Burning Man (2008) * 88 min.  UK-England
9. Inspector George Gently: Bomber's Moon (2008) * 88 min.  UK-England
10. Inspector George Gently: Gently with the Innocents (2009) * 89 min.  UK-England
11. Inspector George Gently: Gently in the Night (2009) * 88 min.  UK-England
12. The True Story of Sawney Beane (2005) 11 min.
A Portrait of Ga (1952) 4 min.
The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo (1955) * 7 min.
Rose Street (1956) * 15 min.
Margaret Tait: Film Maker (1983) * 36 min.
Aerial (1974) 4 min.
Concrete & Flowers (2019) * 9 min. UK-Scotland
13. The Souvenir (2019) * 120 min. UK-England
*First time viewing.
Last edited by ororama on March 24th, 2021, 12:24 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Onderhond
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#274

Post by Onderhond »

sol wrote: March 24th, 2021, 11:23 am 36. From the Dark (2014) Ireland
I think the lack of a solid explanation was actually a perk, but mostly because explanations in horror cinema tend to take away from the mystery and are never really that interesting to begin with. But I agree this wasn't really a stand-out horror flick.

I know it's probably a bit late now (as you tend to plan your backlog well), but have you seen Let Us Prey? That's an Irish horror I really liked a lot (and stuck with me after all this time). It also has Pollyanna McIntosh and Liam Cunningham.
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#275

Post by peeptoad »

Onderhond wrote: March 24th, 2021, 11:39 am I know it's probably a bit late now (as you tend to plan your backlog well), but have you seen Let Us Prey? That's an Irish horror I really liked a lot (and stuck with me after all this time). It also has Pollyanna McIntosh and Liam Cunningham.
Sorry for interloping here, but I agree on Let Us Prey. Saw that back around the time of its release and liked it so much that I messaged O'Malley on IMDB praising his work (he had an account back in those days). The content is really nothing unique, but the style and some of the music (plus the two leads) were great. I didn't enjoy O'Malley's follow up nearly as much (The Lodgers), but I'd still watch any future films he comes up witth.
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#276

Post by AB537 »

58. Brexit: The Uncivil War (Toby Haynes/Channel One, 2019) 7.5/10
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#277

Post by sol »

Onderhond wrote: March 24th, 2021, 11:39 am I know it's probably a bit late now (as you tend to plan your backlog well), but have you seen Let Us Prey? That's an Irish horror I really liked a lot (and stuck with me after all this time). It also has Pollyanna McIntosh and Liam Cunningham.
peeptoad wrote: March 24th, 2021, 12:44 pm Sorry for interloping here, but I agree on Let Us Prey. Saw that back around the time of its release and liked it so much that I messaged O'Malley on IMDB praising his work (he had an account back in those days). The content is really nothing unique, but the style and some of the music (plus the two leads) were great. I didn't enjoy O'Malley's follow up nearly as much (The Lodgers), but I'd still watch any future films he comes up witth.
You guys are nuts. :folded: I hate, hate, hated Let Us Prey. I thought I had it down as a 3/10, but I voted it a 4/10. I must have been feeling generous. :unsure:
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#278

Post by peeptoad »

sol wrote: March 24th, 2021, 12:57 pm
Onderhond wrote: March 24th, 2021, 11:39 am I know it's probably a bit late now (as you tend to plan your backlog well), but have you seen Let Us Prey? That's an Irish horror I really liked a lot (and stuck with me after all this time). It also has Pollyanna McIntosh and Liam Cunningham.
peeptoad wrote: March 24th, 2021, 12:44 pm Sorry for interloping here, but I agree on Let Us Prey. Saw that back around the time of its release and liked it so much that I messaged O'Malley on IMDB praising his work (he had an account back in those days). The content is really nothing unique, but the style and some of the music (plus the two leads) were great. I didn't enjoy O'Malley's follow up nearly as much (The Lodgers), but I'd still watch any future films he comes up witth.
You guys are nuts. :folded: I hate, hate, hated Let Us Prey. I thought I had it down as a 3/10, but I voted it a 4/10. I must have been feeling generous. :unsure:
:P B)
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#279

Post by Onderhond »

peeptoad wrote: March 24th, 2021, 12:44 pm Sorry for interloping here, but I agree on Let Us Prey.
:cheers:

Don't mind the party pooper :P
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#280

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The film was probably more of a disappointment than anything else (I blind bought it on Blu-ray since it was in the They Shoot Zombies canon). I don't actually remember a lot of the film off-hand, but I re-read my review and I compared it to Ghosts of Mars there. And I really didn't like Ghosts of Mars. But I liked Mars more than Prey. :shrug:
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