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A Top 10 Thread

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beavis
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#41

Post by beavis »

nice one that Munch
personally I might lack a Duras in my top 10 or an Antonioni, both directors are very important for me (so India Song or La Notte then), a top 10 is always too small to be inclusive, that is why I also make longer lists ;) but it is a good tool for yourself to highlight the best of the best; and then an emotional impact of a movie like Trys Dienos is more important than the objective state of flawless beauty that something like India Song brings is... for instance
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#42

Post by Teproc »

Mine is also full of mainstream trash I guess.

1. Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino, 1994)

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2. Tonari no Totoro / My Neighbour Totoro (Hayao Miyazaki, 1988)

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3. Mononoke-hime / Princess Mononoke (Hayao Miyazaki, 1997)

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4. Fargo (Ethan & Joel Coen, 1996)

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5. Sen to Chihiro no kamikakushi / Spirited Away (Hayao Miyazaki, 2001)

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6. Wo hu cang long / Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Ang Lee, 2000)

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7. Tengoku to jigoku / High and Low (Akira Kurosawa, 1963)

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8. The Matrix (Lana & Lilly Wachowski, 1999)

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9. Il buono, il brutto, il cattivo / The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (Sergio Leone, 1966)

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10. Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1954)

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#43

Post by OldAle1 »

joachimt wrote: October 26th, 2020, 3:11 pm Every time I think Onderhond and I are miles apart movie-wise, something surprises me. I've seen 5 of his top 10. I favorited 2 of those 5: Enter the Void and Reconstruction. Tetsuo used to be a favorite as well, but not anymore when I rewatched it.

I watchlisted Dolls.
I doubt there's anybody who is Onderhond's opposite here, though it's possible his taste is the most divergent from the "norm", if that could be measured somehow. Somebody with no interest in East Asian cinema or much of anything made after the 1980s I guess, but I can't think of anybody like that here (IRL yes - I have a friend who won't watch anything at all made after 1980 and the only foreign stuff he typically watches is French noir and 30s-40s stuff, and maybe some Italian spy movies). I'm with you probably overall - I definitely overlap with him on enough films to make his opinions on certain things worthwhile to me, particularly anime and maybe more mainstream crime/drama stuff. We're pretty different in our taste for action and big FX-driven things, and maybe horror - apart from the typical difference in our approach to anything older, obviously.

Dolls has been on my to-see list since before I was on this forum - have liked Kitano since the 90s though I've been *very* slow to watch more films, that's one of the problems when you aren't a specialist. Also Reconstruction, another film on my to-see list for ages, not sure why I haven't gotten to that yet.
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#44

Post by Onderhond »

I get the impression it's because I actively dislike many films on people's favorite lists, rather than people disliking many films on my favorites list (though I'm sure that's also because there's some obscure genre work that would people here would dislike when they actually watched it). Which is completely normal of course :)
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#45

Post by OldAle1 »

Onderhond wrote: October 26th, 2020, 3:56 pm I get the impression it's because I actively dislike many films on people's favorite lists, rather than people disliking many films on my favorites list (though I'm sure that's also because there's some obscure genre work that would people here would dislike when they actually watched it). Which is completely normal of course :)
Yeah that's probably it for the most part, though we all ought to be used to having people disagree with our own tastes if we know anybody who isn't a hardcore cineaste either IRL or online; I mean most of the lists here contain mostly or entirely films that Joe Sixpack hasn't heard of, doesn't want to know about, and will just thing you're a weirdo for liking. Almost nobody IRL would know any of my top 10 except for #1, and that's only because it's fairly recent.

What makes your taste unusual in my experience is your combination of a focus on films that are neither from your own culture/country or the USA, AND your distaste for older films. I've never encountered that before IRL and I don't recall it online offhand. That guy (ebossert, was that his name) I've discussed with you at least once who has a YT channel and reviews Asian films for example - while he does focus mostly on new stuff, I know from interacting with him on IMDb that he liked Naruse, Ozu, Mizoguchi, Suzuki, Masumura, etc, as well (not Akira Kurosawa, curiously enough). And I had a friend in college who was developing into a big Japanophile and really liked older samurai films just as much as newer anime (probably Robotech or Gundam at that time period). On the other hand the typical video store customers I had between 87-97 only wanted the brand-new - but only the brand-new from their own, American culture. So your disdain for old stuff + focus on something outside the USA/France/Belgium, that's just something I've personally never encountered.
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#46

Post by Mulholland »

Teproc wrote: October 26th, 2020, 3:30 pm Mine is also full of mainstream trash I guess.
Thank you for posting your Top 10. Makes me feel like I won't be ridiculed mercilessly for my Top 10 because we share so much.



