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Your 2020 best - Year-by-year poll prep'

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Your 2020 best - Year-by-year poll prep'

#1

Post by hurluberlu »

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With our 2020 year-end poll pushed to July/summer, here is a thread to share the progress of building up your top lists for films and performances !

Feel free to share pics, reviews and thoughts on your viewings.

Where to start:

Forum Best of 2020 published lists thread

Participants and their lists:

beavis
Bing147
Good_Will_Harding
hurluberlu
Ivan0716
klaus78
Lilarcor
Onderhond
peeptoad
rnilsson19
sol
St. Gloede
Torgo
TraverseTown
Last edited by hurluberlu on April 15th, 2021, 7:50 pm, edited 6 times in total.
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#2

Post by hurluberlu »

My Top 20 in construction (Edits)...

1. Sin / Il Peccato ( Andrey Konchalovskiy ) ( 2019 )
2. Mank ( David Fincher )
3. First Cow ( Kelly Reichardt ) ( 2019 )
4. Enormous / Énorme ( Sophie Letourneur ) ( 2019 )
5. Dark Waters ( Todd Haynes ) ( 2019 )
6. Little Girl / Petite Fille ( Sébastien Lifshitz )
7. The Nose or Conspiracy of Mavericks / Nos ili zagovor netakikh ( Andrey Khrzhanovskiy )
8. The King of Staten Island ( Judd Apatow )
9. City Hall ( Frederick Wiseman )
10. Adoration ( Fabrice du Welz ) ( 2019 )
11. Kill It and Leave This Town ( Mariusz Wilczynski )
12. I'm Thinking of Ending Things ( Charlie Kaufman )
13. Tenet ( Christopher Nolan )
14. Egg / Öndög ( Quan'an Wang ) ( 2019 )
15. Druk ( Thomas Vinterberg )
16. Tout simplement noir ( John Wax, Jean-Pascal Zadi )
17. Uppercase Print (Radu Jude, 2020)
18. Ema ( Pablo Larraín ) ( 2019 )
19. Soul ( Pete Docter, Kemp Powers )
20. Nomadland ( Chloé Zhao )

extended list
21. WolfWalkers ( Ross Stewart, Tomm Moore )
22. Beauty Water ( Kyung-hun Cho )
23. Lupin III: The First ( Takashi Yamazaki ) ( 2019 )
24. Relic (Natalie Erika James, 2020)
25. Minari (Lee Isaac Chung, 2020)

26. Farewell Amor ( Ekwa Msangi )
27. A Sun / Yangguang puzhao ( Mong-Hong Chung )
28. One Night in Miami (Regina King, 2020)
29. Kim Ji-young: Born 1982 (Kim Do-Young, 2019)

30. Josep ( Aurep ) ( 2019 )
31. Dorian Gray, un portrait d'Oscar Wilde ( Jérôme Lambert, Philippe Picard )
33. Kubrick by Kubrick ( Gregory Monro )
34. Il était une fois...: Faute d'amour ( Olivia Mokiejewski )
35. My Donkey, My Lover & I / Antoinette dans les Cévennes ( Caroline Vignal )
36. Tom Cruise: An Eternal Youth ( Régis Brochier )
37. Auguste Escoffier ou la naissance de la gastronomie moderne ( Olivier Julien )
Dislikes: Malmkrog, Rizi, Borat Subsequent Moviefilm, Da 5 Bloods, Interreflections, Palm Springs, Kajillionaire, A Promising Woman

Watchlist: I'm Thinking of Ending things, Il Peccato/Sin, La virgen de agosto, Pieces of a Woman, Les choses qu'on dit, les choses qu'on fait, Effacer l'historique, Richard Jewell, The invisible man, The king of staten island, the woman who ran, There is no evil, Train to Busan 2, Uppercase print, Mama, The Trial of the Chicago 7, Love after love, The disciple, The swarm, Bye Bye Morons, Shiva Baby, Calamity, a Childhood of Martha Jane Cannary, Relic, Possessor, My Donkey, My Lover & I, Minari, 12 Hour Shift,
Last edited by hurluberlu on April 3rd, 2021, 3:19 pm, edited 11 times in total.
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#3

Post by beavis »

Because of multiple lockdowns I'm feeling way behind the curve right now (on top of the curve being very skewed itself)... not liking it at all. But I still managed to see 59 movies listed as released in 2020 up till now, and can manage a top 17 that I more or less feel good about

