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Films Directed by Women Challenge (Official, March 2021)

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hurluberlu
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#281

Post by hurluberlu »

20. Mary Queen of Scots (Josie Rourke, 2018) 7
21. Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash, 1991) 7+
22. The Piano (Jane Campion, 1993) [Rewatch] 9 (=)

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Josie Rourke directing her cast
Où sont les femmes ?
1. 12 Hour Shift (Brea Grant, 2020) 5+
2. Baxter, Vera Baxter (Marguerite Duras, 1977) 6
3. That Trip We Took with Dad / Die Reise mit Vater (Anca Miruna Lazarescu, 2016) 7+
4. Dead Pigs (Cathy Yan, 2018) 5
5. Nico, 1988 (Susanna Nicchiarelli, 2017) 6+

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Susanna Nicchiarelli directing Trine Dyrholm as Nico

6. What Will People Say / Hva vil folk si (Iram Haq, 2017) 6
7. A Minuscule Adventure / Minuscule - Les Mandibules du Bout du Monde (Hélène Giraud, Thomas Szabo, 2018) 8-
8. Detroit (Kathryn Bigelow, 2017) 5+
9. My Donkey, My Lover & I / Antoinette dans les Cévennes (Caroline Vignal, 2020) 7-

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Caroline Vignal on her film set

10. C'est ça l'amour (Claire Burger, 2018) 7

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Claire Burger (middle) and her crew

11. Si le vent soulève les sables (Marion Hänsel, 2006) 7
12. Woman (Anastasia Mikova, Yann Arthus-Bertrand, 2019) 6
13. Heal the Living / Réparer les vivants (Katell Quillévéré, 2016) 6-

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Katell Quillévéré shooting

14. Vivien Leigh, autant en emporte le vent (Priscilla Pizzato, 2020) 7
15. Loving Vincent (Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, 2017) 6

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Dorota Kobiela with co-director and lead actor

16. Let the Sunshine In / Un beau soleil intérieur (Claire Denis, 2017) 5+
17. Kajillionaire (Miranda July, 2020) 5-

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Miranda July

18. Sleeping with Other People (Leslye Headland, 2015) 4+
19. Take This Waltz (Sarah Polley, 2011) 5+

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Sarah Polley
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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hurluberlu
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#282

Post by hurluberlu »

adwest wrote: March 9th, 2021, 11:45 pm
10. The Piano (1993) Jane Campion 7/10
There is so much in this film that is excellent and could be discussed just on the roles of women during this time period. And it was beautiful from a film perspective. If it wasn't for the glaring plot hole, it would have had a much higher rating.
Spoiler
What plot hole, you may ask? Well, the plot hole where the entire climactic scene of the film is based on a character making a choice completely out of line with every bit of characterization previously seen from that character. You have a child who has been raised by her mother, in a role where she has had to protect and care for that mother against pretty large odds, and you seen her over and over and over again say and do things to continue to protect her mother. And suddenly she decides to completely betray that mother in favor of another character when we've not seen any true bonding take place that could potentially replace that bond she had with her mother. The only explanation given is that she thought it wasn't "proper" for her mom to act that way. Completely and utterly unbelievable. Took me entirely out of the story and made me scream at the screen.
Hi adwest,
As I have just rewatched it...
I dont see it as a plothole
Yes at the beginning, the mother and daughter are almost one entity against the whole world but the mother's relationship with Baines is letting the daughter on the side, physically (outside of Baines home) and emotionally, while the daugher is also discovering life in society at school. There is this episode where the daughter is mimicking a sex act with trees together with local kids and where Stewart told here she should be ashamed. Later Stewart punishes the mother with locking them both (at this point the daughter was already infuriated with her mother). So all the elements were there for the daughter to make that decision but you can also see it motivated to protect them both.
The four lead characters certainly go through bursts of emotions that make them act radically and I find the way the film captures it sensational.
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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St. Gloede
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#283

Post by St. Gloede »

Agnès Varda, 4 rewatches:

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16.6. Cleo From 5 to 7 (1962)

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Cleo From 5 to 7 is arguably Varda's most structurally impressive film - depicting the real-time 90-minute journey of a woman awaiting medical results. She is restless, always moving, either on her own, in absolute solitude or with friends, acquaintances and strangers. (And yes, it should really be called Cleo from 5 to 6.30 ...).

It is divided into chapters, but not in any traditional way. There are no stark cuts - rather a text comes up - with the time in which this chapter takes place - for instance, Cleo from 5.13 to 5.18 - and as such it may be the very first film which is not only itself hyper-aware of being in real-time but wants you to be hyper-aware as well. Furthermore, it gives you a hint that something has changed, and something else will change again in 3, 5, 7+ minutes.

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You are there with Cleo (not even her real name) every second of the way - and besides being beautifully shot and made - it is an exercise that is thoroughly impressive in and of itself.

But let's back up a little bit - as frankly, to me, the very greatest scene is the very beginning - Cleo at the fortune-teller - for a while no faces are shown - and this is the only sequence in colour. All we see are the cards, presenting a future of change and disease. It is not only beautifully accomplished, but, it provides so much insight into Cleo's character, and key people we see throughout - it also sets up a foreboding sense of doom. The transition, or shall we sat transitions, to black and white are sharp. It is the faces. The disbelief, and the command. Cleo and the fortune-teller - and the fear and pain of illness. It is a perfect set-up, and leaves us with a fragile Cleo and a ticking clock until her worst fears may be confirmed.

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And yet, Cleo From 5 to 7 (or again ... 6.30) is not an unnecessarily bleak, stark or cold film - far from it. There is a sense of frivolousness, even lighter touches of comedy - these 90 minutes largely consist of Cleo wanting to do or think about anything else - and taking the strip through Paris, by cab, car, bus - goes really smoothly (besides one sequence at a slightly faster frame rate (likely to ensure the real-time element overall). The character gallery and dialogue is quite strong, and give a sense of really just being in the here and now.

It is a wonderful film, though quite far from Varda's best. I was really hoping that this rewatch would push it up to masterpiece status for me - but I simply had the exact same experience as last time. I'm not quite sure what could have been done to bring it to a level similar to Le bonheur (my 2nd favourite film) - perhaps if it had a slightly harder punch - or decided to either invite more empathy for Cleo - or alternatively taken it in a more playful or more cold and mocking direction - or perhaps if it had been made more socially relevant - or maybe just changed some of the encounters - but, regardless - a great rewatch of a great film. 8.5/10.



17.6. Les créatures / The Creature (1966)

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Les créatures is perhaps the "oddest" film Varda would ever make and confounding in a long set of ways. Luckily, the new Criterion restoration is breathtaking, and gives what was the odd one out a degree of visual prowess and life I could not have expected - turning the whole will into a positively trippy, semi-surreal nightmare that must be the closest Varda ever came to horror.

The plot is simultaneously easy and hard to decipher - so is reality and fiction. I kept wondering what made her follow up her previous successes with something this "rough" - and when I say rough I mean that she gives Godard a run for the money in terms of inserts and cuts. It is almost a little choppy - but so much of what we cut to is spellbinding - including some spectacular shots of the sea at a high frame rate.

Above anything though, what struck me, was the degree to which it reminded me of French expressionism and silent cinema - large sections entirely silent with loud, eerie, scratching music - glittering sea - long piers - and actual use of red and purple tints - which get inserted into the actual story.

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I'm really not sure if this is a case of Varda continuing to aim for new heights, riding on the success of Cleo and Le Bonheur - or if she considered this a light effort. I see evidence of both. Structurally - rhythmically - this really is something else - but the mix of comedy is odd, Deneuve is horribly underused and the writing is thin - but then - is that on purpose? Piccoli is after all a writer - and his sloppy novel - which he describes to talking animals - YES, TALKING ANIMALS - is inserted entirely into the film's reality to the point that we don't even know what to think. 

It was really good to revisit it. The new print really elevated it, and added all the atmosphere harmed by previous releases - but, just as last time, I'm really not sure if I missed something. If there is, even more, to be discovered - and that's pretty exciting. 8/10.


18.6. Daguerreotypes (1975)

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Daguerreotypes used to be my least favourite Varda - I simply found it too flat - and with little to grab onto. Seeing it again, in greater quality, I appreciate it more - though it still falls in with her lesser films for me. What I perhaps appreciate the most - besides the wonderful opening and opening credits - read out over a mirror - with each name written into it with beautiful calligraphy - but with the film team visible in its reflection. 

The set-up is pleasant and good on its own - a simple examination of life on the street - and the lives of the small shop-owners. Varda builds a degree of intimacy with them - but most do not share too much of themselves - and this is also where it slowly starts to turn a little flat. There are many great little moments in between, and the mirroring is nice - but it seems even she noticed an issue - choosing to consistently intercut a magic show - held on the street - and with the shopkeepers in attendance. This adds in a lot of the life and variety missing - but the purpose is also a little obvious. All the same, I liked it far more on a rewatch, and I appreciate what Varda tried to do - she largely succeeded.

This was also her first pure feature-length documentary and there are some traces of what she would later do present even here - such as including herself and her life (though her being broadly missing - a mistake in my opinion). 6/10.



19.6. Visages, Villages / Faces, Places (2017)

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Faces, Places is one of my all-time favourite films, and it hit even harder now after her death - and knowing it was this close. Seeing the final shot from Varda by Agnès (2019), which she used as her final goodbye - hit particularly hard - and the ending was just as powerful as before.

What makes Faces, Places so spectacular is that it feels all-encompassing - there are simply so many ways to look at it and describe it.  

The easy summary, that it is a collaborative project, between renowned artist J.R. and Varda (her first collaboration) - to travel to villages in France and meet people, take their pictures and make them greater than life is so beautiful just in itself - especially in how they do it. We see marginalized communities, a disappearing mining town, striking dockworkers, hard-working farmers and so many everyday people - all coming to life on camera.

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But in traditional Varda fashion, it is also the story of the creation of this project - the act of creating the images, of discussing the project, the people they meet - and simply the act of filming and taking pictures of the event itself - becomes part of the film - and a central narrative - which - at any point over the last decade would be great in and of itself too - added perspective and insight - distance and intimacy - all the things I love - but here it is stronger - as the sense of Varda being ageing, more frail, losing her sight and this perhaps being her last project is absolutely central. Varda is not only the filmmaker - but she is in large part the emotional core - and it is her story - a story of vitality and neverending creativity - of a, at this point 88-year-old woman, with blurry eyesight and a cane still striving to do more.

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However, even that is half the story - as the film is also the tale of Varda and J.R. - her co-director - and their unilkely friendship and great chemistry - as these two people, 55 years apart, do this together - and build a strong friendship. An older and a younger artist - being able to hit the right notes - and this once again carries back to the joy of creation. And then, you have the almost invisible narrative - which slowly sneaks up on you - with such a strong emotional climax. 9.5-10/10.
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#284

Post by St. Gloede »

Agnès Varda, 3 first-time viewings:

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20.2-22.4. Agnès de ci de là Varda / Agnes Varda: From Here to There (2011)

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Agnes Varda: From Here to There is Varda's only mini-series, and it is simply filled with wonder. The opening scene of each episode - rather than intro music - it a beautiful short showing how Varda's three - pruned before her travels - grew back to its former glory by the time her travels were to come to an end. It never failed to put a smile on my face - and that smile continued in the episodes. This is simply a wonderful strong of little wonders and a showcase of how powerful and intimate the essay style Varda so perfected had become. 

Here, we simply follow her as she travels from country to country, partially to promote her then new film The Beaches of Agnés - meeting friends along the way - and the strings of people she manages to bring into each episode - and the way she manages to make them shine is fantastic. Some are stonger than others - with my two favourite encounters - that of Monoel Olviviere - then 102 - putting on a little Chaplin act - and Chris Marker taking Varda to his video game playground - where they hang out with their avatars were already in the first episode - but the way Vardacan take even small observations and likes - and basic conversations with friends and acquaintances and make it into something this strong - with such a feeling of intimacy - is spectacular. 8/10.


23.4. Les demoiselles ont eu 25 an / The Young Girls Turn 25 (1993)

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The Young Girls Turn 25 is a 60-minute celebration of Varda's husband - Jacques Demy - landmark film: The Young Girls of Rocheford, centering on its 25 year anniversary. Frankly, it feels like a featurette - before they became a thing - though it has plenty of nice highlights. It is not just loving towards Demy, who had passed just a few years earlier, with Varda looking at his passion in her original behind the scenes footage - but also many nice sequences and bringing back not only the actors, but the extras - and showing what the film had meant to the community. 6/10.


