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morrison-dylan-fan
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#401

Post by morrison-dylan-fan »

FTV:17:Make Up (2019).8.


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"A disfigured atrocity,J-j-jutting out of place,Jutting out of place,Make up to break up, Make up to break up."

Descending on the Cornwall caravan site like a thick fog, composer Ben Salisbury (who was also the co-composer on Ex Machina (2014-also reviewed)) ushers in waves of Post-Rock reverberations across Ruth's self-discoveries.Closely working with Salisbury, sound designer Ania Przygoda weaves a masterfully textured soundtrack, which draws in a eerie atmosphere of waves hitting against the rocks,creaking floors and a low-rumbling hum that haunts Ruth from every direction she takes.Shaky on her feet as she starts to question reality, Molly Windsor gives a great performance as Ruth, thanks to Windsor threading a curiosity in Ruth to get closer to the strange sights she sees round the site, with an enticing hazy expressiveness as possible hallucinations of dreams/nightmares awash over Ruth as she comes of age.

From when Ruth takes her first steps into the caravan site, feature film debuting writer/director Claire Oakley (whose dad very good weather special effects,on a production where the cast/crew spent 5 weeks living on the open caravan site) & cinematographer Nick Cooke paint an extremely peculiar dream-logic atmosphere, where the camera hangs in the air just that bit too long,wonderfully taking everything off-centre into a surreal Horror.Oakley and Cooke turn the real location into a chilly site,with ghostly lights flicking off polythene-covered caravans, and a red headed woman (whose face is obscured from being seen) appear in the distant in front of Ruth,like a ghostly mirage.

Opening Ruth's self-discovery to have a emphasis on atmosphere,rather than plot, Oakley knots the loose plot threads together into a hypnotic dream-logic, mood piece,via Oakley and editor Sacha Szwarc splintering Ruth's mind-set with jarring,fragmented cuts on what might be Ruth's coming of age,with on-edge slices of surrealist Horror in diced bright red nails, startling blasts of coloured rain, and wigs hanging high made out of human hair,as Ruth applies her make up.
jdidaco
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#402

Post by jdidaco »

(Screenshots from 'Mascara' & 'L'Ange Amazonien'),

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51. The Song of Love (Frances Marion & Chester M. Franklin, 1923) 7.5/10
52. FTA (Francine Parker, 1972) 8.5/10
53. Ich denke oft an Hawaii (I Often Think of Hawaii, Elfi Mikesch, 1978) 9/10
54. Head Over Heels (Joan Micklin Silver, 1979) 8/10
55. Mascara (Roberta Findlay & Henri Pachard, 1983) 9/10
56. L'Ange Amazonien (The Amazonian Angel, Maria Klonaris & Katerina Thomadaki, 1992) 9/10
57. Récréations (Recreations, Claire Simon, 1993-98) 9.5/10
58. Urban Ghost Story (Geneviève Jolliffe, 1998) 6/10
59. Unrelated (Joanna Hogg, 2007) 8/10
60. Rudzienko (Sharon Lockhart, 2017) 8/10

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That's it for me; thanks again for hosting, max & adwest!

!seen 60
Spoiler
1. Laokoon & Söhne (Laocoon & Sons, Ulrike Ottinger & Tabea Blumenschein, 1975) 8.5/10
2. Bruine Squamma (Claudine Eizykman, 1977) 8/10
3. Die Reise nach Lyon (Blind Spot, Claudia von Alemann, 1981) 8.5/10
4. Det speglar i mitt öga (My Eye Is Reflecting, Nina Hedenius, 1992) 9/10
5. From Hetty to Nancy (Deborah Stratman, 1997) 8/10
6. Temenos (Nina Danino, 1998) 8/10
7. Chemins (Martine Rousset, 2014) 9/10
8. A Primeira Missa (The First Mass, Ana Carolina, 2014) 7.5/10
9-10. L'autre scène (Claudine Eizykman & Dominique Avron & Guy Fihman & Jean-François Lyotard, 1972) 7/10 (6 min), Skarpretteren (The Executioner, Ursula Reuter Christiansen, 1973) 8/10 (35 min), V.W. Vitesse Women (Claudine Eizykman, 1974) 9/10 (33 min), A Cold Draft (Lis Rhodes, 1988) 8/10 (29 min), Movimento Expressivo – Klauss Vianna (Inês Bogéa, 2000) 7/10 (14 min), Meer der Dünste (Sea of Vapors, Sylvia Schedelbauer, 2014) 8/10 (15 min), The Visitor (Rachel Monosov, 2015) 7/10 (16 min), The Skin Is Good (Anja Dornieden & Juan David González Monroy, 2018) 7/10 (12 min) (Total: 160 min)
11. Karnal (Of the Flesh, Marilou Diaz-Abaya, 1983) 8.5/10
12. Agent of Paradise (Mary Bellis, 1984) 8.5/10
13. Lou n'a pas dit non (Lou Didn't Say No, Anne-Marie Miéville, 1994) 9/10
14. Beating (Barbara Sternberg, 1995) 9.5/10
15. Bontoc Eulogy (Bridget Yearian & Marlon Fuentes, 1995/2008) 9/10
16. Peggy and Fred in Hell: The Complete Cycle (Leslie Thornton, 2002) 8/10
17. Yâd (Mahine Rouhi & Olivier Fouchard, 2013) 8/10
18. The Grand Bizarre (Jodie Mack, 2018) 8/10
19-20. Real Time (Anne Rees-Moog, 1974) 7.5/10 (33 min), Living Memory (Anne Rees-Mogg, 1980) 8/10 (39 min), Transmogrification (Anne Rees-Mogg, 1980) 7.5/10 (9 min), Burning (Barbara Sternberg, 2002) 8/10 (7 min), Tischk (Mahine Rouhi & Olivier Fouchard, 2004) 9/10 (37 min), Initial Vapor (Rei Hayama, 2012) 7/10 (13 min), The Focus (Rei Hayama, 2013) 7/10 (25 min) (Total: 163 min)
21. Zhui ming qiang (Blood of the Dragon, Kao Pao-Shu, 1971) 8/10
22. George qui? (George Who?, Michèle Rosier, 1973) 8/10
23. Feng huang nu sha xing (The Lady Avenger, Yang Chia-Yun, 1981) 7.5/10
24. Peremena uchasti (Change of Fortune, Kira Muratova, 1987) 8.5/10
25. Fresh Kill (Shu Lea Cheang, 1994) 7/10
26. S dnyom rozhdeniya! (Happy Birthday!, Larisa Sadilova, 1998) 8/10
27. The Invisible Frame (Cynthia Beatt, 2009) 8/10
28. Betoniyö (Concrete Night, Pirjo Honkasalo, 2013) 7/10
29-30. Mulheres de Cinema (Ana Maria Magalhães, 1978) 8/10 (38 min), Cycling the Frame (Cynthia Beatt, 1988) 8/10 (27 min), To Be Here (Ute Aurand, 2013) 7.5/19 (37 min), Sunstone (Filipa César & Louis Henderson, 2017) 7/10 (35 min), Apiyemiyekî? (Ana Vaz, 2020) 7.5/10 (27 min) (Total: 164 min)
31. Ismeri a szandi mandit? (Do You Know Sunday-Monday?, Lívia Gyarmathy, 1969) 8/10
32. Szabad lélegzet (Riddance, Márta Mészáros, 1973) 7.5/10
33. Empty Suitcases (Bette Gordon, 1980) 8.5/10
34. Kwai ching (Maybe It's Love, Angela Chan, 1984) 7.5/10
35. Divinity Gratis (Betzy Bromberg, 1995) 8/10
36. Drylongso (Cauleen Smith, 1998) 8/10
37. Nikita Kino (Vivian Ostrovsky, 2003) 8/10
38. The Fits (Anna Rose Holmer, 2015) 8/10
39-40. Transport (Amy Greenfield, 1970) 7.5/10 (6 min), Husan el-tin (Mud Horse, Attiyat Al-Abnudi, 1971) 9/10 (12 min), Oghneyet Touha Elhazina (The Sad Song of Touha, Attiyat Al-Abnudi, 1973) 8.5/10 (12 min), Deux festivals à Grenoble (Attiyat Al-Abnudi, 1974) 7/10 (29 min), El sandwich (The Sandwich, Attiyat Al-Abnudi, 1975) 9/10 (12 min), Paradis perdu (Françoise Prenant, 1975) 8.5/10 (25 min), The United States of America (Bette Gordon & James Benning, 1975) 8/10 (27 min), Ice/Sea (Vivian Ostrovsky, 2005) 9/10 (32 min), (If I Can Sing a Song About) Ligatures (Abigail Child, 2009) 7/10 (5 min) (Total: 160 min)
41. Ujmuri (Cheerless, Nutsa Gogoberidze, 1934) 9/10
42. Pirveli mertskhali (First Swallow, Nana Mchedlidze, 1975) 8.5/10
43. Sacred Hearts (Barbara Rennie, 1984) 8/10
44. Welcome II the Terrordome (Ngozi Onwurah, 1995) 8.5/10
45. V toy strane... (In That Land..., Lidiya Bobrova, 1998) 8.5/10
46. Boginya: kak ya polyubila (The Goddess: How I Fell in Love, Renata Litvinova, 2004) 8/10
47. Córki dancingu (The Lure, Agnieszka Smoczynska, 2015) 6/10
48. The Other Lamb (Malgorzata Szumowska, 2019) 6/10
49-50. (7 min), Essere donne (Being Women, Cecilia Mangini, 1965) 9/10 (29 min), Joyce at 34 (Joyce Chopra & Claudia Weill, 1972) 8/10 (28 min), La briglia sul collo (The Bridle on the Neck, Cecilia Mangini, 1974) 7.5/10 (15 min), And Still I Rise (Ngozi Onwurah, 1993) 8/10 (31 min), Boneshaker (Nuotama Bodomo, 2013) 7/10 (13 min), Afronauts (Nuotama Bodomo, 2014) 7.5/10 (14 min), Shape of a Surface (Nazli Dinçel, 2018) 8/10 (9 min), The Seismic Form (Antoinette Zwirchmayr, 2020) 8/10 (15 min) (Total: 161 min)
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adwest
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#403

Post by adwest »

St. Gloede wrote: March 30th, 2021, 11:20 am


34. Sedmikrásky / Daisies (1966, Vera Chytilová)

Honestly, Daisies was even more cinematically daring and experimental than I could remember - and strikes me as perhaps one of the finest and most "perfect" examples of a truly "free" film. I absolutely love the way it blends black and white, sepia, tints and just delicious colour photography - as well as still photographs, animation techniques and colour play - where the quality of the print can be increased or decreased - colours may be blended - and the world is always spinning, spinning, spinning.

It is a film that never truly stops, that can change second upon second - and leaves very few breaks for a breather. It is hectic, all imposing - and playful - and we have not even gotten to the "characters" - two young women who decide that as the world is spoiled - they will be spoiled - and spoil they do. The only flaw in the film - for my own enjoyment anyhow - is that they spoil just too well. They are utterly grating from beginning to end - and had it not been for the style - and the concept - not to mention the fairly strong message sending it all off - this might have been a very hard watch. But: It is not. It is utterly delightful - always reinventing itself - always alive - and never taking itself too seriously. An absolute wonder. 8.5/10.
I couldn't agree with you more. Saw it for the first time myself this month and loved it. A full 9/10 for me! (l)
Obgeoff
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#404

Post by Obgeoff »

adwest wrote: March 29th, 2021, 7:42 pm
Obgeoff wrote: March 29th, 2021, 9:17 am
83. Mustang (2015, Erguven) 8
Hmmmm...we seem to have some similar ratings on some of the movies we've both seen which makes me think I should try to squeeze Mustang in before the month ends. It is on my list.
It is certainly worth a watch. Not perfect but strong atmosphere and good film-making. A bit dispiriting that she has been sucked into mainstream US film and TV making. Has anyone seen Kings (2017) - it looks like Crash-lite and got poor reviews?
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Obgeoff
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#405

Post by Obgeoff »

86. The Love Witch (2016, Biller) 6
87. The Secret Life of Bees (2008, Prince-Bythewood) 6
88. Beyond the Lights (2014, Prince-Bythewood) 6
Spoiler
1. Born in Flames (1983, Borden) 7
2. Little Fugitive (1953, Ashley/Engel/Orkin) 8
3. Me and You and Everyone We Know (2005, July) 8
4. A Long Farewell (1971, Muratova) 7
5. Desperately Seeking Susan (1985, Seidelman) 6
6. Nomadland (2020, Zhao) 7
7. Sweetie (1989, Campion) 8
8. Salaam Bombay! (1988, Nair) 7
9. Monster (2003, Jenkins) 6
10. A League of Their Own (1992, Marshall) 7
11. Ratcatcher (1999, Ramsay) 8
12. The Apple (1998, Makhmalbaf) 7
13. The Cool World (1963, Clarke) 7
14. Strange Days (1995, Bigelow) 7
15. The Bling Ring (2013, Coppola) 8
16. The Connection (1961, Clarke) 6
17. Chocolat (1988, Denis) 8
18. Maya Deren Shorts (108 minutes)
18a. At Land (1944, Deren) 9 [15m]
18b. Ritual in Transfigured Time (1946, Deren) 8 [15m]
18c. A Study in Choreography for Camera (1945, Deren) 7 [4m]
18d. Witch's Cradle (1944, Deren) 8 [12m]
18e. The Private Life of a Cat (1946, Hammid, Deren) 7 [29m]
18f. Ensemble for Somnabulists (1951, Deren) 7 [6m]
18g. Meditation on Violence (1949, Deren) 7 [12m]
18h. The Very Eye of Night (1958, Deren) 7 [15m]
19. Divine Horsemen: The Living Gods of Haiti (1993, Deren/Ito/Ito) 6
20. Pasqualino Settebellezze (1975, Wertmuller) 6
21. Police (2020, Fontaine) 6
22. It Felt Like Love (2013, Hittman) 7
23. Adoption (1975, Mészáros) 7
24. Whale Rider (2002, Caro) 7
25. Black Harvest (1992, Anderson/Connolly) 7
26. Grave (2016, Ducournau) 7
27. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014, Amirpour) 7
28. Die bleierne Zeit (1981, von Trotta) 8
29. On Body and Soul (2017, Enyedi) 8
30. Les rendez-vous d'Anna (1978, Akerman) 8
31. Paris is Us (2019, Vogler) 6
32. Desert One (2019, Kopple) 7
33. Miss Sharon Jones! (2015, Kopple) 6
34. Eve's Bayou (1997, Lemmons) 6
35. The Night Porter (1974, Cavani) 8
36. The Silences of the Palace (1994, Tlatli) 7
37. Capharnaum (2018, Labaki) 5
38. L'une chante l'autre pas (1977, Varda) 8
39. Elisa and Marcela (2019, Coixet) 6
40. Astenicheskiy sindrom (1989, Muratova) 6
41. Further Beyond (2016, Lawlor/Molloy) 8
42. Rose Plays Julie (2019, Lawlor/Molloy) 8
43. Mister John (2013, Lawlor/Molloy) 7
44. Boat People (1982, Hui) 7
45. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015, Heller) 7
46. Simon mágus (1999, Enyedi) 7
47. My Twentieth Century (1989, Enyedi) 7
48. Krylya (1966, Shepitko) 7
49. Nachalo nevedomogo veka (1967, Gabay/Shepitko/Smirnov) 7
50. Ty i ya (1971, Shepitko) 9
51. Ich bin den Sommer über in Berlin geblieben (1994, Schanelec) 6
52. Das Glück meiner Schwester (1995, Schanelec) 7
53. Plätze in Städten (1998, Schanelec) 6
54. Pytel blech (1962, Chytilová) 7
55. O necem jinem (1963, Chytilová) 8
56. La idea de un lago (2016, Mumenthaler) 7
57. Je tu il elle (1974, Akerman) 8
58. Vendredi soir (2002, Denis) 8
59. Girls in Uniform (1931, Sagan/Froelich) 8
60. The Selfish Giant (2013, Barnard) 8
61. The Second Awakening of Christa Klages (1978, von Trotta) 7
62. Brief Encounters (1967, Muratova) 7
63. All is Forgiven (2007, Hansen-Love) 8
64. La folie Almayer (2011, Akerman) 7
65. The Arch (1968, Tong) 8
66. Promising Young Woman (2020, Fennell) 8 (2nd watch, was 8)
67. Love & Basketball (2000, Prince-Bythewood) 8
68. The Taste of Others (2000, Jaoui) 6
69. Die Adern der Welt (2020, Davaa) 6
70. Ripley's Game (2002, Cavani) 6
71-72. Shorts (144 minutes + 16 mins over-run from #18)
Small Deaths (1996, Ramsay) 8 [11m]
Gasman (1998, Ramsay) 7 [15m]
Kill the Day (2000, Ramsay) 7 [19m]
Brigitte (2019, Ramsay) 6 [30m]
De Natura (2018, Hadzihalilovic) 6 [6m]
Nectar (2014, Hadzihalilovic) 7 [18m]
Rey Muerto (1995, Martel) 7 [12m]
Nueva Argirópolis (2010, Martel) 6 [8m]
Leguas (2015, Martel) 7 [12m]
A House Divided (1913, Guy) 6 [13m]
73. Wonder Woman (2017, Jenkins) 7
74. The Loneliest Planet (2011, Loktev) 7
75. Day Night Day Night (2006, Loktev) 6
76. Moxie (2021, Poehler) 7
77. La bouche de Jean-Pierre (1996, Hadzihalilovic) 7
78. Innocence (2004, Hadzihalilovic) 7
79. Évolution (2015, Hadzihalilovic) 7
80. Araya (1959, Benacerraf) 8
81. La Pointe-Courte (1955, Varda) 7
82. Jane B. par Agnes V. (1988, Varda) 7
83. Mustang (2015, Erguven) 8
84. Disappearing Acts (2000, Prince-Bythewood) 7
85. Broadway Love (1918, Park) 6
86. The Love Witch (2016, Biller) 6
87. The Secret Life of Bees (2008, Prince-Bythewood) 6
88. Beyond the Lights (2014, Prince-Bythewood) 6
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St. Gloede
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#406