1 - Shirley - 4.5
2 - Ta Fang Jian Li De Yun - 4.5 (the cloud in her room)
3 - Possessor - 4.5
4 - Malmkrog - 4
5 - Birds (Or How to Be One) - 4
6 - Notturno - 4
7 - A l'Abordage - 4
8 - Fellwechselzeit - 4
9 - Atarrabi & Mikelats - 4
10 - Tal Día Hizo un Año - 4
11 - Armour - 4
12 - Mank - 4
13 - Mosquito - 4
14 - Siberia - 4
15 - Maryjki - 4
16 - Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn - 4
17 - A Metamorfose dos Passaros - 4

these are my other "4" scoring movies, any of them could fill up the places 18-20 at the moment, but I think they would certainly fall of when I've seen more

Ammonite - 4
Rizi - 4
Tenet - 4
Luz Nos Tropicos - 4
ADN - 4
Mulan - 4
Wendy - 4
Last edited by beavis on February 20th, 2021, 10:26 am, edited 2 times in total.
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#4

Post by beavis »

hurluberlu wrote: February 20th, 2021, 9:26 am My Top 20 in construction...
13. Ema ( Pablo Larraín )
14. Egg / Öndög ( Quan'an Wang )
There are 2019 movies in your list. I would do the same when it would have been an "end of year" poll, but when it is about the year 2020 that might not be accepted in the poll...?
I loved Ondog too! (and hated Ema! ;))
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#5

Post by hurluberlu »

beavis wrote: February 20th, 2021, 10:17 am
hurluberlu wrote: February 20th, 2021, 9:26 am My Top 20 in construction...
13. Ema ( Pablo Larraín )
14. Egg / Öndög ( Quan'an Wang )
There are 2019 movies in your list. I would do the same when it would have been an "end of year" poll, but when it is about the year 2020 that might not be accepted in the poll...?
I loved Ondog too! (and hated Ema! ;))
True, not sure what direction we will take so I will keep them in but mark them to remove them more easily if needed.
Already feel sad for the Asian and late 2019 releases that won’t get any attention actually... :D

I need to screen your list harder as they are a lot of titles I was unaware about.

I really struggled with Malmkrog, wrote few lines about it after watching it:
« Shot in lavish 19th century settings, our patience is tested with 3h+ of polite verbiage on war, religion and morale from the time. If construction is intriguing, the film suffers from the same language vanity the original text is denouncing. »
I still see as a painful and bitter experience because this could have been my kind of films but turned as a lengthy disappointment.
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#6

Post by rnilsson19 »

1. Atarrabi & Mikelats (Eugene Green)
2. Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets (Bill Ross IV/Turner Ross)
3. The Woman Who Ran (Hong Sang-soo)
4. The Brilliant Biograph: Earliest Moving Images of Europe (1897-1902)
5. L'année dernière à Dachau (Mark Rappaport)
6. Anna/Nana/Nana/Anna (Mark Rappaport)
7. Sportin' Life (Abel Ferrara)
8. First Cow (Kelly Reichardt)
9. Days (Tsai Ming-Liang)
10. Undine (Christian Petzold)
Last edited by rnilsson19 on February 20th, 2021, 11:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#7

Post by beavis »

Malmkrog is a difficult one indeed, not just because of the length and the unusual choice of source it translates to film. But the cinematography and control of the subject is top notch! And I loved the fact that this was more or less an integral adaptation of the original fin-de-siecle (technically slightly later, but still...)philosophical text. I am a sucker for that period too, and I was intrigued by the text. I am sure deeper studies can be made and maybe hypothesis thought up about if (and what) the director might want to say something about the state of Europe with the movie (I have not read up on any of this), for me it was placing the text at the time it was written and getting onto that dynamic that gave me enough food for thought and I just admired the style, the balls and the originality (as in not following anything that is popular, well known or wanted) of it all.
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#8

Post by Onderhond »

https://www.onderhond.com/toplist/custom?year=2020

01. 4.5 - The Day of Destruction [Hakai no Hi] (2020)
02. 4.0 - Daughters (2020)
03. 4.0 - Gretel & Hansel (2020)
04. 4.0 - Greener Grass (2020)
05. 4.0 - Cadaver [Kadaver] (2020)
06. 4.0 - Possessor (2020)
07. 4.0 - Crazy Samurai Musashi (2020)

Way too early for me though, seeing how long it takes most Asian films to reach our shores.
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#9

Post by Torgo »

Mh yeah, as you'd guess, not the brightest year in film history so far. 2021 will probably look even worse.