1. Sunset Boulevard (1950)
2. My Neighbour Totoro (1988)
3. Spirited Away (2001)
4. Gone With the Wind (1939)
5. Beauty and the Beast (1991)
6. Fargo (1996)
7. Princess Mononoke (1997)
8. Inside Out (2015)
9. Amélie (2001)
10. The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)
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#47

Post by Onderhond »

OldAle1 wrote: October 26th, 2020, 4:10 pm though we all ought to be used to having people disagree with our own tastes if we know anybody who isn't a hardcore cineaste either IRL or online; I mean most of the lists here contain mostly or entirely films that Joe Sixpack hasn't heard of, doesn't want to know about, and will just thing you're a weirdo for liking. Almost nobody IRL would know any of my top 10 except for #1, and that's only because it's fairly recent.
I think most cinephiles aren't that used to people disagreeing with their taste to be honest, at least not actively. Usually there's the excuse that the other party hasn't seen a film or enough films from a certain director to make a real argument, meaning regular Joe's Top 10 looks the way it does simply because he hasn't seen "better" films. In my experience, cinephiles deal pretty badly with statements like "Hitchcock is too obvious" or "Kurosawa's action scenes are bland", especially when their first go-to excuse isn't panning out.
OldAle1 wrote: October 26th, 2020, 4:10 pmSo your disdain for old stuff + focus on something outside the USA/France/Belgium, that's just something I've personally never encountered.
I've seen it in some HK and anime fans, but they never really ventured outside of their niche, so you don't really run into them unless you're into a specific niche. I'm a bit more strong-willed than most in keeping on wanting to explore certain niches, even when I don't really like them and I don't cover up my opinions to avoid discussions either.

But yeah, if you ever meet someone like me online, do introduce me to him! :D
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#48

Post by Torgo »

How absurd that with all our Top 1000s, Top 500s, genre polls, country polls, decade polls and digging up of obscure gems we seem to have been missing the classic of all lists in a while: "Name your favorite movies!"

I like to see so many mentions of Stalker, 2001 and Satantango around here. :sweat:
mightysparks wrote: October 26th, 2020, 12:17 am It's unlikely my top 10 will ever be made of films I saw after I was 20 (I've only given one 10/10 since then), except for maybe when I'm in my 50s/60s and they've had time to marinade and prove themselves, so it hasn't changed a lot over the years.
I can relate to this.
Never had a film impact me as much as in my years of adolescence. These were my last, true 10/10; as much as I'd like to make room for new discoveries, it would physically hurt to sort them out. Perhaps I've seen better films since then - did I love them as much? I doubt so.
Also haven't even tried to do this Top 10 thing since around that time. Might give it a shot later.
Teproc wrote: October 26th, 2020, 3:30 pm Mine is also full of mainstream trash I guess.
Disgusting!
:P
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#49

Post by Traveller »

This has been, for a long while, my top 10.

1. The Man Who Sleeps (1974)
2. In the Mood for Love (2000)
3. Fallen Angels (1995)
4. Yi yi (2000)
5. Red Desert (1964)
6. 3-Iron (2004)
7. Woman in the Dunes (1964)
8. Stalker (1979)
9. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
10. The Turin Horse (2011)
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#50

Post by Lammetje »

outdoorcats wrote: October 26th, 2020, 1:46 pm
Lammetje wrote: October 26th, 2020, 10:00 am 1. The Godfather (1972)
2. 12 Angry Men (1957)
3. Titanic (1997)
4. The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
5. A Beautiful Mind (2001)
6. The Sting (1973)
7. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
8. Sen to Chihiro no kamikakushi (2001)
9. Bakushû (1951)
10. Safety Last! (1923)

Basically a mix of mainstream trash and midbrow. ^_^

By the way, here is a thread with miscellaneous top 10s. I'm getting all nostalgic reading through those old posts again...
Is this what's considered mainstream trash on ICM? ;) I've seen 8 - not yet seen A Beautiful Mind or Safety Last! - but all films I really like. I'm a HUGE fan of Spirited Away, it's such an amazing film, and it's sort of special to me because I saw it in theaters when I was a kid (of course, it scared the pants off me but also blew my mind).
Well, I'd consider #3, 4, 5 and 7 mainstream. 'Mainstream trash' is kind of an iCM meme. :P Also, after seeing your top 10 I wouldn't have thought you like Titanic. :)
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#51