Post by St. Gloede »

adwest wrote: March 31st, 2021, 4:31 am I couldn't agree with you more. Saw it for the first time myself this month and loved it. A full 9/10 for me! (l)
(l) (l) (l)
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St. Gloede
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#407

Post by St. Gloede »

35. Quo vadis, Aida? (2020, Jasmila Zbanic)

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Quo vadis, Aida? covers the real history and events of the Serbian invasion of a U.N. safe-zone in Bosnia, and the aftermath. It shows promise after promise from the U.N. - including threats and ultimatums - but as anyone who knows the story is already well aware - this is, in part, a story of capitulation and defeat. Knowing what is coming makes it a hard watch, and I'm not sure which viewing experience is more effective. If you were not aware of these events, you can choose for yourself whether you wish to read up or go in blind.

What I will say is that the way the film handles the capitulations are incredibly effective. It shows how broken people's expectations are. It investigates powerlessness - and it does it with simple, stripped back tools. It could have been more visually powerful - but this is simply not a visual film. There are no pretentions - and little sentimentality - though putting Aida and her family as an emotional core does serve as an easy storytelling device driving home the terror and the complete contrast of everything we have learned to expect to what human being may actually do. 8/10.


36. Até o Fim / To the End (2020, Glenda Nicácio & Ary Rosa)

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A tour-de-force family reunion, placing 2, then 3, then 4 women face to face after years apart - to drink, talk, and clash. It is all set in one singular location - the oldest sister's restaurant - mainly on the beach outside - and with heated, and frankly genuinely inspired photography (especially in the beginning) this is a film that stands out. I do wish the film would keep playing visual tricks, and it does at times feel a little like a play. The ghost of (the excellent) Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean came into my head - but the context is different - and the conversations are different. 

The weakest aspect, and what stops it just short of greatness (and it is damn close) is some of the dialogue, which seems a little like semi-wish-fulfilment, with one of the women being the first Brazilian woman to win an Oscar - and the constant bragging seems to not quite be portrayed as bragging the same way everyone else's one-upmanship and condescending remarks/attacks are - but mostly the conversations flow with life - if not a little overstated - and it proves once again how simple the tools required to make a really good film can be. 7.5/10.


37. Pripadnost / Beginnings (2020, Tea Lukac)

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Shot in the ruined houses and snow clad landscapes and rivers they once called their home, Beginnings looks at the displacement, persecution, murder and rape of the Swabian population post-WW2. Swabians are Ethnic-Germans in a region of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which after the dissolvement at the end of WW2 were split between up between a long string of countries, including Serbia - which held them to blame from the actions of the Nazis. No actual talking heads are shown. The closest we get to the people speaking are the occasional photograph. Instead, we hear the voices of survivors and descendants as they tell quite harrowing tales, both of general persecution and even death camps. What is interesting, being a Serbian look at its own atrocities, it also attempts to make the case that you should not judge individuals on the basis of their ethnicity/nation - though this does at times feel a little muddled. Its strongest moments is in the shots of ruins, contrasted with memories - leaving an haunting impression with great power. 7/10.
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#408

Post by sol »

Another Woman
1. One Night in Miami... (2020) Regina King
2. The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996) Barbra Streisand
3. Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) Eliza Hittman
4. Bastard Out of Carolina (1996) Anjelica Huston
5. How to Kill a Zombie (2014) Tiffany McLean
6. Madeline's Madeline (2018) Josephine Decker
7. She Dies Tomorrow (2020) Amy Seimetz
8. Love & Basketball (2000) Gina Prince-Bythewood
9. I'm Your Woman (2020) Julia Hart
10. Kajillionaire (2020) Miranda July
11. The Assistant (2019) Kitty Green
12. Shirley (2020) Josephine Decker
13. Shook (2021) Jennifer Harrington
14. Time (2020) Garrett Bradley
15. Sea Fever (2019) Neasa Hardiman
16. Clemency (2019) Chinonye Chukwu
17. Belle (2013) Amma Asante
18. Gozo (2016) Miranda Bowen
19. Lucky (2020) Natasha Kermani
20. Rocks (2019) Sarah Gavron
21. I Am I (2013) Jocelyn Towne
22. Moxie (2021) Amy Poehler
23. Emma. (2020) Autumn de Wilde
24. Animals (2019) Sophie Hyde
25. Western (2017) Valeska Grisebach
26. To Dream (2016) Nicole Albarelli
27. Stop-Loss (2008) Kimberly Peirce
28. Lost Girls (2020) Liz Garbus
29. Late Night (2019) Nisha Ganatra
30. Lions Love (1969) Agnès Varda
31. Private Life (2018) Tamara Jenkins
32. Closet Land (1991) Radha Bharadwaj
33. The Holiday (2006) Nancy Meyers
34. The Souvenir (2019) Joanna Hogg
35. Summer 1993 (2017) Carla Simón
36. Faces, Places (2017) Agnès Varda
37. The Riot Club (2014) Lone Scherfig
38. Quarantine Girl (2020) Nicole D'Angelo
39. Spooky Stakeout (2016) Ruth Treacy
40. Black Butterflies (2011) Paula van der Oest
41. Good Vibrations (2012) Lisa Barros D'Sa
42. Mary Shelley (2017) Haifaa Al-Mansour
43. A Way of Life (2004) Amma Asante
44. The Spooky Bunch (1980) Ann Hui

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This might make more sense if you can speak Cantonese or decipher the white-on-white subtitles in the best quality print available online. Based on action (not indecipherable dialogue) alone though, the film mostly seems like a repetitive affair with much humour at the expense of a possessed man speaking in a high pitched voice and calling himself Catsh*t. There are a few quirky bits though in which the theatre company here continue to try to perform.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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#409

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5. Wonder Woman 1984 (Patty Jenkins, 2020) - 4/10
6. The Weight of Water (Kathryn Bigelow, 2000) - 5/10
7. Little Women (Greta Gerwig, 2019) - 8/10
8. Wendy and Lucy (Kelly Reichardt, 2008) - 8/10
9. Old Joy (Kelly Reichardt, 2006) - 6/10
10. First Cow (Kelly Reichardt, 2019) - 7/10
11. Night Moves (Kelly Reichardt, 2013) - 7/10
12. Girlfriends (Claudia Weill, 1978) - 7/10
13. Jupiter Ascending (Lana Wachowski, Lilly Wachowski, 2015) - 5/10
14. Cloud Atlas (Tom Tykwer, Lana Wachowski, Lilly Wachowski, 2012) - 5/10
15. Wanda (Barbara Loden, 1970) - 7/10
16. La Pointe-Courte (Agnès Varda, 1955) - 8/10
17. Cléo de 5 à 7 (Agnès Varda, 1962) - 9/10
18. Bound (Lana Wachowski, Lilly Wachowski, 1996) - 7/10
Spoiler
1. Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn (Cathy Yan, 2020) - 7/10
2. The Loveless (Kathryn Bigelow, Monty Montgomery, 1981) - 7/10
3. Autoportretul unei fete cuminti [Self-Portrait of a Dutiful Daughter] (Ana Lungu, 2015) - 5/10
4. K-19: The Widowmaker (Kathryn Bigelow, 2002) - 8/10
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#410

Post by St. Gloede »

38. La bouche de Jean-Pierre / Mimi / Parental Guidance (1996, Lucile Hadzihalilovic)

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Parental Guidance is as unsettling as either of Hadzihalilovic's later works and shows just how well she can enter childhood and, with incredibly simple tools, create a sense of absolute unease from the very first second. The shots are slightly murkier, but the effect, atmosphere and feeling is exactly the same. The angles are the same. The love of shooting bodies rather than heads, or finding the angle just off enough to send shivers down your spine remains - and so does the simplicity. 

Parental Guidance is however separated from the two later works, created over the next 20 years, by its relative realism. The opening text says "France, Today" - and while the films may feel like it is dragging you to hell, there is never any illusion of magic or unknown danger. Rather, the unease comes from real situations and real relationships, it all their unsettling, damaged and disturbing ways. Yes, it is a rougher cut, and the production values are clearly lower - but the extreme sense of unease, and the themes it looks onto - makes this a knockout. 8/10


39. Fish Tank (2009, Andrea Arnold)

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It is hard not to think about early Ken Loach for the modern-day - as Arnold paints a vivid portrait of the turmoil of a young Britain, in the bottom sphere of society, and immerses us into her life and journey. However, the level of, shall we say, dark wonder, adds something to this kind of film we have not quite seen before. 

Arnold draws a sense of belonging, comfort and joy in the oddest and most contradictory places. At times, the journey seems to go a little too far, be it ordinary wonders such as a white horse tied up in a trailer park - or our lead's deranged, and lasting spiral out of control - but at its core, Fish Tank never lets go of a sense of familiarity, empathy and compassion - letting us - at least to an extent - see things from her point of view.



40. Laokoon & Söhne / Laocoon & Sons (1975, Tabea Blumenschein, Ulrike Ottinger)

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This short, playful and overtly silly romp serves as the directorial debut of Ulrike Ottinger and her frequent collaborator Tabea Blumenschein. It has pretty much all the elements of her early films, including the tacky makeup, over-exaggerated gestures and general delight in camp. It is even sillier, and a bit more muddled, but still fun. Our action takes place in the ridiculously named country of Laura Malloy, which only has one inhabitant - but she's a shapeshifter. Playing with the ideas from Orando, and mixing it all with a ludicrous narrator, there is much to delight in. A perfectly solid first effort, showing several hints of the greatness Ottinger would be able to bring forth just a few years later. 6/10.
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#411

Post by beavis »

beavis wrote: March 30th, 2021, 7:18 pm
Spoiler
1. Taking the horse to eat jalebis (Anamika Haksar, 2019) - 8.0
2. Aloïse (Liliane de Kermadec, 1975) - 7.5
3. Selva. Un portrait de Parvaneh Navaï (Maria Klonaris, 1983) - 7.5
4. Divinity Gratis (Betzy Bromberg, 1995) - 7.5
5. Big Boy (Shireen Seno, 2011) - 7.5
6. Severnyy veter (The North Wind) (Renata Litvinova, 2021) - 7.5
7. shorts
8. shorts
9. shorts
10. Hotel New York (Jackie Raynal, 1984) - 7
11. shorts
12. shorts
13. Nervous Translation (Shireen Seno, 2017) - 8
14. Casanovagen (Luise Donschen, 2018) - 6,5
15. Exotica, Erotica, Etc. (Evangelia Kranioti, 2015) - 8
16. Liminal (Manuela De Laborde, Lav Diaz, Óscar Enríquez, Philippe Grandrieux , 2020) - 7.5
17. Hotel Nueva Isla (Irene Gutiérrez Torres, Javier Labrador Deulofeu, 2014) - 7
18. Obscuro Barroco (Evangelia Kranioti, 2018) - 8
19. Sinmute (Ana Balcázar, Javier Bellido, 2008) - 4.5
20. El olvido (Heddy Honigmann, 2008) - 7.0
21. Los silencios (Beatriz Seigner, 2018) - 7.5
22. Canción sin nombre (Melina León, 2019) - 8.0
23. Motu Maeva (Maureen Fazendeiro, 2014) - 7.5
24. Chircales (Marta Rodríguez, 1972) - 7.5
25. Una vez la noche (Antonia Rossi, Roberto Contador, 2018) - 5.0
26. Giraffe (Anna Sofie Hartmann, 2019) - 7.0
27. Dreissig (Simona Kostova, 2019) - 8.5
28. Diário de Sintra (Paula Gaitán, 2008) - 7.0
29. Ghost of the Golden Groves (Aniket Dutta, Roshni Sen, 2019) - 6.0
30. Divine carcasse (Dominique Loreau, 1998) - 7,5
31. Ilha (Ary Rosa, Glenda Nicácio, 2018) - 7.5
32. A Febre (Maya Da-Rin, 2019) - 7.0
33. Rit over de grens (Rosemarie Blank, 1994) - 7.0
34. Mamá, mamá, mamá (Sol Berruezo Pichon-Riviére, 2020) - 8.0
35. O Amor Natural (Heddy Honigmann, 1996) - 8.0
36. What We Left Unfinished (Mariam Ghani, 2019) - 7.0
37. 9 Leben (Maria Speth, 2011) - 7.0
38. Taiga (Ulrike Ottinger, 1992) - 7.5
39. Ök ketten (Márta Mészáros, 1977) - 7.5
40. Egy nap (Zsófia Szilágyi, 2018) - 7.5
41. Jamais Plus Toujours (Yannick Bellon, 1976) - 8.0
42. Figlia mia (Laura Bispuri, 2018) - 7.0
43. Töchter (Maria Speth, 2014) - 7.5
44. Alice in the Underworld: The Dark Märchen Show!! (Mari Terashima, 2009) - 6.0
45. Chibusa yo eien nare (Kinuyo Tanaka, 1955) - 7.5
46. Nieuwe tieten (Sacha Polak, 2013) - 7.5
47. Napló gyermekeimnek (Márta Mészáros, 1984) - 8.0
48. Shinjuku Boys (Kim Longinotto, 1996) - 7.0
49. Sziget a szárazföldön (Judit Elek, 1969) - 7.5
50. Ejercicios de memoria (Paz Encina, 2016) - 7.5
51. XXY (Lucía Puenzo, 2007) - 7.0
52. Keep It for Yourself (Claire Denis, 1991) - 7
53. Wadjda (Haifaa al-Mansour, 2012) - 7.5
54. Dhalinyaro (Lula Ali Ismaïl, 2018) - 7.5
55. Carmen y Lola (Arantxa Echevarria, 2018) - 7.0
56. El niño pez (Lucía Puenzo, 2009) - 7.0
57. Judy & Punch (Mirrah Foulkes, 2019) - 7.0
58. M (Yolande Zauberman, 2018) - 7.5
59. Loubia hamra (Narimane Mari, 2013) - 4.5
60. Earth (Deepa Mehta, 1998) - 7.5
61. Or (Keren Yedaya, 2004) - 7.5
62. Amiko (Yoko Yamanaka, 2018) - 7
63. Até o Fim (Ary Rosa, Glenda Nicácio, 2020) - 7.5
64. Shakedown (Leilah Weinraub, 2018) - 7.5
65. Meduzot (Shira Geffen, Etgar Keret, 2007) - 7.0
66. Corpo celeste (Alice Rohrwacher, 2011) - 7.5

Two very good films to close out this challenge today! But when rating I chose to round off both downwards because of some elements that I personally didn't like (but might not be a bother or even a plus to others). I liked the light tone of the first, with hints of magic realism, comedy and touching drama in en ensemble piece of crossing story-lines. Towards the end the lines kept crossing more and more to the detriment of genuine emotions and satisfying resolves for me though. Rohrwacher I already know as a formidable director and that also shows in this debut I had missed so far. There are so many beautiful shots and subtle character moments; it is strong observational cinema (coming from a documentary background I found out by watching the interview that is an extra an the Artificial Eye dvd). If I had clicked with it more, this would easily be an 8 or maybe higher, but I felt a dislike for multiple characters that made me care less about the things the movie wanted to engage in... I think...