1. Soul
2. Tenet
3. Never Rarely Sometimes Always
4. WolfWalkers
5. Palm Springs
6. My Octopus Teacher
7. Undine
8. Onward
9. The Trial of the Chicago 7
10. Hamilton

11. The Invisible Man
12. David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet
13. Feels Good Man
14. On the Rocks
15. The King of Staten Island
16. The Social Dilemma
17. His House
18. Mank
19. Freaky
20. Promising Young Woman
... and I'm Thinking of Ending Things


Mh meh: The Midnight Sky, Enola Holmes, Eurovision Song Contest, Project Power, WW1984, Sonic the Hedgehog, Bad Boys for Life, ...
Bah: Birds of Prey, Mulan
Simply lol: 365 Days, Jiu Jitsu

Not seen and probably will make Top 20 in descending order: Druk, Minari, Nomadland, Possessor, The Call, Pieces of A Woman, Da 5 Bloods, News of The World
Also worth a look I guess: One Night in Miami, Emma, Kajillionaire, The Half of It, I Care a Lot, Greyhound, Gretel & Hansel, La vita davanti a sé, ...
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#10

Post by Torgo »

hurluberlu wrote: February 20th, 2021, 9:26 am
2. First Cow ( Kelly Reichardt )
4. Dark Waters ( Todd Haynes )
extended list
21. A Sun / Yangguang puzhao ( Mong-Hong Chung )
Only a few of which I recognize as 2019 on IMDb. (Either we go with that or it will become chaos, mh?)
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#11

Post by hurluberlu »

Torgo wrote: February 20th, 2021, 5:56 pm
hurluberlu wrote: February 20th, 2021, 9:26 am
2. First Cow ( Kelly Reichardt )
4. Dark Waters ( Todd Haynes )
extended list
21. A Sun / Yangguang puzhao ( Mong-Hong Chung )
Only a few of which I recognize as 2019 on IMDb. (Either we go with that or it will become chaos, mh?)
Actually there are five others... :huh:
But seriously who has seen First Cow in 2019 ?
I am going to be in favor of sticking with year-end rules then. After 2-3 years and full public release, we can be strict working with IMDb year.
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#12

Post by Onderhond »

So can I count Cocolors, which is a 2017 film but only got a BR release last year? I don't understand these rules to be honest.
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#13

Post by Torgo »

hurluberlu wrote: February 20th, 2021, 6:53 pm Actually there are five others... :huh:
But seriously who has seen First Cow in 2019 ?
I am going to be in favor of sticking with year-end rules then. After 2-3 years and full public release, we can be strict working with IMDb year.
That's why tried to say that these are only a few I recognize (because I don't know every of the films and would have to look them up :sweat: ).
I totally understand what you mean and it's been the same with films like Enter the Void in the past, but there were so many films - especially from Asia - which were excluded from year-lists due to the strictness of this rule. To be honest, how many people saw Nomadland before 2021? Looks like another festival-only release so far.

If you vote for Dark Waters, I will vote for Uncut Gems. :P
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#14

Post by hurluberlu »

Torgo wrote: February 20th, 2021, 8:57 pm
hurluberlu wrote: February 20th, 2021, 6:53 pm Actually there are five others... :huh:
But seriously who has seen First Cow in 2019 ?
I am going to be in favor of sticking with year-end rules then. After 2-3 years and full public release, we can be strict working with IMDb year.
That's why tried to say that these are only a few I recognize (because I don't know every of the films and would have to look them up :sweat: ).
I totally understand what you mean and it's been the same with films like Enter the Void in the past, but there were so many films - especially from Asia - which were excluded from year-lists due to the strictness of this rule. To be honest, how many people saw Nomadland before 2021? Looks like another festival-only release so far.

If you vote for Dark Waters, I will vote for Uncut Gems. :P
Yeah I didn't realize I had so many until you made me look into it.
I don't mind for Uncut Gems but it ended up at #6 in our 2019 top list last year while Dark Waters was only mentionned in one list. :)
Nomadland... I guess by July it will be ok for everyone to have access to it a way or another - it could have been one for 2021 with our usual poll timeline I agree.
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#15

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

Despite having seen most of what I've been interested in at this point, I'm not entirely confident in my abilities to come up with an adequate list just yet. I've still got COVID on the brain most days and don't think I'll be able to rank and assess these in the same way I've been able to previous years. So at the very least, I'm grateful for the extra time allotted and will just separate most of the list contenders into "triers" until I feel I can order them in any meaningful way...

