Welcome to the ICM Forum. If you have an account but have trouble logging in, or have other questions, see THIS THREAD.
NOTE: Board emails should be working again. Information on forum upgrade and style issues.
Podcast: Talking Images (Episode 22 released November 17th * EXCLUSIVE * We Are Mentioned in a Book!!! Interview with Mary Guillermin on Rapture, JG & More)
Polls: Favourite Movies (Results), 1998 (Results), DtC - Ratings (Apr 26th), Coming of Age (Apr 30th)
Challenges: Doubling the Canon, Animation, Middle East
Film of the Week: Moya lyubov, May nominations (Apr 30th)

A Top 10 Thread

User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

A Top 10 Thread

#1

Post by outdoorcats »

Just spent a while looking for a top 10 thread to see what everyone's 10 favorite movies are. Either it's staring me in the face, or I can't find it in the first couple of pages on all the discussion categories. Time for a new one?

It's about time to take another hard look at my 10s and shuffle up a new list myself.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
pitchorneirda
Posts: 799
Joined: February 11th, 2019, 12:07 pm
Location: France
Contact:

#2

Post by pitchorneirda »

1. Werckmeister harmóniák (Béla Tarr, 2000)
2. L'hypothèse du tableau volé (Raoul Ruiz, 1978)
3. Secret défense (Jacques Rivette, 1998)
4. Beoning (Lee Chang-dong, 2018)
5. A Clockwork Orange (Stanley Kubrick, 1971)
6. Holy Motors (Leos Carax, 2012)
7. Nostalghia (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1983)
8. Midaregumo (Mikio Naruse, 1967)
9. Le sang d'un poète (Jean Cocteau, 1932)
10. Conte d'été (Eric Rohmer, 1996)

Great classics that shaped my cinephilia but are no longer in my top 10:
La Passion de Jeanne d'Arc (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1928), Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941), Rashômon (Akira Kurosawa, 1950), Le mépris (Jean-Luc Godard, 1963), Teorema (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1968)

Directors that I love but are not mentioned above: Marcel L'Herbier, Lars von Trier, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Satyajit Ray, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Ousmane Sembene, Agnès Varda, Krzysztof Kieslowski
"Art is like a fire, it is born from the very thing it burns" - Jean-Luc Godard
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#3

Post by outdoorcats »

Making this list I realized I need to watch a bunch of films again. I stuck to a one-film-per-director rule.

1. STALKER (Andrei Tarkovsky - 1979)
Simply the most hypnotic, stunningly beautiful and transcendent work of art I've encountered so far.
Image

2. SATANTANGO (Béla Tarr - 1994)
A huge, staggering film that earns its 7 hours and its reputation as a cinematic Mecca. Epic, dour, haunting, but too humanist to be truly cynical.
Image

3. A CANTERBURY TALE (Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger - 1944)
The grandparent of all cult films and at least one of the first truly unclassifiable narrative films, it's a gorgeous, bewitching, strangely life-changing film.
Image

4. THE SARAGOSSA MANUSCRIPT (Wojciech Has - 1965)
A hilariously complex, genre-hopping masterpiece as adept at bawdy comedy as it is historical epic as it is gothic horror.
Image

5. THE THIN RED LINE (Terrence Malick - 1997)
A complete disaster behind the scenes and an artistic tug-of-war between Malick and his producers somehow created this perfect film, a war epic unlike any other.
Image

6. BLOWUP (Michelangelo Antonioni - 1966)
The ultimate mystery film and one of the most iconic and influential films of the '60s. Eerie, paranoid, gorgeous, perplexing.
Image

7. MULHOLLAND DR (David Lynch - 2001)
Arguably Lynch's most re-watchable film from an amazing career as likely the greatest surrealist director ever.
Image

8. A MAN ESCAPED (Robert Bresson - 1956)
Bresson's best film is also his warmest. Every frame is a masterpiece of this incredibly suspenseful film.
Image

9. HYENAS (Djibril Diop Mambéty - 1992)
My all time favorite satire, it is both a biting critique of the insidiousness (and destructive power) of materialism and a powerful, morally complex revenge tale. The film's amazing cinematography contains eye-popping use of color.
Image

10. THE THIRD MAN (Carol Reed - 1949)
The film I have watched more than any other on this list. At one point I preferred Reed's Odd Man Out, but the iconic zither score, dialogue, and stunning location work in postwar Vienna give this film greater staying power. It just never gets old.
Image
Last edited by outdoorcats on April 9th, 2021, 9:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#4

Post by outdoorcats »

pitchorneirda wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:04 pm 1. Werckmeister harmóniák (Béla Tarr, 2000)
2. L'hypothèse du tableau volé (Raoul Ruiz, 1978)
3. Secret défense (Jacques Rivette, 1998)
4. Beoning (Lee Chang-dong, 2018)
5. A Clockwork Orange (Stanley Kubrick, 1971)
6. Holy Motors (Leos Carax, 2012)
7. Nostalghia (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1983)
8. Midaregumo (Mikio Naruse, 1967)
9. Le sang d'un poète (Jean Cocteau, 1932)
10. Conte d'été (Eric Rohmer, 1996)

Great classics that shaped my cinephilia but are no longer in my top 10:
La Passion de Jeanne d'Arc (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1928), Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941), Rashômon (Akira Kurosawa, 1950), Le mépris (Jean-Luc Godard, 1963), Teorema (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1968)

Directors that I love but are not mentioned above: Marcel L'Herbier, Lars von Trier, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Satyajit Ray, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Ousmane Sembene, Agnès Varda, Krzysztof Kieslowski
I've seen only 6 of your top 10 (though 6 of your top 7). I'd be curious to hear more about Secret Defense and A Summer's Tale (I've seen so many Rohmer, but not this one) in particular.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
beavis
Posts: 2843
Joined: June 20th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Contact:

#5

Post by beavis »