24.4. Ydessa, les ours et etc. / Ydessa, the Bears and etc. (2004)

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Ydessa, the Bears and etc. is a fairly short documentary, clocking in at only 44 minutes, and feeling a little rushed. The exhibit that caught Varda's eye here is breathtaking and unusual - and the intent of the curator-artist even more so - but said curator-artist - Ydessa - comes off as someone Varda only had a couple of conversations with - and the form of the interviews feel a bit too artificial, or perhaps just straightforward - missing the person underneath. The exhibit elevates it all however, and it is a very solid viewing. 6/10.
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#285

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Another Woman
1. One Night in Miami... (2020) Regina King
2. The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996) Barbra Streisand
3. Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) Eliza Hittman
4. Bastard Out of Carolina (1996) Anjelica Huston
5. How to Kill a Zombie (2014) Tiffany McLean
6. Madeline's Madeline (2018) Josephine Decker
7. She Dies Tomorrow (2020) Amy Seimetz
8. Love & Basketball (2000) Gina Prince-Bythewood
9. I'm Your Woman (2020) Julia Hart
10. Kajillionaire (2020) Miranda July
11. The Assistant (2019) Kitty Green
12. Shirley (2020) Josephine Decker
13. Shook (2021) Jennifer Harrington
14. Time (2020) Garrett Bradley
15. Sea Fever (2019) Neasa Hardiman
16. Clemency (2019) Chinonye Chukwu
17. Belle (2013) Amma Asante
18. Gozo (2016) Miranda Bowen
19. Lucky (2020) Natasha Kermani
20. Rocks (2019) Sarah Gavron
21. I Am I (2013) Jocelyn Towne
22. Moxie (2021) Amy Poehler
23. Emma. (2020) Autumn de Wilde
24. Animals (2019) Sophie Hyde
25. Western (2017) Valeska Grisebach
26. To Dream (2016) Nicole Albarelli
27. Stop-Loss (2008) Kimberly Peirce
28. Lost Girls (2020) Liz Garbus
29. Late Night (2019) Nisha Ganatra
30. Lions Love (1969) Agnès Varda
31. Private Life (2018) Tamara Jenkins
32. Closet Land (1991) Radha Bharadwaj
33. The Holiday (2006) Nancy Meyers

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The basic concept is not half-bad here, but the way that the two female protagonists are entirely defined by the men in their lives (and their need to find love again) makes them seem incredibly vapid. There is, however, enough quirkiness at hand here that the film seldom bores and is generally tolerable. Of particular note is Cameron Diaz constantly imagining her life as narrated movie trailers and "Mr. Napkinhead". Eli Wallach is pretty great too in support.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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#286

Post by maksler »

Spoiler
1. Je tu il elle (1974, Akerman)
2. Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975, Akerman)
3. News from Home (1977, Akerman)
4. Les rendez-vous d'Anna (1978, Akerman)
5. Nuit et jour (1991, Akerman)
6. D'Est (1993, Akerman)
7. La captive (2000, Akerman)
8. No home movie (2015, Akerman)
9. The Matrix (1999, Wachowski sisters)
10. Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020, Hittman)
11. Trolösa (2000, Ullmann)
12. The Rider (2017, Zhao)
13. Nomadland (2020, Zhao)
14. Krylya (1966, Shepitko)
15. Voskhozhdenie (1977, Shepitko)
16. The Farewell (2019, Wang)
17. Promising Young Woman (2020, Fennell)
18. La Pointe-Courte (1955, Varda)
19. Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962, Varda)
20. Le bonheur (1965, Varda)
21. Lions Love (1969, Varda)
22. L'une chante l'autre pas (1977, Varda)
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#287

Post by ororama »

11. The Future (Miranda July, 2011) * 91 min.

Nice blend of July's quirky comedy and a serious look at relationships.
Spoiler
1. Sita Sings the Blues (Nina Paley, 2008) 82 min.
2. Fetch! (Nina Paley, 2002) 5 min.
Tord and Tord (Niki Lindroth von Bahr, 2010) 11 min.
Wild Life (Amanda ForbisWendy Tilby, 2011) * 14 min.
I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors (Ann Marie Fleming, 2010) 15 min.
The True Story of Sawney Beane (Elizabeth Hobbs, 2005) 11 min.
The Danish Poet (Torill Kove, 2006) 15 min.
The Formation of Clouds (Marie-Hélène Turcotte, 2010) * 10 min.
3. Valley Girl (Martha Coolidge, 1983) 99 min.
4. Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020) * 107 min.
5. Caramel (Nadine Labaki, 2007) * 92 min.
6. The Sharks (Lucía Garibaldi, 2019) * 80 min.
7. Daisies (Vera Chytilová, 1966) 76 min.
8. A Portrait of Ga (Margaret Tait, 1952) 4 min.
The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo (Margaret Tait, 1955) * 7 min.
Rose Street (Margaret Tait, 1956) * 15 min.
Margaret Tait: Film Maker (Margaret Williams, 1983) * 36 min.
Aerial (Margaret Tait, 1974) 4 min.
Uncle Bob's Hospital Visit (JoDee Samuelson, 2008) 14 min.
9. The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg, 2019) * 120 min.
10. Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma, 2019) * 122 min.
*First time viewing
Female directors in italics
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#288

Post by Bing147 »

31. Harlan County U.S.A. (1976, Barbara Kopple)
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beavis
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#289

Post by beavis »

beavis wrote: March 20th, 2021, 8:37 pm
Spoiler
1. Taking the horse to eat jalebis (Anamika Haksar, 2019) - 8.0
2. Aloïse (Liliane de Kermadec, 1975) - 7.5
3. Selva. Un portrait de Parvaneh Navaï (Maria Klonaris, 1983) - 7.5
4. Divinity Gratis (Betzy Bromberg, 1995) - 7.5
5. Big Boy (Shireen Seno, 2011) - 7.5
6. Severnyy veter (The North Wind) (Renata Litvinova, 2021) - 7.5
7. shorts
8. shorts
9. shorts
10. Hotel New York (Jackie Raynal, 1984) - 7
11. shorts
12. shorts
13. Nervous Translation (Shireen Seno, 2017) - 8
14. Casanovagen (Luise Donschen, 2018) - 6,5
15. Exotica, Erotica, Etc. (Evangelia Kranioti, 2015) - 8
16. Liminal (Manuela De Laborde, Lav Diaz, Óscar Enríquez, Philippe Grandrieux , 2020) - 7.5
17. Hotel Nueva Isla (Irene Gutiérrez Torres, Javier Labrador Deulofeu, 2014) - 7
18. Obscuro Barroco (Evangelia Kranioti, 2018) - 8
19. Sinmute (Ana Balcázar, Javier Bellido, 2008) - 4.5
20. El olvido (Heddy Honigmann, 2008) - 7.0
21. Los silencios (Beatriz Seigner, 2018) - 7.5
22. Canción sin nombre (Melina León, 2019) - 8.0
23. Motu Maeva (Maureen Fazendeiro, 2014) - 7.5
24. Chircales (Marta Rodríguez, 1972) - 7.5
25. Una vez la noche (Antonia Rossi, Roberto Contador, 2018) - 5.0
26. Giraffe (Anna Sofie Hartmann, 2019) - 7.0
27. Dreissig (Simona Kostova, 2019) - 8.5
28. Diário de Sintra (Paula Gaitán, 2008) - 7.0
29. Ghost of the Golden Groves (Aniket Dutta, Roshni Sen, 2019) - 6.0
30. Divine carcasse (Dominique Loreau, 1998) - 7,5
31. Ilha (Ary Rosa, Glenda Nicácio, 2018) - 7.5
32. A Febre (Maya Da-Rin, 2019) - 7.0
33. Rit over de grens (Rosemarie Blank, 1994) - 7.0
34. Mamá, mamá, mamá (Sol Berruezo Pichon-Riviére, 2020) - 8.0
35. O Amor Natural (Heddy Honigmann, 1996) - 8.0
36. What We Left Unfinished (Mariam Ghani, 2019) - 7.0
37. 9 Leben (Maria Speth, 2011) - 7.0
38. Taiga (Ulrike Ottinger, 1992) - 7.5
39. Ök ketten (Márta Mészáros, 1977) - 7.5
40. Egy nap (Zsófia Szilágyi, 2018) - 7.5
41. Jamais Plus Toujours (Yannick Bellon, 1976) - 8.0
42. Figlia mia (Laura Bispuri, 2018) - 7.0
43. Töchter (Maria Speth, 2014) - 7.5

Another Hungarian one today. A little bit more than 24 hours in the life of a mother of three, racing around with her kids, working a teaching job and going through a crisis with her husband... that's a bit much, and it shows. I like it when movies can keep up a frenetic pace for an entire runtime, but when it is centered on the stress of 'the rat race'... then it still becomes a bit of a nuisance to me.

I love how Bellon uses the city, architecture, building/deconstruction sites and waste disposals to set the mood and frame this story about memories, collected objects, and the transientness of "it all". She is a great filmmaker. And I say this after only the second movie I've seen of her. In Quelque part quelqu'un (1972) the mood is even stronger, but this one was a lovely little melancholic movie.

Figlia Mia has two of the very best Italian actresses and one very striking child actress. The story has potential and the landscape is beautiful. But it is kept back by the fact that the motivations of the child often feel underdeveloped and even unbelievable...

In Töchter the two main characters are also constantly in danger of being unbelievable. But the writing is compelling and actresses make it work. Even if the young drifter character repeatedly becomes annoying, I was not put off but compelled to go along with it! I saw Speth's debut in the theaters when it came out, yesterday the docu 9 Leben and today this one to complete all that is available to me. Now I'm ready for her price winning new one!
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#290

Post by OldAle1 »

D doesn't just stand for Dame

1. Anti-Clock (Jane Arden/Jack Bond, 1979)
2. Paris est â nous / Paris is Us (Elisabeth Vogler, 2019)
3. Hustlers (Lorene Scafaria, 2019)

DTC. Solid, but to my taste, not exactly groundbreaking film, based on a true story, about a group of New York strippers lead by Constance Wu and Jennifer Lopez who conspire to rip off a lot of the rich men who come to see them by spiking their drinks and robbing their bank accounts or running up large cash advances with their credit & debit cards. This takes place mostly during the financial crisis, 2008-9, and feels in some ways like a response to Scorsese's Wolf of Wall Street, focusing this time on working-class women instead of rich asshole bankers. But I'm not sure it has any more to say about the system or why and how we got here, how we fix it, how we make lives - in this case, working women's - better. It's nicely shot and the two leads are really good but it's not a film I'm really going to remember.

4. Orlando (Sally Potter, 1992) (re-watch)
5. The Man Who Cried (Sally Potter, 2000)

I saw Orlando when it came out in the cinema, and remember liking it but not loving it (had it rated 7); I've since gotten to really like Sally Potter's work overall so it was long overdue time to revisit. And I got quite a bit more out of it this time, or perhaps I should say the things I (dimly) remembered not liking bothered me less - Billy Zane's sort of exaggerated romance-novel-book-cover American character near the end of the film, and the general feeling of, how to put it, disconnection through much of the film. It's a film of discrete scenes, beautifully composed and often still or tableaux-like shots that gradually, almost imperceptibly, becomes more "natural" and human-scale even as our main character - Tilda Swinton in the performance that deservedly brought her to more mainstream attention - passes through the centuries. Only at the end of the film does she feel truly alive and we the audience can revel in her finally accepting herself and casting off many of the sorrows of the past. I haven't read the book by Virginia Woolf which I've seen described as a satire, but the film doesn't really play up the social criticism very strongly apart from perhaps a certain mockery of an encrusted aristocracy so divorced from reality that nobody seems to notice - or care - that Orlando has lived for centuries without aging but with a (magical) sex change, except insofar as it impacts his/her ownership of an estate. In any case it's very enjoyable and in the end rather moving, though I still prefer the earlier Thriller and The Gold Diggers.

The Man Who Cried has been on my to-see list since it came out; a friend long-ago in Chicago went into raptures over it, and saw it I believe half a dozen times in the cinema, and I had one conversation with her about it and I can't forget how she seemed to go to another place, into raptures. But I never saw it - I lived in Vermont by that time and if it played at all near me, it only did so for a week I'm sure, and I missed it, and finally just got around to it. Needless to say my expectations were high, and unfortunately it didn't really live up to them at all, though I didn't dislike it. The cinematography of Sacha Vierny alone - though it's over-dark in the DVD transfer, and alas there doesn't seem to be an HD version available - makes it worthy; this was the last film from the man who photographed much of the best work of Alain Resnais and Peter Greenaway and he still had a touch with color and texture that few could match. The story is one of those sweeping epic/romantic type things about a young woman (Christina Ricci, somewhat miscast I think) who has grown up in the UK before WWII, the daughter of Jewish refugees from Russia who came during the pogroms after WWI, and is now with an opera troupe in Italy along with her older Russian friend (Cate Blanchett) and an awful, smarmy Italian tenor (John Turturro); she falls for a handsome gypsy horseman (Johnny Depp) and struggles to survive as the war threatens and laws against both Jews and gypsies start coming down. Blanchett is really good, and got some awards consideration - she brings most of what little humor there is to this fairly melodramatic piece, and we also have old vets Oleg Yankovsky and Harry Dean Stanton on board, but it just doesn't come together - feels way too short for one thing at 100 minutes to properly build it's story and give resonance to all the characters and their places in history, and in the end it was... worth seeing for me, overall, but not something that worked on my emotions as I thought it might.

6. Koibumi / Love Letter (Kinuyo Tanaka, 1953)

Tanaka's first film as a director certainly shows a level of assurance that's rare in a first feature, but then she had learned over a 20+ year career as an actress at this point under masters like Ozu, Naruse, Mizoguchi and Kinoshita (who wrote the screenplay, based on a novel by Fumio Niwa). It's a fairly simple story that would have been an unsurprising project for any of those four men or a number of other filmmakers of the period, focusing on the rending of the social fabric and of one couple in particular by the war - still ever-present in minds and hearts almost a decade after it's end. Reikichi (Masayuki Mori, absolutely great here) is struggling to make it, living with his younger brother, when he gets a new job thanks to his fluency in English and French - reading love letters to women (mostly prostitutes it seems) and writing back to their mostly American soldier "boyfriends". All is well until he encounters his old flame Michiko (Yoshiko Kuga) and all the repressed emotions - and the difficult traumas both have endured, as much psychological as anything else - arise to the surface. Issues of abandonment and loyalty are paramount and the film offers no easy answers and a beautifully nuanced and ambiguous ending. I loved Tanaka's location work - most of this seems to have been shot in real streets and alleys and riversides, and there's a more open feeling, a somewhat more low-key style than in many of her male peers. That's not to say that this is better than the great works it follows of this type, but it is distinctive and shows a director with a real feel for telling a simple story without fuss and yet with a sense of realism that is rare in any cinema at this time. Really fine and quite moving in the end, and I love forward to more.

7. Ángel de fuego / Angel of Fire (Dana Rotberg, 1992) (re-watch)
8. Otilia Rauda (Dana Rotberg, 2001)

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I suppose I saw Ángel de fuego, the director's second feature, around the same time as Orlando, though I can't say for sure; most likely it was at the 1992 Chicago Film Festival in October of that year where I dimly recall it being pretty enthusiastically received - all the people I saw it with loved it, and it got a good review from Jonathan Rosenbaum (accessible on his site). It was certainly at least something of an arthouse success in Mexico, being nominated for 18 Ariels (and winning one). But it essentially vanished and neither it nor any of the director's other films have had much distribution at all - none of them have 20 checks, or 500 ratings on IMDb. I remember trying to find it for a while - not really trying that hard to be fair - and never coming across it anywhere until a couple of years ago I found a copy of the DVD at a Goodwill - I was shocked that it ever was actually released in commercial, official form. So I finally got around to re-watching it and I'm pleased to say that the DVD is pretty high quality - it's full frame but it looks like that was the way the film was shot - and that the film really holds up.