Top trier (will almost certainly appear on my list)

The Assistant
Bad Education
Minari
Never Rarely Sometimes Always
Nomadland
Soul
Wolfwalkers

Also great (most of which are likely to show up)

Another Round
Da 5 Bloods
Lovers Rock
Mank
Martin Eden
The Nest
Possessor
The Prom (my "guilty pleasure" pick of the year - probably won't make my final list though)
Red White & Blue
Sound of Metal
True Mothers
The Wolf of Snow Hollow

On the fringes / needs a re-watch (honorable mentions or films that could rise in ranks after repeat viewings)

76 Days
A Sun
Borat Subsequent Moviefilm
The Climb
Emma
First Cow
La Llorona
Mangrove
News of the World
On the Rocks
Palm Springs
The Personal History of David Copperfield
Promising Young Woman
Saint Maud
Sorry We Missed You
Tenet
Time
Trial of the Chicago 7
The Vast of Night
Zombi Child

Still a few I need to see yet, but otherwise, this looks to be as well rounded of a lineup as I'm able to compile right about now.
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#16

Post by Ivan0716 »

Only seen 43, no favourite yet, not even a decent top 10.
https://letterboxd.com/ivan0716/list/2020-ranked/

You know it's a bad film year when Another Round is one of the most acclaimed films of the year. It's a Vince Vaughn comedy through and through. The last 5 minutes might have been cathartic, but the 2 hours leading up to it? Dry(ironically) and predictable.
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#17

Post by St. Gloede »

Only seen 24 films so far, only the top 3 are likely to remain by the end of the year.

1. Uppercase Print (2020, Radu Jude) 9/10
2. Sheytan vojud nadarad / There is No Evil (2020, Mohammad Rasoulof)
3. A Metamorfose dos Pássaros / The Metamophosis of Birds (2020, Catarina Vasconcelos) 8.5/10
4, Ar Condicionado / Air Conditioner (2020, Fradique) 8/10
5. Emma. (2020, Autumn de Wilde)
6. Circumstantial Pleasures (2020, Lewis Klahr)
7. Lúa vermella (2020, Lois Patiño)
8. Été 85 (2020, François Ozon)
9. Eyimofe / This is My Desire (2020, Arie Esiri, Chuko Esiri)
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#18

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Ivan0716 wrote: February 21st, 2021, 11:46 pm Only seen 43, no favourite yet, not even a decent top 10.
https://letterboxd.com/ivan0716/list/2020-ranked/
Someone who enjoyed The Night Clerk more than Druk! That's rare. :D
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#19

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I'm Thinking of Ending Things (Charlie Kaufman, 2020)
It left me mixed feelings but what I loved, I loved a lot. The return drive under the snow where poetry and introspection are suspending time before/after a crazy meal with boyfriend's parents where social confrontations collapse in time loops is really the brilliance you can expect from Kaufman. Sadly, the last third of the film in the high school lost me, not sure where the director wanted to take us and it drags horribly... I will need to rewatch it to get a definitive opinion.
I discovered Jessie Buckley at this occasion and I hope to see her again; she is different from the usual type and seems to be quite a versatile actress.
Verdict: 7+, entering the top 20

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Train to Busan 2 aka Peninsula (Sang-ho Yeon, 2020)
I was not a fan of the first Busan over-drama, this one is slightly better in this respect. It embraces rather well the potential of a city overtaken by zombies and focuses on visual innovations without too intrusive CGI. But plot is still all too deja-vu (Romero, Del Toro, Miller).
Verdict: 6

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12 Hour Shift (Brea Grant, 2020)
It has a promising story-line and blends well with hospital daily routines and environment but it is too shy in being both a comedy and a horror flick, eventually failing in both categories. Angela Bettis is great as the junkie nurse looking for a kidney, trying to keep things in relative control...
Verdict: 5+

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#20

Post by Bing147 »

Still far too much to see, but I at least have a 10 which I like all of.

1. Never Rarely Sometimes Always
2. Palm Springs
3. My Octopus Teacher
4. Another Round
5. Nomadland
6. Minari
7. Soul
8. One Night in Miami
9. Hamilton
10. Mank
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#21

Post by Torgo »

Bing147 wrote: March 1st, 2021, 9:06 pm 1. Never Rarely Sometimes Always
2. Palm Springs
3. My Octopus Teacher
That's a brilliant, uncommon Top 3!
:sweat:
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#22

Post by Bing147 »

Torgo wrote: March 1st, 2021, 11:04 pm
Bing147 wrote: March 1st, 2021, 9:06 pm 1. Never Rarely Sometimes Always
2. Palm Springs
3. My Octopus Teacher
That's a brilliant, uncommon Top 3!
:sweat:
Thanks, fair amount of cross over I see. I've yet to see Tenet or Wolfwalkers either. Both are in my short term plans.
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#23

Post by sol »

Who's running this poll?