Post by Torgo »

Two things would seem interesting to me to provide only the least of context for all those Top 10s:

1. Your age (if you don't mind, of course!)
2. Your feature films seen (approx.)


Does it really play that much of a role? You can be 26 years old with 1500 features seen, rate Star Wars* as the greatest film of all time and that opinion would be perfectly valid. Does it have another vibe when approaching your 50s and 7000 films with dozens list completed? It does, somehow.
Just an idea, if some of you participants are up to it. :sweat:


*Episode I, what else!
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#52

Post by St. Gloede »

Sure:

1. 30
2. 10,000+
Last Year at Marienbad (1961, Alain Resnais)
Le Bonheur (1965, Agnés Varda)
Children of Paradise (1945, Marcel Carné)
The Parallel Street (1962, Ferdinand Khittl)
Heroic Purgatory (1970, Yoshishige Yoshida)
Brand Upon the Brain (2006, Guy Maddin)
Helas pour moi (1993, Jean-Luc Godard)
Chinese Roulette (1976, Rainer Werner Fassbinder)
Eden and After (1970, Alain Robbe-Grillet)
Pierrot le fou (1965, Jean-Luc Godard)
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#53

Post by OldAle1 »

1. 54 until Election Day
2. about 9,400
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#54

Post by peeptoad »

Torgo wrote: October 26th, 2020, 4:51 pm 1. Your age (if you don't mind, of course!)
2. Your feature films seen (approx.)
OK...

1. 49
2. ~4000 (conservative guess since I have 3500+checked/rated, but only started logging films in 2012)



I need to refine the order slightly for my top 10, but this is close-
1. Alien (1979)
2. Easy Rider (1969)
3. Psycho (1960)
4. Diabolique (1955)
5. Christiane F. (1981)
6. Le désordre et la nuit (1958)
7. Angel Heart (1987)
8. The Thing (1982)
9. Angst (1983)
10. The Wicker Man (1973)

Repulsion 65, Wake in Fright 71, Blowup 66, Der Fan 81, Goodfellas 90, Profondo Rosso 75, (and several others) are all close enough that they could toggle into the bottom 3-5 slots somewhere on any given day...
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#55

Post by beavis »

44 years and i think i can round it off to about 11500 features seen, never counted non feature films
6742 icm toplist checks

Some films have been mainstays on my top 10 from when i saw them in my early 20s (a lot of people jump on Stalker when they start expanding their horizons for instance, so did i) something like Salo i hated the first time round, but had to make a 180 after a rewatch with a huge impact, others slowly creep up... on average my top 10 is very stable and has been for years now, it is hard for something new to make such a huge impact that it has a chance to break into it... zulawski came close with a few films in recent years, those might slowly creep up now to someday take the place of an older favorite...
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#56

Post by burneyfan »

This is not perfect, but this is a pretty reasonable ten for me:

1. Ugestu monogatari -- Mizoguchi, 1953
2. Angst essen Seele auf -- Fassbinder, 1974
3. Hitori musuko -- Ozu, 1936
4. The Night of the Hunter -- Laughton, 1955
5. Dersu Uzala -- Kurosawa, 1975
6. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance -- Ford, 1962
7. Nattvardsgästerna -- Bergman, 1963
8. Madame de ... -- Ophuls, 1953
9. Chinatown -- Polanski, 1974
10. Charulata -- Ray, 1964

There are so many other great films, though...it's painful to limit the list to ten.

Age: 46
# feature films seen: approx. 17,000
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#57

Post by Torgo »

burneyfan wrote: October 26th, 2020, 5:36 pm 5. Dersu Uzala -- Kurosawa, 1975
I think I might love you! :wub:
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#58

Post by Torgo »

Ok, so this is the worst cop out ever, but I can't figure out how to do it else. :shrug:
I have two hearts beating inside. The Top 10 are my favorite movies, some which I grew up with, had the strongest impact on me, I have feelings for. Most of it is brainless mainstream trash, the most imbecile you will find, ridiculous to be called films even. Then there are the ones who deepened my love for cinema as an art form. I have a hard time mixing them alongside the original Top 10 and discovered most of them afterwards.

1. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)
2. Princess Mononoke (1997)
3. Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back (1980)
4. Pulp Fiction (1994)
5. Mulholland Drive (2001)
6. Fight Club (1999)
7. Donnie Darko (2001)
8. The Big Lebowski (1998)
9. Memento (2000)
10. Taxi Driver (1976)

The beyond:
Spoiler
1. Eraserhead (1977)
2. Baraka (1992)
3. Stalker (1979)
4. Tetsuo (1989)
5. Grave of the Fireflies (1988)
6. Sátántangó (1994)
7. Chungking Express (1994)
8. Hana-bi (1997)
9. Come and See (1985)
10. 5 Centimeters per Second (2007)

Runners-up: Dersu Uzala (1975), 2001: A Space Odyssee (1968), Vertigo (1958), Seppuku (1962), Festen (1998)

I'm 34 years old at 4997 :ph43r: films seen.
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#59

Post by peeptoad »

Damn, I forgot Chungking Express.. This is hard.
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#60

Post by Onderhond »

39 year old,
9616 films seen (but that's 30 minutes and up, usually people take the 45 minute line for feature films, which brings the count to 9539).
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#61

Post by klaus78 »

1. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
2. Pather Panchali (1955)
3. L'année dernière à Marienbad (1961)
4. Du levande (2007)
5. Sans soleil (1983)
6. Possession (1981)
7. Shichinin no samurai (1954)
8. Il buono, il brutto, il cattivo (1966)
9. Taxi Driver (1976)
10. Fanny och Alexander (1982)

Age: 35
Features seen: 5000+
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#62

Post by joachimt »

41 years old.
Roughly 7000 features seen.

Top 10:

1. 12 Angry Men
2. Ningen no jôken (part 3)
3. Stalker
4. Letyat zhuravli
5. Rashômon
6. Ballada o soldate
7. Seppuku
8. Neotpravlennoe pismo
9. Shichinin no samurai
10. Suna no onna

Solaris and Satantango are just around the corner, btw.
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#63

Post by Torgo »

Pretty damn amazing list, Jo :sweat:
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#64

Post by joachimt »

Torgo wrote: October 26th, 2020, 7:02 pm Pretty damn amazing list, Jo :sweat:
Thanks! And only one English spoken movie. B)
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#65

Post by Fergenaprido »

I'm 37 and I've seen 3,367 feature-length films.

Taking the top ten from my favourites list (feature-length [40+ min] only), my top ten is:

1. 10.0 Amélie (2001 FRA Jeunet) (9 times, including 3 times on the big screen within one year)
2. 10.0 C.R.A.Z.Y. (2005 CAN Vallée) (3)
3. 10.0 Finding Nemo (2003 USA Stanton) (4)
4. 9.6 Brokeback Mountain (2005 USA Lee) (3)
5. 9.4 The Sound of Music (1965 USA Wise) (3-4)
6. 9.4 Fargo (1996 USA Coen) (2)
7. 9.4 The Shawshank Redemption (1994 USA Darabont) (1)
8. 9.2 Schindler's List (1993 USA Spielberg) (1)
9. 9.2 The Matrix (1999 USA Wachowski) (3)
10. 9.2 Inception (2010 USA Nolan) (1)

All of those were first seen between ~1995 and 2006, except for Inception which I saw in 2011. I first saw 1, 3, 4, and 10 in theatres. 5 and 7 were family watches on tv, and I don't remember the circumstances of first watching 2, 7, and 9. The top six are probably pretty secure in their spots, but the bottom four could be knocked out by other films. I'm excluding shorts since I have a hard time comparing them to features. Whenever I do add them into my ranked lists, I usually drop them down a few points until it feels right (e.g. a short I rated 8.8 might show up next to a feature I rated 8.4) - I adore A Year Along the Abandoned Road (9.6 rating), but it doesn't feel right to include it in my all-time top ten.

Fargo was the movie I most recently upgraded into my top ten (went from an 8.4 to a 9.4), knocking out 9.2 Weekend (2011 GBR Haigh) (1). The most recent film that came close was 9.2 Custody (2017 FRA Legrand) (1) which I saw two years ago in theatres.

I'm a generous rater in that I give out 7s quite readily (it's an average score for me), but giving ratings of 8.4 or higher (equivalent to a icm favourite) is much rarer (around 200 films so far), and those perfect 10s are few and far between. Only Amélie started out at 10 the first time, the other two were upgraded over time. I do want to rewatch the 3 films in my top ten that I've only seen once and see if they still hold up, and I'm probably due for a rewatch of Amélie and The Matrix as well.