Alma (Evangenina Sosa) is a young girl/woman (I don't know that her age is ever mentioned; say mid-late teens?) working at a grungy low-rent circus that apparently plays the outskirts of cities. She is the ángel de fuego because she puts on angel wings, flies on the trapeze, and eats and breathes fire, and she is the main attraction. Her father is the circus clown, and when he dies - after impregnating her in what seems to be a mutual act, and possibly one that has happened before - she is told she must abort the child or leave; she chooses the latter and soon ends up in the company of a group that puts on low-rent religious puppet-pageants a few miles away. There is a lot going on in this deceptively simple hour and a half; it's very much about the contrasts between circus and church, entertainment and religion - and the lies that each tell, as well as the comforts and entertainment they bring - about the various hypocrisies of self-styled leaders - the man who runs the circus, the woman who runs the religious group, which is really just a small family. About the value of belief in anything higher than oneself - as opposed to oneself, in fact. And certainly, about the fate of a young, uneducated world in a place where she cannot fit in as daughter, lover, artist, would-be-nun - soiled and demeaned for everything, and yet innocent throughout. It's an extremely beautiful film of rich colors almost at the point of saturation, but even more remarkable is Rotberg's use of sound - the way we constantly hear the sounds of dogs, of far-away traffic intruding on everything, layered with the dialogue makes for a feeling of regular disassociation, as if both this small circus and small church are being surrounded by the world and through sheer force of will being kept away from it, kept out of modern life for good or ill. A brilliant film that offers faint wisps of the kind of magical realism we associate often with circuses and religious cults in Latin American cinema - Jodorowsky came to mind at a couple of moments - but that for the most part stays resolutely in the reality that such visions try to occlude and offer impossible escapes from.

Otilia Rauda is certainly not on the same level, but it offers many of the same characteristics and a lot of positive elements that are familiar from the earlier film. Again we have a strong central female protagonist, in this case the titular character (Gabriela Canudas), a beautiful and voluptuous woman living - somewhere, a small town and it's outskirts - in the interwar period, it seems, perhaps the 1920s. Otilia has one major physical flaw, a large discoloration over her left eye and much of her cheek, and this results naturally in her being shunned and mocked by the villagers when young, but eventually she marries a rather good-for-nothing soldier and life seems to go along...until she meets a wounded bandit who she decides to secretly bring back to health, falling in love with him and of course into trouble. There is also Melquíades (Alberto Estrella) to contend with, a hulking, somewhat stupid or developmentally disabled man who has always cherished hopes for Otilia, but who is treated by her as badly as she's often been treated by the town's beautiful people. So there is much again in this film about hypocrisy, and also much about religion, forgiveness, sin. I suspect some of Rotberg's focus on outsiders stems from her own status as a Jew in an overwhelmingly Catholic country - and on the basis of these two films, a Jew with a fairly cynical attitudes about religion in general, as there is nothing about Catholicism specifically in the first film. I should mention also that both films are highly sexual with a lot of female and some male nudity, and this combined with their attitudes about how man uses faith and promises of hell to put down other men, and especially women, probably has at least a little to do with why these films haven't gotten much success. This is also nicely shot, though more muted in it's color palette, and like Ángel de fuego it has a superb, dynamic use of offscreen sound, especially a howling wind that is almost omnipresent. Both films certainly deserve to break out of their current level of extreme obscurity.
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adwest
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#291

Post by adwest »

sol wrote: March 20th, 2021, 3:22 am
adwest wrote: March 20th, 2021, 1:04 am 23. The Fits (2016) Anna Rose Holmer 4/10
I do not get the point.
:think: I'm guessing that you have read how the seizures are meant to be metaphor for puberty/bodily changes with all of the fear and anxiety attached to such changes. Obviously, I can't speak for the female side of things, but I thought that the metaphor worked really well and reminded me what it was like for myself way back in the day, having read and learnt about puberty and knowing that it was to inevitably come and not sure how I would feel during or afterwards, i.e. would I still essentially be myself. I think it's pretty cool that the filmmakers were able to deliver a movie about that.

What I really love about The Fits though is how the title has a triple meaning. There are the literal fits (seizures), but there is also the group themselves and how they are keeping fit, i.e. taking care of their bodies on the cusp of change. And then there is the whole notion of trying to fit in. I think the film works with any of these three ideas explaining the title, though the literal fits is the least interesting. The whole film is so strikingly so and so stunningly performed by the lead actress that I easily fell under the movie's spell. One of the best examples of adolescent anxiety on screen that I can think of.
Fair points and I get it a little more now. It's probably that adolescent stories aren't very appealing to me that I didn't really take the time to try to get it either.
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Lu-Chin
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#292

Post by Lu-Chin »

Spoiler
1. Il futuro (2013) 5/10 Alicia Scherson
2. Nomadland (2020) 7/10 Chloé Zhao
3. Die bleierne Zeit (1981) 6/10 Margarethe von Trotta
4. La rabia (2008) 6/10 Albertina Carri
5. Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962) 7/10 Agnès Varda
6. La Pointe-Courte (1955) 7/10 Agnès Varda
7. Wendy and Lucy (2008) 7/10 Kelly Reichardt
8. White Material (2009) 6/10 Claire Denis
9. Orlando (1992) 8/10 Sally Potter
10. Portrait de la jeune fille en feu (2019) 8/10 Céline Sciamma
11. Selma (2014) 7/10 Ava DuVernay
12. Les glaneurs et la glaneuse (2000) 7/10 Agnès Varda
13. Marie Antoinette (2006) 5/10 Sofia Coppola
14. Voskhozhdenie (1977) 7/10 Larisa Shepitko
15. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) 4/10 Ana Lily Amirpour
16. Detroit (2017) 8/10 Kathryn Bigelow
17. The Rider (2017) 8/10 Chloé Zhao
18. Cuatreros (2016) 6/10 Albertina Carri
19. Hotel (2004) 4/10 Jessica Hausner
20. O necem jiném (1963) 4/10 Věra Chytilová
21. The Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bach (1968) 5/10 Danièle Huillet
22. The Forest for the Trees (2003) 7/10 Maren Ade
23. Sehnsucht (2006) 6/10 Valeska Grisebach
24. Ovoce stromu rajských jíme (1970) 7/10 Věra Chytilová
25. Ratcatcher (1999) 6/10 Lynne Ramsay
26. The Selfish Giant (2013) 8/10 Clio Barnard
27. The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum 8/10 Margarethe von Trotta
28. Priest (1994) 6/10 Antonia Bird
29. Marseille (2004) 4/10 Angela Schanelec
30. Red Road (2006) 8/10 Andrea Arnold
31. The Second Awakening of Christa Klages (1978) 6/10 Margarethe von Trotta
32. Nachmittag (2007) 4/10 Angela Schanelec
33. An Education (2009) 8/10 Lone Scherfig
34. Ravenous (1999) 6/10 Antonia Bird
35. Ginger & Rosa (2012) 5/10 Sally Potter
36. Le bonheur (1965) 7/10 Agnès Varda
37. Wuthering Heights (2011) 7/10 Andrea Arnold
38. Casa Roshell (2017) 5/10 Camila José Donoso
39. Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed (1926) 7/10 Lotte Reiniger
40. Las hijas del fuego (2018) 4/10 Albertina Carri
41. Good Vibrations (2012) 5/10 Lisa Barros D'Sa
42. The Gold Diggers (1983) 4/10 Sally Potter
43. Perlicky na dne (1965) 4/10 Věra Chytilová
44. Señorita extraviada (2001) 6/10 Lourdes Portillo
45. My Brilliant Career (1979) 7/10 Gillian Armstrong
46. 35 rhums (2008) 5/10 Claire Denis
47. The Secret Garden (1993) 6/10 Agnieszka Holland
48. Somewhere (2010) 7/10 Sofia Coppola
49. Klassenverhältnisse (1984) 3/10 Danièle Huillet
50. Under the Skin (1997) 6/10 Carine Adler
51. Promising Young Woman (2020) 7/10 Emerald Fennell
52. 13th (2016) 7/10 Ava DuVernay
53. Ripley's Game (2002) 7/10 Liliana Cavani
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flavo5000
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#293

Post by flavo5000 »

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112. After.Life (Agnieszka Wojtowicz-Vosloo, 2009) 6.5/10

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113. Fire (Deepa Mehta, 1996) 5/10

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114. Banoo-Ye Ordibehesht a.k.a. The May Lady (Rakhshan Banietemad, 1998) 6/10

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115. Wij a.k.a. We (Rene Eller, 2018) 6.5/10

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116. The Chipmunk Adventure (Janice Karman, 1987) 4.5/10
The Female Gaze
1. Organ (Kei Fujiwara, 1996)
2. Somewhere (Sofia Coppola, 2010)
3. Dust to Glory (Dana Brown, 2005)
4. Fangs (Kelly Sandefur, 2002)
5. On the Outs (Lori Silverbush & some dude, 2004)
6. American Guinea Pig: Sacrifice (Poison Rouge, 2017)
7. On a Clear Day(Gaby Dellal, 2005)
8. The Care Bears Movie (Arna Selznik, 1985)
9. Nomadland (Chloé Zhao, 2020)
10. Promising Young Woman (Emerald Fennell, 2020)
11. Don't Expect Too Much (Susan Ray, 2011)
12. Angie (Martha Coolidge, 1994)
13. Salvation (J.A. Steel, 2007)
14. Mickey's Once Upon a Christmas(Jun Falkenstein + others, 1999)
15. Killjoy 2: Deliverance from Evil (Tammi Sutton, 2002)
16. Fung gip a.k.a. The Secret (Ann Hui, 1979)
17-19. Tamako Market E1-12 (Naoko Yamada, 2013)
20. Tamako rabu sutôrî a.k.a. Tamako Love Story (Naoko Yamada, 2014)
21. The Fly Papers: The Buzz on Hollywood's Scariest Insect (Victoria Price, 2000)
22. Blood Games (Tanya Rosenberg, 1990)
23. Portrait de la jeune fille en feu a.k.a. Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma, 2019)
24. To All the Boys I've Loved Before (Susan Johnson, 2018)
25. The Anniversary Party (Jennifer Jason Leigh & etc., 2001)
26. The House of Usher (Hayley Cloake, 2006)
27. Caroline and the Magic Potion (Virginia Curiá, 2015)
28. Mädchen in Uniform (Leontine Sagan et al., 1931)
29. Mignonnes a.k.a. Cuties (Maïmouna Doucouré, 2020)
30. The Secret Life of Words (Isabel Coixet, 2005)
31. Wakefield (Robin Swicord, 2016)
32. Limbo (Tina Krause, 1999)
33a. Answering Machine (Tina Krause, 2001)
33b. One Hundred a Day (Gillian Armstrong, 1973)
33c. And You Act Like One Too (Susan Siedelman, 1976)
33d. Yours Truly, Andrea G. Stern (Susan Siedelman, 1979)
33e. The Above (Kristen Johnson, 2015)
34. Dogora - Ouvrons les yeux (Patrice Leconte, 2004)
35. Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020)
36. Bulbbul (Anvita Dutt, 2020)
37. Yes, God, Yes (Karen Maine, 2019)
38. Satan Was a Lady (Doris Wishman, 1975)
39. First Cow (Kelly Reichardt, 2019)
40. Teströl és lélekröl a.k.a. On Body and Soul (Ildikó Enyedi, 2017)
41. Nu ren si shi a.k.a. Summer Snow (Ann Hui, 1995)
42. She Dies Tomorrow (Amy Seimetz, 2020)
43a. Tenshi no yokubou a.k.a. The Lust of Angels (Nagisa Isogai, 2014)
43b. Watashi no Akachan a.k.a. My Baby (Nagisa Isogai, 2011)
43c. Chambre jaune (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2002)
43d. Santos Palace (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2006)
43e. Catharsis (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2001)
43f. La fin de notre amour (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2003)
43g. L'étrange portrait de la dame en jaune (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2004)
44. Tora Tora Tora: The Real Story of Pearl Harbor (Laura Verklan, 2000)
45. Songcatcher (Maggie Greenwald, 2000)
46. Serpent (Amanda Evans, 2017)
47. Infinitely Polar Bear (Maya Forbes, 2014)
48. L'extraordinaire voyage de Marona a.k.a. Marona's Fantastic Tale (Anca Damian, 2019)
49. Shoes (Lois Weber, 1916)
50. Mystique (Roberta Findlay, 1979)
51a. A Study in Choreography for Camera (Maya Deren, 1946)
51b. At Land (Maya Deren, 1944)
51c. Ritual in Transfigured Time (Maya Deren, 1946)
51d. Rat Life and Diet in North America (Joyce Wieland, 1968)
51e. Water Sark (Joyce Wieland, 1965)
51f. Kirsa Nicholina (Gunvor Nelson, 1969)
51g. Orange (Karen Johnson, 1970)
52. Dip sin dip sin a.k.a. Ouija 4 (Jill Wong, 2015)
53. Der Wald vor lauter Bäumen a.k.a. The Forest for the Trees (Maren Ade, 2003)
54. Sha chu chong wei a.k.a. Breakout from Oppression (Karen Yang, 1978)
55. Laure (Emmanuelle Arsan, 1976)
56. Inch'Allah dimanche (Yamina Benguigui, 2001)
57. Nirgendwo in Afrika a.k.a. Nowhere in Africa (Caroline Link, 2001)
58. Brave Miss World (Cecelia Peck, 2013)
59. Angano... Angano... Tales from Madagascar (Marie Clémence Andriamonta-Paes + other, 1989)
60. Snoop Dogg's Hood of Horror (Stacey Title, 2006)
61. Old Joy (Kelly Reichardt, 2006)
62. Madeinusa (Claudia Llosa, 2006)
63. Blood of the Tribades (Sophia Cacciola + bloke, 2016)
64. Tarzan & Jane (Lisa Schaffer & others, 2002)
65. TiMER (Jac Schaeffer, 2009)
66. Fidel (Estela Bravo, 2001)
67.The Silencer (Amy Goldstein, 1992)
68. La reine des pommes a.k.a. Queen of Hearts (Valérie Donzelli, 2009)
69. Marie Antoinette (Sofia Coppola, 2006)
70. Equity (Meera Menon, 2016)
71. Arcadia (Olivia Silver, 2012)
72-74. Makai Ouji a.k.a. Devils and Realist E1-12 (Chiaki Kon, 2013)
75. Gözetleme Kulesi a.k.a. Watchtower (Pelin Esmer, 2012)
76. Housekeeping (Jennifer Harrington, 2013)
77. No Impact Man: The Documentary (Laura Gabbert & some guy, 2009)
78. Der Mondmann a.k.a. Moon Man (Sarah Clara Weber, etc., 2012)
79. Atlantique a.k.a. Atlantics (Mati Diop, 2019)
80. Obvious Child (Gillian Robespierre, 2014)
81. Nachtrit a.k.a. Night Run (Dana Nechushtan, 2006)
82. The Mask You Live In (Jennifer Siebel Newsom, 2015)
83. Pluto (Su-won Shin, 2012)
84. Las hijas del fuego a.k.a. Daughters of Fire (Albertina Carri, 2015) #Bonus
85a. A Summer Rain (Ela Thier, 2009)
85b. Little Canyon (Olivia Silver, 2008)
85c. The Foreigner (Alethea C. Avramis, 2012)
85d. Still Standing (Paola Mendoza, 2006)
85e. a fork, a spoon & a KNIGHT (Mira Nair, 2013)
85f. Supporting Survivors (Gretchen Wallace, 2013)
86. Home (Fien Troch, 2016)
87. Dead Dicks (Lee Paula Springer + some guy, 2019)
88. Old Days (Sunhee Han, 2016)
89. Entre nos (Gloria La Morte & Paola Mendoza, 2009)
90. The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg, 2019)
91. Queen of Katwe (Mira Nair, 2016)
92. Bleeding Heart (Diane Bell, 2015)
93. Az én XX. századom a.k.a. My 20th Century (Ildikó Enyedi, 1989)
94. The Wild Thornberrys Movie (Cathy Malkasian +Jeff, 2002)
95. Body at Brighton Rock (Roxanne Benjamin, 2019)
96. August Underground's Mordum (Cristie Whiles and some other sick fucks, 2003)
97. Satanic Panic (Chelsea Stardust, 2019)
98. Never Fear (Ida Lupino, 1950)
99. Voodoo Dolls (Andrée Pelletier, 1991)
100. Chicken People (Nicole Lucas Haimes, 2016)
101. The Cry (Bernadine Santistevan, 2007)
102. Hurt (Barbara Stepansky, 2009)
103. Rage (Sally Potter, 2009)
104. First: The Official Film of the London 2012 Olympic Games (Caroline Rowland, 2012)
105. Phobic (Alexandra Lief, 2002)
106. Moms Mabley: I Got Somethin' to Tell You (Whoopi Goldberg, 2013)
107. Hot Summer in the City (Gail Palmer, 1976)
108. Protege (Michelle Henderson, 2009)
109. Gut Instincts (Michelle Henderson, 2012)
110. The To Do List (Maggie Carey, 2013)
111. Rolling Stones: Some Girls: Live in Texas '78 (Lynn Leneau Calmes, 2011)
112. After.Life (Agnieszka Wojtowicz-Vosloo, 2009)
113. Fire (Deepa Mehta, 1996)
114. Banoo-Ye Ordibehesht a.k.a. The May Lady (Rakhshan Banietemad, 1998)
115. Wij a.k.a. We (Rene Eller, 2018)
116. The Chipmunk Adventure (Janice Karman, 1987)
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adwest
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#294