The best thing that I have seen from 2020 is probably 911 from Tarsem Singh. Not sure about its eligibility, but if eligible, it is the only film from 2020 that I have seen more than 10 times.

My second most-watched film is also of questionable eligibility; the Polish short The Czar of Noir doesn't have an IMDb page, but it made me laugh more than any other comedy that I saw from 2020.

Not just asking in jest either; would be happy to vote for both of these if I can. :unsure:
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#24

Post by blocho »

You're right. The Czar of Noir may be the funniest thing I saw from 2020.
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#25

Post by gromit82 »

sol wrote: March 3rd, 2021, 12:18 pm Who's running this poll?
Rufus-T is planning to run it.
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#26

Post by hurluberlu »

The King of Staten Island (Judd Apatow, 2020)
While Apatow "lost it" with Funny People according to a lot of (not so funny) people, his work became interesting to me (minus This is 40), subtly blending comedy into more introspective and social drama. The King... is right in this vein even if it probably belongs as much to Pete Davidson, the charismatic acting lead, who has inspired the script and is co-producing. We get to see how unadapted, stuck-in-childhood Scott is gradually overcoming his family-fueled trauma and pulls himself to adult life. Dialogues are true-to-life with the occasional pun that never make the 2h+ boring. There are not that many films that make you feel the gradual shift of an individual as you would experience it on his/her side and this is one of them.
8, entering the top

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My Donkey, My Lover & I / Antoinette dans les Cévennes (Caroline Vignal, 2020)
Here is another French comedy that takes place in summer on a typical holiday location where the main protagonist will attempt to straighten out her/his love life (see Rohmer for the best and a hundred of formulaic flicks like Hikers to name one). Antoinette shows no pretension and has only the delightful Laure Calamy and a few twists to entertain us: it works for the most and brings some fresh air in current lockdowns but is otherwise pretty much forgettable.
7-

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Sin / Il Peccato (Andrey Konchalovskiy, 2019)
A masterpiece ! Retelling the life of Michelangelo as he just completed Sistine chapel and is working on statues for Pope Julius II tomb, it is demythologizing the artist and showing him in all his complexity if not borderline madness. But it is also fascinating at exposing how art is produced out of dirt, blood and greed in Renaissance. And it obviously works as an analogy for the difficulties of any creation process which can look insurmountable at times - Michelangelo physicalling struggling with pulling a monster of marble rock, but also be compromised by financial interests. Alberto Testone is amazingly convincing as Michelangelo, to the point it is hard to imagine anyone else playing it. The cinematography is visually striking; from the stellar beauty of Italian countryside to the darkness of somptuous palaces, the shots are masterfully composed.
9-, new #1 of the top

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#27

Post by Traveller »

So far a pretty underwhelming year, though I've only seen 22; it actually sits at last place at IMDb for me with a 4.41 average. Last and First Men (8/10) was by far the best movie I saw and is the only one I really enjoyed. Though, except for the last part, David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet (7/10) was also great. The other two decent films were Soul and Sheytan vojud nadarad (both also 7/10). I was (a little) disappointed with I'm Thinking of Ending Things (4/10), Druk (5/10) and Crazy Samurai Musashi (5/10). I still have a few ones lined up which interest me, some more than others: Days, Dear Comrades, Malmkrog and Wife of a Spy as well as five Korean ones. Also hoping to come across and catch up with some of the great recommendations mentioned in the lists above.
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#28

Post by Torgo »

Traveller wrote: March 10th, 2021, 4:21 pm Though, except for the last part, David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet (7/10) was also great.
I was (a little) disappointed with I'm Thinking of Ending Things (4/10)
I'll agree that it the Attenflix docu was a mixed bag, it first made me want to cry and then go "Ah, really?" by the end, and that in less than 85 minutes. Hm.
With Thinking..., I was really disappointed though (should make a 8 or 9 for me after Kaufman's debut film), and I could still, albeit grudgingly, rate it a 6/10. Are you that strict of a rater that "a little" disappointment for you yields a 4/10, or were expectations low anyway?
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#29

Post by OldAle1 »