Satantango (Tarr 1994)
Stalker (Tarkovsky 1979)
La vie nouvelle (Grandrieux 2002)
Rengoku Eroica (Yoshida 1970)
Apocalypse Now (Coppola 1979)
Nostalgia (Tarkovsky 1983)
Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma (Pasolini 1975)
Hiroshima Mon Amour (Resnais 1959)
Trys dienos (Bartas 1991)
Shinjû: Ten no Amijima (Shinoda 1969)

full toplist: https://letterboxd.com/beavis/list/all- ... 20/detail/

second Tarr on 1, nice!
It used to be Stalker for me for the longest time, but after seeing Satantango for a third time in cinema, I could not deny the power it has over me
the 70's and the 90's have the strongest favorites for me
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#6

Post by outdoorcats »

beavis wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:27 pm Satantango (Tarr 1994)
Stalker (Tarkovsky 1979)
La vie nouvelle (Grandrieux 2002)
Rengoku Eroica (Yoshida 1970)
Apocalypse Now (Coppola 1979)
Nostalgia (Tarkovsky 1983)
Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma (Pasolini 1975)
Hiroshima Mon Amour (Resnais 1959)
Trys dienos (Bartas 1991)
Shinjû: Ten no Amijima (Shinoda 1969)

full toplist: https://letterboxd.com/beavis/list/all- ... 20/detail/

second Tarr on 1, nice!
It used to be Stalker for me for the longest time, but after seeing Satantango for a third time in cinema, I could not deny the power it has over me
the 70's and the 90's have the strongest favorites for me
:blink: Look at that top 2! We're twins! Apocalypse Now was a runner up in mine too.

I've only ever seen Satantango at home. I was going to see a theatrical screening in Spring, but it was cancelled by COVID. Bummer.

La vie nouvelle - This is a hard film to track down. Streaming does not like Gandrieux, period.
Heroic Purgatory - I was halfway through a full career retrospective of Yoshida when I got sidetracked; started at the beginning at stopped and Woman of the Lake. I'll get to it...
Nostalgia - This was my first Tarkovsky. I actually watched this when I was a teenager. My library had a copy and I just watched at random like, huh, what's this? Afterwards I looked like this :satstunned:
Salo - Not seen yet
Hiroshima - Great film!
Three Days - matthewscott recommended this to me I think, hard to find
Double Suicide - Great film. Saw Shinoda in person do a (translated) Q&A for a retrospective of his work when I visited New York. There I saw Silence, Punishment Island and Pale Flower among others, all of which would be in my top 50.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
pitchorneirda
Posts: 799
Joined: February 11th, 2019, 12:07 pm
Location: France
Contact:

#7

Post by pitchorneirda »

outdoorcats wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:27 pm
pitchorneirda wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:04 pm 1. Werckmeister harmóniák (Béla Tarr, 2000)
2. L'hypothèse du tableau volé (Raoul Ruiz, 1978)
3. Secret défense (Jacques Rivette, 1998)
4. Beoning (Lee Chang-dong, 2018)
5. A Clockwork Orange (Stanley Kubrick, 1971)
6. Holy Motors (Leos Carax, 2012)
7. Nostalghia (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1983)
8. Midaregumo (Mikio Naruse, 1967)
9. Le sang d'un poète (Jean Cocteau, 1932)
10. Conte d'été (Eric Rohmer, 1996)

Great classics that shaped my cinephilia but are no longer in my top 10:
La Passion de Jeanne d'Arc (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1928), Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941), Rashômon (Akira Kurosawa, 1950), Le mépris (Jean-Luc Godard, 1963), Teorema (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1968)

Directors that I love but are not mentioned above: Marcel L'Herbier, Lars von Trier, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Satyajit Ray, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Ousmane Sembene, Agnès Varda, Krzysztof Kieslowski
I've seen only 6 of your top 10 (though 6 of your top 7). I'd be curious to hear more about Secret Defense and A Summer's Tale (I've seen so many Rohmer, but not this one) in particular.
I've seen 7 out of 10 of yours. Blowup is the one I like the most (apart from Tarr and Tarkovsky who are off to an amazing start in this thread!). I've had a terrible experience with Mambety so far but I haven't watched Hyenas, I've heard of it a lot lately, I might prioritize it
"Art is like a fire, it is born from the very thing it burns" - Jean-Luc Godard
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#8

Post by outdoorcats »

Make sure if you watch Hyenas you watch the newly restored version in all its pristine, colorful glory.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
Pretentious Hipster
Donator
Posts: 21183
Joined: October 24th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#9

Post by Pretentious Hipster »

1. A torinói ló [The Turin Horse] (2011)
2. Fuego en Castilla (Tactilvisión del páramo del espanto) [Fire in Castilla (Tactilevision of the Plateau of Fright)] (1960)
3. All That Heaven Allows (1955)
4. Black Harvest (1992)
5. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
6. Hoop Dreams (1994)
7. Восхождение [Ascent] (1977)
8. Vitalina Varela (2019)
9. Combat de boxe (1927)
10. A Woman Under the Influence (1974)
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 12278
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#10

Post by St. Gloede »

This was a fairly hard question honestly, regardless of how many times I have done this. I suppose it is easier to be flippant, when you can list as many films as you want. This is the first time I have had to strip it down to 10 in a long, long time:

Last Year at Marienbad (1961, Alain Resnais)
Le Bonheur (1965, Agnés Varda)
Children of Paradise (1945, Marcel Carné)
The Parallel Street (1962, Ferdinand Khittl)
Heroic Purgatory (1970, Yoshishige Yoshida)
Brand Upon the Brain (2006, Guy Maddin)
Helas pour moi (1993, Jean-Luc Godard)
Chinese Roulette (1976, Rainer Werner Fassbinder)
Eden and After (1970, Alain Robbe-Grillet)
Pierrot le fou (1965, Jean-Luc Godard)

I'd also like to mention Careful, Film Portrait, The Elegant Life of Mr Everyman, Zerkalo, Prenom Carmen, Contempt, Diary of a County Priest, The Conformist, Oedipus Rex, Belle de jour, Dogville, Metropolis and All That Jazz (which has the greatest ending of all-time).