Post by adwest »

hurluberlu wrote: March 21st, 2021, 10:41 am
adwest wrote: March 9th, 2021, 11:45 pm
10. The Piano (1993) Jane Campion 7/10
There is so much in this film that is excellent and could be discussed just on the roles of women during this time period. And it was beautiful from a film perspective. If it wasn't for the glaring plot hole, it would have had a much higher rating.
Spoiler
What plot hole, you may ask? Well, the plot hole where the entire climactic scene of the film is based on a character making a choice completely out of line with every bit of characterization previously seen from that character. You have a child who has been raised by her mother, in a role where she has had to protect and care for that mother against pretty large odds, and you seen her over and over and over again say and do things to continue to protect her mother. And suddenly she decides to completely betray that mother in favor of another character when we've not seen any true bonding take place that could potentially replace that bond she had with her mother. The only explanation given is that she thought it wasn't "proper" for her mom to act that way. Completely and utterly unbelievable. Took me entirely out of the story and made me scream at the screen.
Hi adwest,
As I have just rewatched it...
I dont see it as a plothole
Yes at the beginning, the mother and daughter are almost one entity against the whole world but the mother's relationship with Baines is letting the daughter on the side, physically (outside of Baines home) and emotionally, while the daugher is also discovering life in society at school. There is this episode where the daughter is mimicking a sex act with trees together with local kids and where Stewart told here she should be ashamed. Later Stewart punishes the mother with locking them both (at this point the daughter was already infuriated with her mother). So all the elements were there for the daughter to make that decision but you can also see it motivated to protect them both.
The four lead characters certainly go through bursts of emotions that make them act radically and I find the way the film captures it sensational.

I see what you're saying...
Spoiler
but I didn't buy that there was enough of a bond between the daughter and this new father, whom she swore to hate--and rarely saw--that she'd care what he thought was shameful, especially not after he terrorizes them by forcing her to wash the trees and then beats her mother in front of her and locks them both into their house. She would not choose that man over the woman she'd been bonded to from birth not matter how infuriated. I may be in the minority on this as overall the film has really good reviews so it seems lots of other people share your opinion that it's sensational.
maksler
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#295

Post by maksler »

Spoiler
1. Je tu il elle (1974, Akerman)
2. Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975, Akerman)
3. News from Home (1977, Akerman)
4. Les rendez-vous d'Anna (1978, Akerman)
5. Nuit et jour (1991, Akerman)
6. D'Est (1993, Akerman)
7. La captive (2000, Akerman)
8. No home movie (2015, Akerman)
9. The Matrix (1999, Wachowski sisters)
10. Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020, Hittman)
11. Trolösa (2000, Ullmann)
12. The Rider (2017, Zhao)
13. Nomadland (2020, Zhao)
14. Krylya (1966, Shepitko)
15. Voskhozhdenie (1977, Shepitko)
16. The Farewell (2019, Wang)
17. Promising Young Woman (2020, Fennell)
18. La Pointe-Courte (1955, Varda)
19. Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962, Varda)
20. Le bonheur (1965, Varda)
21. Lions Love (1969, Varda)
22. L'une chante l'autre pas (1977, Varda)
23. Mur murs (1981, Varda)
Obgeoff
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#296

Post by Obgeoff »

Maksler, you are watching some great stuff. I’d be really interested if you indicated how good they were relative to each other.
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ororama
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#297

Post by ororama »

12. The Rider (Chloé Zhao, 2017) * 103 min.

My favorite new movie of the month, so far.
Spoiler
1. Sita Sings the Blues (Nina Paley, 2008) 82 min.
2. Fetch! (Nina Paley, 2002) 5 min.
Tord and Tord (Niki Lindroth von Bahr, 2010) 11 min.
Wild Life (Amanda ForbisWendy Tilby, 2011) * 14 min.
I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors (Ann Marie Fleming, 2010) 15 min.
The True Story of Sawney Beane (Elizabeth Hobbs, 2005) 11 min.
The Danish Poet (Torill Kove, 2006) 15 min.
The Formation of Clouds (Marie-Hélène Turcotte, 2010) * 10 min.
3. Valley Girl (Martha Coolidge, 1983) 99 min.
4. Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020) * 107 min.
5. Caramel (Nadine Labaki, 2007) * 92 min.
6. The Sharks (Lucía Garibaldi, 2019) * 80 min.
7. Daisies (Vera Chytilová, 1966) 76 min.
8. A Portrait of Ga (Margaret Tait, 1952) 4 min.
The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo (Margaret Tait, 1955) * 7 min.
Rose Street (Margaret Tait, 1956) * 15 min.
Margaret Tait: Film Maker (Margaret Williams, 1983) * 36 min.
Aerial (Margaret Tait, 1974) 4 min.
Uncle Bob's Hospital Visit (JoDee Samuelson, 2008) 14 min.
9. The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg, 2019) * 120 min.
10. Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma, 2019) * 122 min.
11. The Future (Miranda July, 2011) * 91 min.
*First time viewing
Female directors in italics
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#298

Post by sol »

Another Woman
1. One Night in Miami... (2020) Regina King
2. The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996) Barbra Streisand
3. Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) Eliza Hittman
4. Bastard Out of Carolina (1996) Anjelica Huston
5. How to Kill a Zombie (2014) Tiffany McLean
6. Madeline's Madeline (2018) Josephine Decker
7. She Dies Tomorrow (2020) Amy Seimetz
8. Love & Basketball (2000) Gina Prince-Bythewood
9. I'm Your Woman (2020) Julia Hart
10. Kajillionaire (2020) Miranda July
11. The Assistant (2019) Kitty Green
12. Shirley (2020) Josephine Decker
13. Shook (2021) Jennifer Harrington
14. Time (2020) Garrett Bradley
15. Sea Fever (2019) Neasa Hardiman
16. Clemency (2019) Chinonye Chukwu
17. Belle (2013) Amma Asante
18. Gozo (2016) Miranda Bowen
19. Lucky (2020) Natasha Kermani
20. Rocks (2019) Sarah Gavron
21. I Am I (2013) Jocelyn Towne
22. Moxie (2021) Amy Poehler
23. Emma. (2020) Autumn de Wilde
24. Animals (2019) Sophie Hyde
25. Western (2017) Valeska Grisebach
26. To Dream (2016) Nicole Albarelli
27. Stop-Loss (2008) Kimberly Peirce
28. Lost Girls (2020) Liz Garbus
29. Late Night (2019) Nisha Ganatra
30. Lions Love (1969) Agnès Varda
31. Private Life (2018) Tamara Jenkins
32. Closet Land (1991) Radha Bharadwaj
33. The Holiday (2006) Nancy Meyers
34. The Souvenir (2019) Joanna Hogg

Image

The story here has some potential but the execution is too lethargic for its own good; the romantic connection between the pair is never well established and her insistence on supporting (rather than leaving) her boyfriend never makes sense. There is also so much of interest go on with the filmmaking angle -- including characters dissecting Psycho and Hitchcock knowing when to break convention -- that it feels like a missed opportunity to focus on the love angle.
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#299

Post by sol »

Another Woman
1. One Night in Miami... (2020) Regina King
2. The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996) Barbra Streisand
3. Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) Eliza Hittman
4. Bastard Out of Carolina (1996) Anjelica Huston
5. How to Kill a Zombie (2014) Tiffany McLean
6. Madeline's Madeline (2018) Josephine Decker
7. She Dies Tomorrow (2020) Amy Seimetz
8. Love & Basketball (2000) Gina Prince-Bythewood
9. I'm Your Woman (2020) Julia Hart
10. Kajillionaire (2020) Miranda July
11. The Assistant (2019) Kitty Green
12. Shirley (2020) Josephine Decker
13. Shook (2021) Jennifer Harrington
14. Time (2020) Garrett Bradley
15. Sea Fever (2019) Neasa Hardiman
16. Clemency (2019) Chinonye Chukwu
17. Belle (2013) Amma Asante
18. Gozo (2016) Miranda Bowen
19. Lucky (2020) Natasha Kermani
20. Rocks (2019) Sarah Gavron
21. I Am I (2013) Jocelyn Towne
22. Moxie (2021) Amy Poehler
23. Emma. (2020) Autumn de Wilde
24. Animals (2019) Sophie Hyde
25. Western (2017) Valeska Grisebach
26. To Dream (2016) Nicole Albarelli
27. Stop-Loss (2008) Kimberly Peirce
28. Lost Girls (2020) Liz Garbus
29. Late Night (2019) Nisha Ganatra
30. Lions Love (1969) Agnès Varda
31. Private Life (2018) Tamara Jenkins
32. Closet Land (1991) Radha Bharadwaj
33. The Holiday (2006) Nancy Meyers
34. The Souvenir (2019) Joanna Hogg
35. Summer 1993 (2017) Carla Simón

Image

Squaring off with her aunt in particular, Laia Artigas is excellent in the lead role here; the piercing look she gives her aunt after convincing her grandfather to tie her shoelaces (after fighting with her aunt about them) really lingers. Her complex relationship with her younger cousin is dynamic too, with Artigas torn between enjoying her younger cousin, feeling jealous of her and merely want her to shut up. The film feels a bit episodic but this generally works.
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#300

Post by dirty_score »

5. Daisies (1966) - Vera Chytilová

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#301

Post by Obgeoff »

56. La idea de un lago (2016, Mumenthaler) 7
57. Je tu il elle (1974, Akerman) 8
58. Vendredi soir (2002, Denis) 8
59. Girls in Uniform (1931, Sagan/Froelich) 8
60. The Selfish Giant (2013, Barnard) 8
61. The Second Awakening of Christa Klages (1978, von Trotta) 7
62. Brief Encounters (1967, Muratova) 7
63. All is Forgiven (2007, Hansen-Love) 8
64. La folie Almayer (2011, Akerman) 7
65. The Arch (1968, Tong) 8
66. Promising Young Woman (2020, Fennell) 8 (2nd watch, was 8)
Spoiler
1. Born in Flames (1983, Borden) 7
2. Little Fugitive (1953, Ashley/Engel/Orkin) 8
3. Me and You and Everyone We Know (2005, July) 8
4. A Long Farewell (1971, Muratova) 7
5. Desperately Seeking Susan (1985, Seidelman) 6
6. Nomadland (2020, Zhao) 7
7. Sweetie (1989, Campion) 8
8. Salaam Bombay! (1988, Nair) 7
9. Monster (2003, Jenkins) 6
10. A League of Their Own (1992, Marshall) 7
11. Ratcatcher (1999, Ramsay) 8
12. The Apple (1998, Makhmalbaf) 7
13. The Cool World (1963, Clarke) 7
14. Strange Days (1995, Bigelow) 7
15. The Bling Ring (2013, Coppola) 8
16. The Connection (1961, Clarke) 6
17. Chocolat (1988, Denis) 8
18. Maya Deren Shorts (108 minutes)
18a. At Land (1944, Deren) 9 [15m]
18b. Ritual in Transfigured Time (1946, Deren) 8 [15m]
18c. A Study in Choreography for Camera (1945, Deren) 7 [4m]
18d. Witch's Cradle (1944, Deren) 8 [12m]
18e. The Private Life of a Cat (1946, Hammid, Deren) 7 [29m]
18f. Ensemble for Somnabulists (1951, Deren) 7 [6m]
18g. Meditation on Violence (1949, Deren) 7 [12m]
18h. The Very Eye of Night (1958, Deren) 7 [15m]
19. Divine Horsemen: The Living Gods of Haiti (1993, Deren/Ito/Ito) 6
20. Pasqualino Settebellezze (1975, Wertmuller) 6
21. Police (2020, Fontaine) 6
22. It Felt Like Love (2013, Hittman) 7
23. Adoption (1975, Mészáros) 7
24. Whale Rider (2002, Caro) 7
25. Black Harvest (1992, Anderson/Connolly) 7
26. Grave (2016, Ducournau) 7
27. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014, Amirpour) 7
28. Die bleierne Zeit (1981, von Trotta) 8
29. On Body and Soul (2017, Enyedi) 8
30. Les rendez-vous d'Anna (1978, Akerman) 8
31. Paris is Us (2019, Vogler) 6
32. Desert One (2019, Kopple) 7
33. Miss Sharon Jones! (2015, Kopple) 6
34. Eve's Bayou (1997, Lemmons) 6
35. The Night Porter (1974, Cavani) 8
36. The Silences of the Palace (1994, Tlatli) 7
37. Capharnaum (2018, Labaki) 5
38. L'une chante l'autre pas (1977, Varda) 8
39. Elisa and Marcela (2019, Coixet) 6
40. Astenicheskiy sindrom (1989, Muratova) 6
41. Further Beyond (2016, Lawlor/Molloy) 8
42. Rose Plays Julie (2019, Lawlor/Molloy) 8
43. Mister John (2013, Lawlor/Molloy) 7
44. Boat People (1982, Hui) 7
45. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015, Heller) 7
46. Simon mágus (1999, Enyedi) 7
47. My Twentieth Century (1989, Enyedi) 7
48. Krylya (1966, Shepitko) 7
49. Nachalo nevedomogo veka (1967, Gabay/Shepitko/Smirnov) 7
50. Ty i ya (1971, Shepitko) 9
51. Ich bin den Sommer über in Berlin geblieben (1994, Schanelec) 6
52. Das Glück meiner Schwester (1995, Schanelec) 7
53. Plätze in Städten (1998, Schanelec) 6
54. Pytel blech (1962, Chytilová) 7
55. O necem jinem (1963, Chytilová) 8
56. La idea de un lago (2016, Mumenthaler) 7
57. Je tu il elle (1974, Akerman) 8
58. Vendredi soir (2002, Denis) 8
59. Girls in Uniform (1931, Sagan/Froelich) 8
60. The Selfish Giant (2013, Barnard) 8
61. The Second Awakening of Christa Klages (1978, von Trotta) 7
62. Brief Encounters (1967, Muratova) 7
63. All is Forgiven (2007, Hansen-Love) 8
64. La folie Almayer (2011, Akerman) 7
65. The Arch (1968, Tong) 8
66. Promising Young Woman (2020, Fennell) 8 (2nd watch, was 8)
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Bing147
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#302