Traveller wrote: March 10th, 2021, 4:21 pm So far a pretty underwhelming year, though I've only seen 22; it actually sits at last place at IMDb for me with a 4.41 average. Last and First Men (8/10) was by far the best movie I saw and is the only one I really enjoyed.
My favorite also so far and I have it rated the same. 8 is usually not good enough to make my top 10 or often even 20 in a year with a "normal" number of films seen but of course it was not a normal year, and realistically I never have enough 9s and 10s from a recent year. Still I hope to start getting to some better stuff before long so I have some kind of list by summer. This is getting ridiculous...
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#30

Post by Torgo »

Wait, that's a surreal sci-fi debut film by the, sadly, gone Jóhann Jóhannsson. I didn't even know such a thing was due. :satstunned:
You really need to advertise such special films more. I haven't heard of it until just now - thanks for the hint.
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#31

Post by OldAle1 »

I wouldn't use the word "surreal". But it's definitely different from anything else out there, just about - the only comparison that comes to mind for me offhand is Ahmad Alyaseer's even more obscure 2012 Jordanian film When Time Becomes a Woman - both are completely static films with no "action" and just lots of talking - voiceover narration in the Jóhannsson film, and a two-person dialogue in the Alyaseer. Both are films where the ideas, the text, are paramount, and if you don't care about those there isn't much there besides some admittedly nice pictures. I really like this kind of stuff myself but I really think I'm part of quite a limited audience.
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#32

Post by Traveller »

OldAle1 wrote: March 10th, 2021, 5:02 pm I wouldn't use the word "surreal". But it's definitely different from anything else out there, just about - the only comparison that comes to mind for me offhand is Ahmad Alyaseer's even more obscure 2012 Jordanian film When Time Becomes a Woman - both are completely static films with no "action" and just lots of talking - voiceover narration in the Jóhannsson film, and a two-person dialogue in the Alyaseer. Both are films where the ideas, the text, are paramount, and if you don't care about those there isn't much there besides some admittedly nice pictures. I really like this kind of stuff myself but I really think I'm part of quite a limited audience.
Never heard of that one - thanks for the recommendation! The greatest part of my enjoyment for Jóhannsson’s film came from his audiovisual experience, but I’m willing to check this one out as well.
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#33

Post by sol »

I made this list for a friend to keep track, but might as well share it here:

Ranked list of 2020 films (plus three 2019 films that everyone seems to regard as 2020). Will probably keep up-to-date for the next few weeks.

https://www.icheckmovies.com/lists/2020 ... ance/sol-/

Not on IMDb/iCM: The Czar of Noir (would be somewhere in the top 10)
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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#34

Post by OldAle1 »

Traveller wrote: March 11th, 2021, 5:51 am
OldAle1 wrote: March 10th, 2021, 5:02 pm I wouldn't use the word "surreal". But it's definitely different from anything else out there, just about - the only comparison that comes to mind for me offhand is Ahmad Alyaseer's even more obscure 2012 Jordanian film When Time Becomes a Woman - both are completely static films with no "action" and just lots of talking - voiceover narration in the Jóhannsson film, and a two-person dialogue in the Alyaseer. Both are films where the ideas, the text, are paramount, and if you don't care about those there isn't much there besides some admittedly nice pictures. I really like this kind of stuff myself but I really think I'm part of quite a limited audience.
Never heard of that one - thanks for the recommendation! The greatest part of my enjoyment for Jóhannsson’s film came from his audiovisual experience, but I’m willing to check this one out as well.
Yeah the Jordanian film isn't nearly as cinematic. I certainly liked Last and First Men as much for that aspect as any other, so I wouldn't necessarily recommend Alyaseer's film to those looking for that kind of cinematic poetry. But I'm also a huge fan of Olaf Stapledon's book which Jóhannssson's film is based on, and the more meandering type of philosophical disquisition that essentially IS When Time Became a Woman definitely connects the two films in my mind. Certainly both are rare examples of the form (if the form is the science fiction film that is), though now that I think of it David Cronenberg's first two hour-long features have some similarities as well. Not the kind of thing that will ever attain any kind of general popularity though, even among genre fans - I suppose these are films more appropriate to lovers of Tarkovsky, Huillet-Straub, Marker, etc.
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#35

Post by Traveller »