*And yes, somehow 6/10 ended up French :unsure:
**And yes, somehow 7/10 ended up being released 1961-1970 :whistling:
User avatar
Onderhond
Posts: 6584
Joined: December 23rd, 2012, 7:00 am
Contact:

#11

Post by Onderhond »

01. Avalon by Mamoru Oshii

"It's the ultimate live action film, made by a seasoned animator, a director who fully understands and exploits the power and appeal of an all-enveloping atmosphere."

Image


02. Enter the Void by Gaspar Noé

"Whether you will fully appreciate Noé's film depends on your stamina and your ability to handle his extremely direct approach, but just on a cinematic level alone there is so much to enjoy here."

Image


03. Honey PuPu by Hung-I Chen

"Everything is a mash-up, a mix, a collage of ideas and perceptions, some personal, some found elsewhere. Watching this executed by a talented director is a truly unique experience"

Image


04. Dolls by Takeshi Kitano

"Dolls is a tragedy wrapped up in a very stylish and atmospheric cocoon, allowing the audience to be swamped by its sadness, but without ever letting go off the beauty that surrounds it."

Image


05. Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence by Mamoru Oshii

"Innocence is a cinematic celebration. It's an audiovisual delight, it's thematically sound and rich and it invites you to watch and enjoy it time and time again."

Image


06. Tokyo.sora by Hiroshi Ishikawa

"As far as realistic drama goes, this is as close to perfection as I've seen. If you're into Japanese dramas and you haven't seen this yet, there is no better film I could recommend."

Image


07. Dead Leaves by Hiroyuki Imaishi

"Fans of animation and high adrenaline cinema owe it to themselves to check this one out, as long as you embrace its juvenile pleasures, Dead Leaves serves pure and unadulterated bliss."

Image


08. Umfeld by Scott Pagano, Jochem Paap

"There's simply nothing out there that matches the experience of submerging yourself in 56 minutes of moody, ambient glitches tailored to wildly morphing abstract visuals."

Image


09. Tetsuo: The Iron Man by Shinya Tsukamoto

"Tsukamoto's Tetsuo is an almost perfect cyberpunk endeavor, sporting lush black and white visuals and a superb industrial soundtrack, while providing a nerve-wrecking and overwhelming experience."

Image


10. Reconstruction by Christoffer Boe

"Reconstruction is a warm, fuzzy and romantic film, set in a world of cold bewilderment and intrigue, scoring high marks in just about every department that matters"

Image

For the other 640 you can check the links in my signature :)
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#12

Post by outdoorcats »

Pretentious Hipster wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:45 pm 1. A torinói ló [The Turin Horse] (2011)
2. Fuego en Castilla (Tactilvisión del páramo del espanto) [Fire in Castilla (Tactilevision of the Plateau of Fright)] (1960)
3. All That Heaven Allows (1955)
4. Black Harvest (1992)
5. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
6. Hoop Dreams (1994)
7. Восхождение [Ascent] (1977)
8. Vitalina Varela (2019)
9. Combat de boxe (1927)
10. A Woman Under the Influence (1974)
Still haven't seen The Turin Horse, inexplicably.
Fuego en Castilla / Black Harvest - Never heard of these, what can you tell me about them?
All That Heaven Allows - I'm really bad on Sirk, even though Imitation of Life was an early favorite
2001 - Great choice, an amazing film
Hoop Dreams - Classic documentary
Ascent - Another great choice, an intense and disturbing experience
Vitalina Varela - Still the only Costa film I've seen is his first
Combat de boxe - Good short, interesting choice for a top 10. What about it did you love?
Woman Under the Influence - Another great film, intense and powerful

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#13

Post by outdoorcats »

St. Gloede wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:47 pm This was a fairly hard question honestly, regardless of how many times I have done this. I suppose it is easier to be flippant, when you can list as many films as you want. This is the first time I have had to strip it down to 10 in a long, long time:

Last Year at Marienbad (1961, Alain Resnais)
Le Bonheur (1965, Agnés Varda)
Children of Paradise (1945, Marcel Carné)
The Parallel Street (1962, Ferdinand Khittl)
Heroic Purgatory (1970, Yoshishige Yoshida)
Brand Upon the Brain (2006, Guy Maddin)
Helas pour moi (1993, Jean-Luc Godard)
Chinese Roulette (1976, Rainer Werner Fassbinder)
Eden and After (1970, Alain Robbe-Grillet)
Pierrot le fou (1965, Jean-Luc Godard)

I'd also like to mention Careful, Film Portrait, The Elegant Life of Mr Everyman, Zerkalo, Prenom Carmen, Contempt, Diary of a County Priest, The Conformist, Oedipus Rex, Belle de jour, Dogville, Metropolis and All That Jazz (which has the greatest ending of all-time).

*And yes, somehow 6/10 ended up French :unsure:
**And yes, somehow 7/10 ended up being released 1961-1970 :whistling:
Is the list ranked or unranked?

I've seen only 4 of your top 10 - Marienbad, Children of Paradise, Eden and After, and Pierrot - but I thought they were all at least excellent. Which should I prioritize?

Second mention of Heroic Purgatory, you guys are starting to make me feel a little unfashionable here. :D

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
Pretentious Hipster
Donator
Posts: 21183
Joined: October 24th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#14

Post by Pretentious Hipster »

outdoorcats wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:51 pm
Pretentious Hipster wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:45 pm 1. A torinói ló [The Turin Horse] (2011)
2. Fuego en Castilla (Tactilvisión del páramo del espanto) [Fire in Castilla (Tactilevision of the Plateau of Fright)] (1960)
3. All That Heaven Allows (1955)
4. Black Harvest (1992)
5. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
6. Hoop Dreams (1994)
7. Восхождение [Ascent] (1977)
8. Vitalina Varela (2019)
9. Combat de boxe (1927)
10. A Woman Under the Influence (1974)
Still haven't seen The Turin Horse, inexplicably.
Fuego en Castilla / Black Harvest - Never heard of these, what can you tell me about them?
All That Heaven Allows - I'm really bad on Sirk, even though Imitation of Life was an early favorite
2001 - Great choice, an amazing film
Hoop Dreams - Classic documentary
Ascent - Another great choice, an intense and disturbing experience
Vitalina Varela - Still the only Costa film I've seen is his first
Combat de boxe - Good short, interesting choice for a top 10. What about it did you love?
Woman Under the Influence - Another great film, intense and powerful
Fuego en Castilla and Combat de boxe are avant-garde shorts that I simply love for visceral reasons. I think experimental cinema shines the most with that kind of stuff.