Post by Bing147 »

32. Ratcatcher (1999, Lynne Ramsay)
Last edited by Bing147 on March 23rd, 2021, 5:07 pm, edited 2 times in total.
maksler
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#303

Post by maksler »

Obgeoff wrote: March 22nd, 2021, 10:14 am Maksler, you are watching some great stuff. I’d be really interested if you indicated how good they were relative to each other.
Thanks! I'll try and give my humble opinion on them below.

Just so you know, I've decided to work my way through these monthly challenges by watching movies chronologically by director. It's a system that works well for me. It gives me a combination of long overdue rewatches and movies that I haven't seen which, in some cases, form a bigger picture together.

A couple of years ago, while working my way through the 1001 movies YMSBYD, I watched Jeanne Dielman and a couple of movies by Agnès Varda, but I didn't really care for them. I figured that I'd appreciate them better now.

Chantal Akerman
I'm afraid I'm going to sound a little ignorant, but I did not really care for most of the movies I've seen by Akerman. My summary in general would be long, static shots, beautifully shot, but also boring and pompous at times with a lot of nudity.
Spoiler
I started with La Chambre (1972), a short that I'm able to appreciate as a piece of modern art. By that I mean that it's definitely not a movie I'll put on for fun, but I can picture it in an exhibition on Akerman. It helps that it's a short, any longer and I would not be able to cope. 5

Je tu il elle (1974) I felt was good, but nothing special. Long, static shots of a woman going through some sort of break-up/make-up with her girlfriend. I was more invested in the 'elle' part than the 'il' part, although the explicit scene at the end was a bit much in my opinion. I did like Akerman violently eating sugar by the spoonful. 6

For me, Jeanne Dielman ... (1975) is Akerman's best work. It was a rewatch, but I didn't remember much, not even the twist at the end. Watching a woman perform her chores in a time that we're all stuck at home sounds boring, but for some reason, I was hooked. Sure it's long, but it's beautifully shot. The fact that it's so long and monotonous helped me to empathize with the main character. The fact that you might find the movie boring is exactly its point and makes you understand - up to a certain point - her motives for the final act. 7

News from Home (1977) was a whole different movie, but I sort of liked it. Basically made of seemingly random shots of New York, combined with letters from her mom read out loud by Akerman. The pictures of New York were mesmerising at times, but you have to be in the mood to just watch people or cars go by for 90 minutes. Again, I felt this would fit well in an art exhibition, more than something I'd watch for fun. 6

Les rendez-vous d'Anna (1978) was the first movie in a series where I started to lose my interest in Akerman a little. I thought this picture was really boring. A female director having different meetings throughout Europe, filled with philosophical ramblings. It just all felt so unnatural to me, except for the part where she meets her mother and comes out to her as gay. 5

Nuit et jour (1991) was a low point for me. Again, this unnatural way of behaving in a relationship, combined with these weird fabricated settings... I did not care for it at all. 4

D'Est (1993) for me would be best compared with News from Home. Lovely pictures, but no narrative whatsoever. And where News from Home had those letters read out loud to create a certain atmosphere, this had nothing like it and became a series of pretty pictures with little meaning to me. 5

La captive (2000) was - again - beautifully shot, but the characters in it did not connect for me. I had so many unanswered questions while watching this. Like Nuit et jour, it felt a little pompous. I didn't really care for it. 5

No home movie (2015) would make for a great combination with News from Home. This time we see Akerman's mom, sometimes filmed from her living room, other times over Skype. The point of this documentary was pretty lost on me and by then, I was happy to move on from Akerman. 5
The Matrix. A movie I've been meaning to rewatch for a while now. The contrast with Chantal Akerman could not be greater. I loved the theme of the movie, but while the movie progressed, it became more and more of a generic action movie with a lot of bullets. 7

Never Rarely Sometimes Always. Not much is said, but a lot of emotions are expressed. The story isn't anything special, but I thought this was a solid movie on teen pregnancy. The part where she's going through the checklist is heartbreaking. 7

Trolösa. I liked the aspect of a writer conjuring up the characters of his new piece, and the drama is solid, but it's quite long with too much narration. 6

The Rider and Nomadland by Chloé Zhao. I rated both a 6, but I think I prefer The Rider a little over Nomadland, probably because of the esthetics. Storywise, I don't think I'll be remembering either in a couple of years. I thought they were just decent movies, with beautiful shots of nature.

Krylya and Voskhozhdenie by Larisa Shepitko. Both rewatches. I had very high expectations of Voskhozhdenie, because I rated it a 9 before. It did not meet those expectations, which left me a little disappointed. 8 Krylya was a little better than I remembered (7), so I was left with mixed feelings after watching these two. Overall, I thought Voskhozhdenie was definitely the better picture of the two, but the symbolism was a little on the nose.

I thought The Farewell was a decent comedy. I liked Akwafina and the Chinese cultural aspects of the movie, but as a story it was not that special. 6

Promising Young Woman was not for me. It started off well, but after a while I grew tired of the fact that almost every single man in this movie is considered bad, plus I didn't like the ending. 5

Agnès Varda
So, considering my judgment of Chantal Akerman, I'm sure you can see where I'm going with this. I've seen six full-length pictures and two shorts up to now. The more Varda is experimenting with the narrative, the less I like it...
Spoiler
I started with La Pointe-Courte (1955), quite a good movie on a fishing village and a couple that is determining whether to go on or to break up. A little slow at times, but beautifully shot. I also enjoyed the story on the couple. 7

Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962). Up to now, I'd consider this Varda's best. I loved it. Great camera work and an engaging story with a lot of symbolism that worked well for me. Also, the short with Jean-Luc Godard and Anna Karina within the picture was a great nod. 8

For me, Le bonheur (1965) is where it starts falling apart again. A guy who feels the need to start an affair because he has so much love to give. When his wife obviously doesn't like it, he doesn't care and in the end she is easily replaced by the other woman. It must have been a sarcastic movie by Varda, but it didn't feel like it while watching it. 5

In Lions Love (1969), Varda starts to experiment with the narrative. Set up to be a fake documentary, I didn't really get the point of the movie. I liked the look into the late 60's America, but as a movie this was not for me. 5

L'une chante l'autre pas (1977) was less experimental. I liked the theme of the movie, but I couldn't really care for the musical scenes. 6

Mur Murs (1981). A documentary on the murals in LA. I should say, documentaries or not really my thing, but I enjoyed the stories behind the different murals and felt that this was, overall, a decent documentary. 6
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#304

Post by Ebbywebby »

I didn't even notice this challenge until just now. But OK....

1. Lions Love (1969, Varda)
2. Before Need Redressed (1994, Gunvor Nelson + Dorothy Wiley)
3. Wadjda (2012, Haifaa Al Mansour)
4. Point Break (1991, Bigelow)
5. Promising Young Woman (2020, Fennell)
6. Bluebeard (2009, Breillat)

shorts:
7a. De Natura (2018, 6 min, Lucile Hadzihalilovic)
7b. Nectar (2014, 18 min, same)
7c. Good Boys Use Condoms (1998, 6 min, same)
7d. The HPO (1938, 4 min, Reiniger)
7e. Daumlienchen (1954, 10 min, Reiniger)
7f. Stanley Pickle (2010, 11 min, Victoria Mather)
7g. The Black Dog (1987, 18 minutes, Alison DeVere)
Last edited by Ebbywebby on March 24th, 2021, 12:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#305

Post by ororama »

13. Madeline's Madeline (Josephine Decker, 2018) * 93 min.

What a mess.
Spoiler
1. Sita Sings the Blues (Nina Paley, 2008) 82 min.
2. Fetch! (Nina Paley, 2002) 5 min.
Tord and Tord (Niki Lindroth von Bahr, 2010) 11 min.
Wild Life (Amanda ForbisWendy Tilby, 2011) * 14 min.
I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors (Ann Marie Fleming, 2010) 15 min.
The True Story of Sawney Beane (Elizabeth Hobbs, 2005) 11 min.
The Danish Poet (Torill Kove, 2006) 15 min.
The Formation of Clouds (Marie-Hélène Turcotte, 2010) * 10 min.
3. Valley Girl (Martha Coolidge, 1983) 99 min.
4. Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020) * 107 min.
5. Caramel (Nadine Labaki, 2007) * 92 min.
6. The Sharks (Lucía Garibaldi, 2019) * 80 min.
7. Daisies (Vera Chytilová, 1966) 76 min.
8. A Portrait of Ga (Margaret Tait, 1952) 4 min.
The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo (Margaret Tait, 1955) * 7 min.
Rose Street (Margaret Tait, 1956) * 15 min.
Margaret Tait: Film Maker (Margaret Williams, 1983) * 36 min.
Aerial (Margaret Tait, 1974) 4 min.
Uncle Bob's Hospital Visit (JoDee Samuelson, 2008) 14 min.
9. The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg, 2019) * 120 min.
10. Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma, 2019) * 122 min.
11. The Future (Miranda July, 2011) * 91 min.
12. The Rider (Chloé Zhao, 2017) * 103 min.
*First time viewing
Female directors in italics
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#306

Post by Melvelet »

1. You Were Never Really Here 2017 7/10 Lynne Ramsay
Current recommendation: Monday (2000)


ImageImage


Current focus: Doubling the Canon nominees, Japan, South Korea

Last.fm | RYM
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#307

Post by sol »

Another Woman
1. One Night in Miami... (2020) Regina King
2. The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996) Barbra Streisand
3. Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) Eliza Hittman
4. Bastard Out of Carolina (1996) Anjelica Huston
5. How to Kill a Zombie (2014) Tiffany McLean
6. Madeline's Madeline (2018) Josephine Decker
7. She Dies Tomorrow (2020) Amy Seimetz
8. Love & Basketball (2000) Gina Prince-Bythewood
9. I'm Your Woman (2020) Julia Hart
10. Kajillionaire (2020) Miranda July
11. The Assistant (2019) Kitty Green
12. Shirley (2020) Josephine Decker
13. Shook (2021) Jennifer Harrington
14. Time (2020) Garrett Bradley
15. Sea Fever (2019) Neasa Hardiman
16. Clemency (2019) Chinonye Chukwu
17. Belle (2013) Amma Asante
18. Gozo (2016) Miranda Bowen
19. Lucky (2020) Natasha Kermani
20. Rocks (2019) Sarah Gavron
21. I Am I (2013) Jocelyn Towne
22. Moxie (2021) Amy Poehler
23. Emma. (2020) Autumn de Wilde
24. Animals (2019) Sophie Hyde
25. Western (2017) Valeska Grisebach
26. To Dream (2016) Nicole Albarelli
27. Stop-Loss (2008) Kimberly Peirce
28. Lost Girls (2020) Liz Garbus
29. Late Night (2019) Nisha Ganatra
30. Lions Love (1969) Agnès Varda
31. Private Life (2018) Tamara Jenkins
32. Closet Land (1991) Radha Bharadwaj
33. The Holiday (2006) Nancy Meyers
34. The Souvenir (2019) Joanna Hogg
35. Summer 1993 (2017) Carla Simón
36. Faces, Places (2017) Agnès Varda

Image

Agnès Varda and a locally famous muralist travel around France photographing everyday individuals, blowing up the photos and placing them on walls here. The process is quite interesting but focus is all over the place with a lot of time spent on goat milking and other activities. The attempts to make the film about Varda and her soured friendship with Godard backfire too. When the duo focus on the art that they are creating though, the film rarely missteps.
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#308

Post by flavo5000 »