There are also other films that I really like, some of which I've seen multiple times, that I constantly think back to - I want to rewatch them and see if my opinion of them would improve enough to break into the top ten. The biggest candidates for promotion would be:

9.0 Oliver! (1968 USA Reed) (2) - probably my favourite movie as a kid, but I haven't seen it since childhood.
9.0 The Way He Looks (2014 BRA Ribeiro) (2) - the only film I saw twice in one month.
8.8 I Killed My Mother (2009 CAN Dolan) (1) - after I finish his last two films to complete his filmography, but his first is still his best for me (Mommy comes second).
8.8 Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984 JAP Miyazaki) (1) - I've seen the English dub, but I want to see the original Japanese version with subtitles.
8.6 Jurassic Park (1993 USA Spielberg) (3-4) - I badly want to see this on the big screen; I missed it by one week when I lived in Kazakhstan.
8.4 Ivan's Childhood (1962 RUS Tarkovsky) (1) - I've been working my way chronologically through Tarkovsky, but his first (second) feature is still my favourite (I'm up to Stalker so far).
8.4 WALL-E (2008 USA Stanton) (1) - I wasn't in love with it as much as everyone else was at the time, but it's the Pixar film I most want to see again.
8.2 The Lady Vanishes (1938 GBR Hitchcock) (1) - I want to rewatch a lot of Hitchcocks, but this one has the best shot because I love the mix of humour and thriller (with Dial M for Murder and Lifeboat close behind).
8.2 Paris 05:59: Théo and Hugo (2016 FRA Ducastel & Martineau) (1) - Only saw it last year, but it's consistently stayed with me since then and I want to immerse myself in it again.
8.0 Come and See (1985 RUS Klimov) (1) - this one keeps haunting me, and now that it's been restored it's going to be the first Criterion Collection I buy once I move back home (along with the Varda films probably); I have a feeling this could jump into the top 5, and probably has the best chance of any of these films of making the top ten, despite it currently being rated the lowest. I think I was just overwhelmed when I saw it and couldn't really process it.

I didn't intend to pick a "next ten", but that's how it worked out. Maybe that will be one of my goals for 2021: to rewatch these ten films.
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#66

Post by Teproc »

Posted mine above, but I'm 28 and have a measly 2.074 checks on ICM (not a lot of shorts in there FWIW).
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#67

Post by blocho »

1. Police Academy
2. Police Academy 2
3. Police Academy 3
4. Police Academy 4
5. Police Academy 5
6. Police Academy 6
7. Police Academy: Mission to Moscow
8-10. There have been no other good movies.
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#68

Post by Torgo »

blocho wrote: October 26th, 2020, 8:06 pm 1. Police Academy
2. Police Academy 2
3. Police Academy 3
4. Police Academy 4
5. Police Academy 5
6. Police Academy 6
7. Police Academy: Mission to Moscow
8-10. There have been no other good movies.
Now if we just knew your age to put this into perspective ..
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#69

Post by shugs »

1. Körkarlen [The Phantom Carriage] (Victor Sjöström, 1921)
2. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Mike Nichols, 1966)
3. Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese, 1976)
4. Rocky (John G. Avildsen, 1976)
5. Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
6. Det sjunde inseglet [The Seventh Seal] (Ingmar Bergman, 1957)
7. Nocturnal Animals (Tom Ford, 2016)
8. Andrey Rublev (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1966)
9. The Terminator (James Cameron, 1984
10. White Dog (Samuel Fuller, 1982)

Age: 28. About 3200 features seen.
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#70

Post by blocho »

Torgo wrote: October 26th, 2020, 8:35 pm
blocho wrote: October 26th, 2020, 8:06 pm 1. Police Academy
2. Police Academy 2
3. Police Academy 3
4. Police Academy 4
5. Police Academy 5
6. Police Academy 6
7. Police Academy: Mission to Moscow
8-10. There have been no other good movies.
Now if we just knew your age to put this into perspective ..
I am 125. My mother gave birth to me at the first Lumiere screening, and I have seen every movie ever made.
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#71