That makes 66 entries for the challenge this month, and 75 features from female directors seen this year already (out of 267 total). Last year I saw 205 female directed features (out of 797 total) without doing a challenge on it, so I'm comfortably on my way to break that personal record!
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#412

Post by hurluberlu »

32. The Creatures / Les Créatures (Agnès Varda, 1966) 6-
33. Brief Encounters / Korotkie vstrechi (Kira Muratova, 1967) 6+
34. Sur mes pas, voyage dans l'autre Afghanistan (Eloïse Barbieri, 2020) 7-
35. Kim Ji-young: Born 1982 (Kim Do-Young, 2019) 7

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Kim Do-Young on set
Où sont les femmes ?
1. 12 Hour Shift (Brea Grant, 2020) 5+
2. Baxter, Vera Baxter (Marguerite Duras, 1977) 6
3. That Trip We Took with Dad / Die Reise mit Vater (Anca Miruna Lazarescu, 2016) 7+
4. Dead Pigs (Cathy Yan, 2018) 5
5. Nico, 1988 (Susanna Nicchiarelli, 2017) 6+

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Susanna Nicchiarelli directing Trine Dyrholm as Nico

6. What Will People Say / Hva vil folk si (Iram Haq, 2017) 6
7. A Minuscule Adventure / Minuscule - Les Mandibules du Bout du Monde (Hélène Giraud, Thomas Szabo, 2018) 8-
8. Detroit (Kathryn Bigelow, 2017) 5+
9. My Donkey, My Lover & I / Antoinette dans les Cévennes (Caroline Vignal, 2020) 7-

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Caroline Vignal on her film set

10. C'est ça l'amour (Claire Burger, 2018) 7

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Claire Burger (middle) and her crew

11. Si le vent soulève les sables (Marion Hänsel, 2006) 7
12. Woman (Anastasia Mikova, Yann Arthus-Bertrand, 2019) 6
13. Heal the Living / Réparer les vivants (Katell Quillévéré, 2016) 6-

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Katell Quillévéré shooting

14. Vivien Leigh, autant en emporte le vent (Priscilla Pizzato, 2020) 7
15. Loving Vincent (Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, 2017) 6

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Dorota Kobiela with co-director and lead actor

16. Let the Sunshine In / Un beau soleil intérieur (Claire Denis, 2017) 5+
17. Kajillionaire (Miranda July, 2020) 5-

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Miranda July

18. Sleeping with Other People (Leslye Headland, 2015) 4+
19. Take This Waltz (Sarah Polley, 2011) 5+

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Sarah Polley

20. Mary Queen of Scots (Josie Rourke, 2018) 7
21. Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash, 1991) 7+
22. The Piano (Jane Campion, 1993) [Rewatch] 9 (=)

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Josie Rourke directing her cast

23. Capernaum / Capharnaüm (Nadine Labaki, 2018) 7+
24. Promising Young Woman (Emerald Fennell, 2020) 5-
25. Rita Hayworth: Zu viel vom Leben (Katja Runge, Henning van Lil, 2021) 7-

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Nadine Labaki on Capernaum set

26. Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020) 6
27. Documenteur (Agnès Varda, 1981) 6+
28. Lions Love (Agnès Varda, 1969) 7-

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Josephine Decker

29. Relic (Natalie Erika James, 2020) 7-
30. One Night in Miami (Regina King, 2020) 7
31. The Headless Woman / La mujer sin cabeza (Lucrecia Martel, 2008) 7-

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Regina King directing Aldis Hodge
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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#413

Post by maksler »

Spoiler
1. Je tu il elle (1974, Akerman)
2. Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975, Akerman)
3. News from Home (1977, Akerman)
4. Les rendez-vous d'Anna (1978, Akerman)
5. Nuit et jour (1991, Akerman)
6. D'Est (1993, Akerman)
7. La captive (2000, Akerman)
8. No home movie (2015, Akerman)
9. The Matrix (1999, Wachowski sisters)
10. Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020, Hittman)
11. Trolösa (2000, Ullmann)
12. The Rider (2017, Zhao)
13. Nomadland (2020, Zhao)
14. Krylya (1966, Shepitko)
15. Voskhozhdenie (1977, Shepitko)
16. The Farewell (2019, Wang)
17. Promising Young Woman (2020, Fennell)
18. La Pointe-Courte (1955, Varda)
19. Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962, Varda)
20. Le bonheur (1965, Varda)
21. Lions Love (1969, Varda)
22. L'une chante l'autre pas (1977, Varda)
23. Mur murs (1981, Varda)
24. Documenteur (1981, Varda)
25. Sans toit ni loi (1985, Varda)
26. Jane B. par Agnès V. (1988, Varda)
27. Les glaneurs et la glaneuse (2000, Varda)
28. Les plages d'Agnès (2008, Varda)
29. Visages villages (2017, Varda)
30. Queen & Slim (2019, Matsoukas)

Watched this after hearing it mentioned on the Talking Images podcast. Lovely shots, great soundtrack, but overall I can't help but feel a little disappointed. The movie felt a little too long and the script was cringeworthy unbelievable at times.

Well, this was it for me in March. On to Doubling the Canon B)
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#414

Post by morrison-dylan-fan »

jdidaco wrote: March 26th, 2021, 3:03 pm
morrison-dylan-fan wrote:Hi JD,I've enjoyed following your progress and was wondering what made First Swallow (had to check it was not a XXX flick) stand out for you?
morrison!!!

:lol: (Stay tuned for my last report on this challenge though - Roger has uncovered a wonderful piece from the Golden Age of Adult Cinema!!!)

There have been some very good films where football/soccer is the main subject, and Mchedlidze's 'First Swallow' is up there with the very best - she captures the community joy, the group rivalries, the family and comradeship dynamics, the lack of resources and economic difficulties with considerable humor and a very attentive, observant gaze, but also, crucially, the frustration, pain and melancholy of the game itself through the underdog's eyes (and bodies!).

Been as always enjoying your festival reports (took notes on that Fulci documentary!)

:cheers:
Hi JD,as a early Easter present, here is the trailer for Fulci Talks.



Next month,I'm actually going to continue with this "Directed by Women" challenge, with a number of viewings lined up at two film festivals I'll be joining in April.
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#415

Post by morrison-dylan-fan »

flavo5000 wrote: March 28th, 2021, 8:28 pm Image
134a. Bach Cello Suite #6: Six Gestures (Patricia Rozema, 1997) 4.5/10
134b. Bach Cello Suite #3: Falling Down Stairs (Barbara Willis Sweete, 1997) 3.5/10

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135. Gore Theatre (Jennifer Nangle + others, 2017) 4/10

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136. Miss Marple: At Bertram's Hotel (Mary McMurray, 1987) 5/10

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137. Hai yang tian tang a.k.a. Ocean Heaven (Xiao Lu Xue, 2010) 5.5/10

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138. Come Along with Me (Joanne Woodward, 1982) 6/10

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139. Eko eko azaraku a.k.a. Eko Eko Azarak: Wizard of Darkness (Shimako Sato, 1995) 6/10

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140. Milae a.k.a. Ardor (Young-Joo Byun, 2002) 6/10

The Female Gaze
1. Organ (Kei Fujiwara, 1996)
2. Somewhere (Sofia Coppola, 2010)
3. Dust to Glory (Dana Brown, 2005)
4. Fangs (Kelly Sandefur, 2002)
5. On the Outs (Lori Silverbush & some dude, 2004)
6. American Guinea Pig: Sacrifice (Poison Rouge, 2017)
7. On a Clear Day(Gaby Dellal, 2005)
8. The Care Bears Movie (Arna Selznik, 1985)
9. Nomadland (Chloé Zhao, 2020)
10. Promising Young Woman (Emerald Fennell, 2020)
11. Don't Expect Too Much (Susan Ray, 2011)
12. Angie (Martha Coolidge, 1994)
13. Salvation (J.A. Steel, 2007)
14. Mickey's Once Upon a Christmas(Jun Falkenstein + others, 1999)
15. Killjoy 2: Deliverance from Evil (Tammi Sutton, 2002)
16. Fung gip a.k.a. The Secret (Ann Hui, 1979)
17-19. Tamako Market E1-12 (Naoko Yamada, 2013)
20. Tamako rabu sutôrî a.k.a. Tamako Love Story (Naoko Yamada, 2014)
21. The Fly Papers: The Buzz on Hollywood's Scariest Insect (Victoria Price, 2000)
22. Blood Games (Tanya Rosenberg, 1990)
23. Portrait de la jeune fille en feu a.k.a. Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma, 2019)
24. To All the Boys I've Loved Before (Susan Johnson, 2018)
25. The Anniversary Party (Jennifer Jason Leigh & etc., 2001)
26. The House of Usher (Hayley Cloake, 2006)
27. Caroline and the Magic Potion (Virginia Curiá, 2015)
28. Mädchen in Uniform (Leontine Sagan et al., 1931)
29. Mignonnes a.k.a. Cuties (Maïmouna Doucouré, 2020)
30. The Secret Life of Words (Isabel Coixet, 2005)
31. Wakefield (Robin Swicord, 2016)
32. Limbo (Tina Krause, 1999)
33a. Answering Machine (Tina Krause, 2001)
33b. One Hundred a Day (Gillian Armstrong, 1973)
33c. And You Act Like One Too (Susan Siedelman, 1976)
33d. Yours Truly, Andrea G. Stern (Susan Siedelman, 1979)
33e. The Above (Kristen Johnson, 2015)
34. Dogora - Ouvrons les yeux (Patrice Leconte, 2004)
35. Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020)
36. Bulbbul (Anvita Dutt, 2020)
37. Yes, God, Yes (Karen Maine, 2019)
38. Satan Was a Lady (Doris Wishman, 1975)
39. First Cow (Kelly Reichardt, 2019)
40. Teströl és lélekröl a.k.a. On Body and Soul (Ildikó Enyedi, 2017)
41. Nu ren si shi a.k.a. Summer Snow (Ann Hui, 1995)
42. She Dies Tomorrow (Amy Seimetz, 2020)
43a. Tenshi no yokubou a.k.a. The Lust of Angels (Nagisa Isogai, 2014)
43b. Watashi no Akachan a.k.a. My Baby (Nagisa Isogai, 2011)
43c. Chambre jaune (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2002)
43d. Santos Palace (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2006)
43e. Catharsis (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2001)
43f. La fin de notre amour (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2003)
43g. L'étrange portrait de la dame en jaune (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2004)
44. Tora Tora Tora: The Real Story of Pearl Harbor (Laura Verklan, 2000)
45. Songcatcher (Maggie Greenwald, 2000)
46. Serpent (Amanda Evans, 2017)
47. Infinitely Polar Bear (Maya Forbes, 2014)
48. L'extraordinaire voyage de Marona a.k.a. Marona's Fantastic Tale (Anca Damian, 2019)
49. Shoes (Lois Weber, 1916)
50. Mystique (Roberta Findlay, 1979)
51a. A Study in Choreography for Camera (Maya Deren, 1946)
51b. At Land (Maya Deren, 1944)
51c. Ritual in Transfigured Time (Maya Deren, 1946)
51d. Rat Life and Diet in North America (Joyce Wieland, 1968)
51e. Water Sark (Joyce Wieland, 1965)
51f. Kirsa Nicholina (Gunvor Nelson, 1969)
51g. Orange (Karen Johnson, 1970)
52. Dip sin dip sin a.k.a. Ouija 4 (Jill Wong, 2015)
53. Der Wald vor lauter Bäumen a.k.a. The Forest for the Trees (Maren Ade, 2003)
54. Sha chu chong wei a.k.a. Breakout from Oppression (Karen Yang, 1978)
55. Laure (Emmanuelle Arsan, 1976)
56. Inch'Allah dimanche (Yamina Benguigui, 2001)
57. Nirgendwo in Afrika a.k.a. Nowhere in Africa (Caroline Link, 2001)
58. Brave Miss World (Cecelia Peck, 2013)
59. Angano... Angano... Tales from Madagascar (Marie Clémence Andriamonta-Paes + other, 1989)
60. Snoop Dogg's Hood of Horror (Stacey Title, 2006)
61. Old Joy (Kelly Reichardt, 2006)
62. Madeinusa (Claudia Llosa, 2006)
63. Blood of the Tribades (Sophia Cacciola + bloke, 2016)
64. Tarzan & Jane (Lisa Schaffer & others, 2002)
65. TiMER (Jac Schaeffer, 2009)
66. Fidel (Estela Bravo, 2001)
67.The Silencer (Amy Goldstein, 1992)
68. La reine des pommes a.k.a. Queen of Hearts (Valérie Donzelli, 2009)
69. Marie Antoinette (Sofia Coppola, 2006)
70. Equity (Meera Menon, 2016)
71. Arcadia (Olivia Silver, 2012)
72-74. Makai Ouji a.k.a. Devils and Realist E1-12 (Chiaki Kon, 2013)
75. Gözetleme Kulesi a.k.a. Watchtower (Pelin Esmer, 2012)
76. Housekeeping (Jennifer Harrington, 2013)
77. No Impact Man: The Documentary (Laura Gabbert & some guy, 2009)
78. Der Mondmann a.k.a. Moon Man (Sarah Clara Weber, etc., 2012)
79. Atlantique a.k.a. Atlantics (Mati Diop, 2019)
80. Obvious Child (Gillian Robespierre, 2014)
81. Nachtrit a.k.a. Night Run (Dana Nechushtan, 2006)
82. The Mask You Live In (Jennifer Siebel Newsom, 2015)
83. Pluto (Su-won Shin, 2012)
84. Las hijas del fuego a.k.a. Daughters of Fire (Albertina Carri, 2015) #Bonus
85a. A Summer Rain (Ela Thier, 2009)
85b. Little Canyon (Olivia Silver, 2008)
85c. The Foreigner (Alethea C. Avramis, 2012)
85d. Still Standing (Paola Mendoza, 2006)
85e. a fork, a spoon & a KNIGHT (Mira Nair, 2013)
85f. Supporting Survivors (Gretchen Wallace, 2013)
86. Home (Fien Troch, 2016)
87. Dead Dicks (Lee Paula Springer + some guy, 2019)
88. Old Days (Sunhee Han, 2016)
89. Entre nos (Gloria La Morte & Paola Mendoza, 2009)
90. The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg, 2019)
91. Queen of Katwe (Mira Nair, 2016)
92. Bleeding Heart (Diane Bell, 2015)
93. Az én XX. századom a.k.a. My 20th Century (Ildikó Enyedi, 1989)
94. The Wild Thornberrys Movie (Cathy Malkasian +Jeff, 2002)
95. Body at Brighton Rock (Roxanne Benjamin, 2019)
96. August Underground's Mordum (Cristie Whiles and some other sick fucks, 2003)
97. Satanic Panic (Chelsea Stardust, 2019)
98. Never Fear (Ida Lupino, 1950)
99. Voodoo Dolls (Andrée Pelletier, 1991)
100. Chicken People (Nicole Lucas Haimes, 2016)
101. The Cry (Bernadine Santistevan, 2007)
102. Hurt (Barbara Stepansky, 2009)
103. Rage (Sally Potter, 2009)
104. First: The Official Film of the London 2012 Olympic Games (Caroline Rowland, 2012)
105. Phobic (Alexandra Lief, 2002)
106. Moms Mabley: I Got Somethin' to Tell You (Whoopi Goldberg, 2013)
107. Hot Summer in the City (Gail Palmer, 1976)
108. Protege (Michelle Henderson, 2009)
109. Gut Instincts (Michelle Henderson, 2012)
110. The To Do List (Maggie Carey, 2013)
111. Rolling Stones: Some Girls: Live in Texas '78 (Lynn Leneau Calmes, 2011)
112. After.Life (Agnieszka Wojtowicz-Vosloo, 2009)
113. Fire (Deepa Mehta, 1996)
114. Banoo-Ye Ordibehesht a.k.a. The May Lady (Rakhshan Banietemad, 1998)
115. Wij a.k.a. We (Rene Eller, 2018)
116. The Chipmunk Adventure (Janice Karman, 1987)
117. Red Road (Andrea Arnold, 2006)
118. Rough Magic (Clare Peploe, 1995)
119. The Night Visitor (Jennifer Blanc, 2013)
120. The Night Visitor 2: Heather's Story (Brianne Davis, 2016)
121. Deuce of Spades (Faith Granger, 2011)
122. Gomennasai a.k.a. Ring of Curse (Mari Asato, 2011)
123. Out of the Clear Blue Sky (Danielle Gardner, 2012)
124. Taryn Barker: Demon Hunter (Zoe Kavanagh, 2016)
125. La tête haute a.k.a. Standing Tall (Emmanuelle Bercot, 2015)
126. Horns and Halos (Suki Hawley, 2002)
127. Watch Me (Melanie Ansley, 2006)
128. Slaughtered (Kate Glover, 2010)
129. Strangerland (Kim Farrant, 2015)
130. Katy Perry: Part of Me (Jane Lipsitz + a guy,, 2012)
131. Zhui ming qiang a.k.a. Blood of the Dragon (Pao-Shu Kao, 1971)
132. Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie (Mandie Fletcher, 2016)
133. Black Christmas (Sophia Takal, 2019)
134a. Bach Cello Suite #6: Six Gestures (Patricia Rozema, 1997)
134b. Bach Cello Suite #3: Falling Down Stairs (Barbara Willis Sweete, 1997)
135. Gore Theatre (Jennifer Nangle + others, 2017)
136. Miss Marple: At Bertram's Hotel (Mary McMurray, 1987)
137. Hai yang tian tang a.k.a. Ocean Heaven (Xiao Lu Xue, 2010)
138. Come Along with Me (Joanne Woodward, 1982)
139. Eko eko azaraku a.k.a. Eko Eko Azarak: Wizard of Darkness (Shimako Sato, 1995)
140. Milae a.k.a. Ardor (Young-Joo Byun, 2002)
Hi Flavo,I've enjoyed following your viewings,was Wizard of Darkness as mad-cap as it looks?
morrison-dylan-fan
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#416