Image
117. Red Road (Andrea Arnold, 2006) 7.5/10

Image
118. Rough Magic (Clare Peploe, 1995) 6/10

Image
119. The Night Visitor (Jennifer Blanc, 2013) 4.5/10

Image
120. The Night Visitor 2: Heather's Story (Brianne Davis, 2016) 4/10

Image
121. Deuce of Spades (Faith Granger, 2011) 6/10

Image
122. Gomennasai a.k.a. Ring of Curse (Mari Asato, 2011) 6/10
The Female Gaze
1. Organ (Kei Fujiwara, 1996)
2. Somewhere (Sofia Coppola, 2010)
3. Dust to Glory (Dana Brown, 2005)
4. Fangs (Kelly Sandefur, 2002)
5. On the Outs (Lori Silverbush & some dude, 2004)
6. American Guinea Pig: Sacrifice (Poison Rouge, 2017)
7. On a Clear Day(Gaby Dellal, 2005)
8. The Care Bears Movie (Arna Selznik, 1985)
9. Nomadland (Chloé Zhao, 2020)
10. Promising Young Woman (Emerald Fennell, 2020)
11. Don't Expect Too Much (Susan Ray, 2011)
12. Angie (Martha Coolidge, 1994)
13. Salvation (J.A. Steel, 2007)
14. Mickey's Once Upon a Christmas(Jun Falkenstein + others, 1999)
15. Killjoy 2: Deliverance from Evil (Tammi Sutton, 2002)
16. Fung gip a.k.a. The Secret (Ann Hui, 1979)
17-19. Tamako Market E1-12 (Naoko Yamada, 2013)
20. Tamako rabu sutôrî a.k.a. Tamako Love Story (Naoko Yamada, 2014)
21. The Fly Papers: The Buzz on Hollywood's Scariest Insect (Victoria Price, 2000)
22. Blood Games (Tanya Rosenberg, 1990)
23. Portrait de la jeune fille en feu a.k.a. Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma, 2019)
24. To All the Boys I've Loved Before (Susan Johnson, 2018)
25. The Anniversary Party (Jennifer Jason Leigh & etc., 2001)
26. The House of Usher (Hayley Cloake, 2006)
27. Caroline and the Magic Potion (Virginia Curiá, 2015)
28. Mädchen in Uniform (Leontine Sagan et al., 1931)
29. Mignonnes a.k.a. Cuties (Maïmouna Doucouré, 2020)
30. The Secret Life of Words (Isabel Coixet, 2005)
31. Wakefield (Robin Swicord, 2016)
32. Limbo (Tina Krause, 1999)
33a. Answering Machine (Tina Krause, 2001)
33b. One Hundred a Day (Gillian Armstrong, 1973)
33c. And You Act Like One Too (Susan Siedelman, 1976)
33d. Yours Truly, Andrea G. Stern (Susan Siedelman, 1979)
33e. The Above (Kristen Johnson, 2015)
34. Dogora - Ouvrons les yeux (Patrice Leconte, 2004)
35. Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020)
36. Bulbbul (Anvita Dutt, 2020)
37. Yes, God, Yes (Karen Maine, 2019)
38. Satan Was a Lady (Doris Wishman, 1975)
39. First Cow (Kelly Reichardt, 2019)
40. Teströl és lélekröl a.k.a. On Body and Soul (Ildikó Enyedi, 2017)
41. Nu ren si shi a.k.a. Summer Snow (Ann Hui, 1995)
42. She Dies Tomorrow (Amy Seimetz, 2020)
43a. Tenshi no yokubou a.k.a. The Lust of Angels (Nagisa Isogai, 2014)
43b. Watashi no Akachan a.k.a. My Baby (Nagisa Isogai, 2011)
43c. Chambre jaune (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2002)
43d. Santos Palace (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2006)
43e. Catharsis (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2001)
43f. La fin de notre amour (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2003)
43g. L'étrange portrait de la dame en jaune (Hélène Cattet + guy, 2004)
44. Tora Tora Tora: The Real Story of Pearl Harbor (Laura Verklan, 2000)
45. Songcatcher (Maggie Greenwald, 2000)
46. Serpent (Amanda Evans, 2017)
47. Infinitely Polar Bear (Maya Forbes, 2014)
48. L'extraordinaire voyage de Marona a.k.a. Marona's Fantastic Tale (Anca Damian, 2019)
49. Shoes (Lois Weber, 1916)
50. Mystique (Roberta Findlay, 1979)
51a. A Study in Choreography for Camera (Maya Deren, 1946)
51b. At Land (Maya Deren, 1944)
51c. Ritual in Transfigured Time (Maya Deren, 1946)
51d. Rat Life and Diet in North America (Joyce Wieland, 1968)
51e. Water Sark (Joyce Wieland, 1965)
51f. Kirsa Nicholina (Gunvor Nelson, 1969)
51g. Orange (Karen Johnson, 1970)
52. Dip sin dip sin a.k.a. Ouija 4 (Jill Wong, 2015)
53. Der Wald vor lauter Bäumen a.k.a. The Forest for the Trees (Maren Ade, 2003)
54. Sha chu chong wei a.k.a. Breakout from Oppression (Karen Yang, 1978)
55. Laure (Emmanuelle Arsan, 1976)
56. Inch'Allah dimanche (Yamina Benguigui, 2001)
57. Nirgendwo in Afrika a.k.a. Nowhere in Africa (Caroline Link, 2001)
58. Brave Miss World (Cecelia Peck, 2013)
59. Angano... Angano... Tales from Madagascar (Marie Clémence Andriamonta-Paes + other, 1989)
60. Snoop Dogg's Hood of Horror (Stacey Title, 2006)
61. Old Joy (Kelly Reichardt, 2006)
62. Madeinusa (Claudia Llosa, 2006)
63. Blood of the Tribades (Sophia Cacciola + bloke, 2016)
64. Tarzan & Jane (Lisa Schaffer & others, 2002)
65. TiMER (Jac Schaeffer, 2009)
66. Fidel (Estela Bravo, 2001)
67.The Silencer (Amy Goldstein, 1992)
68. La reine des pommes a.k.a. Queen of Hearts (Valérie Donzelli, 2009)
69. Marie Antoinette (Sofia Coppola, 2006)
70. Equity (Meera Menon, 2016)
71. Arcadia (Olivia Silver, 2012)
72-74. Makai Ouji a.k.a. Devils and Realist E1-12 (Chiaki Kon, 2013)
75. Gözetleme Kulesi a.k.a. Watchtower (Pelin Esmer, 2012)
76. Housekeeping (Jennifer Harrington, 2013)
77. No Impact Man: The Documentary (Laura Gabbert & some guy, 2009)
78. Der Mondmann a.k.a. Moon Man (Sarah Clara Weber, etc., 2012)
79. Atlantique a.k.a. Atlantics (Mati Diop, 2019)
80. Obvious Child (Gillian Robespierre, 2014)
81. Nachtrit a.k.a. Night Run (Dana Nechushtan, 2006)
82. The Mask You Live In (Jennifer Siebel Newsom, 2015)
83. Pluto (Su-won Shin, 2012)
84. Las hijas del fuego a.k.a. Daughters of Fire (Albertina Carri, 2015) #Bonus
85a. A Summer Rain (Ela Thier, 2009)
85b. Little Canyon (Olivia Silver, 2008)
85c. The Foreigner (Alethea C. Avramis, 2012)
85d. Still Standing (Paola Mendoza, 2006)
85e. a fork, a spoon & a KNIGHT (Mira Nair, 2013)
85f. Supporting Survivors (Gretchen Wallace, 2013)
86. Home (Fien Troch, 2016)
87. Dead Dicks (Lee Paula Springer + some guy, 2019)
88. Old Days (Sunhee Han, 2016)
89. Entre nos (Gloria La Morte & Paola Mendoza, 2009)
90. The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg, 2019)
91. Queen of Katwe (Mira Nair, 2016)
92. Bleeding Heart (Diane Bell, 2015)
93. Az én XX. századom a.k.a. My 20th Century (Ildikó Enyedi, 1989)
94. The Wild Thornberrys Movie (Cathy Malkasian +Jeff, 2002)
95. Body at Brighton Rock (Roxanne Benjamin, 2019)
96. August Underground's Mordum (Cristie Whiles and some other sick fucks, 2003)
97. Satanic Panic (Chelsea Stardust, 2019)
98. Never Fear (Ida Lupino, 1950)
99. Voodoo Dolls (Andrée Pelletier, 1991)
100. Chicken People (Nicole Lucas Haimes, 2016)
101. The Cry (Bernadine Santistevan, 2007)
102. Hurt (Barbara Stepansky, 2009)
103. Rage (Sally Potter, 2009)
104. First: The Official Film of the London 2012 Olympic Games (Caroline Rowland, 2012)
105. Phobic (Alexandra Lief, 2002)
106. Moms Mabley: I Got Somethin' to Tell You (Whoopi Goldberg, 2013)
107. Hot Summer in the City (Gail Palmer, 1976)
108. Protege (Michelle Henderson, 2009)
109. Gut Instincts (Michelle Henderson, 2012)
110. The To Do List (Maggie Carey, 2013)
111. Rolling Stones: Some Girls: Live in Texas '78 (Lynn Leneau Calmes, 2011)
112. After.Life (Agnieszka Wojtowicz-Vosloo, 2009)
113. Fire (Deepa Mehta, 1996)
114. Banoo-Ye Ordibehesht a.k.a. The May Lady (Rakhshan Banietemad, 1998)
115. Wij a.k.a. We (Rene Eller, 2018)
116. The Chipmunk Adventure (Janice Karman, 1987)
117. Red Road (Andrea Arnold, 2006)
118. Rough Magic (Clare Peploe, 1995)
119. The Night Visitor (Jennifer Blanc, 2013)
120. The Night Visitor 2: Heather's Story (Brianne Davis, 2016)
121. Deuce of Spades (Faith Granger, 2011)
122. Gomennasai a.k.a. Ring of Curse (Mari Asato, 2011)
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St. Gloede
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#309

Post by St. Gloede »

maksler wrote: March 22nd, 2021, 8:43 pm Agnès Varda
So, considering my judgment of Chantal Akerman, I'm sure you can see where I'm going with this. I've seen six full-length pictures and two shorts up to now. The more Varda is experimenting with the narrative, the less I like it...
Spoiler
I started with La Pointe-Courte (1955), quite a good movie on a fishing village and a couple that is determining whether to go on or to break up. A little slow at times, but beautifully shot. I also enjoyed the story on the couple. 7

Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962). Up to now, I'd consider this Varda's best. I loved it. Great camera work and an engaging story with a lot of symbolism that worked well for me. Also, the short with Jean-Luc Godard and Anna Karina within the picture was a great nod. 8

For me, Le bonheur (1965) is where it starts falling apart again. A guy who feels the need to start an affair because he has so much love to give. When his wife obviously doesn't like it, he doesn't care and in the end she is easily replaced by the other woman. It must have been a sarcastic movie by Varda, but it didn't feel like it while watching it. 5

In Lions Love (1969), Varda starts to experiment with the narrative. Set up to be a fake documentary, I didn't really get the point of the movie. I liked the look into the late 60's America, but as a movie this was not for me. 5

L'une chante l'autre pas (1977) was less experimental. I liked the theme of the movie, but I couldn't really care for the musical scenes. 6

Mur Murs (1981). A documentary on the murals in LA. I should say, documentaries or not really my thing, but I enjoyed the stories behind the different murals and felt that this was, overall, a decent documentary. 6
Really appreciate all these write-ups, Maksler! Nice read, and interesting thought process. We are certainly a little inverse of each other - as I tend to prefer experiments with form, but we share the same favourite Akerman, and are less impressed with others.

Lions Love and One Sings, the Other Doesn't are generally thought to be lesser Vardas (I think the second is great, but not seen it in years), and the same goes for La Pointe-Courte (might rewatch it this month and see if my perspective changes), though I like both - possibly the same as you - I get the sense that you may be a stricter rater.

I am disappointed the indictment of Happiness did not hit you harder - perhaps it will happen later. Today it is broadly speaking tied as my favourite film, but the first time I saw it I thought it too cruel and cold - and could not quite get what exactly the film was doing.

Today I see it as an indictment of postcard Happiness, showing - as you wrote - the woman as simply a replaceable object/thing - life goes on just as before. What is happiness? I it really that banal, that empty, that cruel? I loved not only the cinematography, but the use of colour in the transitions, and the use of seasons - and colour matching. It is really odd to see a film that could be read to this misanthropic and connect it to the Varda we know today - but it truly hits home.

(My other top favourites, in the masterpiece category, would be Jane B. for Agnes V. and Faces Places, both of which are far more about creation, and with such vitality and love for life - be it the warm humanism of Faces Places, exploring creativity, age, friendship and community - or the more extreme, and beautifully "all over the place" Jane B. for Agnes V., which is really all about the wonder and fun of creation, with Varda bringing Jane Birkin's fantasies to life, and vice versa. Both of course playing with form, and being about their own creation - which I'm not sure is quite your thing.

If you are more interested in narrative Vagabond and Kung-fu master! are among the very few left - and both absolutely incredible films, as well as her heartfelt biography of her husband's youth (just after his passing), Jacquot de Nantes. The rest of her work, even the largely fictional, like The Creatures, Nausicaa and Simon Cinéma, are all quite experimental in form and content. I do absolutely adore her documentaries - Mur Mur is one of her straighter - and she is not inserting herself as fully as in her best - you may want to still give Faces Places or her other major crowdpleaser The Gleaners and I a try.
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#310

Post by flavo5000 »

St. Gloede wrote: March 23rd, 2021, 3:31 pm
maksler wrote: March 22nd, 2021, 8:43 pm Agnès Varda
So, considering my judgment of Chantal Akerman, I'm sure you can see where I'm going with this. I've seen six full-length pictures and two shorts up to now. The more Varda is experimenting with the narrative, the less I like it...
Spoiler
I started with La Pointe-Courte (1955), quite a good movie on a fishing village and a couple that is determining whether to go on or to break up. A little slow at times, but beautifully shot. I also enjoyed the story on the couple. 7

Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962). Up to now, I'd consider this Varda's best. I loved it. Great camera work and an engaging story with a lot of symbolism that worked well for me. Also, the short with Jean-Luc Godard and Anna Karina within the picture was a great nod. 8

For me, Le bonheur (1965) is where it starts falling apart again. A guy who feels the need to start an affair because he has so much love to give. When his wife obviously doesn't like it, he doesn't care and in the end she is easily replaced by the other woman. It must have been a sarcastic movie by Varda, but it didn't feel like it while watching it. 5

In Lions Love (1969), Varda starts to experiment with the narrative. Set up to be a fake documentary, I didn't really get the point of the movie. I liked the look into the late 60's America, but as a movie this was not for me. 5

L'une chante l'autre pas (1977) was less experimental. I liked the theme of the movie, but I couldn't really care for the musical scenes. 6

Mur Murs (1981). A documentary on the murals in LA. I should say, documentaries or not really my thing, but I enjoyed the stories behind the different murals and felt that this was, overall, a decent documentary. 6
Really appreciate all these write-ups, Maksler! Nice read, and interesting thought process. We are certainly a little inverse of each other - as I tend to prefer experiments with form, but we share the same favourite Akerman, and are less impressed with others.

Lions Love and One Sings, the Other Doesn't are generally thought to be lesser Vardas (I think the second is great, but not seen it in years), and the same goes for La Pointe-Courte (might rewatch it this month and see if my perspective changes), though I like both - possibly the same as you - I get the sense that you may be a stricter rater.

I am disappointed the indictment of Happiness did not hit you harder - perhaps it will happen later. Today it is broadly speaking tied as my favourite film, but the first time I saw it I thought it too cruel and cold - and could not quite get what exactly the film was doing.