Black Harvest is huge in this forum. It's a documentary that pretty much shows present day colonialism and capitalist exploitation. It follows a man who lives near a papau new guinea tribe. He's half white and half of the tribe and uses that to his advantage to fuck them over to better his own wealth. There are many twist and turns as well that have nothing to do with the main plot, and it becomes even more engaging than Hoop Dreams.
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#15

Post by outdoorcats »

Onderhond wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:50 pm
Spoiler
01. Avalon by Mamoru Oshii

"It's the ultimate live action film, made by a seasoned animator, a director who fully understands and exploits the power and appeal of an all-enveloping atmosphere."

Image


02. Enter the Void by Gaspar Noé

"Whether you will fully appreciate Noé's film depends on your stamina and your ability to handle his extremely direct approach, but just on a cinematic level alone there is so much to enjoy here."

Image


03. Honey PuPu by Hung-I Chen

"Everything is a mash-up, a mix, a collage of ideas and perceptions, some personal, some found elsewhere. Watching this executed by a talented director is a truly unique experience"

Image


04. Dolls by Takeshi Kitano

"Dolls is a tragedy wrapped up in a very stylish and atmospheric cocoon, allowing the audience to be swamped by its sadness, but without ever letting go off the beauty that surrounds it."

Image


05. Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence by Mamoru Oshii

"Innocence is a cinematic celebration. It's an audiovisual delight, it's thematically sound and rich and it invites you to watch and enjoy it time and time again."

Image


06. Tokyo.sora by Hiroshi Ishikawa

"As far as realistic drama goes, this is as close to perfection as I've seen. If you're into Japanese dramas and you haven't seen this yet, there is no better film I could recommend."

Image


07. Dead Leaves by Hiroyuki Imaishi

"Fans of animation and high adrenaline cinema owe it to themselves to check this one out, as long as you embrace its juvenile pleasures, Dead Leaves serves pure and unadulterated bliss."

Image


08. Umfeld by Scott Pagano, Jochem Paap

"There's simply nothing out there that matches the experience of submerging yourself in 56 minutes of moody, ambient glitches tailored to wildly morphing abstract visuals."

Image


09. Tetsuo: The Iron Man by Shinya Tsukamoto

"Tsukamoto's Tetsuo is an almost perfect cyberpunk endeavor, sporting lush black and white visuals and a superb industrial soundtrack, while providing a nerve-wrecking and overwhelming experience."

Image


10. Reconstruction by Christoffer Boe

"Reconstruction is a warm, fuzzy and romantic film, set in a world of cold bewilderment and intrigue, scoring high marks in just about every department that matters"

Image

For the other 640 you can check the links in my signature :)
Thanks for including screenshots, it's often visuals that tip the balance to whether I want to watch a film or not. From your list (from which I've only seen Tetsuo), Avalon and Ghost in the Shell look the most interesting. I really liked the first Ghost in the Shell but was a bit caught off guard by the ending. I understand the adage of 'leave em wanting more' but it felt a bit incomplete to me.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#16

Post by outdoorcats »

Pretentious Hipster wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:56 pm
outdoorcats wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:51 pm
Pretentious Hipster wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:45 pm 1. A torinói ló [The Turin Horse] (2011)
2. Fuego en Castilla (Tactilvisión del páramo del espanto) [Fire in Castilla (Tactilevision of the Plateau of Fright)] (1960)
3. All That Heaven Allows (1955)
4. Black Harvest (1992)
5. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
6. Hoop Dreams (1994)
7. Восхождение [Ascent] (1977)
8. Vitalina Varela (2019)
9. Combat de boxe (1927)
10. A Woman Under the Influence (1974)
Still haven't seen The Turin Horse, inexplicably.
Fuego en Castilla / Black Harvest - Never heard of these, what can you tell me about them?
All That Heaven Allows - I'm really bad on Sirk, even though Imitation of Life was an early favorite
2001 - Great choice, an amazing film
Hoop Dreams - Classic documentary
Ascent - Another great choice, an intense and disturbing experience
Vitalina Varela - Still the only Costa film I've seen is his first
Combat de boxe - Good short, interesting choice for a top 10. What about it did you love?
Woman Under the Influence - Another great film, intense and powerful
Fuego en Castilla and Combat de boxe are avant-garde shorts that I simply love for visceral reasons. I think experimental cinema shines the most with that kind of stuff.

Black Harvest is huge in this forum. It's a documentary that pretty much shows present day colonialism and capitalist exploitation. It follows a man who lives near a papau new guinea tribe. He's half white and half of the tribe and uses that to his advantage to fuck them over to better his own wealth. There are many twist and turns as well that have nothing to do with the main plot, and it becomes even more engaging than Hoop Dreams.
I see that Kanopy has the whole trilogy of films that ends with Black Harvest. That actually looks fascinating.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
beavis
Posts: 2843
Joined: June 20th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Contact:

#17

Post by beavis »

outdoorcats wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:39 pm Heroic Purgatory - I was halfway through a full career retrospective of Yoshida when I got sidetracked; started at the beginning at stopped and Woman of the Lake. I'll get to it...
Yoshida started out good, but he became really next level good somewhere around Joen (1967). He made his masterpieces when he started collaborating with writer Masahiro Yamada of which Erosu Purasu Gyakusatsu (1969) and Rengoku Eroica (1970) are the best, and closed off this period of his career when he reached the peak of his aesthetic style in Kaigenrei (1973), after which he took an extended break, seemingly done everything he could. For me Rengoku Eroica is the most perfect of these movies. And luckily there is already someone here to back me up on this. But I only saw the shorter version of Eros Purasu Gyakusatsu in cinema, so the longer version is getting a second chance whenever I'll be in the perfect mood for it.
User avatar
pitchorneirda
Posts: 799
Joined: February 11th, 2019, 12:07 pm
Location: France
Contact:

#18

Post by pitchorneirda »

@Onderhond: We have very different tastes obviously but Dolls is a truly good movie that is really underrated!
I remember watching it thanks to a blog called Shangols and back then I thought their tastes were well shared but I was very sad to discover they weren't. It's a shame Kitano is almost never mentioned besides Hanabi (which is so-so imo...)
"Art is like a fire, it is born from the very thing it burns" - Jean-Luc Godard
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 12278
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#19

Post by St. Gloede »

outdoorcats wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:55 pm
St. Gloede wrote: October 25th, 2020, 10:47 pm This was a fairly hard question honestly, regardless of how many times I have done this. I suppose it is easier to be flippant, when you can list as many films as you want. This is the first time I have had to strip it down to 10 in a long, long time:

Last Year at Marienbad (1961, Alain Resnais)
Le Bonheur (1965, Agnés Varda)
Children of Paradise (1945, Marcel Carné)
The Parallel Street (1962, Ferdinand Khittl)
Heroic Purgatory (1970, Yoshishige Yoshida)
Brand Upon the Brain (2006, Guy Maddin)
Helas pour moi (1993, Jean-Luc Godard)
Chinese Roulette (1976, Rainer Werner Fassbinder)
Eden and After (1970, Alain Robbe-Grillet)
Pierrot le fou (1965, Jean-Luc Godard)

I'd also like to mention Careful, Film Portrait, The Elegant Life of Mr Everyman, Zerkalo, Prenom Carmen, Contempt, Diary of a County Priest, The Conformist, Oedipus Rex, Belle de jour, Dogville, Metropolis and All That Jazz (which has the greatest ending of all-time).

*And yes, somehow 6/10 ended up French :unsure:
**And yes, somehow 7/10 ended up being released 1961-1970 :whistling:
Is the list ranked or unranked?

I've seen only 4 of your top 10 - Marienbad, Children of Paradise, Eden and After, and Pierrot - but I thought they were all at least excellent. Which should I prioritize?

Second mention of Heroic Purgatory, you guys are starting to make me feel a little unfashionable here. :D
Yes, for all intents and purposes it is ranked.

I think you will undoubtedly love Heroic Purgatory, and most like The Parallel Street as well, so those would be my prioritized recommendations.
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#20

Post by outdoorcats »

beavis wrote: October 25th, 2020, 11:25 pm
Yoshida started out good, but he became really next level good somewhere around Joen (1967).
So in other words, I stopped at exactly the wrong point. Dammit! :angry: :lol:
St. Gloede wrote: October 25th, 2020, 11:42 pm I think you will undoubtedly love Heroic Purgatory, and most like The Parallel Street as well, so those would be my prioritized recommendations.
OK, they're definitely points of interest.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
mightysparks
Site Admin
Posts: 31391
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Perth, WA, Australia
Contact:

#21

Post by mightysparks »

It's unlikely my top 10 will ever be made of films I saw after I was 20 (I've only given one 10/10 since then), except for maybe when I'm in my 50s/60s and they've had time to marinade and prove themselves, so it hasn't changed a lot over the years.

1. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)
2. Festen (1998)
3. A Clockwork Orange (1971)
4. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
5. From Dusk Till Dawn (1996)
6. An American Werewolf in London (1981)
7. Le samouraï (1967)
8. Dawn of the Dead (1978)
9. Pulp Fiction (1994)
10. Sex, Lies, and Videotape (1989)
"I do not always know what I want, but I do know what I don't want." - Stanley Kubrick

iCM | IMDb | LastFM | TSZDT

Image
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#22

Post by outdoorcats »

mightysparks wrote: October 26th, 2020, 12:17 am It's unlikely my top 10 will ever be made of films I saw after I was 20 (I've only given one 10/10 since then), except for maybe when I'm in my 50s/60s and they've had time to marinade and prove themselves, so it hasn't changed a lot over the years.

1. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)
2. Festen (1998)
3. A Clockwork Orange (1971)
4. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
5. From Dusk Till Dawn (1996)
6. An American Werewolf in London (1981)
7. Le samouraï (1967)
8. Dawn of the Dead (1978)
9. Pulp Fiction (1994)
10. Sex, Lies, and Videotape (1989)
Great list of films. I've seen 8 of them - haven't seen Festen or sex, lies, and videotape. 2001 and Dawn of the Dead are also favorites.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
prodigalgodson
Posts: 848
Joined: July 30th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Los Angeles
Contact:

#23

Post by prodigalgodson »

Just off the top...

1. Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)
2. Floating Clouds (Mikio Naruse, 1955)
3. Andrei Rublev (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1966)
4. West of the Tracks (Wang Bing, 2003)
5. Inca Light (Robert Fulton, 1972)
6. Lancelot du Lac (Robert Bresson, 1975)
7. India Song (Margeurite Duras, 1975)
8. The Leopard (Luchino Visconti, 1963)
9. Barry Lyndon (Stanley Kubrick, 1975)
10. The Big Lebowski (Ethan and Joel Coen, 1998)
User avatar
Onderhond
Posts: 6584
Joined: December 23rd, 2012, 7:00 am
Contact:

#24

Post by Onderhond »

outdoorcats wrote: October 25th, 2020, 11:00 pm Thanks for including screenshots, it's often visuals that tip the balance to whether I want to watch a film or not.
Yeah, same here. Most of my choices are based on a poster and 2 or 3 screenshots.
outdoorcats wrote: October 25th, 2020, 11:00 pm I really liked the first Ghost in the Shell but was a bit caught off guard by the ending. I understand the adage of 'leave em wanting more' but it felt a bit incomplete to me.
I think it works well as an origin story. Maybe it's because the ending isn't really your typical climax? There's the fight with the armoured tank of course, but after that it becomes quite talkative and mellow and then it's just one scene and it's done. I quite like the rhythm of the film, including the fact that it doesn't follow a more traditional build-up, but I can image the ending can feel quite sudden.