Post by prodigalgodson »

outdoorcats wrote: October 26th, 2020, 1:41 pm I've seen 6 and they're all great. I've never heard of Inca Light though the name Robert Fulton rings a bell.
-Oh, right, I still haven't seen a single Naruse. Thanks for the guilty reminder. :ermm:
-Barry Lyndon was for years my #1 favorite film.
-Vertigo was one of several films I wanted to squeeze into my list, just outside my top 10. It seems weird to leave out a film that I basically think is perfect. But all the films on my list are perfect, so :shrug: (u)
I heard about Fulton here, from Ale plugging Path of Cessation, but it seems like he has a few fans on here (he's very well represented on pda's experimental list). A bunch of his films are available on this website, unfortunately in faaar from ideal condition:
http://www.ref3films.com/index.html
I just discovered Inca Light recently, being stoned and wanting something to watch before I went to bed. But then it blew me away. I ended up watching it five times that week, including an alternate cut on youtube in lower quality and a slightly different soundtrack, but with subtitles for the Spanish. Seeing this and Fulton's other work on film is definitely on the bucket list. Definitely a favorite for personal reasons (this is like the platonic ideal I aspire to with my filmmaking), but it should be an enjoyable/interesting 17 minutes for anyone.
My little blurb from the weekly thread, in response to pitchforneirda:
Ahh so glad you dug it! I'm in a phase right now where I'm getting very easily bored watching narrative films, but find myself drawn back daily to whatever experimentalism I can dredge up from the internet. I've found it resonates more with my experience of the world and interests, especially since I've been so engulfed in experimental videography myself lately. That said, there are very few things that compare to this one. For me it puts Fulton in the realm of Tarkovsky, Kubrick, and Mizoguchi: a total conceptual understanding of the medium's strengths and potential, combined with an out-of-the-box approach to subject more akin to the flow of music than traditional filmmaking, and a mastery of craft that allows him to evoke perfectly what he aims to evoke.
I put off Naruse for years too, since I've always found Ozu tough to get into, and he seemed to fit into a similar mold of gently devastating family dramas. But I finally started watching him at the darkest point of my life (so far :p), and everything resonated with me...the flow, the emotion, the sense of life truly captured in cinematic form. I feel like Naruse is to film what George Elliot is to literature. I'm also learning to appreciate Ozu more haha.

Barry Lyndon's a great number one. It's the first-seen film of my favorites by years, and before I saw Stalker (my favorite for years, and the film that got me seriously into film) was probably most essential to opening my eyes to the possibilities of the art form. It's never gotten worse with numerous viewings over the years (one time when I was in the Bay, I drove down to LA for one night to see it on film, then it ended up screening in SF like a month later), and the only reason it's not still in the top five is there've been so many other incredible films along the way since.

In addition to being, indeed, the perfect film, it's one that holds incredible personal resonance for me -- not only does it achieve an ideal aesthetic resonance, a lived-in haunted aura that I aim for in my film, music, and writing, but the depiction of losing one's mind in San Francisco was just such a striking encapsulation of my experience at the time. Saw this a number of times over the years, and was always drawn back, but it wasn't til my fifth viewing or so, on the big screen, that everything clicked and this took the crown. And I usually won't be snobby about this, but of all the favorites I've seen on film, this one benefits most from the theatrical experience (on film!), to the extent that I'd say folks are missing out on the full experience otherwise. The Castro Theater, which screened a 70mm print annually, shut down amid covid. :o Well, glad I got to catch it a couple times when I could, with the pipe organ intro and everything.

Speaking of films it hurt to cut from the top ten, that gives me an excuse to plug my regrettable almosts, any of which could take the last few spots on another day:
The Searchers (John Ford, 1956)
Die Nibelungen (Fritz Lang, 1924)
Night and Day (Hong Sangsoo, 2008)
L'avventura (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960)
Eika Katappa (Werner Schroeter, 1969)
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#72

Post by prodigalgodson »

OldAle1 wrote: October 26th, 2020, 2:55 pm I've seen all of these films in the cinema except (maybe) #6; you would think I'd remember clearly if I saw that in a theater but I don't - right this second I'd say if pushed that yeah, I did, probably around 1996 or so, but can't be sure. In any case I saw that film and Ordet and The Magnificent Ambersons first on VHS, back in the early 90s probably; the rest were all seen first in 35mm except Out 1 which was seen in it's original 16mm format, and LLL which of course was only shown digitally in commercial release (though I did manage to see it once in 35mm with Chazelle present). The Yang and Rivette films I've only seen in the cinema. The cinema experience is still of overwhelming importance to me and it certainly is a significant part of some of the best viewings on this list including the first viewings of the top 4 films, and in packed or sell-out environments with great audiences.
Ah, I've seen fewer than half of yours on the big screen, but one of those was Once Upon a Time in America, which I was lucky enough to catch in an English-dialogue Spanish-subtitle screening in Madrid. Brighter Summer's Day on film is definitely on the bucket list.