OldAle1 wrote: March 11th, 2021, 2:29 pm
Traveller wrote: March 11th, 2021, 5:51 am
OldAle1 wrote: March 10th, 2021, 5:02 pm I wouldn't use the word "surreal". But it's definitely different from anything else out there, just about - the only comparison that comes to mind for me offhand is Ahmad Alyaseer's even more obscure 2012 Jordanian film When Time Becomes a Woman - both are completely static films with no "action" and just lots of talking - voiceover narration in the Jóhannsson film, and a two-person dialogue in the Alyaseer. Both are films where the ideas, the text, are paramount, and if you don't care about those there isn't much there besides some admittedly nice pictures. I really like this kind of stuff myself but I really think I'm part of quite a limited audience.
Never heard of that one - thanks for the recommendation! The greatest part of my enjoyment for Jóhannsson’s film came from his audiovisual experience, but I’m willing to check this one out as well.
Yeah the Jordanian film isn't nearly as cinematic. I certainly liked Last and First Men as much for that aspect as any other, so I wouldn't necessarily recommend Alyaseer's film to those looking for that kind of cinematic poetry. But I'm also a huge fan of Olaf Stapledon's book which Jóhannssson's film is based on, and the more meandering type of philosophical disquisition that essentially IS When Time Became a Woman definitely connects the two films in my mind. Certainly both are rare examples of the form (if the form is the science fiction film that is), though now that I think of it David Cronenberg's first two hour-long features have some similarities as well. Not the kind of thing that will ever attain any kind of general popularity though, even among genre fans - I suppose these are films more appropriate to lovers of Tarkovsky, Huillet-Straub, Marker, etc.
You got me intrigued enough; a philosophical disquisition is always appreciated. I have it on my watchlist now. In the case of Last and First Men, I felt it had more a mystical than philosophical undertone and that it contributed to the audiovisual experience focused on rather than the other way around.
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But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!
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#36

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

For anyone that's really behind on current releases and feels overwhelmed at the thought of catching up, I'd suggest just going in order of release date - just to have some semblance of a linear path to your watch list. I'll even list 30 of the most acclaimed films from 2020 in chronological order of their (American) releases:

The Assistant
First Cow
The Invisible Man
Never Rarely Sometimes Always
Bad Education
The Vast of Night
Shirley
Da 5 Bloods
Palm Springs
Tenet
I'm Thinking of Ending Things
Dick Johnson is Dead
Trial of the Chicago 7
Borat Subsequent Moviefilm
On the Rocks
Time
Possessor
The Nest
Wolfwalkers
Small Axe (Mangrove / Lovers Rock / Red White & Blue / Alex Wheatle / Education)
Mank
Another Round
Sound of Metal
Ma Rainey's Black Bottom
Soul
Promising Young Woman
One Night in Miami
Minari
Nomadland
The Father

Again, I'm sure it seems like a lot to people who haven't been keeping up by this point, but nobody says you have to watch everything ;)
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#37

Post by hurluberlu »

Kajillionaire (Miranda July, 2020)
At start it made me wonder whether this would be a US answer to Parasite, if not a complete rip-off, as they share so many elements: an outcast family of small-time crooks surviving and hoping for a major heist... living in a squalid building and fighting to protect it from flooding... At a later stage the film re-focus on the daughter traumatic bounds with her parents and how a newcomer helps her to move over. But everything feels uninspired and a patchwork of themes that are just here to check boxes of what's getting audience attention at the moment.
Verdict: 5-, dislike

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Ma Rainey's Black Bottom (George C. Wolfe, 2020)
I can totally see the potential of this as a play with strong lead characters and live music. The film translates that potential to some extent even though it is a very static cinematic experience. There are the expected emotional moments and acting performances (Boseman's oscar-bait God-pointing “Did you turn your back on me?” scene) but surprisingly it steels feels lacking depth in plot and even character development: the dramatic conclusion felt forced and rushed to me and Ma Rainey's character is really caricatural.
Verdict: 6-

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Minari (Lee Isaac Chung, 2020)
It took me a while to understand it is set in the 80s and I kept asking myself why a Korean family would try and settle as farmers in Arkansas nowadays - actually even for the 80s I still find it dubious. But besides the story, which is very linear, it is a little gem of direction, actually in the vein of both US (Mallick, Nichols) and Korean (Chang-dong, Bong Joon) cinema treating family drama in rural environment or with a strong connection to nature. Camera work is really subtle with great care to frame the protagronists in their environment at the right distance, still letting you feel all the empathy the director has for them. It is a promising debut, at least technically.
Verdict: 7-