The second film isn't a basic sequel either, but if only for a couple of memorable scenes essential viewing imo :)
pitchorneirda wrote: October 25th, 2020, 11:26 pm @Onderhond: We have very different tastes obviously but Dolls is a truly good movie that is really underrated!
I remember watching it thanks to a blog called Shangols and back then I thought their tastes were well shared but I was very sad to discover they weren't. It's a shame Kitano is almost never mentioned besides Hanabi (which is so-so imo...)
I'm a pretty big Kitano fan in general, but this one has always stood out for me. Kikujiro is also pretty popular, no?
User avatar
mightysparks
Site Admin
Posts: 31391
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Perth, WA, Australia
Contact:

#25

Post by mightysparks »

Onderhond wrote: October 26th, 2020, 8:36 am
outdoorcats wrote: October 25th, 2020, 11:00 pm Thanks for including screenshots, it's often visuals that tip the balance to whether I want to watch a film or not.
Yeah, same here. Most of my choices are based on a poster and 2 or 3 screenshots.
And I never look at posters or screenshots :P
"I do not always know what I want, but I do know what I don't want." - Stanley Kubrick

iCM | IMDb | LastFM | TSZDT

Image
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 12278
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#26

Post by St. Gloede »

I have to give Onderhond credit for not just the screenshots, but the composition of the screenshot. I'm for instance not at all a fan of Tetsuo, but this set of images really makes me want to rewatch it. I think I should just make a point of completing Onderhond's favourites in the next Japan challenge as, quite like me, he seems to lean heavily towards one country when it comes to top favourites.

(and for the record, visuals are usually the main way I decide to watch or get excited about something too - beyond word of mouth/trusted opinions.
User avatar
Lammetje
Donator
Posts: 4198
Joined: October 4th, 2013, 6:00 am
Location: Poland
Contact:

#27

Post by Lammetje »

1. The Godfather (1972)
2. 12 Angry Men (1957)
3. Titanic (1997)
4. The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
5. A Beautiful Mind (2001)
6. The Sting (1973)
7. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
8. Sen to Chihiro no kamikakushi (2001)
9. Bakushû (1951)
10. Safety Last! (1923)

Basically a mix of mainstream trash and midbrow. ^_^

By the way, here is a thread with miscellaneous top 10s. I'm getting all nostalgic reading through those old posts again...
iCM | IMDb | Last.fm | Listal

Image
OldAle1 wrote:I think four Aamir Khan films is enough for me. Unless I'm down to one film left on the IMDb Top 250 at some point and he's in that last film, at which point I'll watch it and then shoot myself having become the official-check-whoring person I hate.
More memorable quotes
PeacefulAnarchy wrote:Active topics is the devil. Please use the forums and subforums as intended and peruse all the topics nicely sorted by topic, not just the currently popular ones displayed in a jumbled mess.
maxwelldeux wrote:If you asked me to kill my wife and pets OR watch Minions, I'd check the runtime and inquire about sobriety requirements before providing an answer.
Torgo wrote:Lammetje is some kind of hybrid Anna-Kendrick-lamb-entity to me and I find that very cool.
monty wrote:If you can't take the heat, get out of the kitchen. iCM ain't for sissies.
mightysparks wrote:ARGH. RARGH. RARGH. DIE.
Kowry wrote:Thanks, Art Garfunky.
Rich wrote:*runs*
User avatar
nimimerkillinen
Posts: 2365
Joined: December 30th, 2011, 7:00 am
Location: Vantaa, Finland
Contact:

#28

Post by nimimerkillinen »

in no order

2001: A Space Odyssey
A Man Escaped
A Woman Under the Influence
Satantango
Stalker
The Lovers on the Bridge
Naked
Two-Lane Blacktop
The Servant
Gummo
User avatar
Onderhond
Posts: 6584
Joined: December 23rd, 2012, 7:00 am
Contact:

#29

Post by Onderhond »

St. Gloede wrote: October 26th, 2020, 8:50 am I have to give Onderhond credit for not just the screenshots, but the composition of the screenshot.
Thanks! Though I'm not sure if I can take too much credit there. These are automatically generated composites from the screenshots I take for reviews. These shots are chosen separately, and apart from a quick look at the color story I don't really pay attention to the composition of the combined shots :)
St. Gloede wrote: October 26th, 2020, 8:50 am I think I should just make a point of completing Onderhond's favourites in the next Japan challenge
With a cut-off I hope, currently that list is 275 entries long B)
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 12278
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#30

Post by St. Gloede »

Onderhond wrote: October 26th, 2020, 10:26 am
St. Gloede wrote: October 26th, 2020, 8:50 am I have to give Onderhond credit for not just the screenshots, but the composition of the screenshot.
Thanks! Though I'm not sure if I can take too much credit there. These are automatically generated composites from the screenshots I take for reviews. These shots are chosen separately, and apart from a quick look at the color story I don't really pay attention to the composition of the combined shots :)
Oh, I think you can take full credit for that - you picked them! Love the set-up.
St. Gloede wrote: October 26th, 2020, 8:50 am I think I should just make a point of completing Onderhond's favourites in the next Japan challenge
With a cut-off I hope, currently that list is 275 entries long B)
Can I just say that the way your site works is absolutely incredible? Love it!