Post by morrison-dylan-fan »

Right, time to put my cards on the table.

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Every Jacqueline Audry film,currently with English subtitles.

Run!

FTV:18:Gigi (1949)8

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Turning Gaston’s head with teasing flirting, directing auteur Jacqueline Audry is joined by cinematographer Gerard Perrin in continuing to expand her disincentive, refined stylisation, with Audry bringing the perfect light touch to attempts made by the family to turn Gigi into a high class mistress.Keeping a close eye on the attempts by the family to push Gigi into the direction they desire, Audry makes the dialogue pop,with a sparkling atmosphere of push-ins and whip-pans spinning on the snappy exchanges between Gigi and her relatives, which Audry spins out to elegant panning shots gliding across the flirting between Gigi and Gaston.

Initially being out of the loop on the attempt being made to alter her, Daniele Delorme gives a outstanding turn as Gigi, thanks to Delorme balancing a youthful comedic naivety,with a growing self-confidence in her casual flirting, whilst Frank Villard gives a delightful, buttoned-up, dead-pan turn as Gaston.Later getting married to Audry in 1958, Pierre Laroche displays the closeness of their collaboration In adapting Colette’s novel,which Laroche lines with merry, witty word-play dialogue that zips between Gigi and her relatives,which Laroche binds together with the sweet Melodrama of the decadent Gaston developing romantic affection for Gigi.

FTV:19:Olivia (1951)9

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Previously adapting the Colette novel Gigi with her husband, directing auteur Jacqueline Audry widens family involvement and a “Colette” connection, in her sister Colette Audry joining Jacqueline’s husband/regular corroborator Pierre Laroche, in adapting Dorothy Bussy’s autobiographical novel, into a heart-felt, blossoming screenplay.

Displaying a interest in defying the norms of this era of cinema which would become a major characteristic of Jacqueline Audry’s works, the screenplay by Colette Audry and Pierre Laroche welcomes Olivia into a open school where a romantic Melodrama atmosphere hangs high,with a magical touch of poetic realism giving the exchanges between Julie and Olivia a hushed romantic aura under the skin. Book-ended their adaptation with horse carriage rides,the writers track Olivia riding into a rich coming of age,via the one-upmanship between Julie and Cara at the boarding school, to be the teacher of affection from the pupil,which widens for Julie to that of student Olivia.

Featuring only two scenes involving men, directing auteur Jacqueline Audry and A Kiss for a Killer (1957-also reviewed) cinematographer Christian Matras unveil an exquisite atmosphere of light as a feather tracking shots down the school halls capturing the students and teachers bonding, which Audry twists into loving corner shot’s and deep close-ups upon Olivia’s lingering gaze at Julie.Joined by a wonderful Simone Simon as the passionate Cara, Edwige Feuillere and debut actress Marie-Claire Olivia give magnificent performances as Julie and Olivia,with each of them expressing with a stunning precision the romantic longing which hangs in the air unsaid,as Olivia receives an education.

FTV:20:No Exit (1954)10.

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Departing from the Costume Drama setting the majority of her credits take place in, directing auteur Jacqueline Audry & Forbidden Games (1952-also reviewed) cinematographer Robert Juillard welcome everyone into hell with magnificent ultra-stylisation,via mesmerising in-camera tricks which places the visions of what the three people have left behind into the room,with Audry winding panning shots from the afterlife back down to Earth.

Packing them all in one room, Audry continues to expand her eye for elegant detail,with the walls of the room glistening with refined elegance,that Audry cuts through with a knife in starling close-ups on this new hellish life getting under Garcin’s skin.All locked in, the ensemble cast give magnificent performances,with the dressed in a masculine suit, (which would become a recurring motif of Audry’s works, continued in Le secret du Chevalier d'Eon (1959-also reviewed)) rather butch lesbian turn Arletty gives gloriously going against the tide of her feminine image.

Reuniting with Audry after Gigi (1949-also reviewed), Frank Villard gives a scotching hot turn as Garcin, who Villard places under boiling hot pressure from finding himself in Hell,which Villard snaps in brittle exchanges with Estelle (played with a sharp, enticing curiosity by Gaby Sylvia.)Taking on Jean-Paul Sartre’s classic play, the screenplay by Audry’s husband/ regular collaborator Pierre Laroche superbly adapts the one location origins into a cinematic nightmare gallery, via gripping, Film Noir flashbacks unveiling the vicious misdeeds of the three strangers, and the ripe cynical aftermath they have left behind, as Laroche ushers into a hotel with no exit.

FTV:21:Le secret du Chevalier d'Éon (1959)7.

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The only one out of the five current subtitled films from her credits that was shot in colour, directing auteur Jacqueline Audry lights her distinctive eye for Costume Drama period detail, with a chocolate box shimmering ultra-stylisation.

Audry unveils long, refined panning shots over the bursting with colour flowing dresses of Catherine II, with the walls of the castles being lined in sparkling ruby red.Having to keep her real identity under wraps, Andree Debar makes her final performance one that sparkles as Genevieve / Charles, with the femininity she displays when away from the eyes of royalty as Genevieve,being a aspect which Debar subtly stretches out into a more withdrawn, masculine direction, whilst real life couple Simone Valere and Jean Desailly lay dead-pan dry-wit round the household as Pompadour and Louis XV.

Playing fast and loose with reality, (the real Charles was a man who dressed up as a woman) Audry’s husband/regular corroborator is here joined by Ennio De Concini/ Jacques Laurent/ Vittorio Nino Novarese & Les maudits (1947-also reviewed) co-writer Jacques Remy for a grand Costume Drama, which continues Audry’s subversions of period romantic archetypes, in the delicate loving passion between “Charles” and Elisabeth (played by a lovely Isa Miranda) with playful, merry misunderstanding comedic word-play,as Charles/ Genevieve reveals a secret.

FTV:22:Hitch-Hike/ Les petits matins(1962)8

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Released the same year that her husband/regular collaborator Pierre Laroche passed away at just 59 years old, directing auteur Jacqueline Audry & The Gates of Paris (1957-also reviewed) cinematographer Robert Lefebvre drive into a major departure from the shine of Audry’s Costume Drama works,with a large part of the movie clearly being filmed in real location, which Audry stylishly takes advantage of in gliding panning shots towards the care-free Agathe.Presenting Agathe’s criss-crossing riding encounters with men in an anthology manner, Audry charges up a jaunty, cheeky comedic atmosphere via darting push-in shots on the increasingly sleazy men, which Audry twists into glowing close-ups on the butter wouldn’t melt in her mouth innocent Agathe.

On the last film by his wife before he passed away (Audry’s Cadavres en vacances that he co-wrote,would come out in 1963) Pierre Laroche is joined by co-writers Stella Kersova and The Girl with the Golden Eyes (1961-also reviewed) co-scriptwriter Pierre Pelegri,for a screenplay which heightens Audry’s major theme across her works of women’s independence into a Road Movie of discovery.

The writers make the rather noticeable decision,that Agathe discovers that every single man she meets on her hitch-hike travels, is a sleazy chap who tries to make Agathe fulfill their lustful desires.Never acting on film or TV again, Agathe Aems gives a charming turn as Agathe,thanks to blending naive innocence with enticing, sugary sweet flirting. Turning Agathe’s Road Movie into an exciting adventure, Audry packs the supporting cast of slimeball lads with an incredible selection of actors,with Noel-Noel, Pierre Brasseur, Robert Hossein, Daniel Gelin and Lino Ventura all hitting their cheeky punch-lines, as Agathe sets off to hitch-hike.
Last edited by morrison-dylan-fan on April 2nd, 2021, 2:56 am, edited 2 times in total.
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#417

Post by morrison-dylan-fan »

Jennifer Kent duo:

FTV:23: The Nightingale (2018)10.


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Reuniting with The Babadook (2014-also reviewed) cinematographer Radek Ladczuk, writer/directing auteur Jennifer Kent’s decision to shoot in the Academy ratio of 1.37 : 1, frames an incredibly claustrophobic,chilling atmosphere, via long tracking shots of Clare and Billy’s walk to the mountain summit, and unflinching close-ups on Clare’s tortured face, being framed in a closed-in style,subtly creating the impression of their being no corners the characters can take to escape this horror.Dressed with the regal appearance of a Costume Drama, Kent cracks any hint of the good-behavioral traditions of that genre, with a extremely bleak opening thirty minutes,during which Kent stylishly flies whip-pans over dour blacks and browns to Clare’s agonized face, as a excellent sound design and unflinching wide-shots gaze at Clare’s life being destroyed.

Moving at a impressive pace, Kent builds the bond between Claire and Billy with stark push-ins on the pain and desire for revenge cast across their faces, which is unleashed by Kent in white-knuckle wide-shot tilts towards the Colonial force in the mountain,who left Clare for dead.Continuing an exploration of grief which had haunted The Babadook (2014), the screenplay by Kent brilliantly examines the PTSD psychological torment Clare suffers, with unsettling flinches of the abuse Clare has suffered and killings she has been forced to witness, merging without any warning into the continuing search for the murderers of her family.

Following the Colonial force leaving a trail of death and torture, Kent makes the release of revenge one that is physical and psychological, as Clare faces down those who have attacked her with everything they’ve got,and states that she is no longer the nightingale that all the men in the force have caged with grief and abuse, while Billy soars in with revenge against those who for years have mercilessly killed the Tasmanian Aboriginal people for years.

Delivering the coarsely chopped dialogue with a ferocious bite, Aisling Franciosi gives a magnificent turn as Clare, with Franciosi delicacy expressing the psychological horror Clare has suffered in her body language and facial expressions, with a blood-red raw scar for revenge just under the skin.Ordered by Clare at point-blank range to be her guide, Baykali Ganambarr gives a excellent debut performance as Billy, whose mistrust of Clare due to the abuse white people have inflicted on the Tasmanian Aboriginals, is gradually eased by Ganambarr into a rough-edge friendship,as they release the nightingale.

FTV:24: The Babadook (2014)

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Last edited by morrison-dylan-fan on April 1st, 2021, 1:23 am, edited 2 times in total.
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OldAle1
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#418

Post by OldAle1 »

D doesn't just stand for Dame

1. Anti-Clock (Jane Arden/Jack Bond, 1979)
2. Paris est â nous / Paris is Us (Elisabeth Vogler, 2019)
3. Hustlers (Lorene Scafaria, 2019)
4. Orlando (Sally Potter, 1992) (re-watch)
5. The Man Who Cried (Sally Potter, 2000)
6. Koibumi / Love Letter (Kinuyo Tanaka, 1953)
7. Ángel de fuego / Angel of Fire (Dana Rotberg, 1992) (re-watch)
8. Otilia Rauda (Dana Rotberg, 2001)
9. Sambizanga (Sarah Maldoror, 1972)

DTC. I don't know too much about this French director, who died last year at the age of 90, apart from seeing lists of her films - many shorts, a couple of features, some documentaries - and her Wiki page; not many of the films are available, and if this one is any indication, many are not in good shape, alas. Several were made in Angola in the late 60s and 70s, so I presume she lived and worked there for a time. This is a pretty solid, angry piece of agitprop about a young man arrested for handing out political pamphlets and the terrible fate that awaits him, and the futile attempts made by his wife and others to set him free. The copy I saw was bleached very pink-red and whatever qualities the cinematography might have were not readily apparent; this seems like the kind of film Scorsese's foundation might go after for restoration - let's hope, anyway. At any rate, it's pretty visceral and moving and worth seeing even in the condition it's in today.

10. Hot Gimmick: GIrl Meets Boy (Yûki Yamato, 2019)

DTC. Interesting take on teen romance involving a fairly complex love quadrangle (I think), with girl crushing on hot idol guy who's come back to the area he grew up in, other guy smitten with this girl but unable to do anything but be an asshole to her, girl's older stepbrother also interested - and on top of this, old family secrets that come to life that threaten to break apart any and all relationships. I was fairly involved in this - and unlike some reviewers, I didn't find it THAT challenging to keep track of what was going on and who was who, though it is more complex than you typical teen-oriented romance for sure - but I had mixed feelings about the filmmaking. Too much shaky-cam and closeups, particularly in the first third or so; strange use of music, with Pachelbel's Canon showing up over and over, and well-loved pieces by Bach and Beethoven also foregrounded, and somewhat uneasily mixing with a few Japanese pop songs (which seemed more appropriate). Also fairly dreary digital blue-gray look did no favors; but there are some standout scenes, like a climactic long sequence in a waterside park area, and nice use of vertical spaces, particularly stairs, which all help to give it a certain strange energy - helpful as at 2 hours it's a bit much for what it is. Overall mixed but positive. I may take a look at the manga this was taken from since my library has it - apparently the film got shit on for being too different. Can't please everybody.