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Uppercase Print (Radu Jude, 2020)
Radu Jude continues to revisit Romanian tragic history in the most creative fashion. After the meta-theatrical re-enactment of ethnic purification in I Do Not Care..., he is confronting Ceaușescu's propaganda TV actual footage with a surrealistic retelling of a small but harrowing event, namely a teenager caught writing anti-regime stances on a public wall and detained by the secret police. It reminded me Godard's documentaries montages at its best, where the succession of images that dont necessarily look connected at first glance gradually work on you. The TV parts woud have deserved shorter cuts though as it weighs on overall film' s pace.
Verdict: 7

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#38

Post by hurluberlu »

Promising Young Woman (Emerald Fennell, 2020) 5
Carey Mulligan in such an incendiary role was quite a surprise; she delivers a performance that will certainly stay as a milestone in her career. For the rest, the film undecided tone, torn between a responsible eye-opener on rape for US campus male students and the excesses of an entertaining revenge flick, left me on the side of the road and rather bored. It is a film that might prove useful or groundbreaking for a certain crowd but I didn't make anything out of it on any account.

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Shirley (Josephine Decker, 2020) 6-
The comparison with Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? has been made multiple times but this is really more the portrait of a middle-aged woman opressed by a patriarchal society and how she finds an outlet in writing and through a younger woman. Acting is decent, nothing memorable. The main letdown is that everything is just too bland and predictable: you get all the main characters pictured after the first 20 mins and they wont move from there until the end. There is clearly a lack of dramatic tension, that the director wants to compensate with complex camera work but which is just aggravating.

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Relic (Natalie Erika James, 2020) 7
Between family drama and horror lies that story where a woman and her daughter try to cope with the grand-mother being inexorably called into the other world. While their relationships, weighed down by memories and traumas from the past, provide already an interesting background, the supernatural level that gradually kicks in really lifts everything up: a relatable metaphore for fear of the unknown and death without being too heavy-handed.

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One Night in Miami (Regina King, 2020) 7-
I had never heard about the crooner Sam Cooke and I might forget about him but I will remember Leslie Odom Jr. playing the role. I was not expecting much from this but both the quality of the perfomances (Leslie Odom Jr./Kingsley Ben-Adir in Cooke/Malcom X arguing duel) and a somehow balanced script in debating Civil Rights and Black movements from different angles made it worth, even if it is still a bit of a didactical exercise.

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Kim Ji-young: Born 1982 (Kim Do-Young, 2019) 7-
Adapted from a South-Korean best-seller novel, we follow the life of Kim in modern Seoul, who, like all generations of women before her, is expected to be "a good mother" and nothing else, with the frustration and social alienation it implies. Like for all Korean drama, despite its good reputation, I was concerned about a potential over-melodramatic tone but here again the subtle play of the lead actress and the strength of the script with deep roots in actual experiments of daily life nailed a rather powerful plea for a long overdue change.

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#39

Post by peeptoad »

so far-

Small Axe (Mangrove/Lovers Rock/Red, White and Blue/ Alex Wheatle/ Education)
Rocks
My Octopus Teacher
His House
The Courier
Saint Maud
The Wolf of Snow Hollow
Calm with Horses
Mank


far as I can tell Rocks, Saint Maud, and Calm with Horses all have 2020 release dates at least in the US and UK. They're 2020 BAFTA noms. IMDB has them at 2019. Do they count??
Mank will likely drop off after I've seen more...
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#40

Post by Carmel1379 »

Hey, how do you do? Thanks for starting the thread! This reminds me of brokenface's hosted movie year projects in the headliners, from the early days. I will post the 10 I've rated soon, with an animation duo related confession, under the spoiler tag below, to not make a double post in this thread, to not be too adorable (thank you for the invitation btw). My 4670th post will happen on Avril 14th with my year poll choices (i almost feel as excited and giddy as for an election or oscars ceremony tbh) :mellow :
Spoiler
Confession: I have not seen Frozen or Frozen II

Carmel's 10 for 2020 so far (Released between 2020-01-01 and 2020-12-31, Restrict to Titles I've Seen (Sorted by Popularity Ascending))

TeneT
The Queen's Gambit
Soul
Best Supporting Actress: Maria Bakalova
Antkind: The Movie
Saint Laurent - Summer of '21 (2020 Video)
Fire (PoZar) (2020)
World of Tomorrow Episode Three: The Absent Destinations of David Prime (2020)
Microphones in 2020 (2020) 44 min Short, Biography
What Is David Working on Today? (2020– ) Episode: The Jar (2020) David introduces a mysterious ....
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