And surprising to see the inclusion of My Neighbours the Yamadas :wub:

I'll definitely work on the top 10 there. Only seen 2 ...
User avatar
sol
Donator
Posts: 11209
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Perth, WA, Australia
Contact:

#31

Post by sol »

1. Videodrome / 1983 / David Cronenberg
Image

2. Fanny and Alexander / 1982 / Ingmar Bergman
Image

3. Solaris / 1972 / Andrei Tarkovsky
Image

4. Scream Quadrilogy / 1996-2011 / Wes Craven
Image

5. Eyes Wide Shut / 1999 / Stanley Kubrick
Image

6. 2001: A Space Odyssey / 1968 / Stanley Kubrick
Image

7. The Last Picture Show / 1971 / Peter Bogdanovich
Image

8. The Conversation / 1974 / Francis Ford Coppola
Image

9. The Night of the Hunter / 1955 / Charles Laughton
Image

10. Crimes and Misdemeanors / 1989 / Woody Allen
Image
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
Image Image Image
User avatar
Onderhond
Posts: 6584
Joined: December 23rd, 2012, 7:00 am
Contact:

#32

Post by Onderhond »

Cheater :P
User avatar
sol
Donator
Posts: 11209
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Perth, WA, Australia
Contact:

#33

Post by sol »

Yeah, but those took me ages to search for and compile. :rolleyes: I think I would have done better taking my own epitome screenshots. :unsure:
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
Image Image Image
User avatar
Onderhond
Posts: 6584
Joined: December 23rd, 2012, 7:00 am
Contact:

#34

Post by Onderhond »

No no, I meant 4. Scream Quadrilogy / 1996-2011 / Wes Craven. :)
St. Gloede wrote: October 26th, 2020, 10:37 am Can I just say that the way your site works is absolutely incredible? Love it!
Thanks, always glad to hear that :sweat:
St. Gloede wrote: October 26th, 2020, 10:37 am And surprising to see the inclusion of My Neighbours the Yamadas :wub:
Really? It's been my favorite Ghibli (maybe together with Grave ot Fireflies) since forever. I even had one of the Basho quotes as my signature for a while I think (art is brief, life is long). But looking forward to the Japanese challenge then, at least my top-rated ones shouldn't be that hard to track down :)
Last edited by Onderhond on October 26th, 2020, 11:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
sol
Donator
Posts: 11209
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Perth, WA, Australia
Contact:

#35

Post by sol »

Oohh, well I actually do have them separate in my "actual" top movies list, but for the purposes of this thread, why not? They work immensely well as a singular work; I have watched them either back-to-back or near back-to-back on a yearly basis for.... 8 years now (?) or something like that.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
Image Image Image
User avatar
Ivan0716
Posts: 1250
Joined: February 5th, 2012, 7:00 am
Contact:

#36

Post by Ivan0716 »

1. Once Upon a Time in the West (1969, Sergio Leone)
2. Le samourai (1967, Jean-Pierre Melville)
3. The Cranes are Flying (1957, Mikhail Kalatozov)
4. Fallen Angels (1995, Wong Kar-wai)
5. Persona (1966, Ingmar Bergman)
6. The Double Life of Veronique (1991, Krzysztof Kieślowski)
7. Viridiana (1960, Luis Bunuel)
8. The Mirror (1975, Andrei Tarkovsky)
9. Sunset (2018, László Nemes)
10. Pierrot le fou (1965, Jean-Luc Godard)
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#37

Post by outdoorcats »

prodigalgodson wrote: October 26th, 2020, 4:38 am Just off the top...

1. Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)
2. Floating Clouds (Mikio Naruse, 1955)
3. Andrei Rublev (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1966)
4. West of the Tracks (Wang Bing, 2003)
5. Inca Light (Robert Fulton, 1972)
6. Lancelot du Lac (Robert Bresson, 1975)
7. India Song (Margeurite Duras, 1975)
8. The Leopard (Luchino Visconti, 1963)
9. Barry Lyndon (Stanley Kubrick, 1975)
10. The Big Lebowski (Ethan and Joel Coen, 1998)
I've seen 6 and they're all great. I've never heard of Inca Light though the name Robert Fulton rings a bell.
-Oh, right, I still haven't seen a single Naruse. Thanks for the guilty reminder. :ermm:
-Barry Lyndon was for years my #1 favorite film.
-Vertigo was one of several films I wanted to squeeze into my list, just outside my top 10. It seems weird to leave out a film that I basically think is perfect. But all the films on my list are perfect, so :shrug: (u)

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
outdoorcats
Posts: 1453
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#38

Post by outdoorcats »

Lammetje wrote: October 26th, 2020, 10:00 am 1. The Godfather (1972)
2. 12 Angry Men (1957)
3. Titanic (1997)
4. The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
5. A Beautiful Mind (2001)
6. The Sting (1973)
7. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
8. Sen to Chihiro no kamikakushi (2001)
9. Bakushû (1951)
10. Safety Last! (1923)

Basically a mix of mainstream trash and midbrow. ^_^

By the way, here is a thread with miscellaneous top 10s. I'm getting all nostalgic reading through those old posts again...
Is this what's considered mainstream trash on ICM? ;) I've seen 8 - not yet seen A Beautiful Mind or Safety Last! - but all films I really like. I'm a HUGE fan of Spirited Away, it's such an amazing film, and it's sort of special to me because I saw it in theaters when I was a kid (of course, it scared the pants off me but also blew my mind).
nimimerkillinen wrote: October 26th, 2020, 10:24 am in no order

2001: A Space Odyssey
A Man Escaped
A Woman Under the Influence
Satantango
Stalker
The Lovers on the Bridge
Naked
Two-Lane Blacktop
The Servant
Gummo
Definitely some significant overlap with our tastes. I have seen 8, they're all at least excellent, not even a 'very good' among them. So I guess I should prioritize Two Lane Blacktop and The Servant.
sol wrote: October 26th, 2020, 11:08 am
Spoiler
1. Videodrome / 1983 / David Cronenberg
Image