11. Baxter, Vera Baxter (Marguerite Duras, 1977)

DTC. Duras' films typically start out slow and get slower - and they also typically bore me at first but end up fascinating by the end. This was no exception, and it also was typical in that it was fairly challenging to really get what was going on, what it all meant beyond the beautiful (Sacha Vierny-shot) images and the posing and the languorous feeling of ennui throughout - and I watched it a week ago and can't really put it all together now. So read THIS review by our own matthewscott if you want more.

12. Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance (Alanis Obomsawin, 1993)

DTC. I haven't gotten around to this until now because for some strange reason I was under the impression that it was 4 hours long until quite recently. Don't ask me why, it's one of those things - I either never looked at the running time or I made up something in my head, or I was mixing it up with something else. Anyway, it's just half that length, and it's a fairly engrossing if quite standard (cinematically-speaking) piece of on-the-spot journalism, the story of the attempt by a Mohawk tribe to prevent the expansion of a golf course near Montréal into their sacred space in 1990. For those used to thinking of Canada as a place with all the pluses and none of the minuses of the USA (that was my prejudice when I first moved to Vermont and made friends in the province to the north), this is a good shot of ice water, as the tribes are treated just about the same by town, provincial, and federal governments as you'd expect in most countries with histories of repression and racism. This is clearly a work with an agenda that isn't particularly trying for "objectivity", which I think is fine - no documentary is TRULY objective, there is always a POV unless we're looking at raw unedited (and un-aimed/framed) footage - so you're getting a cry of anger from an indigenous woman filmmaker at centuries of oppression that show no signs of ending. I guess I would have liked just a little bit more context on the recent situations - we get a nice few minutes about the overall history of the Mohawks since the white men came, but little about the contemporary relations of the natives and the white villagers nearby. Otherwise this is an excellent piece of work and makes me want to look into the follow-up material that's out there.
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#419

Post by Ebbywebby »

Spoiler
1. Lions Love (1969, Varda)
2. Before Need Redressed (1994, Gunvor Nelson + Dorothy Wiley)
3. Wadjda (2012, Haifaa Al Mansour)
4. Point Break (1991, Bigelow)
5. Promising Young Woman (2020, Fennell)
6. Bluebeard (2009, Breillat)
7. Krane's Confectionery (1951)...I've had this in my DVR for several months (TCM's past blitz of female-directed films) and finally got around to it. I wondered if I'd even want to sit through the whole thing, but it was better than expected. Quite ahead of the curve, as far as having a lead female character in 1951 who calls the shots and is master of her own destiny.
8. Katatsumori (1994, Naomi Kawase...just squeaks into "feature" length for purposes of this challenge, I guess)
9a. De Natura (2018, 6 min, Lucile Hadzihalilovic)
9b. Nectar (2014, 18 min, same)
9c. Good Boys Use Condoms (1998, 6 min, same)
9d. The HPO (1938, 4 min, Reiniger)
9e. Daumlienchen (1954, 10 min, Reiniger)
9f. Stanley Pickle (2010, 11 min, Victoria Mather)
9g. The Black Dog (1987, 18 minutes, Alison DeVere)
9h. Butterfly (1967, 4 minutes, Wendy & Shirley Clarke)...I don't know why I never came across this before. Just the sort of late-60s experimental noodling I enjoy.
9i. The Judy Spots (1995, 12 minutes, Sadie Benning)...with Kathleen Hanna (Le Tigre, Bikini Kill)

OK, that gives me another set of 80 minutes of shorts.
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#420

Post by frbrown »

Thanks for hosting, Max and adwest!


Starting the next month's challenges early with some animation by women:

6a. The Red Book (1994, Janie Geiser)
6b. The Secret Story (1996, Janie Geiser)
6c. Immer zu (1997, Janie Geiser)
6d. Lost Motion (1999, Janie Geiser)
6e. The Fourth Watch (2000, Janie Geiser)
6f. Ultima Thule (2002, Janie Geiser)
6g. Terrace 49 (2004, Janie Geiser)

6h. Kyousou Giga (2011, Rie Matsumoto)

Spoiler
1. Damned If You Don't (1987, Su Friedrich)
2. A League of Their Own (1992, Penny Marshall)
3. Desperately Seeking Susan (1985, Susan Seidelman)
4. Liz and the Blue Bird (2018, Naoko Yamada)
5. Subway in the Sky (1959, Muriel Box)
6a. The Red Book (1994, Janie Geiser)
6b. The Secret Story (1996, Janie Geiser)
6c. Immer zu (1997, Janie Geiser)
6d. Lost Motion (1999, Janie Geiser)
6e. The Fourth Watch (2000, Janie Geiser)
6f. Ultima Thule (2002, Janie Geiser)
6g. Terrace 49 (2004, Janie Geiser)
6h. Kyousou Giga (2011, Rie Matsumoto)
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#421

Post by flavo5000 »

morrison-dylan-fan wrote: March 31st, 2021, 9:59 pm
flavo5000 wrote: March 28th, 2021, 8:28 pm Image
134a. Bach Cello Suite #6: Six Gestures (Patricia Rozema, 1997) 4.5/10
134b. Bach Cello Suite #3: Falling Down Stairs (Barbara Willis Sweete, 1997) 3.5/10

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135. Gore Theatre (Jennifer Nangle + others, 2017) 4/10

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136. Miss Marple: At Bertram's Hotel (Mary McMurray, 1987) 5/10

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137. Hai yang tian tang a.k.a. Ocean Heaven (Xiao Lu Xue, 2010) 5.5/10

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138. Come Along with Me (Joanne Woodward, 1982) 6/10

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139. Eko eko azaraku a.k.a. Eko Eko Azarak: Wizard of Darkness (Shimako Sato, 1995) 6/10

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140. Milae a.k.a. Ardor (Young-Joo Byun, 2002) 6/10

The Female Gaze
1. Organ (Kei Fujiwara, 1996)
2. Somewhere (Sofia Coppola, 2010)
3. Dust to Glory (Dana Brown, 2005)
4. Fangs (Kelly Sandefur, 2002)
5. On the Outs (Lori Silverbush & some dude, 2004)
6. American Guinea Pig: Sacrifice (Poison Rouge, 2017)
7. On a Clear Day(Gaby Dellal, 2005)
8. The Care Bears Movie (Arna Selznik, 1985)
9. Nomadland (Chloé Zhao, 2020)
10. Promising Young Woman (Emerald Fennell, 2020)
11. Don't Expect Too Much (Susan Ray, 2011)
12. Angie (Martha Coolidge, 1994)
13. Salvation (J.A. Steel, 2007)
14. Mickey's Once Upon a Christmas(Jun Falkenstein + others, 1999)
15. Killjoy 2: Deliverance from Evil (Tammi Sutton, 2002)
16. Fung gip a.k.a. The Secret (Ann Hui, 1979)
17-19. Tamako Market E1-12 (Naoko Yamada, 2013)
20. Tamako rabu sutôrî a.k.a. Tamako Love Story (Naoko Yamada, 2014)
21. The Fly Papers: The Buzz on Hollywood's Scariest Insect (Victoria Price, 2000)
22. Blood Games (Tanya Rosenberg, 1990)
23. Portrait de la jeune fille en feu a.k.a. Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma, 2019)
24. To All the Boys I've Loved Before (Susan Johnson, 2018)
25. The Anniversary Party (Jennifer Jason Leigh & etc., 2001)
26. The House of Usher (Hayley Cloake, 2006)
27. Caroline and the Magic Potion (Virginia Curiá, 2015)
28. Mädchen in Uniform (Leontine Sagan et al., 1931)
29. Mignonnes a.k.a. Cuties (Maïmouna Doucouré, 2020)
30. The Secret Life of Words (Isabel Coixet, 2005)
31. Wakefield (Robin Swicord, 2016)
32. Limbo (Tina Krause, 1999)
33a. Answering Machine (Tina Krause, 2001)
33b. One Hundred a Day (Gillian Armstrong, 1973)
33c. And You Act Like One Too (Susan Siedelman, 1976)
33d. Yours Truly, Andrea G. Stern (Susan Siedelman, 1979)
33e. The Above (Kristen Johnson, 2015)
34. Dogora - Ouvrons les yeux (Patrice Leconte, 2004)
35. Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020)
36. Bulbbul (Anvita Dutt, 2020)
37. Yes, God, Yes (Karen Maine, 2019)
38. Satan Was a Lady (Doris Wishman, 1975)
39. First Cow (Kelly Reichardt, 2019)
40. Teströl és lélekröl a.k.a. On Body and Soul (Ildikó Enyedi, 2017)
41. Nu ren si shi a.k.a. Summer Snow (Ann Hui, 1995)
42. She Dies Tomorrow (Amy Seimetz, 2020)
43a. Tenshi no yokubou a.k.a. The Lust of Angels (Nagisa Isogai, 2014)
43b. Watashi no Akachan a.k.a. My Baby (Nagisa Isogai, 2011)
43c. Chambre jaune (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2002)
43d. Santos Palace (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2006)
43e. Catharsis (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2001)
43f. La fin de notre amour (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2003)
43g. L'étrange portrait de la dame en jaune (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2004)
44. Tora Tora Tora: The Real Story of Pearl Harbor (Laura Verklan, 2000)
45. Songcatcher (Maggie Greenwald, 2000)
46. Serpent (Amanda Evans, 2017)
47. Infinitely Polar Bear (Maya Forbes, 2014)
48. L'extraordinaire voyage de Marona a.k.a. Marona's Fantastic Tale (Anca Damian, 2019)
49. Shoes (Lois Weber, 1916)
50. Mystique (Roberta Findlay, 1979)
51a. A Study in Choreography for Camera (Maya Deren, 1946)
51b. At Land (Maya Deren, 1944)
51c. Ritual in Transfigured Time (Maya Deren, 1946)
51d. Rat Life and Diet in North America (Joyce Wieland, 1968)
51e. Water Sark (Joyce Wieland, 1965)
51f. Kirsa Nicholina (Gunvor Nelson, 1969)
51g. Orange (Karen Johnson, 1970)
52. Dip sin dip sin a.k.a. Ouija 4 (Jill Wong, 2015)
53. Der Wald vor lauter Bäumen a.k.a. The Forest for the Trees (Maren Ade, 2003)
54. Sha chu chong wei a.k.a. Breakout from Oppression (Karen Yang, 1978)
55. Laure (Emmanuelle Arsan, 1976)
56. Inch'Allah dimanche (Yamina Benguigui, 2001)
57. Nirgendwo in Afrika a.k.a. Nowhere in Africa (Caroline Link, 2001)
58. Brave Miss World (Cecelia Peck, 2013)
59. Angano... Angano... Tales from Madagascar (Marie Clémence Andriamonta-Paes + other, 1989)
60. Snoop Dogg's Hood of Horror (Stacey Title, 2006)
61. Old Joy (Kelly Reichardt, 2006)
62. Madeinusa (Claudia Llosa, 2006)
63. Blood of the Tribades (Sophia Cacciola + bloke, 2016)
64. Tarzan & Jane (Lisa Schaffer & others, 2002)
65. TiMER (Jac Schaeffer, 2009)
66. Fidel (Estela Bravo, 2001)
67.The Silencer (Amy Goldstein, 1992)
68. La reine des pommes a.k.a. Queen of Hearts (Valérie Donzelli, 2009)
69. Marie Antoinette (Sofia Coppola, 2006)
70. Equity (Meera Menon, 2016)
71. Arcadia (Olivia Silver, 2012)
72-74. Makai Ouji a.k.a. Devils and Realist E1-12 (Chiaki Kon, 2013)
75. Gözetleme Kulesi a.k.a. Watchtower (Pelin Esmer, 2012)
76. Housekeeping (Jennifer Harrington, 2013)
77. No Impact Man: The Documentary (Laura Gabbert & some guy, 2009)
78. Der Mondmann a.k.a. Moon Man (Sarah Clara Weber, etc., 2012)
79. Atlantique a.k.a. Atlantics (Mati Diop, 2019)
80. Obvious Child (Gillian Robespierre, 2014)
81. Nachtrit a.k.a. Night Run (Dana Nechushtan, 2006)
82. The Mask You Live In (Jennifer Siebel Newsom, 2015)
83. Pluto (Su-won Shin, 2012)
84. Las hijas del fuego a.k.a. Daughters of Fire (Albertina Carri, 2015) #Bonus
85a. A Summer Rain (Ela Thier, 2009)
85b. Little Canyon (Olivia Silver, 2008)
85c. The Foreigner (Alethea C. Avramis, 2012)
85d. Still Standing (Paola Mendoza, 2006)
85e. a fork, a spoon & a KNIGHT (Mira Nair, 2013)
85f. Supporting Survivors (Gretchen Wallace, 2013)
86. Home (Fien Troch, 2016)
87. Dead Dicks (Lee Paula Springer + some guy, 2019)
88. Old Days (Sunhee Han, 2016)
89. Entre nos (Gloria La Morte & Paola Mendoza, 2009)
90. The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg, 2019)
91. Queen of Katwe (Mira Nair, 2016)
92. Bleeding Heart (Diane Bell, 2015)
93. Az én XX. századom a.k.a. My 20th Century (Ildikó Enyedi, 1989)
94. The Wild Thornberrys Movie (Cathy Malkasian +Jeff, 2002)
95. Body at Brighton Rock (Roxanne Benjamin, 2019)
96. August Underground's Mordum (Cristie Whiles and some other sick fucks, 2003)
97. Satanic Panic (Chelsea Stardust, 2019)
98. Never Fear (Ida Lupino, 1950)
99. Voodoo Dolls (Andrée Pelletier, 1991)
100. Chicken People (Nicole Lucas Haimes, 2016)
101. The Cry (Bernadine Santistevan, 2007)
102. Hurt (Barbara Stepansky, 2009)
103. Rage (Sally Potter, 2009)
104. First: The Official Film of the London 2012 Olympic Games (Caroline Rowland, 2012)
105. Phobic (Alexandra Lief, 2002)
106. Moms Mabley: I Got Somethin' to Tell You (Whoopi Goldberg, 2013)
107. Hot Summer in the City (Gail Palmer, 1976)
108. Protege (Michelle Henderson, 2009)
109. Gut Instincts (Michelle Henderson, 2012)
110. The To Do List (Maggie Carey, 2013)
111. Rolling Stones: Some Girls: Live in Texas '78 (Lynn Leneau Calmes, 2011)
112. After.Life (Agnieszka Wojtowicz-Vosloo, 2009)
113. Fire (Deepa Mehta, 1996)
114. Banoo-Ye Ordibehesht a.k.a. The May Lady (Rakhshan Banietemad, 1998)
115. Wij a.k.a. We (Rene Eller, 2018)
116. The Chipmunk Adventure (Janice Karman, 1987)
117. Red Road (Andrea Arnold, 2006)
118. Rough Magic (Clare Peploe, 1995)
119. The Night Visitor (Jennifer Blanc, 2013)
120. The Night Visitor 2: Heather's Story (Brianne Davis, 2016)
121. Deuce of Spades (Faith Granger, 2011)
122. Gomennasai a.k.a. Ring of Curse (Mari Asato, 2011)
123. Out of the Clear Blue Sky (Danielle Gardner, 2012)
124. Taryn Barker: Demon Hunter (Zoe Kavanagh, 2016)
125. La tête haute a.k.a. Standing Tall (Emmanuelle Bercot, 2015)
126. Horns and Halos (Suki Hawley, 2002)
127. Watch Me (Melanie Ansley, 2006)
128. Slaughtered (Kate Glover, 2010)
129. Strangerland (Kim Farrant, 2015)
130. Katy Perry: Part of Me (Jane Lipsitz + a guy,, 2012)
131. Zhui ming qiang a.k.a. Blood of the Dragon (Pao-Shu Kao, 1971)
132. Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie (Mandie Fletcher, 2016)
133. Black Christmas (Sophia Takal, 2019)
134a. Bach Cello Suite #6: Six Gestures (Patricia Rozema, 1997)
134b. Bach Cello Suite #3: Falling Down Stairs (Barbara Willis Sweete, 1997)
135. Gore Theatre (Jennifer Nangle + others, 2017)
136. Miss Marple: At Bertram's Hotel (Mary McMurray, 1987)
137. Hai yang tian tang a.k.a. Ocean Heaven (Xiao Lu Xue, 2010)
138. Come Along with Me (Joanne Woodward, 1982)
139. Eko eko azaraku a.k.a. Eko Eko Azarak: Wizard of Darkness (Shimako Sato, 1995)
140. Milae a.k.a. Ardor (Young-Joo Byun, 2002)
Hi Flavo,I've enjoyed following your viewings,was Wizard of Darkness as mad-cap as it looks?
I would say it wasn't as crazy as stuff like the Sushi Typhoon films but was a step beyond stuff like Ringu and Ju-On. It actually reminded me of the anime/manga Another or the visual novel/anime Corpse Party if you're familiar with either of those with its school girls getting brutally murdered in a school theme but with some supernatural occult stuff mixed in as well. I thought it was pretty entertaining though. I'll probably get around to watching the two sequels sooner or later.
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kongs_speech
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#422

Post by kongs_speech »

I didn't actively participate in this at all, but I try to watch female cinema constantly, so it just happened.