The cinema experience was absolutely essential to the development of my interests too, but interestingly for me the emptier the theater the better, unless it's a comedy people are really getting into, or just an out-of-the-blue packed house, like Four Nights of a Dreamer being the only sold-out screening in a Bresson retrospective.
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#73

Post by clemmetarey »

I am 26, I've seen 3342 feature films according to my Excel sheet.


1. Reservoir Dogs (1992)
2. The Big Lebowski (1998)
3. A Clockwork Orange (1971)
4. 12 Angry Men (1957)
5. Det sjunde inseglet (1957)
6. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
7. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop... (1964)
8. Un condamné à mort s'est échappé ou Le vent... (1956)
9. Barry Lyndon (1975)
10. Rebecca (1940)

All films I saw early on my cinematic journey, but they all still resonated with me on rewatches. That being said, I think I only saw Lyndon and A Man Escaped once.
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#74

Post by mightysparks »

Torgo wrote: October 26th, 2020, 4:51 pm 1. Your age (if you don't mind, of course!)
2. Your feature films seen (approx.)
1. 29
2. 6150


Also people need to stop being so concerned about their list being 'mainstream' :( Being a cinephile is about loving film, not showing off how obscure and strange you are. Be proud of your love for everything.
"I do not always know what I want, but I do know what I don't want." - Stanley Kubrick

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#75

Post by prodigalgodson »

27
don't know, but somewhere around 3,000 I'd guess?
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#76

Post by prodigalgodson »

mightysparks wrote: October 26th, 2020, 10:09 pm Also people need to stop being so concerned about their list being 'mainstream' :( Being a cinephile is about loving film, not showing off how obscure and strange you are. Be proud of your love for everything.
Hear hear. On that note, nice to see more love for Lebowski from clem.
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#77

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

Very roughly ordered for me, at the moment. The top six or seven are pretty set in stone, but the bottom few could easily be swapped out with a handful of alternate picks on another day...

1. 29
2. A little more than 5,800 titles rated on IMDB.

I'll try to be coy and not post titles, but these are all pretty recognizable images from widely seen films - though I could be biased... :$

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#78

Post by Torgo »

Cool idea, it's working! Although I'd never see someone voting for Yongary ..
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#79

Post by prodigalgodson »

Good_Will_Harding wrote: October 26th, 2020, 10:29 pm
Spoiler
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Damn those movies looked so good.
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#80

Post by Lammetje »

Fergenaprido wrote: October 26th, 2020, 7:29 pm 8.8 Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984 JAP Miyazaki) (1) - I've seen the English dub, but I want to see the original Japanese version with subtitles.
Yes, watch the original version! Naushika (l)
Teproc wrote: October 26th, 2020, 7:50 pm Posted mine above, but I'm 28 and have a measly 2.074 checks on ICM (not a lot of shorts in there FWIW).
OMG, someone with less checks than me! :circle:

Please don't start binging shorts...
blocho wrote: October 26th, 2020, 9:19 pm
Torgo wrote: October 26th, 2020, 8:35 pm
blocho wrote: October 26th, 2020, 8:06 pm 1. Police Academy
2. Police Academy 2
3. Police Academy 3
4. Police Academy 4
5. Police Academy 5
6. Police Academy 6
7. Police Academy: Mission to Moscow
8-10. There have been no other good movies.
Now if we just knew your age to put this into perspective ..
I am 125. My mother gave birth to me at the first Lumiere screening, and I have seen every movie ever made.
Maybe you can fill up that number 8 spot soon!
mightysparks wrote: October 26th, 2020, 10:09 pm Also people need to stop being so concerned about their list being 'mainstream' :( Being a cinephile is about loving film, not showing off how obscure and strange you are. Be proud of your love for everything.
I like to show off my mainstream trash among snobs. tehe
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OldAle1 wrote:I think four Aamir Khan films is enough for me. Unless I'm down to one film left on the IMDb Top 250 at some point and he's in that last film, at which point I'll watch it and then shoot myself having become the official-check-whoring person I hate.
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