Today I see it as an indictment of postcard Happiness, showing - as you wrote - the woman as simply a replaceable object/thing - life goes on just as before. What is happiness? I it really that banal, that empty, that cruel? I loved not only the cinematography, but the use of colour in the transitions, and the use of seasons - and colour matching. It is really odd to see a film that could be read to this misanthropic and connect it to the Varda we know today - but it truly hits home.

(My other top favourites, in the masterpiece category, would be Jane B. for Agnes V. and Faces Places, both of which are far more about creation, and with such vitality and love for life - be it the warm humanism of Faces Places, exploring creativity, age, friendship and community - or the more extreme, and beautifully "all over the place" Jane B. for Agnes V., which is really all about the wonder and fun of creation, with Varda bringing Jane Birkin's fantasies to life, and vice versa. Both of course playing with form, and being about their own creation - which I'm not sure is quite your thing.

If you are more interested in narrative Vagabond and Kung-fu master! are among the very few left - and both absolutely incredible films, as well as her heartfelt biography of her husband's youth (just after his passing), Jacquot de Nantes. The rest of her work, even the largely fictional, like The Creatures, Nausicaa and Simon Cinéma, are all quite experimental in form and content. I do absolutely adore her documentaries - Mur Mur is one of her straighter - and she is not inserting herself as fully as in her best - you may want to still give Faces Places or her other major crowdpleaser The Gleaners and I a try.
I think Varda is at her best when she's being playful, doc or not. Cleo, Faces Places, Gleaners and I, Jane B., Jacques du Nontes and Beaches of Agnes are all ones I quite enjoyed of hers. Lions Love I had a similar reaction to maksler... Just didn't care for its unstructured meandering. I liked Mur Murs fine but it wasn't a favorite. The Creatures didn't quite gel for me. I should probably revisit Vagabond and Le Bonheur... Been a long time since I've seen those.
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#311

Post by sol »

Another Woman
1. One Night in Miami... (2020) Regina King
2. The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996) Barbra Streisand
3. Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) Eliza Hittman
4. Bastard Out of Carolina (1996) Anjelica Huston
5. How to Kill a Zombie (2014) Tiffany McLean
6. Madeline's Madeline (2018) Josephine Decker
7. She Dies Tomorrow (2020) Amy Seimetz
8. Love & Basketball (2000) Gina Prince-Bythewood
9. I'm Your Woman (2020) Julia Hart
10. Kajillionaire (2020) Miranda July
11. The Assistant (2019) Kitty Green
12. Shirley (2020) Josephine Decker
13. Shook (2021) Jennifer Harrington
14. Time (2020) Garrett Bradley
15. Sea Fever (2019) Neasa Hardiman
16. Clemency (2019) Chinonye Chukwu
17. Belle (2013) Amma Asante
18. Gozo (2016) Miranda Bowen
19. Lucky (2020) Natasha Kermani
20. Rocks (2019) Sarah Gavron
21. I Am I (2013) Jocelyn Towne
22. Moxie (2021) Amy Poehler
23. Emma. (2020) Autumn de Wilde
24. Animals (2019) Sophie Hyde
25. Western (2017) Valeska Grisebach
26. To Dream (2016) Nicole Albarelli
27. Stop-Loss (2008) Kimberly Peirce
28. Lost Girls (2020) Liz Garbus
29. Late Night (2019) Nisha Ganatra
30. Lions Love (1969) Agnès Varda
31. Private Life (2018) Tamara Jenkins
32. Closet Land (1991) Radha Bharadwaj
33. The Holiday (2006) Nancy Meyers
34. The Souvenir (2019) Joanna Hogg
35. Summer 1993 (2017) Carla Simón
36. Faces, Places (2017) Agnès Varda
37. The Riot Club (2014) Lone Scherfig

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While this sounds a bit like The Wolf of Wall Street with the university elite club members all going by the belief that money can buy their way out of anything, this is nowhere near as fun or involving as that. The biggest issue is that all of the characters are arrogant jerks without an iota of Leo's charisma; they also tend to mumble their lines, leading to a near intolerable first half. The second half (with a sobering dinner party) is a noticeable improvement.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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#312

Post by Bing147 »

33. Portrait of Jason (1967, Shirley Clarke)
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#313

Post by morrison-dylan-fan »

FTV:15:Vendetta (2015) 5 out of 10.

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Revealing during a interview at the 2019 Cine-Excess Film Festival that they signed up to work at WWE Studios,at a time when they had seriously considered quitting film making, due to the challenges in getting productions rolling, sisters Jen & Sylvia Soska bring their distinctive Body Horror vibes to the Action flick,with the Soska's snapping body modifications into hard-knuckle Action set-pieces, via wonderfully gory close-ups of blood pouring out from the repeatedly smashed open wounds of the prisoners.

Walking round as the biggest heel in the block with (as Michael Cole called them) his "Typewriter-like hands" raised, Paul "The Big Show" Wight gives a delightfully gruff turn as boo-hiss baddie Abbott, who Wight has stomp a mudhole into any fellow inmate who does not follow his orders, as Dean Cain gives Danvers a simmering aggression,which he unleashes as Danvers decides to end his vendetta.
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#314

Post by hurluberlu »

23. Capernaum / Capharnaüm (Nadine Labaki, 2018) 7+
24. Promising Young Woman (Emerald Fennell, 2020) 5-
25. Rita Hayworth: Zu viel vom Leben (Katja Runge, Henning van Lil, 2021) 7-

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Nadine Labaki on Capernaum set
Où sont les femmes ?
1. 12 Hour Shift (Brea Grant, 2020) 5+
2. Baxter, Vera Baxter (Marguerite Duras, 1977) 6
3. That Trip We Took with Dad / Die Reise mit Vater (Anca Miruna Lazarescu, 2016) 7+
4. Dead Pigs (Cathy Yan, 2018) 5
5. Nico, 1988 (Susanna Nicchiarelli, 2017) 6+

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Susanna Nicchiarelli directing Trine Dyrholm as Nico

6. What Will People Say / Hva vil folk si (Iram Haq, 2017) 6
7. A Minuscule Adventure / Minuscule - Les Mandibules du Bout du Monde (Hélène Giraud, Thomas Szabo, 2018) 8-
8. Detroit (Kathryn Bigelow, 2017) 5+
9. My Donkey, My Lover & I / Antoinette dans les Cévennes (Caroline Vignal, 2020) 7-

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Caroline Vignal on her film set

10. C'est ça l'amour (Claire Burger, 2018) 7

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Claire Burger (middle) and her crew

11. Si le vent soulève les sables (Marion Hänsel, 2006) 7
12. Woman (Anastasia Mikova, Yann Arthus-Bertrand, 2019) 6
13. Heal the Living / Réparer les vivants (Katell Quillévéré, 2016) 6-

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Katell Quillévéré shooting

14. Vivien Leigh, autant en emporte le vent (Priscilla Pizzato, 2020) 7
15. Loving Vincent (Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, 2017) 6

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Dorota Kobiela with co-director and lead actor

16. Let the Sunshine In / Un beau soleil intérieur (Claire Denis, 2017) 5+
17. Kajillionaire (Miranda July, 2020) 5-

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Miranda July

18. Sleeping with Other People (Leslye Headland, 2015) 4+
19. Take This Waltz (Sarah Polley, 2011) 5+

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Sarah Polley

20. Mary Queen of Scots (Josie Rourke, 2018) 7
21. Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash, 1991) 7+
22. The Piano (Jane Campion, 1993) [Rewatch] 9 (=)

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Josie Rourke directing her cast
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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maksler
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#315

Post by maksler »

St. Gloede wrote: March 23rd, 2021, 3:31 pm I am disappointed the indictment of Happiness did not hit you harder - perhaps it will happen later. Today it is broadly speaking tied as my favourite film, but the first time I saw it I thought it too cruel and cold - and could not quite get what exactly the film was doing.

Today I see it as an indictment of postcard Happiness, showing - as you wrote - the woman as simply a replaceable object/thing - life goes on just as before. What is happiness? I it really that banal, that empty, that cruel? I loved not only the cinematography, but the use of colour in the transitions, and the use of seasons - and colour matching. It is really odd to see a film that could be read to this misanthropic and connect it to the Varda we know today - but it truly hits home.
Who knows, maybe the next time I decide to rewatch some Varda's, I'll appreciate it more. It'll take some time before I decide to do that though :D
St. Gloede wrote: March 23rd, 2021, 3:31 pm If you are more interested in narrative Vagabond and Kung-fu master! are among the very few left - and both absolutely incredible films, as well as her heartfelt biography of her husband's youth (just after his passing), Jacquot de Nantes. The rest of her work, even the largely fictional, like The Creatures, Nausicaa and Simon Cinéma, are all quite experimental in form and content. I do absolutely adore her documentaries - Mur Mur is one of her straighter - and she is not inserting herself as fully as in her best - you may want to still give Faces Places or her other major crowdpleaser The Gleaners and I a try.
Thanks for the heads up. My compulsiveness is strong enough that I'm going to work through the ones I was planning on (Documenteur, Vagabond, Jane B., Gleaners & I, the Beaches of Agnes and Faces Places). However, I might include Kung-fu master! and Jacquot de Nantes in my watchlist between Vagabond and the Gleaners. We still have a week of March left...
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#316

Post by maksler »

Spoiler
1. Je tu il elle (1974, Akerman)
2. Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975, Akerman)
3. News from Home (1977, Akerman)
4. Les rendez-vous d'Anna (1978, Akerman)
5. Nuit et jour (1991, Akerman)
6. D'Est (1993, Akerman)
7. La captive (2000, Akerman)
8. No home movie (2015, Akerman)
9. The Matrix (1999, Wachowski sisters)
10. Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020, Hittman)
11. Trolösa (2000, Ullmann)
12. The Rider (2017, Zhao)
13. Nomadland (2020, Zhao)
14. Krylya (1966, Shepitko)
15. Voskhozhdenie (1977, Shepitko)
16. The Farewell (2019, Wang)
17. Promising Young Woman (2020, Fennell)
18. La Pointe-Courte (1955, Varda)
19. Cléo de 5 à 7 (1962, Varda)
20. Le bonheur (1965, Varda)
21. Lions Love (1969, Varda)
22. L'une chante l'autre pas (1977, Varda)
23. Mur murs (1981, Varda)
24. Documenteur (1981, Varda)
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#317

Post by beavis »

beavis wrote: March 21st, 2021, 9:18 pm
Spoiler
1. Taking the horse to eat jalebis (Anamika Haksar, 2019) - 8.0
2. Aloïse (Liliane de Kermadec, 1975) - 7.5
3. Selva. Un portrait de Parvaneh Navaï (Maria Klonaris, 1983) - 7.5
4. Divinity Gratis (Betzy Bromberg, 1995) - 7.5
5. Big Boy (Shireen Seno, 2011) - 7.5
6. Severnyy veter (The North Wind) (Renata Litvinova, 2021) - 7.5
7. shorts
8. shorts
9. shorts
10. Hotel New York (Jackie Raynal, 1984) - 7
11. shorts
12. shorts
13. Nervous Translation (Shireen Seno, 2017) - 8
14. Casanovagen (Luise Donschen, 2018) - 6,5
15. Exotica, Erotica, Etc. (Evangelia Kranioti, 2015) - 8
16. Liminal (Manuela De Laborde, Lav Diaz, Óscar Enríquez, Philippe Grandrieux , 2020) - 7.5
17. Hotel Nueva Isla (Irene Gutiérrez Torres, Javier Labrador Deulofeu, 2014) - 7
18. Obscuro Barroco (Evangelia Kranioti, 2018) - 8
19. Sinmute (Ana Balcázar, Javier Bellido, 2008) - 4.5
20. El olvido (Heddy Honigmann, 2008) - 7.0
21. Los silencios (Beatriz Seigner, 2018) - 7.5
22. Canción sin nombre (Melina León, 2019) - 8.0
23. Motu Maeva (Maureen Fazendeiro, 2014) - 7.5
24. Chircales (Marta Rodríguez, 1972) - 7.5
25. Una vez la noche (Antonia Rossi, Roberto Contador, 2018) - 5.0
26. Giraffe (Anna Sofie Hartmann, 2019) - 7.0
27. Dreissig (Simona Kostova, 2019) - 8.5
28. Diário de Sintra (Paula Gaitán, 2008) - 7.0
29. Ghost of the Golden Groves (Aniket Dutta, Roshni Sen, 2019) - 6.0
30. Divine carcasse (Dominique Loreau, 1998) - 7,5
31. Ilha (Ary Rosa, Glenda Nicácio, 2018) - 7.5
32. A Febre (Maya Da-Rin, 2019) - 7.0
33. Rit over de grens (Rosemarie Blank, 1994) - 7.0
34. Mamá, mamá, mamá (Sol Berruezo Pichon-Riviére, 2020) - 8.0
35. O Amor Natural (Heddy Honigmann, 1996) - 8.0
36. What We Left Unfinished (Mariam Ghani, 2019) - 7.0
37. 9 Leben (Maria Speth, 2011) - 7.0
38. Taiga (Ulrike Ottinger, 1992) - 7.5
39. Ök ketten (Márta Mészáros, 1977) - 7.5
40. Egy nap (Zsófia Szilágyi, 2018) - 7.5
41. Jamais Plus Toujours (Yannick Bellon, 1976) - 8.0
42. Figlia mia (Laura Bispuri, 2018) - 7.0
43. Töchter (Maria Speth, 2014) - 7.5
44. Alice in the Underworld: The Dark Märchen Show!! (Mari Terashima, 2009) - 6.0
45. Chibusa yo eien nare (Kinuyo Tanaka, 1955) - 7.5
46. Nieuwe tieten (Sacha Polak, 2013) - 7.5
47. Napló gyermekeimnek (Márta Mészáros, 1984) - 8.0

Another Meszaros one, two movies about breast cancer and something that is more a performance piece than a functional movie to my eyes, but it still looked pretty enough.
I had expected more from Tanaka, it was a bit slow moving and felt to me like a pretty standard drama, with the focus on poetry being more interesting than anything it might have had to say on breast cancer. The small docu Polak made has so much more to say. I love her fiction work, so it was already interesting to know more about the person who made it, but then to live along with the things that have profound impact on her life (even though they are filmed quick and simple, in an almost blog like manner) is huge. On top of that I can see this one to be very helpful or instructive to people who are confronted with this conundrum of knowing you have a gene that gives you a 70+ percentage change of getting breast cancer, but do you freely go into heavy surgery to remove your breasts?
Last edited by beavis on March 24th, 2021, 9:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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St. Gloede
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#318

Post by St. Gloede »

24.7-28. Agnès Varda, 19 shorts - 285m

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It is pretty incredible and sad that Varda struggled to get another film made after La Pointe-Courte, and that she actually needed to work for the French Tourism Board in 1958 just to be able to create something: but create she did! The two travelogues, or shall we say "ads" are spectacular pieces of art - and at the same time she made the stark and unique Diary of a Pregnant Woman.