01) But I'm a Cheerleader (1999, Jamie Babbit) - 5/5
02) Goodnight Mommy (2014, Severin Fiala & Veronika Franz) - 4/5
03) Better Than Chocolate (1999, Anne Fletcher) - 3.5/5
04) Paris Was a Woman (1995, Greta Schiller) - 3/5
05) Queen to Play (2009, Caroline Bottaro) - 4/5

06) Butter on the Latch (2013, Josephine Decker) - 2/5
07) Thou Wast Mild and Lovely (2014, Josephine Decker) - 4/5
08) Songcatcher (2000, Maggie Greenwald) - 1.5/5
09) The Pink Cloud (2021, Iuli Gerbase) - 4/5
10) She Dies Tomorrow (2020, Amy Seimetz) - 2/5

11) The Assistant (2019, Kitty Green) - 4/5
12) The Mole Agent (2020, Maite Alberdi) - 3.5/5
13) Dick Johnson is Dead (2020, Kirsten Johnson) - 5/5
14) The Dog Who Wouldn't Be Quiet (2021, Ana Katz) - 2.5/5
15) First Cow (2019, Kelly Reichardt) - 4/5

16) Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution (2020, Nicole Newnham & James Lebrecht) - 3.5/5
17) Bull (2019, Annie Silverstein) - 2/5
18) The Forty-Year-Old Version (2020, Radha Blank) - 4.5/5
19) The Half of It (2020, Alice Wu) - 1/5
20) Quo Vadis, Aida (2020, Jasmila Zbanic) - 4/5

21) La Leyenda Negra (2020, Patricia Vidal Delgado) - 4/5
22) Lingua Franca (2019, Isabel Sandoval) - 4.5/5
23) Humanoids from the Deep (1980, Barbara Peeters) - 3.5/5
24) Bluebeard (2009, Catherine Breillat) - 4/5
25) The Sleeping Beauty (2010, Catherine Breillat) - 4/5

26) Abuse of Weakness (2013, Catherine Breillat) - 4.5/5
27) Monsoon Wedding (2001, Mira Nair) - 3.5/5
28) Heroes Don't Die (2019, Aude Lea Rapin) - 2/5
29) Enormous (2019, Sophie Letourneur) - 0.5/5
30) Cialo (2015, Małgorzata Szumowska) - 3.5/5

31) Eve's Bayou (1997, Kasi Lemmons) - 4.5/5
32) Love & Basketball (2000, Gina Prince-Blythewood) - 3.5/5
33) Queen & Slim (2019, Melina Matsoukas) - 4/5
34) Romance (1999, Catherine Breillat) - 4.5/5
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adwest
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#423

Post by adwest »

Uggggghhhhh! I did not get to watch nearly as many as I wanted this month. Life is too busy. There are still so many more I want to see so I might have to join morrison-dylan-fan and keep watching these for another month. Maybe, subconsciously, I didn't watch any in the last couple of days because I wanted to end on a high note. Logging my favorites right here in the last post.

**FAVORITE OF THE CHALLENGE** :poshclap:
40. Obscuro Barroco (2018) Evangelia Kranioti 10/10
There's so much here I love, I almost don't know where to start. First, the poem that the narrator reads throughout is a work of art just by itself. The way they play with obscuring gender, obscuring those clues that hold us captive to binary gender myths, and then later in the film reveling in revealing all those bodies that don't fit and are so incredibly beautiful. It's also, kind of like Cleo from 5 to 7 and Paris, in it's exploration of Rio de Janeiro and its people. So much of the beautiful prose sounds like a love (and a little fear or hate) poem written to the city and the city is definitely one of the main characters in the film. I love the name of the film. I love the existential thrust of this quest for transformation and for choosing one's own body. Well, I think it's pretty clear. I hated it. Just kidding. It's fantastic and will stay with me and I'll probably watch it over and over.

41. Capernaum (2018) Nadine Labaki 9/10
I was pulled in from the moment the film started and totally heartbroken by the end in many ways. It was very real. It would make my favorites list as a film, for the cinematography and acting and directing but it was so depressing, I just can't call it a favorite.

**RUNNERS UP FOR FAVORITE**
Portrait of a Lady on Fire
Hannah Gadsby: Nanette (although, lots of this is pretty depressing too)
Daisies

Quite the eclectic list, but there you have it. Thanks everyone who has been participating and who watched any of my recommendations!
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#424

Post by blocho »

OldAle1 wrote: March 31st, 2021, 11:17 pm 12. Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance (Alanis Obomsawin, 1993)
Otherwise this is an excellent piece of work and makes me want to look into the follow-up material that's out there.
I saw it just more than a year ago, the last movie I saw in a theater (and possibly where I picked up Covid). Great movie. I've since seen Obomsawin's Incident at Restigouche, which is also good. I think all of her work is available for free on the National Film Board of Canada's web site.
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#425

Post by Knaldskalle »

8. We Need to Talk about Kevin (Ramsay, 2011). Holy Schmokes! Perhaps not the best movie for relaxing after a long day, this is an incredibly well-made tense-as-heck movie that manages to create an uncomfortable viewing experience (and that's not criticism, but praise). This is really good stuff, but man, did I pick the wrong day to watch this. ;)

Spoiler
1. Sicilia! (Straub & Huillet, 1999).
2. Intruder (Denis, 2004).
3. The Headless Woman (Martel, 2008).
4. The Turin Horse (Tarr & Hranitsky. 2011)
5. The Inland Sea (Carra, 1991).
6. Ratchatcher (Ramsay, 1999).
7. Morvern Callar (Ramsay, 2002).
8. We Need to Talk about Kevin (Ramsay, 2011)
ImageImageImageImage

Please don't hurt yourself, talk to someone.
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#426

Post by blocho »

8. I'm Your Woman (2020) Julia Hart
It starts like a gangster movie, but it turns into a pretty good family drama. Recommended.

9. Advantageous (2015) Jennifer Phang
Near-future sci-fi in the style of Black Mirror, with a feminist bent. Aside from some production design and the central sci-fi element driving the plot, this movie is thematically indistinguishable from our present-day concerns about economic inequality, resource scarcity, bodily autonomy, gender roles, corporate power, etc.
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#427

Post by zzzorf »

Spoiler
1. Fig Tree (2018, Aalam-Warqe Davidian) - 6/10
2. The World Unseen (2007, Shamim Sarif) - 5/10
3. Ta fang jian li de yun (2020, Xinyuan Zheng Lu) - 4/10
4. El despertar de las hormigas (2019, Antonella Sudasassi) - 7/10
5. Ayiti Mon Amour (2016, Guetty Felin) - 5/10
6. Rizu to aoi tori (2018, Naoko Yamada) - 6/10
7. Committed (2014, Stelana Kliris) - 7/10
8. Rain (2008, Maria Govan) - 7/10
9. The Stand (2020, Bridget Savage Cole, Danielle Krudy) {Ep. 3 Blank Page 53mins, ep.4 The House of the Dead 60mins} - 6/10
10. Cold Light of Day (1989, Fhiona-Louise) - 1/10
11. Cinderela Pop (2012, Anita Barbosa) - 6/10
12. Dhalinyaro (2018, Lula Ali Ismaïl) - 7/10
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#428

Post by Onderhond »

OldAle1 wrote: March 31st, 2021, 11:17 pm 10. Hot Gimmick: GIrl Meets Boy (Yûki Yamato, 2019)

... apparently the film got shit on for being too different. Can't please everybody.
:cheers:

You may be one of the people most vocal about how different our tastes are, but you're also one of the people who sample my favorites/recommends most often :D

As for the flack it got, that's mostly due to the source material being EXTREMELY cliché, which generally brings out the worst fanboys/girls. Yamato on the other hand has a rather unique style that's more about cinematic language than narrative, which clashed a lot with what people wanted out of this film adaptation (standard drama/romance cheese). Props to Netflix for funding projects like these though, they rarely get credits for that.
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#429

Post by ororama »

19. Pearls of the Deep (Jirí Menzel, Jan Nemec, Evald Schorm, Vera Chytilová, Jaromil Jires, 1965) 107 min.
Better or Worse? (Jocelyn Cammack, 2000) * 9 min.
Spoiler
1. Sita Sings the Blues (Nina Paley, 2008) 82 min.
2. Fetch! (Nina Paley, 2002) 5 min.
Tord and Tord (Niki Lindroth von Bahr, 2010) 11 min.
Wild Life (Amanda ForbisWendy Tilby, 2011) * 14 min.
I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors (Ann Marie Fleming, 2010) 15 min.
The True Story of Sawney Beane (Elizabeth Hobbs, 2005) 11 min.
The Danish Poet (Torill Kove, 2006) 15 min.
The Formation of Clouds (Marie-Hélène Turcotte, 2010) * 10 min.
3. Valley Girl (Martha Coolidge, 1983) 99 min.
4. Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020) * 107 min.
5. Caramel (Nadine Labaki, 2007) * 92 min.
6. The Sharks (Lucía Garibaldi, 2019) * 80 min.
7. Daisies (Vera Chytilová, 1966) 76 min.
8. A Portrait of Ga (Margaret Tait, 1952) 4 min.
The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo (Margaret Tait, 1955) * 7 min.
Rose Street (Margaret Tait, 1956) * 15 min.
Margaret Tait: Film Maker (Margaret Williams, 1983) * 36 min.
Aerial (Margaret Tait, 1974) 4 min.
Uncle Bob's Hospital Visit (JoDee Samuelson, 2008) 14 min.
9. The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg, 2019) * 120 min.
10. Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma, 2019) * 122 min.
11. The Future (Miranda July, 2011) * 91 min.
12. The Rider (Chloé Zhao, 2017) * 103 min.
13. Madeline's Madeline (Josephine Decker, 2018) * 93 min.
14. Blue Black Permanent (Margaret Tait, 1992) * 86 min.
15. Grantchester: Episode #1.3 (Jill Robertson, 2014) * 52 min.
Grantchester: Episode #1.4 (Jill Robertson, 2014) * 52 min.
16. Everyone Else ( Maren Ade, 2009) * 124 min.
17. Kajillionaire (2020) * 104 min.
18. Beau Travail (1999) * 93 min.
*First time viewing
Female directors in italics
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#430

Post by matthewscott8 »

I didn't notice the challenge until today and am hardly viewing at the moment, but for what it's worth, here is my top 50 women-directed movies, all in my top films list:

Cesarée (1978 - Marguerite Duras)
Amer (2009 - Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani)
Meshes of the Afternoon (1946 - Maya Deren & Alexander Hammid)
Marie Antoinette (2006 - Sofia Coppola)
Zacharovannaya Desna / The Enchanted Desna (1964 - Yuliya Solntseva)
Semnadtsat mgnoveniy vesny / Seventeen Moments of Spring (1973 - Tatyana Lioznova)
Détruire dit-elle / She said destroy (1969 - Marguerite Duras)
Klassenverhältnisse / Class Relations (1984 - Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub)
Sedmikrásky / Daisies (1966 - Vera Chytilová)
The Mafu Cage (1978 - Karen Arthur)
Unrelated (2007 - Joanna Hogg)
Laissez bronzer les cadavres / Let the Corpses Tan (2017 - Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani)
Les mains négatives (1978 - Marguerite Duras)
Sacris Pulso (2008 - Ana Vaz)
Art Herstory (1974 - Hermine Freed)
Melodiya dlya sharmanki / Melody for a Street Organ (2009 - Kira Muratova)
Aparelho Voador a Baixa Altitude / Low-Flying Aircraft (2002 - Solveig Nordlund)
Buster's Bedroom (1991 - Rebecca Horn)
Orlando (1992 - Sally Potter)
Voskhozhdeniye / The Ascent (1977 - Larisa Shepitko)
Zama (2017 - Lucrecia Martel)
Wolkenschatten (2014 - Anja Dornieden & Juan David Gonzålez Monroy)
The Grand Bizarre (2018 - Jodie Mack)
Exit (1971 - Denys Irving & Naomi Zack)
Le hérisson / The Hedgehog (2009 - Mona Achache)
Trouble every day (2001 - Claire Denis)
Thou Wast Mild and Lovely (2014 - Josephine Decker)
Baxter, Vera Baxter (1977 - Marguerite Duras)
Krylya / Wings (1966 - Larisa Shepitko)
La ferdinanda: Sonate für eine Medici-Villa (1982 - Rebecca Horn)
Blood Tea and Red String (2006 - Christiane Cegavske)
Die Antigone des Sophokles nach der Hölderlinschen Übertragung für die Bühne bearbeitet von Brecht 1948 (Suhrkamp Verlag) (1992 - Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub)
La fée / The Fairy (2011 - Dominique Abel, Fiona Gordon, Bruno Romy)
Old Joy (2006 - Kelly Reichardt)
The Strange Colour of Your Body's Tears (2013 - Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani)
Un amour de jeunesse / Goodbye First Love (2011 - Mia Hansen-Løve)
I Don't Know (1972 - Penelope Spheeris)
Archipelago (2010 - Joanna Hogg)
Blue Black Permanent (1992 - Margaret Tait)
Les enfants / The Children (1985 - Marguerite Duras, Jean Mascolo, Jean-Marc Turine)
Tiefland (1954 - Leni Riefenstahl)
All Can Become a Rose (1992 - Linda Christanell)
Asparagus (1979 - Suzan Pitt)
Ung flukt / The Wayward Girl (1959 - Edith Calmar)
Nothing Personal (2009 - Urszula Antoniak)
Pond and Waterfall (1982 - Barbara Hammer)
Aurélia Steiner (Melbourne) (1979 - Marguerite Duras)
Aniara (2018 - Pella Kågerman & Hugo Lilja)
Dal Polo all'Equatore / From The Pole To The Equator (1987 - Yervant Gianikian & Angela Ricci Lucchi)
Khaneh siah ast / The House is Black (1963 - Forugh Farrokhzad)
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#431

Post by kongs_speech »

adwest wrote: April 1st, 2021, 3:59 am **FAVORITE OF THE CHALLENGE** :poshclap:
40. Obscuro Barroco (2018) Evangelia Kranioti 10/10
There's so much here I love, I almost don't know where to start. First, the poem that the narrator reads throughout is a work of art just by itself. The way they play with obscuring gender, obscuring those clues that hold us captive to binary gender myths, and then later in the film reveling in revealing all those bodies that don't fit and are so incredibly beautiful. It's also, kind of like Cleo from 5 to 7 and Paris, in it's exploration of Rio de Janeiro and its people. So much of the beautiful prose sounds like a love (and a little fear or hate) poem written to the city and the city is definitely one of the main characters in the film. I love the name of the film. I love the existential thrust of this quest for transformation and for choosing one's own body. Well, I think it's pretty clear. I hated it. Just kidding. It's fantastic and will stay with me and I'll probably watch it over and over.
Yes!!! I saw this incredible film last year because a friend who programs a queer film fest recommended it to me. Have you had a chance to see Queen of Lapa yet? I don't know if it's available online. I saw it through that festival.
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#432

Post by flavo5000 »

Final update of the challenge! Thanks max for hosting! I always dig this one each year. I just wanted a quick shout out to Sudden Manhattan, a criminally under-recognized film from director/actress Adrienne Shelly who only directed three films before dying tragically early. It's a very assured debut that's quirky and dreamlike with its own feel. While there is some influence from Hal Hartley who she had worked with multiple times, it is a far stranger film than most of what I've seen from Hartley. Anyway, what I'm sayin' is, check it out if you haven't, particularly if you like quirky '90s indie comedies.