2. Fanny and Alexander / 1982 / Ingmar Bergman
Image

3. Solaris / 1972 / Andrei Tarkovsky
Image

4. Scream Quadrilogy / 1996-2011 / Wes Craven
Image

5. Eyes Wide Shut / 1999 / Stanley Kubrick
Image

6. 2001: A Space Odyssey / 1968 / Stanley Kubrick
Image

7. The Last Picture Show / 1971 / Peter Bogdanovich
Image

8. The Conversation / 1974 / Francis Ford Coppola
Image

9. The Night of the Hunter / 1955 / Charles Laughton
Image

10. Crimes and Misdemeanors / 1989 / Woody Allen
Image
Upping the ante, eh?
-I wouldn't have guessed your #1, that's a unique pick. Between your #1 and #8 I'd guess you'd have an affinity for paranoid thrillers. I assume you've already seen most of Alan J. Pakula's filmography?
-The 4 Scream films is an interesting choice. I finally watched the first one for the first time a couple weeks ago. I'd love to hear what you love about them.
Ivan0716 wrote: October 26th, 2020, 12:03 pm 1. Once Upon a Time in the West (1969, Sergio Leone)
2. Le samourai (1967, Jean-Pierre Melville)
3. The Cranes are Flying (1957, Mikhail Kalatozov)
4. Fallen Angels (1995, Wong Kar-wai)
5. Persona (1966, Ingmar Bergman)
6. The Double Life of Veronique (1991, Krzysztof Kieślowski)
7. Viridiana (1960, Luis Bunuel)
8. The Mirror (1975, Andrei Tarkovsky)
9. Sunset (2018, László Nemes)
10. Pierrot le fou (1965, Jean-Luc Godard)
I actually have an extremely low rating for Viridiana but don't remember why. The others I've seen (haven't seen Cranes, Angels or Sunset) are all great to amazing films.
-If I didn't use a one-film-per-director rule for mine then Mirror would have been on my list.

A lie ain't a 'side of the story.' It's just a lie.
User avatar
OldAle1
Donator
Posts: 5872
Joined: February 9th, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Dairyland, USA
Contact:

#39

Post by OldAle1 »

Sure why not; too lazy for screenshots but none of these are exactly obscure films that you're gonna go "what the hell is that" and have to look up; I'm also going to add the number of viewings at the end (approximate in a couple of cases)

1. La La Land (Damien Chazelle, 2016) 15
2. Out 1, noli me tangere (Jacques Rivette, 1971) 1
3. Dead Man (Jim Jarmusch, 1995) 20
4. Stalker (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1979) 7
5. Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958) 10
6. Once Upon a Time in America (Sergio Leone, 1984) 6
7. Gu ling jie shao nian sha ren shi jian (Edward Yang, 1991) 4
8. The Magnificent Ambersons (Orson Welles, 1942) 6
9. Ordet (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1955) 3
10. Banshun (Yasujirô Ozu, 1949) 2 or 3

I personally find the whole idea of ranked top 10s or whatever less and less useful the older I get; in part I suspect this is because of my relatively (at least compared to most other serious film buffs) positive outlook - I love SO many films that ranking them is very hard, and I love a pretty wide variety of films and comparing them to each other is often impossible; also it's quite rare that I re-watch something I love and end up being disappointed or liking it a lot less. And I have so many loves that can't all be in such a small list that I hate to leave out - no Iranian cinema here, no animation, nothing from the 1960s, no shorts, no experimental/nonnarrative work, only one French film, no Lang or Ruiz. I know I'm not the only one to feel this way, but sometimes it does seem like many people are more readily able to make a "concrete" list and be happy with it. I guess it's a list of films that I have mostly loved for a very long time, and have continued to love, and that I look forward to seeing again and think about seeing again all the time.

So I don't change my list very often - the last time I reworked the top 10 was in the spring of 2017 just around the time I joined this forum, as IMDb killed off it's forums; #1 shot up out of nowhere obviously since it was new, and #10 replaced A Canterbury Tale. Some other films that were in the top 10 at one time or another over the last 30 years include Paths of Glory, It's a Wonderful Life, Defending Your life, Sátántangó, The Falls, L'amour fou (Rivette), Go-yang-i-leul boo-tak-hae, Offret, La règle du jeu and Singin' in the Rain; I think all of these are still in my top 50. Pretty sure Tarkovsky is the only director to ever have two films in the top 10 at once. There are films that have fallen a bit farther from favor such as The Third Man, but that is still in my overall (870+) favorites list.

I've seen all of these films in the cinema except (maybe) #6; you would think I'd remember clearly if I saw that in a theater but I don't - right this second I'd say if pushed that yeah, I did, probably around 1996 or so, but can't be sure. In any case I saw that film and Ordet and The Magnificent Ambersons first on VHS, back in the early 90s probably; the rest were all seen first in 35mm except Out 1 which was seen in it's original 16mm format, and LLL which of course was only shown digitally in commercial release (though I did manage to see it once in 35mm with Chazelle present). The Yang and Rivette films I've only seen in the cinema. The cinema experience is still of overwhelming importance to me and it certainly is a significant part of some of the best viewings on this list including the first viewings of the top 4 films, and in packed or sell-out environments with great audiences.

As to everybody else's lists, I think I've seen at least 6 from each posted so far except Onderhond's and I've seen 4 of his (and liked all of them, though none would be close to all-time favorites at the moment). Unless I'm glossing over something, only 1 film from any of the lists that I strongly dislike (well, hate, actually) and only 3 or 4 others that I would rate below 6. See I told you I was a softie.

Also I think it would be fun to add your "newest contender" - a film that isn't in your top 10 but that blew you away enough that you might have actually thought about putting it there, that might get there in the future - mine is Peter Watkins' 1974 Edvard Munch.
Last edited by OldAle1 on October 26th, 2020, 6:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
joachimt
Donator
Posts: 33724
Joined: February 16th, 2012, 7:00 am
Location: Netherlands
Contact:

#40

Post by joachimt »

Every time I think Onderhond and I are miles apart movie-wise, something surprises me. I've seen 5 of his top 10. I favorited 2 of those 5: Enter the Void and Reconstruction. Tetsuo used to be a favorite as well, but not anymore when I rewatched it.

I watchlisted Dolls.
ICM-profile
Fergenaprido: "I find your OCD to be adorable, J"
Post Reply