While Varda both started and ended her career on full-length films, shorts were a consistent part of her life - and the variety is wonderful. What struck me most was how many of these I genuinely wished she had developed into features - as there truly is so much potential here. I was also struck by how, even in 1958, her early documentary shorts hints at what she would later do - such as the wonderful framing of the locals in Du côté de la côte - I can hardly think of a more Varda style-joke - and yet also, how far away they were.

This election really varies from Varda as a young director eager to just create - to an older director just having some fun - including a 2-minute cat video - which is genuinely great (!).


O saisons, ô châteaux / O Seasons, O Castles (1958) - 20m

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Sent to create a document of Les Châteaux De La Loire, Varda does almost everything else. She is captivated by the workers, the area, nature, life, encounters. What could have been a dry documentary is immediately turned on its head - it is comical - but also elegant. She fills the castle with models and shoots in beautiful colour. She captures the sounds and the life - and just has one hell of a time playing with form and conventions - an absolute delight. 8/10.


L'opéra-mouffe / Diary of a Pregnant Woman (1958) - 16m

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Diary of a Pregnant Woman is one of Varda's darkest and most visually unnerving films placing you inside a world of poverty and abstracted images. Shot as a silent, this is a visually evocative, experimental and even risque short, complete with the kind of striking nude photography Varda did before entering into cinema. This film was made when Varda herself was pregnant (and struggling to get a second feature made) and shows her not only pouring every ounce of creativity into this work (to the point that the various styles almost seem jarring) but evoking the uneasy sense of the kind of world a woman pregnant is actually bringing their child into. The jarring styles - romance, near surrealist horror and social realism, also complement each other in bringing the complexities of pregnancy and what the journey of bringing a child into the world can mean.


Du côté de la côte / Along the Coast (1958) - 25m

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Du côté de la côte is simply glorious, and possibly one of the greatest shorts ever made - not only that, it makes me saddened Varda did not have a longer career as a travelogueist - though I do suppose From Here to There and Faces Places could count. :D

Shot in stunning colour photography Du côté de la côte is an observational travelogue, filled to the brink with comedy and visual poetry as it dissects trends and behavior in a way that feels incredibly much like the Varda we know today - but with an added air of mystique and elegance - leaving more to the visuals themselves. Varda, of course, started as a photographer - and this can be felt in her other two shorts from this year as well - but here, even more so than O saisons, ô châteaux, the visual story-telling and humour his hit is such a detail-oriented, clever way - setting up contexts and associations with such ease.

Don't get me wrong - this is a very warm film - but in a very different way. It is the light observations - such as the commentary on trendy colours (blue and yellow) which builds up an entire story of windows, houses, designs - before moving on to dresses, hats, swimsuits - and then of course - the contradictions. This is only one example - but the specific observations, and the running commentary (one man, one woman) could not be more spot-on - perfect synergy - and a near-perfect depiction of summer and tourism. 9/10.

*It was also really nice to see some left bank associated names here, for instance, Henri Colpi as the editor (I should sneak in a film of his in the waves challenge), and Quinto Albicocco as the cinematographer (he was the father of Jean-Gabriel Albicocco, and shot his son's films).

*Dedicated to André Bazin.


Les fiancés du pont Mac Donald ou (Méfiez-vous des lunettes noires) (1961) - 5m

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This is the delightful short-film from Cleo From 5 to 7, starring Jean-Luc Godard and Anna Karina is a silly, playful silent cinema homage (and more importantly, dire warning against using dark sunglasses). Seeing it again separately I was hoping it may have something extra - but beyond the credits, no. Not that anything else needed to be added, it is fun on its own and tells a complete story. 6/10.


Salut les Cubains (1964) - 30m

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And talking about Varda as a photographer ... Salut les Cubains is made up exclusively of still black and white photographs capturing the joy, hope and excitement in Cuba at a time when the revolution is coming to a close and the future seems bright. While in black and white, there are certainly traces of the Du côté de la côte style of an observational travelogue, filled with humour and lightness - though it is also more well-rounded, less overtly comical and tries to paint an actual rather than satirical picture - capturing the spirit of the time. Varda manages just that, and it is a wonderful viewing that could easily have been expanded into a feature. 8/10.


Elsa la rose (1966) - 20m

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Elsa la rose was meant to be part of a 2-part project where Varda and her husband Jacques Demy would each do a short documentary on famous authors, married couple (and communists) Elsa Triolet and Louis Aragon - with Varda directing Louis describing Elsa and Demy directing Elsa describing Aragon. An incredibly sweet and intriguing idea. Unfortunately, Demy dropped out and Varda made a compromise - where Elsa also has a voice and more focus is places on how they met - though the core Louis talking of his wife - stayed. It is interesting and sweet - but as it stands feels a little light. 6.5/10.


Oncle Yanco (1967) - 18m

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In this utterly delightful mini-portrait Varda visits her father's cousin - Jean Varda - after accidentally having been made aware there was a semi-famous painter name Varda while visiting California. They had never met before - and this brief and playful encounter - which takes in the broad bohemian house-boat area filled with intellectuals and hippies - comes off beautifully well. Varda stages her meeting with the older Varda several times, recutting their embraces - clearly enjoying his company - asks playful questions - and gets to briefly soak in the lifestyle. Yet again I feel like we were robbed of a potential feature - especially as Jean Varda, or: Uncle Yanco - has such a wonderfully large personality. 8/10.


Black Panthers (1968) - 31m

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*I saw the English language version of Black Panthers - the key distinction being that the French has translators over the speeches/interviews and French V/O. Would be interested in seeing the French version at some point as well - and to get this out of the way as I have been saying it a lot - could and should have been a feature damn it.

Black Panthers is one of Varda's straightest films - documenting the Free Huey marches as the leader of the Black Panther Party faces murder charges. Varda speaks to Huey himself, several representatives of the party, protestors and bystanders. She is not unquestioning, and highlights complexities beyond their narrative - but it is broadly speaking a document of the movement, the anger and the goals of the movement - shot with a lot of clarity, and eagerness to understand and showcase the movement to a world audience.

*It is tempting to contrast this with Godard's footage of the Black Panthers at approximately the same time - almost night and day.


Réponse de femmes: Notre corps, notre sexe / Women Reply (1975) - 8m

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This one, about what it means to be a woman - is coated in playful sarcasm where stereotypes, personal experience and hopes are merged into a statement of self-assertion. There are many great moments, though it also feels a little rough and even a little outdated. 6/10.


Plaisir d'amour en Iran / The Pleasure of Love in Iran (1976) - 6m

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Short, light but delightful - The Pleasure of Love in Iran does something as bizarre as to try to show the erotic nature in Iranian architecture - coupled with young romantic love (Varda is using two of the leads from One Sings, the Other Doesn't) and it really comes together wonderfully. It is so short that there are really just two key parts/scenes - the erotization - if you can call it that - and a brief moment with the lovers - but both are excellent - leaving it to only fall below greatness as it feels so short and incomplete. 7/10.


Ulysse (1983) - 22m

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Unable to stop thinking of a striking photograph she took in 1954 - her fairly famous shot of a dead donkey, a naked child looking at it and a naked man staring out towards the sea in B/W. It made a notable appearance in Faces, Places as well - and it is clear it kept its place in Varda's mind - even this exorcism in place. Varda does not only seek out the subjects of the photograph and interview them of what they remember (one has forgotten everything), she gets one to re-enter the state of nudism - speaks to family - and takes around her photo - and the child's drawing of the event for analysis on the street. It is a fairly light little film, that feels a little conventional, even with all the play.


Une minute pour une image (1983) - Selected episodes (all episodes available?) 26m

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I saw the 26-minute version of this series, which is made up of a selected sets of episodes added back to back - which is really not a great way to experience these shorts.

Varda created 170 episodes, with different narrators, including Duras and Montand - and the concept is fantastic. Spurred on by Ulysses she wanted to confront the idea of different interpretations of photographs. To showcase this she lets a photograph stay, without narration, for 15 seconds, then a narrator will say what they see. Only at the end will the photograph, the photographer (+ setting/year) and the narrator be revealed.

This set only has the ones narrated by Varda - though there are co-guests, including her mother. Many of these shorts are great, others are merely good. The main pain point is seeing the intro (which is good) over and over again in such a short time. The original episodes aired as 1 per day - which sounds perfect, and I adjusted for this in my assessment. As it stands I'll give it 7, but if more episodes are revealed I'd love to see more.


7p., cuis., s. de b., ... à saisir (1984) - 28m

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Varda at her most experimental? Perhaps! The title 7p., cuis., s. de b., ... à saisir reads as an apartment ad - and that's exactly our starting point - a realtor showing off a massive house - which used to be a hospice, but was converted into a home. Suddenly, the past inhabitants start inhabiting the space, as time is shown to flow together piece by piece. The core is a family living there for a long time, trailing their relationship with their oppressive father from childhood to adulthood - but only with short scenes - while hold hospice inhabitants glean in too. Some never want to leave, others can't wait to get out - and the invisible realtor keeps opening empty room after room. Dreamlike, ghostly and extremely effective. Once again I wish Varda would have developed this into a full-blown feature. 8/10.


Les dites cariatides / The So-called Caryatids (1984) - 12m
Les dites cariatides bis (2005) - 2m

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In these two shorts Varda looks at the nude, humanoid pillars holding up grand buildings across Paris. In the first she brings it all to life with humous commentary and observational humour, bringing history and society to life - complete with questioning society's views of nudity on the street - sending a man running naked in Paris (don't worry, no cars crashed). It is utterly delightful and clever. The latter, extremely short, is a cute follow-up with no commentary, and feels like a small companion piece, showcasing extra forms. 8/10 + 6/10.


T'as de beaux escaliers, tu sais / You've Got Beautiful Stairs, You Know (1986) - 3m

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A fairly quick effort to humour her local cinametque where Varda mixes their trafficked stairways with famous stairways from film history. The visual quality changes drastically, as access to high-quality prints was clearly poor back in '86 - but it works. It also has a brief appearance by Adjani. 6/10.


Hommage à Zgougou (et salut à Sabine Mamou) / Homage to Zgougou the Cat (2002) - 2m

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Yes, this is a 2-minute cat video - showing how Zgougou the Cat takes over every situation, including Varda's laptop - and how she deals with it - not to mention the Zgougou has played in her life. Could this too have been a feature? Yes, actually. Why not?! 8/10.


Le lion volatil (2003) - 12m

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Le lion volatil is a cute little film that stands apart from most of Varda's short work as it is largely fiction - but not quite. Varda is right there, thinking of and talking about the famous statue of a lion - a symbol of her part of Paris, with cars buzzing around it - and she concocts a clearly cheap, but playful mini-romance - complete with a throwback to Cleo and some fun comic special effects. It is utterly delightful but feels light. 7/10.

*Zgougou the Cat has a really notable role in this film as well.


Les 3 boutons (2015) - - 11m

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Les 3 boutons is Varda's last short, and - shockingly - her last fiction work - creating an excellent anti-fairytale about a girl who would rather have an education than mystique. There is a lot of metaphor here, and it is shot with so much light I could not help but be reminded of Le bonheur. It is formatically experimental and aesthetically simple, sporting the earnest and simplified style of acting we expect from minimalists, coupled with easy digital video and a lead character - a young/teenage girl, Jasmine, who will do her chores/have magical experiences and break the fourth wall - talk directly to us - and tell us something she thinks. I may appreciate it even more on a rewatch. This time I thought a few things seemed a little meandering - but the ending and overall idea is simply so clever. 7.5/10.

*The postman is Varda's real postman - and makes an appearance in Faces, Places as well - as does the painting in the end credits.
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#319

Post by adwest »

27. Lost in Translation (2003) Sofia Coppola 6/10
It's a good character movie but there isn't a plot and I'm all about a good story so while I enjoyed the depth of these characters, I felt myself waiting around for anything of substance to happen.

28. American Honey (2016) Andrea Arnold 7/10
The director took on one of the lesser talked about forms of labor trafficking and I think did it justice in showing how complicated it is, and how they target specific types of kids--the ones who can say "no" to the question "will anyone around her miss you" is huge. The characters were interesting and well developed and I felt a lot of empathy for their plight.

29. Cherry Blossoms (2008) Doris Dörrie 8/10
Man German films are depressing but excellent. It broke my heart and that's a compliment.

30. Embrace (2016) Taryn Brumfitt 7/10
I appreciate the message of this movie and it was done well for a documentary, no plot to critique but it was engaging. Reminded me a little of Newsom's doc "Miss Representational" in some of the discussion of the elements of culture that skew the way we see our bodies. However, it was primarily about exploring the lives of women who have found a love for their bodies, even in some pretty tough circumstances and I really appreciated hearing those stories.

31. Wadjda (2012) Haifaa al-Mansour 7/10
I do not think I have appreciated the depth of how difficult it might be to be a woman in this particular society. It felt like I was watching possessions instead of human beings and it makes me sad. But the story was really sweet--the girl who played Wadjda was amazing and the story, while sad from a human rights perspective, was a inspiring because she was spunky. I can't help feeling that the spunk would be beaten out of her in the next few years following that story though.

32. Fortune Feimster: Sweet & Salty (2020) Krysia Plonka 7/10
I've seen Fortune on shows and things but had never seen any of her comedy. A little predictable but fun and I laughed a lot.
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#320

Post by Ebbywebby »

1. Lions Love (1969, Varda)
2. Before Need Redressed (1994, Gunvor Nelson + Dorothy Wiley)
3. Wadjda (2012, Haifaa Al Mansour)
4. Point Break (1991, Bigelow)
5. Promising Young Woman (2020, Fennell)
6. Bluebeard (2009, Breillat)

7. Krane's Confectionery (1951)...I've had this in my DVR for several months (TCM's past blitz of female-directed films) and finally got around to it. I wondered if I'd even want to sit through the whole thing, but it was better than expected. Quite ahead of the curve, as far as having a lead female character in 1951 who calls the shots and is master of her own destiny.

8a. De Natura (2018, 6 min, Lucile Hadzihalilovic)
8b. Nectar (2014, 18 min, same)
8c. Good Boys Use Condoms (1998, 6 min, same)
8d. The HPO (1938, 4 min, Reiniger)
8e. Daumlienchen (1954, 10 min, Reiniger)
8f. Stanley Pickle (2010, 11 min, Victoria Mather)
8g. The Black Dog (1987, 18 minutes, Alison DeVere)
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