153-154. Women In Love (Miranda Bowen, 2011) 6.5/10


155. Lezate divanegi a.k.a. Joy of Madness (Hana Makhmalbaf, 2003) 6/10


156. Kong Zi a.k.a. Confucius (Mei Hu, 2010) 6/10


157. The Bye Bye Man (Stacy Title, 2017) 3/10


158. Sudden Manhattan (Adrienne Shelly, 1996) 8/10


159. The Long Dumb Road (Hannah Fidell, 2018) 7/10


160. Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey (Ramona S. Diaz, 2013) 6.5/10


161. Berlin Syndrome (Cate Shortland, 2017) 6/10


162. Descent (Talia Lugacy, 2007) 6/10


163. Pulsion (Ovidie, 2014) 5/10


164. Mickey's Twice Upon a Christmas (Carole Holliday + guy, 2004) 5/10


165. Roald Dahl's Esio Trot (Dearbhla Walsh, 2015) 7/10


166. Gwen Stefani: Harajuku Lovers Live (Sophie Muller, 2006) 6/10


167. Bullets Over Hollywood (Elaina Archer, 2005) 6.5/10
The Female Gaze
1. Organ (Kei Fujiwara, 1996)
2. Somewhere (Sofia Coppola, 2010)
3. Dust to Glory (Dana Brown, 2005)
4. Fangs (Kelly Sandefur, 2002)
5. On the Outs (Lori Silverbush & some dude, 2004)
6. American Guinea Pig: Sacrifice (Poison Rouge, 2017)
7. On a Clear Day(Gaby Dellal, 2005)
8. The Care Bears Movie (Arna Selznik, 1985)
9. Nomadland (Chloé Zhao, 2020)
10. Promising Young Woman (Emerald Fennell, 2020)
11. Don't Expect Too Much (Susan Ray, 2011)
12. Angie (Martha Coolidge, 1994)
13. Salvation (J.A. Steel, 2007)
14. Mickey's Once Upon a Christmas(Jun Falkenstein + others, 1999)
15. Killjoy 2: Deliverance from Evil (Tammi Sutton, 2002)
16. Fung gip a.k.a. The Secret (Ann Hui, 1979)
17-19. Tamako Market E1-12 (Naoko Yamada, 2013)
20. Tamako rabu sutôrî a.k.a. Tamako Love Story (Naoko Yamada, 2014)
21. The Fly Papers: The Buzz on Hollywood's Scariest Insect (Victoria Price, 2000)
22. Blood Games (Tanya Rosenberg, 1990)
23. Portrait de la jeune fille en feu a.k.a. Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma, 2019)
24. To All the Boys I've Loved Before (Susan Johnson, 2018)
25. The Anniversary Party (Jennifer Jason Leigh & etc., 2001)
26. The House of Usher (Hayley Cloake, 2006)
27. Caroline and the Magic Potion (Virginia Curiá, 2015)
28. Mädchen in Uniform (Leontine Sagan et al., 1931)
29. Mignonnes a.k.a. Cuties (Maïmouna Doucouré, 2020)
30. The Secret Life of Words (Isabel Coixet, 2005)
31. Wakefield (Robin Swicord, 2016)
32. Limbo (Tina Krause, 1999)
33a. Answering Machine (Tina Krause, 2001)
33b. One Hundred a Day (Gillian Armstrong, 1973)
33c. And You Act Like One Too (Susan Siedelman, 1976)
33d. Yours Truly, Andrea G. Stern (Susan Siedelman, 1979)
33e. The Above (Kristen Johnson, 2015)
34. Dogora - Ouvrons les yeux (Patrice Leconte, 2004)
35. Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020)
36. Bulbbul (Anvita Dutt, 2020)
37. Yes, God, Yes (Karen Maine, 2019)
38. Satan Was a Lady (Doris Wishman, 1975)
39. First Cow (Kelly Reichardt, 2019)
40. Teströl és lélekröl a.k.a. On Body and Soul (Ildikó Enyedi, 2017)
41. Nu ren si shi a.k.a. Summer Snow (Ann Hui, 1995)
42. She Dies Tomorrow (Amy Seimetz, 2020)
43a. Tenshi no yokubou a.k.a. The Lust of Angels (Nagisa Isogai, 2014)
43b. Watashi no Akachan a.k.a. My Baby (Nagisa Isogai, 2011)
43c. Chambre jaune (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2002)
43d. Santos Palace (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2006)
43e. Catharsis (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2001)
43f. La fin de notre amour (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2003)
43g. L'étrange portrait de la dame en jaune (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2004)
44. Tora Tora Tora: The Real Story of Pearl Harbor (Laura Verklan, 2000)
45. Songcatcher (Maggie Greenwald, 2000)
46. Serpent (Amanda Evans, 2017)
47. Infinitely Polar Bear (Maya Forbes, 2014)
48. L'extraordinaire voyage de Marona a.k.a. Marona's Fantastic Tale (Anca Damian, 2019)
49. Shoes (Lois Weber, 1916)
50. Mystique (Roberta Findlay, 1979)
51a. A Study in Choreography for Camera (Maya Deren, 1946)
51b. At Land (Maya Deren, 1944)
51c. Ritual in Transfigured Time (Maya Deren, 1946)
51d. Rat Life and Diet in North America (Joyce Wieland, 1968)
51e. Water Sark (Joyce Wieland, 1965)
51f. Kirsa Nicholina (Gunvor Nelson, 1969)
51g. Orange (Karen Johnson, 1970)
52. Dip sin dip sin a.k.a. Ouija 4 (Jill Wong, 2015)
53. Der Wald vor lauter Bäumen a.k.a. The Forest for the Trees (Maren Ade, 2003)
54. Sha chu chong wei a.k.a. Breakout from Oppression (Karen Yang, 1978)
55. Laure (Emmanuelle Arsan, 1976)
56. Inch'Allah dimanche (Yamina Benguigui, 2001)
57. Nirgendwo in Afrika a.k.a. Nowhere in Africa (Caroline Link, 2001)
58. Brave Miss World (Cecelia Peck, 2013)
59. Angano... Angano... Tales from Madagascar (Marie Clémence Andriamonta-Paes + other, 1989)
60. Snoop Dogg's Hood of Horror (Stacey Title, 2006)
61. Old Joy (Kelly Reichardt, 2006)
62. Madeinusa (Claudia Llosa, 2006)
63. Blood of the Tribades (Sophia Cacciola + bloke, 2016)
64. Tarzan & Jane (Lisa Schaffer & others, 2002)
65. TiMER (Jac Schaeffer, 2009)
66. Fidel (Estela Bravo, 2001)
67.The Silencer (Amy Goldstein, 1992)
68. La reine des pommes a.k.a. Queen of Hearts (Valérie Donzelli, 2009)
69. Marie Antoinette (Sofia Coppola, 2006)
70. Equity (Meera Menon, 2016)
71. Arcadia (Olivia Silver, 2012)
72-74. Makai Ouji a.k.a. Devils and Realist E1-12 (Chiaki Kon, 2013)
75. Gözetleme Kulesi a.k.a. Watchtower (Pelin Esmer, 2012)
76. Housekeeping (Jennifer Harrington, 2013)
77. No Impact Man: The Documentary (Laura Gabbert & some guy, 2009)
78. Der Mondmann a.k.a. Moon Man (Sarah Clara Weber, etc., 2012)
79. Atlantique a.k.a. Atlantics (Mati Diop, 2019)
80. Obvious Child (Gillian Robespierre, 2014)
81. Nachtrit a.k.a. Night Run (Dana Nechushtan, 2006)
82. The Mask You Live In (Jennifer Siebel Newsom, 2015)
83. Pluto (Su-won Shin, 2012)
84. Las hijas del fuego a.k.a. Daughters of Fire (Albertina Carri, 2015) #Bonus
85a. A Summer Rain (Ela Thier, 2009)
85b. Little Canyon (Olivia Silver, 2008)
85c. The Foreigner (Alethea C. Avramis, 2012)
85d. Still Standing (Paola Mendoza, 2006)
85e. a fork, a spoon & a KNIGHT (Mira Nair, 2013)
85f. Supporting Survivors (Gretchen Wallace, 2013)
86. Home (Fien Troch, 2016)
87. Dead Dicks (Lee Paula Springer + some guy, 2019)
88. Old Days (Sunhee Han, 2016)
89. Entre nos (Gloria La Morte & Paola Mendoza, 2009)
90. The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg, 2019)
91. Queen of Katwe (Mira Nair, 2016)
92. Bleeding Heart (Diane Bell, 2015)
93. Az én XX. századom a.k.a. My 20th Century (Ildikó Enyedi, 1989)
94. The Wild Thornberrys Movie (Cathy Malkasian +Jeff, 2002)
95. Body at Brighton Rock (Roxanne Benjamin, 2019)
96. August Underground's Mordum (Cristie Whiles and some other sick fucks, 2003)
97. Satanic Panic (Chelsea Stardust, 2019)
98. Never Fear (Ida Lupino, 1950)
99. Voodoo Dolls (Andrée Pelletier, 1991)
100. Chicken People (Nicole Lucas Haimes, 2016)
101. The Cry (Bernadine Santistevan, 2007)
102. Hurt (Barbara Stepansky, 2009)
103. Rage (Sally Potter, 2009)
104. First: The Official Film of the London 2012 Olympic Games (Caroline Rowland, 2012)
105. Phobic (Alexandra Lief, 2002)
106. Moms Mabley: I Got Somethin' to Tell You (Whoopi Goldberg, 2013)
107. Hot Summer in the City (Gail Palmer, 1976)
108. Protege (Michelle Henderson, 2009)
109. Gut Instincts (Michelle Henderson, 2012)
110. The To Do List (Maggie Carey, 2013)
111. Rolling Stones: Some Girls: Live in Texas '78 (Lynn Leneau Calmes, 2011)
112. After.Life (Agnieszka Wojtowicz-Vosloo, 2009)
113. Fire (Deepa Mehta, 1996)
114. Banoo-Ye Ordibehesht a.k.a. The May Lady (Rakhshan Banietemad, 1998)
115. Wij a.k.a. We (Rene Eller, 2018)
116. The Chipmunk Adventure (Janice Karman, 1987)
117. Red Road (Andrea Arnold, 2006)
118. Rough Magic (Clare Peploe, 1995)
119. The Night Visitor (Jennifer Blanc, 2013)
120. The Night Visitor 2: Heather's Story (Brianne Davis, 2016)
121. Deuce of Spades (Faith Granger, 2011)
122. Gomennasai a.k.a. Ring of Curse (Mari Asato, 2011)
123. Out of the Clear Blue Sky (Danielle Gardner, 2012)
124. Taryn Barker: Demon Hunter (Zoe Kavanagh, 2016)
125. La tête haute a.k.a. Standing Tall (Emmanuelle Bercot, 2015)
126. Horns and Halos (Suki Hawley, 2002)
127. Watch Me (Melanie Ansley, 2006)
128. Slaughtered (Kate Glover, 2010)
129. Strangerland (Kim Farrant, 2015)
130. Katy Perry: Part of Me (Jane Lipsitz + a guy,, 2012)
131. Zhui ming qiang a.k.a. Blood of the Dragon (Pao-Shu Kao, 1971)
132. Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie (Mandie Fletcher, 2016)
133. Black Christmas (Sophia Takal, 2019)
134a. Bach Cello Suite #6: Six Gestures (Patricia Rozema, 1997)
134b. Bach Cello Suite #3: Falling Down Stairs (Barbara Willis Sweete, 1997)
135. Gore Theatre (Jennifer Nangle + others, 2017)
136. Miss Marple: At Bertram's Hotel (Mary McMurray, 1987)
137. Hai yang tian tang a.k.a. Ocean Heaven (Xiao Lu Xue, 2010)
138. Come Along with Me (Joanne Woodward, 1982)
139. Eko eko azaraku a.k.a. Eko Eko Azarak: Wizard of Darkness (Shimako Sato, 1995)
140. Milae a.k.a. Ardor (Young-Joo Byun, 2002)
141-143. Yahari ore no seishun rabukome wa machigatteiru a.k.a. My Teen Romantic Comedy SNAFU Season 1 E1-13 (2013)
144. Bury Me an Angel (Barbara Peeters, 1972)
145. Kakera: A Piece of Our Life (Momoko Andô, 2009)
146. Surveillance (Jennifer Chambers Lynch, 2008)
147. Saint Maud (Rose Glass, 2019)
148. Elsker dig for evigt a.k.a. Open Hearts (Susanne Bier, 2002)
149. Erotic Adventures of Candy (Gail Palmer, 1978)
150. Candy Goes to Hollywood (Gail Palmer, 1979)
151. Ringers: Lord of the Fans (Carlene Cordova, 2005)
152. Si da ming bu a.k.a. The Four (Janet Chun & dude, 2012)
153-154. Women In Love (Miranda Bowen, 2011)
155. Lezate divanegi a.k.a. Joy of Madness (Hana Makhmalbaf, 2003)
156. Kong Zi a.k.a. Confucius (Mei Hu, 2010)
157. The Bye Bye Man (Stacy Title, 2017)
158. Sudden Manhattan (Adrienne Shelly, 1996)
159. The Long Dumb Road (Hannah Fidell, 2018)
160. Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey (Ramona S. Diaz, 2013)
161. Berlin Syndrome (Cate Shortland, 2017)
162. Descent (Talia Lugacy, 2007)
163. Pulsion (Ovidie, 2014)
164. Mickey's Twice Upon a Christmas (Carole Holliday + guy, 2004)
165. Roald Dahl's Esio Trot (Dearbhla Walsh, 2015)
166. Gwen Stefani: Harajuku Lovers Live (Sophie Muller, 2006)
167. Bullets Over Hollywood (Elaina Archer, 2005)
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My last set. Thank you both for most adwest and max! (why do you both hate capitals btw? :D)

-

41. Western (2017, Valeska Grisebach) - Rewatch

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I have been racking my brain to put words to what it is Valeska Grisebach does in Western that is so incredibly hypnotizing and brilliant. 

All I wrote the first time I saw it was: "Incredibly bare minimalism. Grisebach finds something incredibly vulnerable in this masculine culture, and she never lets it go".

This holds true once again - it is something in how Grisebach shoots masculinity, in particular hyper-masculinity and downright toxic masculinity. What she is able to do is find something genuinely vulnerable there - something sad - something that makes you empathise, feel something - it is, frankly, jarring. We have all seen films that revel in this behaviour, and we have seen films shows it as dangerous, scary and/or (purposefully) unnerving. But that is not this film.

Take for instance an early scene where the boss harasses a young woman by the river, and practically assaults her - while the men simply sit and watch. There is something pitiable about how they look on - and fail to do anything before several lines are crossed. It finds weakness, complacency, unease, powerlessness. Who are these men? Why are they the way they are? Perhaps we won't get those answers, but the experience of the all-male workplace, and the petty, childlike, and brutish way they act leave a lasting impression. 

However, it is not solely masculinity at display - there is also a degree of National chauvinism, and cultural relations. Our Germans are working in Bulgaria, building up the infrastructure - and as one gleefully shouts - they are back after 70 years (referring to the Nazis in WW2). 

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Large sets of the film are focused on communication without language and the bonds that can still be made. Our lead character, Meinhard Neumann's "Meinhard" in particular stands out by in some ways being able to assert himself against his fellow German, and strike relations and even friendships, with the Bulgarian population - to the confusion of the others - and there is a lot of clear subtext - including the prominent use of a German flag - at one point shot as if enveloping Meinhard, or perhaps even as a cape.

The entire film is calm, stripped back and minimalistic. There is no true excess emotions - the camera rather captures larger contexts and contrasts with a peering eye - shredding our characters, in particular our Germans, and leaving them naked - but still hard to comprehend and touch. This peering eye, and the details it manages to capture makes Western a powerful, visceral experience - though, just as the first time I saw this film there seems to be even more just out of reach. 9/10.


42. Peremena uchasti / Change of Fate (1987, Kira Muratova)

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Change of Fate is a trippy, and often clever murder story from Muratova - that manages to, despite some visual limitations, feel alive and eerie with really simple tools. Looping the same dialogue, same scenes, with slight changes, or over entirely different backdrops - we get a sense, from the very beginning, that everything is not as it should be.

With rough comedic overtones - we are seeing the preparation for a murder trial - and a woman's story, that keeps being placed under suspicion - while everyone, including the guards, see her as a hero. There is a lot of clear satire of racism here - and the film is set in the Asian part of Russia - with fairly extreme lines from the guards, such as "only white women are women", "white people must stick together", etc. - though this also seems a little out of place and a backdrop as her victim is white - and frankly, some off the comic relief characters are a little jarring. It is also, a weaker visual effort than her previous, and while the punch does land well-enough, I really feel it doesn't quite live up to its potential. 7/10. 


43. Les jeux de la Comtesse Dolingen de Gratz / The Games of Countess Dolingen (1981, Catherine Binet)

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The Games of Countess Dolingen blends reality and fiction to such a degree it is near impossible to tell which is which - and it takes utter delight in the web it spins. I do wish the print was better. At present, I really feel it underdelivers on the visuals - which is key to establishing the kind of atmosphere a surreal head-scratcher like this usually needs. 

However: I really enjoyed the longer set-pieces here - especially the scenes of a man - face not shown - making specific preparations and actions. The statue heads in particular are wonderfully eerie, and the flashbacks/fake narratives and unknown relations take on many a creepy turn. In the end it did not quite have the direction, cinematography or atmosphere to reach greatness for me, but it remains a good film, and I might be inclined to revisit it if a restoration was ever made. 6.5/10.


44. Le 17e parallèle: La guerre du peuple / 17th Parallel: Vietnam in War  (1968, Joris Ivens, Marceline Loridan Ivens)

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Living with the Vietnamese for a year Joris Ivens and Marceline Loridan Ivens are able to capture a lot of great shots you would not otherwise see - and plenty of strong interviews. It is a good film, which at times can evoke strong emotions, but it also feels a little flat and is, at least for me, unable to keep up the emotional momentum or drive certain scenes create. 6/10.
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adwest wrote: April 1st, 2021, 3:59 am **FAVORITE OF THE CHALLENGE** :poshclap:
40. Obscuro Barroco (2018) Evangelia Kranioti 10/10
There's so much here I love, I almost don't know where to start. First, the poem that the narrator reads throughout is a work of art just by itself. The way they play with obscuring gender, obscuring those clues that hold us captive to binary gender myths, and then later in the film reveling in revealing all those bodies that don't fit and are so incredibly beautiful. It's also, kind of like Cleo from 5 to 7 and Paris, in it's exploration of Rio de Janeiro and its people. So much of the beautiful prose sounds like a love (and a little fear or hate) poem written to the city and the city is definitely one of the main characters in the film. I love the name of the film. I love the existential thrust of this quest for transformation and for choosing one's own body. Well, I think it's pretty clear. I hated it. Just kidding. It's fantastic and will stay with me and I'll probably watch it over and over.
This sounds incredible! Added to my watchlist.
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D doesn't just stand for Dame

1. Anti-Clock (Jane Arden/Jack Bond, 1979)
2. Paris est â nous / Paris is Us (Elisabeth Vogler, 2019)
3. Hustlers (Lorene Scafaria, 2019)
4. Orlando (Sally Potter, 1992) (re-watch)
5. The Man Who Cried (Sally Potter, 2000)
6. Koibumi / Love Letter (Kinuyo Tanaka, 1953)
7. Ángel de fuego / Angel of Fire (Dana Rotberg, 1992) (re-watch)
8. Otilia Rauda (Dana Rotberg, 2001)
9. Sambizanga (Sarah Maldoror, 1972)
10. Hot Gimmick: GIrl Meets Boy (Yûki Yamato, 2019)
11. Baxter, Vera Baxter (Marguerite Duras, 1977)
12. Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance (Alanis Obomsawin, 1993)
13. Tau ban no hoi / Boat People (Ann Hui, 1982)

DTC. Vietnam after the end of the war, and Japanese photojournalist Shiomi Akutagawa (George Lam) is on assignment in the country, taking pictures of the new People's Paradise that has come into being - or so it seems at first. But when he begins to dig a little deeper into the lives of ordinary people outside of his official itinerary, he finds a very different story. This is a pretty tough, unpleasant, sad and angry film about a man coming to a realization that he's been lied to, and also about his crossing the border from "objective" journalism into a humanistic understanding of a people's plight that he can't ignore anymore. I really liked the fact that most of the relationships we see between Akutagawa and the locals are nuanced and subtle - beyond the first moments, where he might be asked to sell his camera or just for money, there's a very real mixture of distrust, hope, fear of other, etc, in just about every setting, including the most important one with teenager Cam Nuong (Season Ma), which seems on the verge of something more than friendship, and which is the real impetus for Akutagawa to get more involved and try to help some of these people escape from their not-so-wonder-land. The only real flaw in this excellent film IMO is in the ending which has a rather ridiculous death scene that seems right out of an action movie.

14. Angela (Rebecca Miller, 1995) (re-watch)

DTC. One I thought I might have seen when new, but wasn't sure - I didn't have completely accurate notes or lists when I started plugging my ratings into IMDb in the 2000s and this one slipped by, and at this point it was largely forgotten. It has very much a southern gothic feeling though it's set in the Hudson River valley north of NYC - call it a New York or maybe Catskill gothic? Two sisters - 10 or 11 Angela and Ellie, a few years younger- explore the always strange world of childhood - particularly strange after moving - and cope with their problematic parents - a mother, a singer who seems mentally ill, and a father who is trying to keep everything together but whose problems eventually manifest as well towards the end. There's a lot of "magic of childhood" stuff here, with a little circus and a pony and the girls getting into various mischief, and there's a lot of weirdness around religion and superstition - which struck me as standing out a little bit; we see one very brief scene early on in a church, but then this religious obsession develops in Angela that seems to come from nowhere and eventually sort of takes over the film. Perhaps it's my own complete lack of religious feeling, even when young, that limits my understanding here. Very beautifully shot by Ellen Kuras, certainly distinctive and worth seeing, but I'm not sure in the end what it all adds up to.

15. The Fits (Anna Rose Holmer, 2015)

DTC. Yet another film about an adolescent girl; it seems like a great percentage of the films in this challenge I saw dealt with childhood verging on young adulthood; wasn't by choice, but I guess it's a popular Doubling theme this year, and I can't complain - most were worth seeing, with this being one of the best. The plot couldn't be simpler - Toni (Royalty Hightower) a boyish 11-year old girl in a big old unidentified industrial city (unidentified - I thought it might be Cleveland but turns out it was shot in Cincinnati) joins a dance troupe, tries to fit in, and watches as many of the older girls (at first) start to have seizures - or fits - during their classes. Toni has a few friends and a pretty good relationship with her older brother, but seems kind of a loner and is mostly watching, and listening, to what's going on, and we wonder (well, I did anyway) just where these fits are coming from; a teacher suggests it could be the water, but that never seems plausible, it seems more likely to be something involving adolescence, puberty - there's a feeling that I had all along that this was all an allegory about the place of girls, black girls in particular, in this changing world where they often have to be more adult than the boys or adults around them, but it's never made clear and the film starts to tread towards something like surrealism before the quite remarkable ending. I loved the music by Danny Bensi and Saunder Jurrians, which treads a ground between free jazz and late 20th century classical avant-garde.

16. Head Over Heels / Chilly Scenes of Winter (Joan Micklin Silver, 1979)

DTC. Charles (John Heard) loves Laura (Mary Beth Hurt), who apparently doesn't love him back, having gone back to her husband after a brief few months away and a brief problematic relationship with obsessive and deeply neurotic Charles. Actually Laura's neurotic too, but in a seemingly more functional, ordinary way, while Charles is... something else. This often felt to me like a variation on Elaine May's The Heartbreak Kid, both films being about men who seem like nice guys who are just suffering from some low self-esteem and neediness at first - but slowly transform into near-psychopaths over the course of the film. What I like about both films is that they document male behavior that is all-too typical and that, while never getting to the point of actual danger to others, is so emotionally self-destructive that you want to both laugh and cry, at least if you've ever experienced it in real life. David Brent in the British The Office is another example, though his obsessions are more career-oriented. It's hard to create characters so pathetic and yet relatively likeable and Silver does a great job overall, though the film isn't for me quite on the level of May's earlier masterpiece - it seems to take a while to get going for one thing, and I guess I wanted the ending to be a little harsher. But a really solid example of a subject that's hard to get just right. I'd seen one other film from Silver, Hester Street, which I liked even more - looks like it's time to check out more from this sadly neglected and recently deceased filmmaker. I should mention also that this was shot in and apparently takes place in Salt Lake City, though I don't remember any specific references, not any that someone who doesn't know the city would know anyway - not a place that gets a lot of Hollywood films produced, so worth seeing also if you're interested in seeing a part of America that's rarely portrayed on the "big screen".

17. Enough Said (Nicole Holofcener, 2017)

DTC. I'd seen one previous film from the director, the 2010 Please Give which I liked a fair bit. Love Catherine Keener, her usual muse, who is also in this, and the other main cast members (Julia Louis-Dreyfus, James Gandolfini, Toni Colllette), and like romantic comedies more than most here, so... of course I was going to be disappointed. The cast is fine - Gandolfini and Collette especially are terrific, it's reasonably well put together, paced nicely, and has a reasonable mix of warmth and cynicism, but... it is just so damn cliched ultimately, and the plot is so utterly predictable and overused that I just couldn't say more than "meh". Louis-Dreyfus is a massage therapist in LA who is at a party and separately meets both Gandolfini - who she develops a slight attraction to - and Keener, who wants a massage. So she starts going out with the guy, becomes friends with the woman, each of them telling her horror stories about their ex-spouse and STOP ME IF YOU CAN'T GUESS WHERE THIS IS GOING AFTER 15 MINUTES. Of course predictability all on it's own isn't necessarily a killer and I still would give this a marginal thumbs-up for the cast, sunlit photography, etc, but...please get some new ideas for your rom-coms Hollywood.

18. Herutâ sukerutâ / Helter Skelter (Mika Ninagawa, 2012)

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DTC. Another film with plenty of positive elements that just didn't end up working overall. First of all leading lady Erika Sawajiri is just gorgeous and dominates the film - I'm not entirely sure I'd call it a great acting performance, but her charisma, beauty, and seemingly hundreds of costume changes certainly hold the screen; second, if you've read many of my reviews you know I'm a sucker for COLOR and this film certainly has a lush, saturated vibrant set of hues, particularly in the photography sessions that dominate the early part of the film. But as a narrative, it's just ultimately not that interesting. Lillico (Sawajiri) is a top model, TV drama actress, etc, on top of the world, but it's all due to all these experimental plastic surgeries she's had, and it turns out you can't look perfect forever when the drugs and skin grafts and such don't last, when the company's doing shady business, and when there's always a new up-and-comer ready to take over the spotlight. This had a lot of promise when it seemed to be going into somewhat surreal/weird terrain - when Lilico starts hallucinating - but the police procedural subplot seemed boring and unnecessary, and ultimately this is yet another film trying to show the dangers of a shallow, youth-and-beauty-and-money-based consumer society, and it doesn't really offer anything new in that department. And it uses Pachelbel's Canon again - the second recent Japanese film in a row I've seen that does so - and turns it into a fucking pop song. Ughh! Overall, not impressed.

That's it for me, thanks max!
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Onderhond wrote: April 1st, 2021, 10:59 am

You may be one of the people most vocal about how different our tastes are, but you're also one of the people who sample my favorites/recommends most often :D

As for the flack it got, that's mostly due to the source material being EXTREMELY cliché, which generally brings out the worst fanboys/girls. Yamato on the other hand has a rather unique style that's more about cinematic language than narrative, which clashed a lot with what people wanted out of this film adaptation (standard drama/romance cheese). Props to Netflix for funding projects like these though, they rarely get credits for that.
Well, you happened to pick a bunch of films that were directed by women, readily available and/or already on my watchlist for DTC, so that was part of it this month. Also modern Asian cinema is an area I'm thin on relatively speaking and the stuff I already know and plan to see is mostly arthouse stuff that isn't your thing, so you offer something new. And while we don't agree all that much overall it's fairly rare that I find stuff you recommend worthless - and it seems like most in that category are action films, and I already have plenty of other action films that I know about and want to see without going to your lists for recs there :)
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blocho wrote: April 1st, 2021, 5:01 am
OldAle1 wrote: March 31st, 2021, 11:17 pm 12. Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance (Alanis Obomsawin, 1993)
Otherwise this is an excellent piece of work and makes me want to look into the follow-up material that's out there.
I saw it just more than a year ago, the last movie I saw in a theater (and possibly where I picked up Covid). Great movie. I've since seen Obomsawin's Incident at Restigouche, which is also good. I think all of her work is available for free on the National Film Board of Canada's web site.
Yeah the NFBC website is absolutely a treasure, if there's a better free streaming site oriented to one country I've sure never seen it. Had I focused more on this challenge this month I might have seen a few more from Obomsawin or other Canadian female directors from there.
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kongs_speech wrote: April 1st, 2021, 2:13 pm
adwest wrote: April 1st, 2021, 3:59 am **FAVORITE OF THE CHALLENGE** :poshclap:
40. Obscuro Barroco (2018) Evangelia Kranioti 10/10
There's so much here I love, I almost don't know where to start. First, the poem that the narrator reads throughout is a work of art just by itself. The way they play with obscuring gender, obscuring those clues that hold us captive to binary gender myths, and then later in the film reveling in revealing all those bodies that don't fit and are so incredibly beautiful. It's also, kind of like Cleo from 5 to 7 and Paris, in it's exploration of Rio de Janeiro and its people. So much of the beautiful prose sounds like a love (and a little fear or hate) poem written to the city and the city is definitely one of the main characters in the film. I love the name of the film. I love the existential thrust of this quest for transformation and for choosing one's own body. Well, I think it's pretty clear. I hated it. Just kidding. It's fantastic and will stay with me and I'll probably watch it over and over.
Yes!!! I saw this incredible film last year because a friend who programs a queer film fest recommended it to me. Have you had a chance to see Queen of Lapa yet? I don't know if it's available online. I saw it through that festival.
I haven't seen that one yet but I'll try to track it down. Thanks for the recommendation!
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Knaldskalle wrote: April 1st, 2021, 5:02 am 8. We Need to Talk about Kevin (Ramsay, 2011). Holy Schmokes! Perhaps not the best movie for relaxing after a long day, this is an incredibly well-made tense-as-heck movie that manages to create an uncomfortable viewing experience (and that's not criticism, but praise). This is really good stuff, but man, did I pick the wrong day to watch this. ;)
This has been on my list for so long but the subject matter looks so difficult--just what you're saying--that I keep putting it off until I feel mentally prepared. Which hasn't happened yet. :lol:
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St. Gloede wrote: April 1st, 2021, 2:36 pm My last set. Thank you both for most adwest and max! (why do you both hate capitals btw? :D)

i blame e.e. cummings
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